WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam energy dependence

  1. Dependence of bunch energy loss in cavities on beam velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1999-03-01

    Beam energy loss in a cavity can be easily computed for a relativistic bunch using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for nonrelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the cavity loss factors for a bunch in frequency domain as a function of its velocity and compare results with the relativistic case.

  2. On the energy dependence of proton beam extraction with a bent crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi; Fidecaro, Giuseppe; Gyr, Marcel; Herr, Werner; Klem, J T; Mikkelsen, U; Weisse, E

    1998-01-01

    Proton beam extraction from the CERN SPS by means of a bent silicon crystal is reported at three different energies, 14 GeV, 120 GeV and 270 GeV. The experimental results are compared to computer simulations which contain a sound model of the SPS accelerator as well as the channeling phenomena in bent crystals. The overall energy dependence of crystal assisted proton beam extraction is understood and provides the basis to discuss such a scheme for future accelerators.

  3. Beam energy dependence of two-proton correlations at the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Panitkin, S Y; Alexander, J; Anderson, M; Best, D; Brady, F P; Case, T; Caskey, W; Cebra, D; Chance, J; Chung, J; Cole, B; Crowe, K M; Das, A; Draper, J E; Gilkes, M L; Gushue, S; Heffner, M; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Huo, L; Justice, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kintner, J C; Klay, J L; Krofcheck, D; Lacey, R A; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Liu, Y; McGrath, R; Milosevich, Z; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Olson, D; Pinkenburg, C H; Porile, N T; Rai, G; Ritter, H G; Romero, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schröder, L; Srivastava, B; Stone, N; Symons, T J M; Wang, S; Whitfield, J; Wienold, T; Witt, R; Wood, L; Yang, X; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    1999-01-01

    First measurements of the beam energy dependence of the two proton correlation function in central Au+Au collisions are performed by the E895 Collaboration at the BNL AGS. No significant changes with beam energy were observed. The imaging technique of Brown-Danielewicz is used in order to extract information about the space-time content of the proton source at freeze-out. Extracted source functions show peculiar enhancement at low relative separation.

  4. Beam energy dependence of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii from a blast-wave model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Chen, J H; Zhong, C

    2016-01-01

    Beam energy dependence of correlation lengths (Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii) is calculated by using a blast-wave model and the results are comparable with those from RHIC-STAR beam energy scan data as well as the LHC-ALICE measurements. The parameters for the blast-wave model as a function of beam energy are configured by fitting Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii at each energy point. Transverse momentum dependence of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii are presented with the extracted parameters for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 200 GeV and 2.76 TeV. From the results it can be found that particle emission duration can not be ignored while calculating Hanbury-Brown-Twiss radii with the same parameters. And tuning kinetic freeze-out temperature in a range will result in system lifetime changing in reverse direction as that in RHIC-STAR measurements.

  5. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  6. On the energy dependence of proton beam extraction with a bent crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Elsener, K.; Fidecaro, G.; Gyr, M.; Herr, W.; Klem, J.; Mikkelsen, U.; Weisse, E.

    1998-03-01

    Proton beam extraction from the CERN SPS by means of a bent silicon crystal is reported at three different energies, 14 GeV, 120 GeV and 270 GeV. The experimental results are compared to computer simulations which contain a sound model of the SPS accelerator as well as the channeling phenomena in bent crystals. The overall energy dependence of crystal assisted proton beam extraction is understood and provides the basis to discuss such a scheme for future accelerators. © 1998

  7. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams - energy dependence and improved film read-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Petri; Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in 60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read-out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose-dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ± 50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read-out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scan-ner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read-out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k = 2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC-simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV-16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read-out procedure established

  8. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams - energy dependence and improved film read-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Petri; Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in 60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read-out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose-dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ± 50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read-out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scan-ner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read-out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k = 2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC-simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV-16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read-out procedure established

  9. Beam-Energy and Centrality Dependence of Directed Flow of Identified Particles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present directed flow ($v_1$) measurements in Au+Au collisions from STAR's Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar\\Lambda$, $K^\\pm$, $K^0_S$ and $\\pi^\\pm$. At intermediate centrality, protons show a minimum in directed flow slope, $dv_1/dy\\,|_{y\\leq0.8}$, as a function of beam energy. Proton $dv_1/dy$ changes sign near 10 GeV, and the directed flow for $\\Lambda$ is consistent with the proton result. The directed flow slope for net protons shows a clear minimum at 14.5 GeV and becomes positive at beam energies below 10 GeV and above 30 GeV. New results for net-kaon directed flow slope resemble net protons from high energy down to 14.5 GeV, but remain negative at lower energies. The slope $dv_1/dy$ shows a strong centrality dependence, especially for $p$ and $\\Lambda$ at the lower beam energies. Available model calculations are in poor agreement.

  10. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  11. Energy resolution methods efficiency depending on beam source position of potassium clusters in time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ş Şentürk; F Demiray; O Özsoy

    2007-09-01

    Energy resolution of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer was considered. The estimations indicate that the time-lag energy focusing method provides better resolution for the parallel case while the turnaround time is more convenient for the perpendicular position. Hence the applicability of the methods used for the energy resolution depends on beam source arrangement.

  12. Beam energy dependence of Elliptic and Triangular flow with the AMPT model

    CERN Document Server

    Solanki, Dronika; Basu, Sumit; Raniwala, Rashmi; Nayak, Tapan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A beam energy scan has been carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory to search for the onset of deconfinement and a possible critical point where the transition from a Quark Gluon Plasma to a hadronic phase changes from a rapid cross-over to a first order phase transition. Anisotropy in the azimuthal distribution of produced particles such as the second and third harmonics $v_2$ and $v_3$ are expected to be sensitive to the existence of a Quark Gluon Plasma phase and the Equation of State of the system. For this reason, they are of great experimental interests. In this Letter we report on calculations of $v_2$ and $v_3$ from the AMPT model in the Default(Def.) and String Melting(SM) mode to provide a reference for the energy dependence of $v_2$ and $v_3$ for $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ from 7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV. We expect that in the case that collisions cease to produce QGP at lower colliding energies, data will deviate from the AMPT String Melting calculations and come in b...

  13. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this paper, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39 and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy, and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. The implications of these results for the CME will be discussed.

  14. Dependence of the electron beam energy and types of surface to determine EBSD indexing reliability in yttria-stabilized zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V

    2012-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful technique for surface microstructure analysis. EBSD analysis of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is demonstrated. The statistics related to EBSD indexing reliability shows that the probability of accurate grain orientation detection increased significantly when the electron beam energy was increased from 10 to 30 kV. As a result of better sampling with increased interaction volume, a disparity between local and average grain misorientation angle also exhibited the dependence of the electron beam energy to determine the accuracy of grain orientation. To study EBSD indexing reliability as a function of surface roughness and overlayer formation, rapid EBSD measurement tests were performed on (a) YSZ surfaces ion-polished at ion beam energies of 65 nA at 30 kV and 1 nA at 30 kV and (b) carbon-coated versus uncoated YSZ surfaces. The EBSD results at both 10 and 30 kV electron beam energies indicate that EBSD indexing reliability is negatively affected by higher ion beam milling current and amorphous overlayer formation. PMID:22336075

  15. Optical and energy dependent response of the alanine gel solution produced at IPEN to clinical photons and electrons beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2) is an amino acid tissue equivalent traditionally used as standard dosimetric material in EPR dosimetry. Recently, it has been studied to be applied in gel dosimetry, considering that the addition of Alanine in the Fricke gel solution improves the production of ferric ions radiation induced. The spectrophotometric evaluation technique can be used comparing the two spectrum wavelengths bands: 457 nm band that corresponds to ferrous ions and 588 nm band that corresponds to ferric ions concentration to evaluate the dosimetric properties of this material. The performance of the Alanine gel solution developed at IPEN has been firstly studied using the spectrophotometric technique aiming to apply this material to 3D clinical doses evaluations using MRI technique. In this work, the optical and the energy dependent response of this solution submitted to clinical photons and electrons beams were studied. Different batches of gel solutions were prepared and maintained at low temperature during 12 h to solidification. Before irradiation, the samples were maintained during 1 h at room temperature. The photons and electrons irradiations were carried out using a Varian 2100C Medical Linear Accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital das Clinicas of the University of Sao Paulo with absorbed doses between 1 and 40 Gy; radiation field of 10 x 10 cm2; photon energies of 6 MeV and 15 MeV; and electron with energies between 6 and 15 MeV. The obtained results indicate that signal response dependence for clinical photons and electrons beams, to the same doses, for Alanine gel dosimeter is better than 3.6 % (1σ), and the energy dependence response, to the same doses, is better 3% (1σ) for both beams. These results indicate that the same calibration factor can be used and the optical response is energy independent in the studied dose range and clinical photons and electrons beams energies. (author)

  16. Optical and energy dependent response of the alanine gel solution produced at IPEN to clinical photons and electrons beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cleber F. [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), SP (Brazil). Radiologia; Campos, Leticia L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The DL-Alanine (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NO{sub 2}) is an amino acid tissue equivalent traditionally used as standard dosimetric material in EPR dosimetry. Recently, it has been studied to be applied in gel dosimetry, considering that the addition of Alanine in the Fricke gel solution improves the production of ferric ions radiation induced. The spectrophotometric evaluation technique can be used comparing the two spectrum wavelengths bands: 457 nm band that corresponds to ferrous ions and 588 nm band that corresponds to ferric ions concentration to evaluate the dosimetric properties of this material. The performance of the Alanine gel solution developed at IPEN has been firstly studied using the spectrophotometric technique aiming to apply this material to 3D clinical doses evaluations using MRI technique. In this work, the optical and the energy dependent response of this solution submitted to clinical photons and electrons beams were studied. Different batches of gel solutions were prepared and maintained at low temperature during 12 h to solidification. Before irradiation, the samples were maintained during 1 h at room temperature. The photons and electrons irradiations were carried out using a Varian 2100C Medical Linear Accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital das Clinicas of the University of Sao Paulo with absorbed doses between 1 and 40 Gy; radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}; photon energies of 6 MeV and 15 MeV; and electron with energies between 6 and 15 MeV. The obtained results indicate that signal response dependence for clinical photons and electrons beams, to the same doses, for Alanine gel dosimeter is better than 3.6 % (1{sigma}), and the energy dependence response, to the same doses, is better 3% (1{sigma}) for both beams. These results indicate that the same calibration factor can be used and the optical response is energy independent in the studied dose range and clinical photons and electrons beams energies. (author)

  17. Energy dependent charge spread function in a dedicated synchrotron beam pnCCD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Hazem

    2011-05-20

    A scan on the pixel edges is the method which is used to resolve the electron cloud size in the pixel array of the pnCCD detector. The EDR synchrotron radiation in BESSY is the source of the X-ray photons which are used in the scans. The radius of the electron cloud as a function of the impinging photon energy is analyzed. The angle of incidence of the X-ray beam is employed in the measurements. The measurements are validated by the numerical simulation models. The inclined X-ray track leads to distribute the electron clouds in a certain number of pixels according to the incident angle of the X-ray beam. The pixels detect different electron clouds according to their generation position in the detector bulk. A collimated X-ray beam of 12.14 keV is used in the measurements with 30 and 40 entrance angles. It is shown that the two factors that leads to expand the electron clouds namely the diffusion and the mutual electrostatic repulsion can be separated from the measured electron clouds. It is noticed as well that the influence of the mutual electrostatic repulsion dominates the cloud expansion over the diffusion process in the collection time of the detector. The perpendicular X-ray track leads to determine the average radius of the electron cloud per photon energy. The results show that the size of the electron clouds (RMS) in the energy range of [5.0-21.6] keV is smaller than the pixel size. (orig.)

  18. Beam Energy Dependence of Dielectron Production in Au+Au Collisions from STAR at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Huck, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We present the energy-dependent study of dielectron production in 0-80% minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ energies of 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV in STAR. Invariant mass ($M_{ee}$) and transverse momentum ($p_T$) differential measurements of dielectron yields are compared to cocktail simulations of known hadronic sources and semi-leptonic charmed decays. The enhancement (excess yield) prominent in the Low-Mass Region (LMR) over the cocktail at all energies, is further compared to calculations of $\\rho$ in-medium modifications. Within statistical and systematic uncertainties, we find that the model consistently describes this enhancement from SPS up to top RHIC energies in its $M_{ee}$- as well as $p_T$-dependence. Dielectron measurements drive the statistics for the future BES Phase-II program, which promises to improve our understanding of the LMR enhancement's trend with total baryon densities.

  19. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  20. Internal energy dependence of molecular condensation coefficients determined from molecular beam surface scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl4 from a 90 K CC14 ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC14 relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC14 at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 104 cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 150 superspecularly independent of incident velocity. 9 references

  1. Linear Energy Transfer-Dependent Change in Rice Gene Expression Profile after Heavy-Ion Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kotaro; Kazama, Yusuke; Morita, Ryouhei; Hirano, Tomonari; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Usuda, Sachiko; Hayashi, Yoriko; Ohbu, Sumie; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    A heavy-ion beam has been recognized as an effective mutagen for plant breeding and applied to the many kinds of crops including rice. In contrast with X-ray or γ-ray, the heavy-ion beam is characterized by a high linear energy transfer (LET). LET is an important factor affecting several aspects of the irradiation effect, e.g. cell survival and mutation frequency, making the heavy-ion beam an effective mutagen. To study the mechanisms behind LET-dependent effects, expression profiling was performed after heavy-ion beam irradiation of imbibed rice seeds. Array-based experiments at three time points (0.5, 1, 2 h after the irradiation) revealed that the number of up- or down-regulated genes was highest 2 h after irradiation. Array-based experiments with four different LETs at 2 h after irradiation identified LET-independent regulated genes that were up/down-regulated regardless of the value of LET; LET–dependent regulated genes, whose expression level increased with the rise of LET value, were also identified. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of LET-independent up-regulated genes showed that some GO terms were commonly enriched, both 2 hours and 3 weeks after irradiation. GO terms enriched in LET-dependent regulated genes implied that some factor regulates genes that have kinase activity or DNA-binding activity in cooperation with the ATM gene. Of the LET-dependent up-regulated genes, OsPARP3 and OsPCNA were identified, which are involved in DNA repair pathways. This indicates that the Ku-independent alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway may contribute to repairing complex DNA legions induced by high-LET irradiation. These findings may clarify various LET-dependent responses in rice. PMID:27462908

  2. Comparison of Energy Dependence of PAGAT Polymer Gel Dosimeter with Electron and Photon Beams using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Azadbakht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter 1/T2 on different electron and photon energies for a standard clinically used 60Co therapy unit and an electa linear accelerator.Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2(1/T2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylen-bis-acrylamide(bis, 4.5% acrylamid(AA, 5% gelatine, 5 mM tetrakis (hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC, 0.01 mM hydroquinone (HQ and 86% HPLC(Water. When the preparation of final polymer gel solution is completed, it is transferred into phantoms and allowed to set by storage in a refrigerator at about 4°C. The optimal post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both determined to be 24 h. The sensitivity of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter with irradiation of photon and electron beams was represented by the slope of calibration curve in the linear region measured for each modality. The response of PAGAT gel with photon and electron beams is very similar in the lower dose region. The R2-dose response was linear up to 30 Gy and the R2-dose response of the PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter is linear between 10 to 30 Gy. In electron beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 3 Gy is not exact, but in photon beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 2Gy is not exact. Dosimeter energy dependence was studied for electron energies of 4, 12 and 18MeV and photon energies of 1.25, 4, 6 and 18 MV. Evaluation of dosimeters were performed on Siemens Symphony, Germany 1.5T Scanner in the head coil. In this study no trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T2 dependence was found on mean energy for electron and photon beams.

  3. Phase composition in NiTi near-surface layers after electron beam treatment and its variation depending on beam energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapenko, Marina G., E-mail: artifakt@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Meisner, Ludmila L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: egu@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In the work, we study the mechanisms of structural phase state formation in NiTi surface layers after low-energy pulsed electron beam irradiation depending on the electron beam energy density. It is revealed that after electron beam treatment of the NiTi specimens at energy densities E{sub 1} = 15 J/cm{sup 2}, E{sub 2} = 20 J/cm{sup 2}, and E{sub 3} = 30 J/cm{sup 2}, a series of effects is observed: the absence of the Ti2Ni phase and the presence of new peaks correspond to the B19′ martensite phase with monoclinic structure. Estimation of the relative volume content of the B2 and B19′ phases from the total intensity of their peaks shows that the percentage of the martensite phase increases from ∼5 vol.% in the NiTi specimen irradiated at E{sub 1} = 15 J/cm{sup 2} to ∼80 vol.% in the NiTi specimen irradiated at E{sub 3} = 30 J/cm{sup 2}. It is found that in the NiTi specimens irradiated at E ≤ 20 J/cm{sup 2}, the layer that contains a martensite phase resides not on the surface but at some depth from it.

  4. MOSFET sensitivity dependence on integrated dose from high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi, James A; Krafft, Shane P; Hagio, Tomoe; Fuss, Martin; Salter, Bill J

    2008-01-01

    The ability of a commercially available dual bias, dual MOSFET dosimetry system to measure therapeutic doses reproducibly throughout its vendor-defined dose-based lifetime has been evaluated by characterizing its sensitivity variation to integrated/cumulative doses from,high-energy (6 and 15 MV) photon radiotherapy beams. The variation of sensitivity as a function of total integrated dose was studied for three different dose-per-fraction levels; namely, 50, 200, and 1200 cGy/fraction. In standard sensitivity mode (i.e., measurements involving dose-per-fraction levels > or =100 cGy), the response of the MOSFET system to identical irradiations increased with integrated dose for both energies investigated. Dose measurement reproducibility for the low (i.e., 50 cGy) dose fractions was within 2.1% (if the system was calibrated before each in-phantom measurement) and 3.1% [if the system was calibrated prior to first use, with no intermediate calibration(s)]. Similarly, dose measurement reproducibility was between 2.2% and 6.6% for the conventional (i.e., 200 cGy) dose fractions and between 1.8% and 7.9% for escalated (i.e., 1200 cGy) dose fractions. The results of this study suggest that, due to the progressively increasing sensitivity resulting from the dual-MOSFET design, frequent calibrations are required to achieve measurement accuracy of < or =3% (within one standard deviation). PMID:18293559

  5. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  6. Impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry of direct photons and free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-Hua; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; SHEN Wen-Qing; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Kun

    2009-01-01

    Hard photon emitted from energetic heavy ion collisions is of very interesting since it does not experience the late-stage nuclear interaction, therefore it is useful to explore the early-stage information of matter phase. In this work, we have calculated the impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry, characterized by directed transverse flow parameter F and elliptic asymmetry coefficient v2, of direct photons and the corresponding free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. It is further shown the anti-correlated azimuthal asymmetry between direct photons and free protons.

  7. Time-dependent propagation of high-energy laser beams through the atmosphere: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various factors that can affect thermal blooming in stagnation zones are examined, including stagnation-zone motion, longitudinal air motion in the neighborhood of the stagnation zone, and the effects of scenario noncoplanarity. Of these effects, only the last offers any reasonable hope of reducing the strong thermal blooming that normally accompanies stagnation zones; in particular, noncoplanarity should benefit multipulse more than cw beams. The methods of treating nonhorizontal winds hydrodynamically for cw and multipulse steady-state sources are discussed. Pulse ''self-blooming'' in the triangular pulse approximation is discussed in the context of both single and multipulse propagation. It is shown that self-blooming and multipulse blooming cannot be treated independently

  8. Beam energy dependence of charged pion ratio in $^{28}$Si + In reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Nakai, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Ieki, K; Imajo, S; Isobe, T; Matsushita, M; Murata, J; Nishimura, S; Sakurai, H; Sameshima, R D; Takada, E

    2014-01-01

    The double differential cross sections for $^{nat}$In($^{28}$Si, $\\pi ^{\\pm}$) reactions are measured at 400, 600, and 800 MeV/nucleon. Both $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$ are found to be emitted isotropically from a single moving source. The $\\pi^- / \\pi^+$ yield ratio is determined as a function of the charged pion energy between 25 and 100 MeV. The experimental results significantly differ from the prediction of the standard transport model calculation using the code PHITS. This discrepancy suggests that more theoretical works are required to deduce firm information on the nuclear symmetry energy from the $\\pi^- / \\pi^+$ yield ratio.

  9. Proton Beam Energy Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Marus, Lauren A.; Engle, J.W.; John, K. D.; Birnbaum, E. R.; Nortier, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) is actively engaged in the development of isotope production technologies that can utilize its 100 MeV proton beam. Characterization of the proton beam energy and current is vital for optimizing isotope production and accurately conducting research at the IPF. Motivation In order to monitor beam intensity during research irradiations, aluminum foils are interspersed in experimental stacks. A theoretical yield of 22Na from...

  10. Beam energy and centrality dependence of the multiplicity fluctuations in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Event-by-event fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities have been proposed as the basic tools for understanding the particle production mechanisms and to probe the QCD phase transition. The fluctuations of experimentally accessible quantities, such as particle multiplicities, mean transverse momenta, temperature, particle ratios, and other global observables are related to the thermodynamic properties of the system, such as the entropy, specific heat, chemical potential and matter compressibility. A non-monotonic behaviour of multiplicity fluctuations may signal the onset of deconfinement and can be effectively used to probe the critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements at the vanishing μB at LHC energies set the scale of all theoretical calculations, and one can accurately calculate several quantities and their fluctuations

  11. Beam-energy dependence of charge balance functions from Au + Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, H. F.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R. M.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solanki, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Q. H.; Yan, W.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Balance functions have been measured in terms of relative pseudorapidity (Δ η ) for charged particle pairs at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider from Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 200 GeV using the STAR detector. These results are compared with balance functions measured at the CERN Large Hadron Collider from Pb + Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV by the ALICE Collaboration. The width of the balance function decreases as the collisions become more central and as the beam energy is increased. In contrast, the widths of the balance functions calculated using shuffled events show little dependence on centrality or beam energy and are larger than the observed widths. Balance function widths calculated using events generated by UrQMD are wider than the measured widths in central collisions and show little centrality dependence. The measured widths of the balance functions in central collisions are consistent with the delayed hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma (QGP). The narrowing of the balance function in central collisions at √{sNN}=7.7 GeV implies that a QGP is still being created at this relatively low energy.

  12. The energy dependence on microstructure of (Ti-Al-V) nitrides deposited by dual ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebler, R.; Tentardini, E.K.; Blando, E. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Teixeira, S.R.; Vasconcellos, M.Z.; Soares, M. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619900, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Kamijo, E.; Fujiwara, M. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryokoku University, Seta, Otsu (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloys and their nitrides are of wide interest in technological applications because of their exceptional properties. The structure and composition of these alloys are strongly dependent on the deposition conditions. In this work, we report the influence of the ion energy on the film characteristics. We have used a dual ion beam sputtering (DIBS) equipment where the reactive ion (N{sub 2}) acceleration voltage was changed in the range of 200 to 400 V. The film structure was studied by means of an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and the chemical composition and nitration degree were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by a microprobe spectrometer. Coating hardness was checked using an ultramicrohardness tester equipped with a Vickers' indentor, and the corrosion resistance power was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry. The substrates used here were stainless steel ISO 316, the same used in most femoral prosthesis, and silicon monocrystals for the analytical tests. We compare the results of the coatings deposited by DIBS with films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. (orig.)

  13. Pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched microchip laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-yu; Dong, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The incident pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal passively Q-switched microchip laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically by moving the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction. Highest pulse energy of 0.4 mJ has been generated when the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal is moved about 6 mm away from the focused pump beam waist. Laser pulses with pulse width of 1.7 ns and peak power of over 235 kW have been achieved. The theoretically calculated effective laser beam area at different positions of Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction is in good agreement with the experimental results. The highest peak power can be generated by adjusting the pump beam waist incident on the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal to optimize the effective laser beam area in passively Q-switched microchip laser.

  14. Beam energy dependence of moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments -mean ($M$), variance ($\\sigma^{2}$), skewness ($S$) and kurtosis ($\\kappa$) -of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from $\\sqrt {{s_{\\rm NN}}}$=7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net-charge, which are expected to diverge at the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, $\\sigma^{2}/M$, $S\\sigma$ and $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBD). The $S\\sigma$ values deviate from Poisson and are close to NBD baseline, while the $\\kappa\\sigma^{2}$ values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show clear evidence of non-monotonic behavior as a function of collision energy.

  15. Two-proton small-angle correlations in central heavy-ion collisions: A beam-energy- and system-size-dependent study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotte, R. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, IKH, PF 510119, Dresden (Germany); Alard, P.; Barret, V.; Bastid, N.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P. [IN2P3/CNRS and Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Andronic, A.A. [Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Basrak, Z.; Caplar, R.; Dzelalija, M.; Gasparic, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Cordier, E.; Herrmann, N. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Fodor, Z. [Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Gobbi, A.; Hartmann, O.N.; Hildenbrand, K.D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Grishkin, Y. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hong, B. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kecskemeti, J.; Kim, Y.J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koczon, P.; Korolija, M.; Kress, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lopez, X.; Merschmeyer, M.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, P.; Petrovici, M.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; De Schauenburg, B.; Schuettauf, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K.S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stoicea, G.; Tyminski, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z.G.; Yushmanov, Y.; Zhilin, A.

    2005-02-01

    Small-angle correlations of pairs of protons emitted in central collisions of Ca+Ca, Ru+Ru and Au+Au at beam energies from 400 to 1500 MeV per nucleon are investigated with the FOPI detector system at SIS/GSI Darmstadt. Dependences on system size and beam energy are presented which extend the experimental data basis of pp correlations in the SIS energy range substantially. The size of the proton-emitting source is estimated by comparing the experimental data with the output of a final-state interaction model which utilizes either static Gaussian sources or the one-body phase-space distribution of protons provided by the BUU transport approach. The trends in the experimental data, i.e.system size and beam energy dependences, are well reproduced by this hybrid model. However, the pp correlation function is found rather insensitive to the stiffness of the equation of state entering the transport model calculations. (orig.)

  16. Beam energy and centrality dependence of the statistical moments of the net-charge and net-kaon multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In part to search for a possible critical point (CP) in the phase diagram of hot nuclear matter, a Beam Energy Scan was performed at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR experiment collected significant Au+Au data sets at beam energies, $\\sqrt{{\\rm s}_{\\rm NN}}$, of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV. Lattice and phenomenological calculations suggest that the presence of a CP might result in divergences of the thermodynamic susceptibilities and correlation length. The statistical moments of the multiplicity distributions of particles reflecting conserved quantities, such as net-charge and net-strangeness, are expected to depend sensitively on these correlation lengths, making them attractive tools in the search for a possible critical point. The centrality and beam-energy dependence of the statistical moments of the net-charge multiplicity distributions will be discussed. The observables studied include the lowest four statistical moments (mean, variance, ske...

  17. Beam energy dependent two-pion interferometry and the freeze-out eccentricity of pions in heavy ion collisions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We present results of analyses of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR detector as part of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan program. The extracted correlation lengths (HBT radii) are studied as a function of beam energy, azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane, centrality, and transverse mass ($m_{T}$) of the particles. The azimuthal analysis allows extraction of the eccentricity of the entire fireball at kinetic freeze-out. The energy dependence of this observable is expected to be sensitive to changes in the equation of state. A new global fit method is studied as an alternate method to directly measure the parameters in the azimuthal analysis. The eccentricity shows a monotonic decrease with beam energy that is qualitatively consistent with the trend from all model predictions and quantitatively consistent with a hadronic transport model.

  18. Beam Energy Dependence of Moments of the Net-Charge Multiplicity Distributions in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report the first measurements of the moments—mean (M), variance (σ2), skewness (S), and kurtosis (κ)—of the net-charge multiplicity distributions at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at seven energies, ranging from √sNN =7.7 to 200 GeV, as a part of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC. The moments are related to the thermodynamic susceptibilities of net charge, and are sensitive to the location of the QCD critical point. We compare the products of the moments, σ2/M, Sσ, and κσ2, with the expectations from Poisson and negative binomial distributions (NBDs). The Sσ values deviate from the Poisson baseline and are close to the NBD baseline, while the κσ2 values tend to lie between the two. Within the present uncertainties, our data do not show nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. These measurements provide a valuable tool to extract the freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions by comparing with theoretical models.

  19. ESR spin trapping of radicals in methanol solution irradiated by heavy ion beams. Dependence on specific energy and LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Seiko, E-mail: Nakagawa.Seiko@iri-tokyo.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Facility of Science, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi [Research Program for the Application of Heavy Ions in Medical Sciences, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Science, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • The relative yield among radicals produced by ion irradiation of methanol was studied. • The ratio varied depending on the LET value, the specific energy and mass of ions. • The recombination of ionic species will occur effectively for Ar and Fe-ion irradiation. - Abstract: Radicals produced by the heavy ion (He, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe) irradiation of methanol were spin trapped with PBN. Three kinds of radicals, PBN-CH{sub 3}O, PBN-CH{sub 2}OH, and PBN-H, were observed similar to those by γ-irradiation. The relative radical yields, PBN-CH{sub 3}O/PBN-CH{sub 2}OH and (PBN-CH{sub 3}O + PBN-CH{sub 2}OH)/PBN-H, varied depending on the LET value, the specific energy and mass of ions.

  20. Beam dynamics in high energy particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Particle accelerators are essential tools for scientific research in fields as diverse as high energy physics, materials science and structural biology. They are also widely used in industry and medicine. Producing the optimum design and achieving the best performance for an accelerator depends on a detailed understanding of many (often complex and sometimes subtle) effects that determine the properties and behavior of the particle beam. Beam Dynamics in High Energy Particle Accelerators provides an introduction to the concepts underlying accelerator beam line design and analysis, taking an approach that emphasizes the elegance of the subject and leads into the development of a range of powerful techniques for understanding and modeling charged particle beams.

  1. A model for a constrained, finitely deforming, elastic solid with rotation gradient dependent strain energy, and its specialization to von Kármán plates and beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, A. R.; Reddy, J. N.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop the governing equations for a fully constrained finitely deforming hyperelastic Cosserat continuum where the directors are constrained to rotate with the body rotation. This is the generalization of small deformation couple stress theories and would be useful for developing mathematical models for an elastic material with embedded stiff short fibers or inclusions (e.g., materials with carbon nanotubes or nematic elastomers, cellular materials with oriented hard phases, open cell foams, and other similar materials), that account for certain longer range interactions. The theory is developed as a limiting case of a regular Cosserat elastic material where the directors are allowed to rotate freely by considering the case of a high "rotational mismatch energy". The theory is developed using the formalism of Lagrangian mechanics, with the static case being based on Castigliano's first theorem. By considering the stretch U and the rotation R as additional independent variables and using the polar decomposition theorem as an additional constraint equation, we obtain the governing and as well as the boundary conditions for finite deformations. The resulting equations are further specialized for plane strain and axisymmetric finite deformations, deformations of beams and plates with small strain and moderate rotation, and for small deformation theories. We also show that the boundary conditions for this theory involve "surface tension" like terms due to the higher gradients in the strain energy function. For beams and plates, the rotational gradient dependent strain energy does not require additional variables (unlike Cosserat theories) and additional differential equations; nor do they raise the order of the differential equations, thus allowing us to include a material length scale dependent response at no extra "computational cost" even for finite deformation beam/plate theories

  2. Electron-beam transmission through a micrometer-sized tapered-glass capillary: Dependence on incident energy and angular tilt angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental study of 500- and 1000-eV incident electrons transmitted through a micrometer-sized funnel-shaped (tapered) glass capillary with inlet diameter 0.80 mm, outlet diameter 0.10 mm, and a length of 35 mm is reported. The properties of the electron beam transmitted were measured as a function of the emerging angle and the incident energy dependence. The angular profiles were found to be comprised of up to three peaks for both 500 and 1000 eV showing evidence for transmission going straight through the capillary without interacting with the walls (direct), as well as transmission resulting from Coulomb deflection of the electrons from a negative charge patch or by scattering from nuclei close to the surface of the capillary (indirect). The energy spectra show that elastically transmitted electrons dominate at 500 eV for increasing sample tilt angles up to ˜5.0°, while inelastic processes dominate for 1000 eV already at tilt angles of ˜1.0°. The angular width of the emitted electrons was found to constitute a narrow beam for direct (˜0.4°) and indirect (<0.6° for 500 eV and <1.0° for 1000 eV) transmission for both energies with the widths decreasing for the largest tilt angles measured and approaching the inherent resolution (˜0.3°) of the electron analyzer.

  3. Neutralization of low energy broad ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of a low energy broad ion beam space charge and current compensation and ion-beam plasma (IBP), which would be created in transport space of the beam. The beam had cylindrical symmetry. The continuous uniform and hole tube like ion beams are used in the experiments. Different channels of electron appearing have been investigated for cases of neutralization due to secondary γ-electrons from the target and by electrons from glow cathode-neutralizer with metal or dielectric target. Results of neutralizing electrons energy distributions function measurements are presented as well as dependences of electron temperature and self-consisted plasma potential vs. beam parameters, ambient gas pressure, neutralizer parameters. Role of the thermoelectrons and dependence of IBP parameters on neutralizer area, location and potential are discussed. Significant role in neutralization of spatial collisional processes has been revealed even in neutralization by thermocathode. On the base of the experimental results self-consistent theoretical model have been developed, which describes the behavior of intense ion beam passing through the neutral gas at low pressure within conductive walls. The collisionless approach is used which means absence of collisional relaxation of the beam. This theory is used to derive the plasma potential and electron temperature within the beam

  4. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of the space-time extent of the pion emission source produced in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bing, X; Black, D; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, E; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kihara, K; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H -J; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kofarago, M; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, A J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozaki, H; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Riveli, N; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, M; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Soumya, M; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, M; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tsuji, T; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vargyas, M; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; Whitaker, S; White, S N; Winter, D; Wolin, S; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xie, W; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    Two-pion interferometry measurements are used to extract the Gaussian radii $R_{{\\rm out}}$, $R_{{\\rm side}}$, and $R_{{\\rm long}}$, of the pion emission sources produced in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au collisions at several beam collision energies $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ at PHENIX. The extracted radii, which are compared to recent STAR and ALICE data, show characteristic scaling patterns as a function of the initial transverse size $\\bar{R}$ of the collision systems and the transverse mass $m_T$ of the emitted pion pairs, consistent with hydrodynamiclike expansion. Specific combinations of the three-dimensional radii that are sensitive to the medium expansion velocity and lifetime, and the pion emission time duration show nonmonotonic $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ dependencies. The nonmonotonic behaviors exhibited by these quantities point to a softening of the equation of state that may coincide with the critical end point in the phase diagram for nuclear matter.

  5. Study of energy dependence of a extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays beams; Estudo da dependencia energetica de uma camara de extrapolacao em feixes de raios-X de baixa energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Teogenes A. da, E-mail: fernanda_mbastos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimeto da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work was with the main objective to study the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays to determine the value of the uncertainty associated with the variation of the incident radiation energy in the measures in which it is used. For studying the dependence of energy, were conducted comparative ionization current measurements between the extrapolation chamber and two ionization chambers: a chamber mammography, RC6M model, Radcal with energy dependence less than 5% and a 2575 model radioprotection chamber NE Technology; both chambers have very thin windows, allowing its application in low power beams. Measurements were made at four different depths of 1.0 to 4.0 mm extrapolation chamber, 1.0 mm interval, for each reference radiation. The study showed that there is a variable energy dependence on the volume of the extrapolation chamber. In other analysis, it is concluded that the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber becomes smaller when using the slope of the ionization current versus depth for the different radiation reference; this shows that the extrapolation technique, used for the absorbed dose calculation, reduces the uncertainty associated with the influence of the response variation with energy radiation.

  6. Temperature dependence of the beam-foil interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam energy dependence between 50 and 200 keV of the linear polarization fraction (M/I) of the 2s 1S--3p 1P, 5016 A transition in He I on temperature was measured. The thin carbon exciter foils were heated externally by nichrome resistance elements. The measurements of Hight et al. are duplicated; the energy and current dependences are the same for corresponding between beam heating and external heating. It was also observed that γ, the number of slow secondary electrons produced per incident ion, decreases with increasing foil temperature. These two effects, in conjunction, offer a plausible explanation for the variation of polarization with beam current density. 5 figures

  7. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ GeV to 200 GeV. The third harmonic $v_3^2\\{2\\}=\\langle \\cos3(\\phi_1-\\phi_2)\\rangle$, where $\\phi_1-\\phi_2$ is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs $\\Delta\\eta = \\eta_1-\\eta_2$. Non-zero {\\vthree} is directly related to the previously observed large-$\\Delta\\eta$ narrow-$\\Delta\\phi$ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) phase. For sufficiently central collisions, $v_3^2\\{2\\}$ persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV suggesting that QGP may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies however, $v_3^2\\{2\\}$ is consistent with zero. When scaled by pseudorapidity density of charged particle multiplicity per participating nuc...

  8. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV.

  9. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV. PMID:27035295

  10. Beam-beam studies for the High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    LHC upgrades are being considered both towards higher luminosity (HL-LHC) and towards higher energy (HE-LHC). In this paper we report initial studies of the beam-beam effects in the HE-LHC [1]. The HE-LHC aims at beam energies of 16.5 TeV, where the transverse emittance decreases due to synchrotron radiation with a 2-hour damping time. As a result of this emittance, shrinkage the beam-beam parameter increases with time, during a physics store. The beam-beam limit in the HE-LHC is explored using computer simulations.

  11. Fluidic energy harvesting beams in grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, A. H.; Goushcha, O.; Elvin, N.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Much of the recent research involving fluidic energy harvesters based on piezoelectricity has focused on excitation through vortex-induced vibration while turbulence-induced excitation has attracted very little attention, and virtually no previous work exists on excitation due to grid-generated turbulence. The present experiments involve placing several piezoelectric cantilever beams of various dimensions and properties in flows where turbulence is generated by passive, active, or semi-passive grids, the latter having a novel design that significantly improves turbulence generation compared to the passive grid and is much less complex than the active grid. We experimentally show for the first time that the average power harvested by a piezoelectric cantilever beam placed in decaying isotropic, homogeneous turbulence depends on mean velocity, velocity and length scales of turbulence as well as the electromechanical properties of the beam. The output power can be modeled as a power law with respect to the distance of the beam from the grid. Furthermore, we show that the rate of decay of this power law closely follows the rate of decay of the turbulent kinetic energy. We also introduce a forcing function used to model approximately the turbulent eddies moving over the cantilever beam and observe that the feedback from the beam motion onto the flow is virtually negligible for most of the cases considered, indicating an effectively one-way interaction for small-velocity fluctuations.

  12. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James Institute of Oncology The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Evans, J. A. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds, United Kingdom and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field

  13. Yield of isomers in 76Ge (635 MeV) + 198Pt deep-inelastic collision and their dependence on projectiles (74,76Ge) and beam energies (635,550 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the yields and distribution of ns-μs isomers produced in 76Ge (635 MeV) + 198Pt deep-inelastic collision. The population yields of isomers evaluated for individual channel and compared with the relevant yields produced in 76Ge (635 MeV) + 198Pt and 74Ge (550 MeV) + 198Pt reaction. These comparisons reflect how isomer yield depends on beam energies and projectile mass in deep-inelastic collisions. (author)

  14. Determination of the LEP beam energy

    CERN Document Server

    Torrence, E

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the determination of the LEP beam energy above the production threshold for W boson pairs. A brief overview of the magnetic extrapolation method is presented which is currently used to determine the LEP beam energy to a relative precision of 2*10/sup -4 /. A new method for beam energy measurements based on an in-line energy spectrometer is presented, and current developments in the commissioning of this device are outlined. (2 refs).

  15. Electron beam energy QA - a note on measurement tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Juergen; Nyflot, Matthew J; Smith, Wade P; Wottoon, Landon S; Young, Lori; Yang, Fei; Kim, Minsun; Hendrickson, Kristi R G; Ford, Eric; Kalet, Alan M; Cao, Ning; Dempsey, Claire; Sandison, George A

    2016-01-01

    Monthly QA is recommended to verify the constancy of high-energy electron beams generated for clinical use by linear accelerators. The tolerances are defined as 2%/2 mm in beam penetration according to AAPM task group report 142. The practical implementation is typically achieved by measuring the ratio of readings at two different depths, preferably near the depth of maximum dose and at the depth corresponding to half the dose maximum. Based on beam commissioning data, we show that the relationship between the ranges of energy ratios for different electron energies is highly nonlinear. We provide a formalism that translates measurement deviations in the reference ratios into change in beam penetration for electron energies for six Elekta (6-18 MeV) and eight Varian (6-22 MeV) electron beams. Experimental checks were conducted for each Elekta energy to compare calcu-lated values with measurements, and it was shown that they are in agreement. For example, for a 6 MeV beam a deviation in the measured ionization ratio of ± 15% might still be acceptable (i.e., be within ± 2 mm), whereas for an 18 MeV beam the corresponding tolerance might be ± 6%. These values strongly depend on the initial ratio chosen. In summary, the relationship between differences of the ionization ratio and the corresponding beam energy are derived. The findings can be translated into acceptable tolerance values for monthly QA of electron beam energies. PMID:27074488

  16. Beam energy online measurement of BEPCII LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shao-Zhe; Chi, Yun-Long

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes beam energy online measurement of BEPCII linac, presents the calculation formula and some of the results. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring beam positions in the horizontal direction with three beam position monitors (BPM) eliminating the effect of orbit fluctuation, which is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in the end of this paper.

  17. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Roed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ortho-voltage energies are often used for treatment of patients’ superficial lesions, and also for small- animal irradiations. Polymer-Gel dosimeters such as MAGAT (Methacrylic acid Gel and THPC are finding increasing use for 3-dimensional verification of radiation doses in a given treatment geometry. For mega-voltage beams, energy dependence of MAGAT has been quoted as nearly energy-independent. In the kilo-voltage range, there is hardly any literature to shade light on its energy dependence.Methods: MAGAT was used to measure depth-dose for 250 kVp beam. Comparison with ion-chamber data showed a discrepancy increasing significantly with depth. An over-response as much as 25% was observed at a depth of 6 cm.Results and Conclusion: Investigation concluded that 6 cm water in the beam resulted in a half-value-layer (HVL change from 1.05 to 1.32 mm Cu. This amounts to an effective-energy change from 81.3 to 89.5 keV. Response measurements of MAGAT at these two energies explained the observed discrepancy in depth-dose measurements. Dose-calibration curves of MAGAT for (i 250 kVp beam, and (ii 250 kVp beam through 6 cm of water column are presented showing significant energy dependence.-------------------Cite this article as: Roed Y, Tailor R, Pinksy L, Ibbott G. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020232. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.32 

  18. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 μm precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  19. Coupling Impedances of Small Discontinuities: Dependence on Beam Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Kurennoy, S S

    2006-01-01

    The beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities of an accelerator vacuum chamber have been calculated [e.g., S.S. Kurennoy, R.L. Gluckstern, and G.V. Stupakov, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4354 (1995)] for ultrarelativistic beams using the Bethe diffraction theory. Here we extend the results to an arbitrary beam velocity. The vacuum chamber is assumed to have an arbitrary, but uniform along the beam path, cross section. The longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances are derived in terms of series over cross-section eigenfunctions, while the discontinuity shape enters via its polarizabilities. Simple explicit formulas for two important particular cases - circular and rectangular chamber cross sections - are presented. The impedance dependence on the beam velocity exhibits some unusual features: for example, the reactive impedance, which dominates in the ultrarelativistic limit, can vanish at a certain beam velocity, or its magnitude can exceed the ultrarelativistic value many times. In addition, we demonstrate ...

  20. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  1. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Paschuk, S.A.; Schelin, H.R.; Rocha, R.L.; Setti, J.A.P.; Klock, M.C.L.; Evseev, I.G. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Yevseyeva, O.I. [Polytechnic Institute of the Rio de Janeiro State University, Nova Friburgo 28610-970 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the earliest works dedicated to proton radiography and proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of image creation using proton beams appears when the energy is chosen as small as possible, but enough to pass the object. This phenomenon is based on the great sensitivity of the energy flux of the proton beam in relation to the length and density of the object at the end of the proton range. However, this fact was proved experimentally only with thin detectors, such as photographic films, which detect only part of the exit energy of protons. Another method which is based on the measurement of total exit energy of protons contains two effects that act in opposite ways: the necessary irradiation dose increases when the energy of the proton is reduced. In this work, the dependence of the irradiation dose on proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation shows that the irradiation dose depends slightly on the proton energy beyond the region at the end of the proton range and increases sharply in it.

  2. Ion Beam Energy Calibration Method for Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam energy calibration methods, i e : nuclear reaction method, magnetic field method and calorimeter method were elaborated and studied from its advantage and disadvantage in this paper. Ion beam energy calibration method for accelerator using the method of magnetic field on 3 MV Tandem Accelerator have been carried out at Tiara, JAERI, Japan. The result showed that the energy of ion beam current is 43.56 keV. The result of study conclude that nuclear reaction method generally used to calibrate ion beam energy at the accelerator of energy larger than 2 MeV, calorimetric method for the accelerator electron including linac, magnetic field method for all particle type of accelerator. (author)

  3. Low energy beam transport system developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  4. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, M F; Coutrakon, G B; Ghebremedhin, A; Shahnazi, K; Koss, P; Sanders, E

    2007-06-01

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of +/-0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of +/-0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  5. Low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D.; Formanoy, I.; Brandenburg, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign of the low-energy beam line at KVI. Redesigned and properties of the optical elements of the transport beam line is done by using the code COSY INFINITY in the third-order of approximation. The effects of fringe fields of the optical elements are also taken into acc

  6. Coupling impedances of small discontinuities: Dependence on beam velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2006-05-01

    The beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities of an accelerator vacuum chamber have been calculated [e.g., Kurennoy, Gluckstern, and Stupakov, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4354 (1995)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.52.4354] for ultrarelativistic beams using the Bethe diffraction theory. Here we extend the results to an arbitrary beam velocity. The vacuum chamber is assumed to have an arbitrary, but uniform along the beam path, cross section. The longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances are derived in terms of series over cross-section eigenfunctions, while the discontinuity shape enters via its polarizabilities. Simple explicit formulas for two important particular cases—circular and rectangular chamber cross sections—are presented. The impedance dependence on the beam velocity exhibits some unusual features: for example, the reactive impedance, which dominates in the ultrarelativistic limit, can vanish at a certain beam velocity, or its magnitude can exceed the ultrarelativistic value many times. In addition, we demonstrate that the same technique, the field expansion into a series of cross-section eigenfunctions, is convenient for calculating the space-charge impedance of uniform beam pipes with arbitrary cross section.

  7. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  8. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper

  9. Pxie low energy beam transport commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, L; Andrews, R; Carneiro, J -P; Hanna, B; Scarpine, V; Shemyakin, A; D'Arcy, R; Wiesner, C

    2015-01-01

    The Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) at Fermilab is a program of upgrades to the injection complex. At its core is the design and construction of a CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting RF linac. To validate the concept of the front-end of such machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) is under construction. It includes a 10 mA DC, 30 KeV H- ion source, a 2 m-long Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, followed by a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) that feeds the first of 2 cryomodules increasing the beam energy to ~25 MeV, and a High Energy Beam Transport section (HEBT) that takes the beam to a dump. The ion source and LEBT, which includes 3 solenoids, several clearing electrodes/collimators and a chopping system, have been built, installed, and commissioned to full specification parameters. This report presents the outcome of our commissioning activities, including phase-space measurements at the end of the beam line under various neutralization schemes obtained by changing the electro...

  10. Systematic properties of the Tsallis distribution: Energy dependence of parameters in high energy p–p collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleymans, J., E-mail: jean.cleymans@gmail.com [UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape (South Africa); Lykasov, G.I. [JINR, Dubna, 141980 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Parvan, A.S. [JINR, Dubna, 141980 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics, Moldova Academy of Sciences, MD-2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Sorin, A.S.; Teryaev, O.V. [JINR, Dubna, 141980 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Worku, D. [UCT-CERN Research Centre and Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape (South Africa)

    2013-06-25

    Changes in the transverse momentum distributions with beam energy are studied using the Tsallis distribution as a parameterization. The dependence of the Tsallis parameters q, T and the volume are determined as a function of beam energy. The Tsallis parameter q shows a weak but clear increase with beam energy with the highest value being approximately 1.15. The Tsallis temperature and volume are consistent with being independent of beam energy within experimental uncertainties.

  11. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  12. Low energy beam transport system developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudnikov, V., E-mail: vadim@muonsinc.com [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dudnikova, G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 3261 (United States); Institute of Computational Technologies SBRAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  13. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  14. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-15

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 {mu}m precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  15. Low Energy High Brilliance Beam Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, J

    2005-01-01

    Low energy high brilliance beam characterization plays an important role for electron sources and injectors of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and electron linear accelerators as for example the future ILC project. The topic is discussed basing on solutions of the PITZ facility (PhotoInjector Test facility Zeuthen) which are compared with methods applied at other facilities. The properties of an electron beam produced at a laser-driven rf-gun is mainly influenced also by characteristics of the laser beam and the electron gun itself. Therefore aspects of diagnostics will be also discussed for the laser, laser beam line and gun as well. The main properties of the electron beam are transverse and longitudinal phase space and charge as well. The measurement of transverse beam size and position, transverse emittance, charge, beam current, and longitudinal phase space will be discussed in detail. The measurements of the transverse emittance at PITZ is based on a single slit method. The measurement of the longitudinal p...

  16. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  17. Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta, M R; Mazumdar; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-01-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, minijet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  18. LHC Beam Energy in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Ravaioli, E; Schmidt, R; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between the LHC main magnets are made of soldered joints (splices) of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The measurements performed in 2009 in the whole machine, in particular in sector 3-4 during the repair after the 2008 accident, demonstrated that there is a significant fraction of defective copper bus bar joints in the machine. In this paper, the limiting factors for operating the LHC at higher energies with defective 13 kA bus bar joints are briefly reviewed. The experience gained during the 2011 run, including the quench statistics and dedicated quench propagation tests impacting on maximum safe energy are presented. The impact of the by-pass diode contact resistance issue is also addressed. Finally, a proposal for running at the highest possible safe energy compatible with the pre-defined risk level is presented.

  19. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE GANIL BEAM ENERGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CASANDJIAN, JM; MITTIG, W; BEUNARD, R; GAUDARD, L; LEPINESZILY, A; VILLARI, ACC; AUGER, G; BIANCHI, L; CUNSOLO, A; FOTI, A; LICHTENTHALER, R; PLAGNOL, E; SCHUTZ, Y; SIEMSSEN, RH; WIELECZKO, JP

    1993-01-01

    The energy of the GANIL cyclotron beam was measured on-line during the Pb-208 + Pb-208 elastic scattering experiment ''Search for Color van der Waals Force in the Pb-208 + Pb-208 Mott scattering'' with an absolute precision of 7 x 10(-5) at approximately 1.0 GeV, which represents an improvement of o

  20. Experimental observation of polarization-dependent optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Srisuphaphon, S; Photia, T; Temnuch, W; Chiangga, S; Deachapunya, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of the induced polarization-dependent optical vortex beams. We use the Talbot configuration as a method to probe this effect. In particular, our simple experiment shows the direct measurement of this observation. Our experiment can exhibit clearly the combination between the polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light. This implementation might be useful for further studies in the quantum system or quantum information.

  1. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Patrick; Beach, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this study was to (1) review and analyze the state-of-art in beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) by identifying potential game-changing applications, (2) formulate a roadmap of technology development, and (3) identify key near-term technology demonstrations to rapidly advance elements of BEP technology to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. The two major areas of interest were launching payloads and space propulsion. More generally, the study was requested and structured to address basic mission feasibility. The attraction of beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) is the potential for high specific impulse while removing the power-generation mass. The rapid advancements in high-energy beamed-power systems and optics over the past 20 years warranted a fresh look at the technology. For launching payloads, the study concluded that using BEP to propel vehicles into space is technically feasible if a commitment to develop new technologies and large investments can be made over long periods of time. From a commercial competitive standpoint, if an advantage of beamed energy for Earth-to-orbit (ETO) is to be found, it will rest with smaller, frequently launched payloads. For space propulsion, the study concluded that using beamed energy to propel vehicles from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and into deep space is definitely feasible and showed distinct advantages and greater potential over current propulsion technologies. However, this conclusion also assumes that upfront infrastructure investments and commitments to critical technologies will be made over long periods of time. The chief issue, similar to that for payloads, is high infrastructure costs.

  2. Energy Absorption Capacity of Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arivalagan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Local buckling may occur in the compression flange of rectangular hollow-section beams under cyclic repeated loadingarising from earthquakes. Once a local mechanism forms, residual strength rapidly reduces within a few cycles. This is trueeven for compact sections under static bending. This paper aims to study the experimental behaviour and ultimate momentcapacity of unfilled and concrete-filled rectangular hollow sections subjected to cyclic reversible loading. Two types offiller material were used - normal mix concrete and fly ash concrete. The effect of filler materials, section slenderness, loaddeflectionresponse, moment-strain behaviour, first cycle peak load, ductility, stiffness degradation and energy absorption ofconcrete –filled RHS beams are studied.

  3. Patient-dependent beam-modifier physics in Monte Carlo photon dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E; Bergstrom, P M; Cox, L J

    2000-05-01

    Model pencil-beam on slab calculations are used as well as a series of detailed calculations of photon and electron output from commercial accelerators to quantify level(s) of physics required for the Monte Carlo transport of photons and electrons in treatment-dependent beam modifiers, such as jaws, wedges, blocks, and multileaf collimators, in photon teletherapy dose calculations. The physics approximations investigated comprise (1) not tracking particles below a given kinetic energy, (2) continuing to track particles, but performing simplified collision physics, particularly in handling secondary particle production, and (3) not tracking particles in specific spatial regions. Figures-of-merit needed to estimate the effects of these approximations are developed, and these estimates are compared with full-physics Monte Carlo calculations of the contribution of the collimating jaws to the on-axis depth-dose curve in a water phantom. These figures of merit are next used to evaluate various approximations used in coupled photon/electron physics in beam modifiers. Approximations for tracking electrons in air are then evaluated. It is found that knowledge of the materials used for beam modifiers, of the energies of the photon beams used, as well as of the length scales typically found in photon teletherapy plans, allows a number of simplifying approximations to be made in the Monte Carlo transport of secondary particles from the accelerator head and beam modifiers to the isocenter plane.

  4. One THz. Beamed Energy - Mission Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Donald G.

    2005-04-01

    Gyrotrons now used for nuclear fusion experiments are a possibile source for beamed energy electro-thermal propulsion. Water vapor absorption is likely to bar 1 THz. transmission through the atmosphere. A space-based source in low equatorial orbit offers beamed energy velocity increments for upper stage orbit insertion. Transfer orbits to geosynchronous and lunar destinations and escape velocities to Mars and Venus are considered. Rapid acceleration (1 g) at high specific impulse implies very high source power and mass. Altitudes for BEP source satellites are in 600 to 800 kilometer range, set by atmospheric drag and avoidance of van Allen belt. Earth oblateness plus lunar and solar tidal forces are important factors governing source orbit selection and maintenance.

  5. Energy verification in Ion Beam Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, F; Dorda, U

    2011-01-01

    The adoption of synchrotrons for medical applications necessitates a comprehensive on-line verification of all beam parameters, autonomous of common beam monitors. In particular for energy verification, the required precision of down to 0.1MeV in absolute terms, poses a special challenge regarding the betatron-core driven 3rd order extraction mechanism which is intended to be used at MedAustron [1]. Two different energy verification options have been studied and their limiting factors were investigated: 1) A time-of-flight measurement in the synchrotron, limited by the orbit circumference information and measurement duration as well as extraction uncertainties. 2) A calorimeter-style system in the extraction line, limited by radiation hardness and statistical fluctuations. The paper discusses in detail the benefits and specific aspects of each method.

  6. Space Experiments to Advance Beamed Energy Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Donald G.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave sources are now available and usable, with modification, or beamed energy propulsion experiments in space. As output windows and vacuum seals are not needed space is a natural environment for high power vacuum tubes. Application to space therefore improves reliability and performance but complicates testing and qualification. Low power communications satellite devices (TWT, etc) have already been through the adapt-to-space design cycle and this history is a useful pathway for high power devices such as gyrotrons. In this paper, space experiments are described for low earth orbit (LEO) and lunar environment. These experiments are precursors to space application for beamed energy propulsion using high power microwaves. Power generation and storage using cryogenic systems are important elements of BEP systems and also have an important role as part of BEP experiments in the space environment.

  7. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pronskikh, Vitaly S; Novitski, Igor; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton accelerator facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however...

  8. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  9. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  10. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  11. Feasibility of a 90° electric sector energy analyzer for low energy ion beam characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahinay, C. L. S., E-mail: cmahinay@nip.upd.edu.ph; Ramos, H. J. [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Metro Manila (Philippines); Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    A simple formula to calculate refocusing by locating the output slit at a specific distance away from the exit of 90° ion deflecting electric sector is given. Numerical analysis is also performed to calculate the ion beam trajectories for different values of the initial angular deviation of the beam. To validate the theory, a compact (90 mm × 5.5 mm × 32 mm) 90° sector ESA is fabricated which can fit through the inner diameter of a conflat 70 vacuum flange. Experimental results show that the dependence of resolution upon the distance between the sector exit and the Faraday cup agrees with the theory. The fabricated 90° sector electrostatic energy analyzer was then used to measure the space resolved ion energy distribution functions of an ion beam with the energy as low as 600 eV.

  12. Beam diagnostics instrumentation for the high energy beam transfer line of I.P.H.I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ausset, P.; Berthelot, S.; Coacolo, J.L.; Lesrel, J.; Maymon, J.N.; Olivier, A.; Rouviere, N.; Solal, M.; Vatrinet, L.; Yaniche, J.F. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, (IN2P3/CNRS) 91 - Orsay (France); Belyaev, G.; Roudskoy, I. [I.T.E.P. Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    I.P.H.I. is a High Intensity Proton Injector under construction at Saclay. An E.C.R. source produces a 100 keV, 100 mA C.W. proton beam which will be accelerated at 3 MeV by a 4 vanes R.F.Q. operating at 352.2 MHz. Finally, a High Energy Beam Transport Line (H.E.B.T.) will deliver the beam to a beam stopper and will be equipped with appropriate beam diagnostics to carry intensity, centroid beam transverse position, transverse beam profiles, beam energy and energy spread measurements for the commissioning of I.P.H.I. These beam diagnostics will operate under both pulsed and C.W. operation. Transverse beam profile measurements will be acquired under low and high duty factor pulsed beam operation using a slow wire scanner and a C.C.D. camera to image the beam-induced fluorescence. The beam instrumentation of the H.E.B.T. is reviewed and preliminary obtained transverse profile measurements at 100 keV are described. (authors)

  13. Beam Diagnostics Instrumentation for the High Energy Beam Transport Line of I.P.H.I.

    CERN Document Server

    Ausset, P; Coacolo, J L; Lesrel, J; Maymon, J N; Olivier, A; Rouviere, N; Solal-Cohen, M; Vatrinet, L; Yaniche, J F

    2005-01-01

    I.P.H.I. is a High Intensity Proton Injector under construction at Saclay (C.N.R.S/ I.N.2P.3; C.E.A. / D.A.P.N.I.A and C.E.R.N. collaboration). An E.C.R. produces a 100 keV, 100 mA C.W. proton beam which will be accelerated at 3 MeV by a 4 vanes R.F.Q. operating at 352.2 MHz. Finally, a High Energy Beam Transport Line (H.E.B.T.) will deliver the beam to a beam stopper and will be equipped with appropriate beam diagnostics to carry intensity; centroïd beam transverse position, transverse beam profiles, beam energy and energy spread measurements for the commissioning of I.P.H.I. These beam diagnostics will operate under both pulsed and C.W. operation. Transverse beam profile measurements will be acquired under low and high duty factor pulsed beam operation using a slow wire scanner and a C.C.D. camera to image the beam-induced fluorescence. The beam instrumentation of the H.E.B.T. is reviewed and preliminary obtained transverse profile measurements at 100 keV are described.

  14. Characterization of the NEPOMUC primary and remoderated positron beams at different energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Saitoh, H.; Stenson, E. V.; Stoneking, M. R.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the characterization of the positron beam provided at the open beam port of the NEPOMUC facility at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) Garching. The absolute positron flux of the primary beam at 400 eV and 1 keV kinetic energy and of the remoderated beam at 5, 12 and 22 eV were determined. Energy-dependent intensities in the range of (1 - 5) ·108e+ / s and (2 - 6) ·107e+ / s have been observed for the primary and remoderated beam, respectively. We attribute the significant losses for the primary beam, in comparison with the expected value, to the non-adiabatic positron guiding in the beam line. We also measured the longitudinal energy distribution of the remoderated beam, yielding an energy spread below 3.3 eV. The mean transverse energy of the remoderated beam, determined from measurements in different final magnetic fields, was found to be below 1.3 eV. These results are likely to apply to the NEPOMUC beam delivered to other user stations.

  15. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = (ν/ν0) k + thetav0, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from –0.1 to –2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav0 in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  16. Calculation of Electron Beam Potential Energy from RF Photocathode Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Wan Ming; Power, John G; Wang, Haitao

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the contribution of potential energy to beam dynamics as simulated by PARMELA at low energies (10 - 30MeV). We have developed a routine to calculate the potential energy of the relativistic electron beam using the static coulomb potential in the rest frame (first order approximation as in PARMELA). We found that the potential energy contribution to the beam dynamics could be very significant, particularly with high charge beams generated by an RF photocathode gun. Our results show that when the potential energy is counted correctly and added to the kinetic energy from PARMELA, the total energy is conserved. Simulation results of potential and kinetic energies for short beams (~1 mm) at various charges (1 - 100 nC) generated by a high current RF photocathode gun are presented.

  17. Use of Crystals for High Energy Photon Beam Linear Polarization Conversion into Circular

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N Z; Darbinian, S M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility to convert the photon beam linear polarization into circularone at photon energies of hundreds GeV with the use of crystals is considered.The energy and orientation dependencies of refractive indexes are investigatedin case of diamond, silicon and germanium crystal targets. To maximize thevalues for figure of merit, the corresponding crystal optimal orientationangles and thickness are found. The degree of circular polarization andintensity of photon beam are estimated and possibility of experimentalrealization is discussed.

  18. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  19. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  20. Observation of resonant energy transfer between identical-frequency laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeyan, B. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Estabrook, K. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; Wharton, K. B.

    1998-12-09

    Enhanced transmission of a low intensity laser beam is observed when crossed with an identical-frequency beam in a plasma with a flow velocity near the ion sound speed. The time history of the enhancement and the dependence on the flow velocity strongly suggest that this is due to energy transfer between the beams via a resonant ion wave with zero frequency in the laboratory frame. The maximum energy transfer has been observed when the beams cross in a region with Mach 1 flow. The addition of frequency modulation on the crossing beams is seen to reduce the energy transfer by a factor of two. Implications for indirect-drive fusion schemes are discussed.

  1. Two beam energy exchange in hybrid liquid crystal cells with photorefractive field controlled boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P.; Subota, S. I.; Evans, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory describing energy gain when two light beams intersect in a hybrid nematic liquid crystal (LC) cell with photorefractive crystalline substrates. A periodic space-charge field induced by interfering light beams in the photorefractive substrates penetrates into the LC layer and reorients the director. We account for two main mechanisms of the LC director reorientation: the interaction of the photorefractive field with the LC flexopolarization and the director easy axis at the cell boundaries. It is shown that the resulting director grating is a sum of two in-phase gratings: the flexoelectric effect driven grating and the boundary-driven grating. Each light beam diffracts from the induced gratings leading to an energy exchange between beams. We evaluate the signal beam gain coefficient and analyze its dependence on the director anchoring energy and the magnitude of the director easy axis modulation.

  2. ILC Beam Energy Measurement by means of Laser Compton Backscattering

    OpenAIRE

    Muchnoi, N.; Schreiber, H. J.; Viti, M

    2008-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered $\\gamma$-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitiv...

  3. Self-healing of Bessel-like beams with longitudinally dependent cone angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, I.; Burger, L.; Forbes, A.

    2015-10-01

    Bessel beams have been extensively studied, but to date have been created over a finite region inside the laboratory. Recently Bessel-like beams with longitudinally dependent cone angles have been introduced allowing for a potentially infinite quasi non-diffracting propagation region. Here we show that such beams can self-heal. Moreover, in contrast to Bessel beams where the self-healing distance is constant, here the self-healing distance is dependent on where the obstruction is placed in the field, with the distance increasing as the Bessel-like beam propagates farther. We outline the theoretical concept for this self-healing and confirm it experimentally.

  4. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Bassler, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10Areasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes (11)C and (15)O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10Aand measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values.

  5. Compact Measurement Station for Low Energy Proton Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Yildiz, H; Oz, S; Yasatekin, B; Turemen, G; Ogur, S; Sunar, E; Aydin, Y A; Dimov, V A; Unel, G; Alacakir, A

    2016-01-01

    A compact, remote controlled, cost efficient diagnostic station has been developed to measure the charge, the profile and the emittance for low energy proton beams. It has been installed and tested in the proton beam line of the Project Prometheus at SANAEM of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority.

  6. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  7. US oil dependency and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three papers of this document were written in the framework of a seminar organized the 30 may 2002 by the IFRI in the framework of its program Energy and Climatic Change. The first presentation deals with the american oil policy since 1980 (relation between the oil dependence and the energy security, the Reagan oil policy, the new oil policy facing the increase of the dependence). The second one deals with the US energy security (oil security, domestic energy security, policy implications). The last presentation is devoted to the US oil dependence in a global context and the problems and policies of international energy security. (A.L.B.)

  8. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  9. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  10. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  11. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly. PMID:12689203

  12. Plasma focusing and diagnosis of high energy particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin.

    1990-09-01

    Various novel concepts of focusing and diagnosis of high energy charged particle beams, based on the interaction between the relativistic particle beam and the plasma, are reviewed. This includes overdense thin plasma lenses, and (underdense) adiabatic plasma lens, and two beam size monitor concepts. In addition, we introduce another mechanism for measuring flat beams based on the impulse received by heavy ions in an underdense plasma. Theoretical investigations show promise of focusing and diagnosing beams down to sizes where conventional methods are not possible to provide. 21 refs.

  13. Inter-dependence not Over-dependence: Reducing Urban Transport Energy Dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Michael James; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio Nelson

    2007-07-01

    A major issue of concern in today's world is urban transport energy dependence and energy supply security. In an energy inter-dependent world, energy over-dependence brings risks to urban transport systems. Many urban areas are over-dependent on finite petroleum resources for transport. New technology and the development and integration of renewable resources into transport energy systems may reduce some of the current transport energy dependence of urban areas. However, the most effective means of reducing energy dependence is to first design urban areas for this condition. An urban policy framework is proposed that requires transport energy dependence to be measured and controlled in the urban development process. A new tool has been created for this purpose, the Transport Energy Specification (TES), which measures transport energy dependence of urban areas. This creates the possibility for cities to regulate urban development with respect to energy dependence. Trial assessments were performed in Germany, New Zealand and Brazil; initial analysis by transport and government professionals shows promise of this tool being included into urban policy. The TES combined with a regulatory framework has the potential to significantly reduce transport energy consumption and dependence in urban areas in the future. (auth)

  14. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device

  15. Characterization of low energy radioactive beams using direct reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.G.; Fraser, M.A.; Bildstein, V.;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to determine the beam structure of low energy radioactive beams using coincidence events from a direct reaction. The technique will be described and tested using Geant4 simulations. We use the technique to determine for the first time the width, divergence and energy...... of an accelerated radioactive beam produced at ISOLDE. We use data from an experiment with an 11Be beam incident on a deuteron target producing 10Be from a (d,t) reaction. The T-REX Si detector array was used for particle detection, but the technique is applicable for other setups....

  16. Review of Recent Results from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Lokesh

    2013-01-01

    We review recent results from the RHIC beam energy scan (BES) program, aimed to study the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The main goals are to search for the possible phase boundary, softening of equation of state or first order phase transition, and possible critical point. Phase-I of the BES program has recently concluded with data collection for Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$) of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. Several interesting results are observed for these lower energies where the net-baryon density is high at the mid-rapidity. These results indicate that the matter formed at lower energies (7.7 and 11.5 GeV) is hadron dominated and might not have undergone a phase transition. In addition, the centrality dependence of freeze-out parameters is observed for the first time at lower energies, slope of directed flow for (net)-protons measured versus rapidity shows an interesting behavior at lower energies, and higher moments of net-proton show deviation from Skel...

  17. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  18. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H− magnetron source provides about 100 mA H− beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H− beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H− beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H− beam from optically pumped polarized ion source

  19. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  20. Density Dependence of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Behera, B; Tripathy, S K

    2016-01-01

    High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy is studied on the basis of a stiffest density dependence of asymmetric contribution to energy per nucleon in charge neutral $n+p+e+\\mu$ matter under beta equilibrium. The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy obtained in this way is neither very stiff nor soft at high densities and is found to be in conformity with recent observations of neutron stars

  1. Piezoelectric energy harvester having planform-tapered interdigitated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Rick A.; Sumali, Hartono

    2011-05-24

    Embodiments of energy harvesters have a plurality of piezoelectric planform-tapered, interdigitated cantilevered beams anchored to a common frame. The plurality of beams can be arranged as two or more sets of beams with each set sharing a common sense mass affixed to their free ends. Each set thus defined being capable of motion independent of any other set of beams. Each beam can comprise a unimorph or bimorph piezoelectric configuration bonded to a conductive or non-conductive supporting layer and provided with electrical contacts to the active piezoelectric elements for collecting strain induced charge (i.e. energy). The beams are planform tapered along the entirety or a portion of their length thereby increasing the effective stress level and power output of each piezoelectric element, and are interdigitated by sets to increase the power output per unit volume of a harvester thus produced.

  2. Cryogenic Beam Screens for High-Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R

    2013-01-01

    Applied superconductivity has become a key enabling technology for high-energy particle accelerators, thus making them large helium cryogenic systems operating at very low temperature. The circulation of high-intensity particle beams in these machines generates energy deposition in the first wall through different processes. For thermodynamic efficiency, it is advisable to intercept these beam-induced heat loads, which may be large in comparison with cryostat heat in-leaks, at higher temperature than that of the superconducting magnets of the accelerator, by means of beam screens located in the magnet apertures. Beam screens may also be used as part of the ultra-high vacuum system of the accelerator, by sheltering the gas molecules cryopumped on the beam pipe from impinging radiation and thus avoiding pressure runaway. Space being extremely tight in the magnet apertures, cooling of the long, slender beam screens also raises substantial problems in cryogenic heat transfer and fluid flow. We present sizing rule...

  3. Beam Energy Scan at RHIC and z-Scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam Energy Scan (BES) data obtained at RHIC are briefly reviewed. Method of data analysis (z-scaling approach) based on self-similarity and locality of constituent interactions in hadron and nucleus collisions at high energy is described. The method is applied for analysis of BES data to search for signatures of phase transition and Critical Point (CP). Some results of analysis of hadron spectra measured in heavy ion collisions (HIC) at RHIC over a wide range of the energy √(sNN)=7.7–200 GeV are presented. Microscopic scenario of constituent interactions in the framework of this approach is discussed. Dependence of the energy loss on the momentum of the produced hadron, energy and centrality of the collision is studied. Self-similarity of the constituent interactions in terms of momentum fractions is used to characterize the nuclear medium by a “specific heat” and the colliding nuclei by fractal dimensions. Kinematic regions which are assumed to be most preferable for search for signatures of phase transition of nuclear matter produced in HIC in BES are discussed

  4. ILC Beam Energy Measurement by means of Laser Compton Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Muchnoi, N; Viti, M

    2008-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered $\\gamma$-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of $10^{-4}$ or bette...

  5. Development of multi-bunch beam energy compensation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to compensate for beam loading effects in a multi-bunch beam is under development at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in KEK. In this paper we describe the rf high power test for ΔT energy compensation by using the SLED cavities. In this ΔT (early injection and amplitude modulation) energy compensation method, the input waveform into accelerating structure is changed by controlling the rf phase and combining the rf-power from two klystrons with a 3 dB hybrid combiner to compensate multi-bunch beam energy for various beam currents. In this test, an arbitrary waveform was generated by changing the rotating speed of the each klystron phase into the opposite direction and the beam test will be done soon. (author)

  6. Analyzer of energy spectra of a magnetized relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzer of magnetized REB instant energy spectrum is described. The analyzer operation principle is based on the application of a sharp change of the direction of force lines of a magnetic field which is non-adiabatic for the beam electrons. The analyzer design is described, the main factors effecting the energy resolution are considered. The analyzer serviceability is examined in the course of experiments on plasma heating using a heavy-current microsecond REB at the GOL-3 device. The analyzer energy resolution which does not exceed 10% at 0.8 MeV energy and 20% at 0.3 MeV is determined. Beam energy spectra are obtained in one of the regimes of beam interaction with plasma. The efficiency of beam interaction with plasma determined using the analyzer achieves 30%. 10 refs.; 7 figs

  7. Structuring of silicon with low energy focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The defect production in silicon induced by focused ion beam irradiation as a function of energy and projectile mass has been investigated and compared to the measured sputter yield. The aim was to find optimal beam parameters for the structuring of semiconductors with a minimum amount of defects produced per removed atom. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  8. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report summarizes the results of research carried out in 1986 within the framework of the program 'High Energy Density in Matter Produced by Heavy Ion Beams' which is funded by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. Its initial motivation and its ultimate goal is the question whether inertial confinement can be achieved by intense beams of heavy ions. (orig./HSI)

  9. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J; Zeil, K; Kraft, S D; Karsch, L; Sobiella, M; Rehwald, M; Obst, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Schramm, U

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source. PMID:27587116

  10. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  11. Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Driven by Incoherent Laser Beams with Frequency Detuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, A.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Seka, W.

    2015-11-01

    In the direct-drive method of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the coupling of laser energy to target plasmas is strongly influenced by the effect of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) between multiple driving laser beams. The laser -plasma interaction (LPI) model of CBET is based on the nonparaxial laser light propagation coupled with the low-frequency ion-acoustic-domain plasma response. Common ion waves driven by multiple laser beams play a very important role in CBET. The effect of the frequency detuning (colors) in the driving laser beams is studied and it is shown to significantly reduce the level of common ion waves and therefore the level of CBET. The differences between the LPI-based CBET model and the ray-based CBET model used in hydrocodes are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Unprecedented intensity of a low-energy positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenschmidt, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, ZWEFRM II/E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: Christoph.Hugenschmidt@frm2.tum.de; Loewe, B.; Mayer, J.; Piochacz, C.; Pikart, P.; Repper, R.; Stadlbauer, M.; Schreckenbach, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, ZWEFRM II/E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2008-08-11

    A new in-pile {gamma}-converter and Pt-moderator was recently installed at the neutron induced positron source NEPOMUC. The intensity of the moderated positron beam is unprecedented and amounts to (9.0{+-}0.8)x10{sup 8} moderated positrons per second at an energy of 1 keV. Hence, the beam facility NEPOMUC provides the world highest intensity of a monoenergetic positron beam reported so far. Up to now, no degradation of the positron yield has been observed for several weeks of operation. Thus, the long-term stability of the positron beam enables experiments with high reliability.

  13. Neutrons in proton pencil beam scanning: parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Lomax, Tony

    2016-08-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons produced during proton therapy in inducing cancer is unknown, but potentially large. In particular, since neutron biological effectiveness is energy dependent, it is necessary to estimate, besides the dose, also the energy spectra, in order to obtain quantities which could be a measure of the biological effectiveness and test current models and new approaches against epidemiological studies on cancer induction after proton therapy. For patients treated with proton pencil beam scanning, this work aims to predict the spatially localized neutron energies, the effective quality factor, the weighting factor according to ICRP, and two RBE values, the first obtained from the saturation corrected dose mean lineal energy and the second from DSB cluster induction. A proton pencil beam was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron spectra for three different proton beam energies a parameterization of energy, quality factors and RBE was calculated. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed parameterizations in order to calculate the spatially localized neutron energy, quality factors and RBE for each treated patient. The parameterization represents the simple quantification of neutron energy in two energy bins and the quality factors and RBE with a satisfying precision up to 85 cm away from the proton pencil beam when compared to the results based on 3D Monte Carlo simulations. The root mean square error of the energy estimate between Monte Carlo simulation based results and the parameterization is 3.9%. For the quality factors and RBE estimates it is smaller than 0.9%. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. It was found that the parameterizations for neutron energy, quality factors and RBE were independent of proton energy in the investigated energy range of interest for proton therapy. The pencil beam algorithm has

  14. Evaluation of size dependent design shear strength of reinforced concrete beams without web reinforcement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Appa Rao; S S Injaganeri

    2011-06-01

    Analytical studies on the effect of depth of beam and several parameters on the shear strength of reinforced concrete beams are reported. A large data base available has been segregated and a nonlinear regression analysis (NLRA) has been performed for developing the refined design models for both, the cracking and the ultimate shear strengths of reinforced concrete (RC) beams without web reinforcement. The shear strength of RC beams is size dependent, which needs to be evaluated and incorporated in the appropriate size effect models. The proposed models are functions of compressive strength of concrete, percentage of flexural reinforcement and depth of beam. The structural brittleness of large size beams seems to be severe compared with highly ductile small size beams at a given quantity of flexural reinforcement. The proposed models have been validated with the existing popular models as well as with the design code provisions.

  15. Multichannel analyzer of energy spectra of a magnetized relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of a magnetic step-analyser of intense relativistic electron beam energy spectra is presented. The azimuthal magnetic field in the analyser is created by the current flowing through two coaxial cylinders. The particles move in the analyser along the trajectories, representing spirals with the pitch depending on the energy and rolled on the magnetic field spiral force lines. The magnetic analyser serviceability is demonstrated at the U-1 device with 1.1 MeV electron beam energy and 50 kA current. 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Evaluation of the energy dependence of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated beam tomography standards; Avaliacao da dependencia energetica de camaras de ionizacao do tipo lapis calibradas em feixes padroes de tomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: lpfontes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Instrument Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI - IPEN) performs calibrations of pencil-type ionization chambers (IC) used in measures of dosimetric survey on clinical systems of Computed Tomography (CT). Many users make mistakes when using a calibrated ionization chamber in their CT dosimetry systems. In this work a methodology for determination of factors of correction for quality (Kq) through the calibration curve that is specific for each ionization chamber was established. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate the energy dependence on an pencil-type Ionization Chamber(IC) calibrated at the LCI - IPEN. (author)

  17. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  18. Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kohley, Z; Baumann, T; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Jones, M; Smith, J K; Snyder, J; Spyrou, A; Thoennessen, M

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg + 9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model(CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive beam induced reactions.

  19. Evaluation of ion chamber dependent correction factors for ionisation chamber dosimetry in proton beams using a Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmans, H. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Biomedical Physics; Verhaegen, F.

    1995-12-01

    In the last decade, several clinical proton beam therapy facilities have been developed. To satisfy the demand for uniformity in clinical (routine) proton beam dosimetry two dosimetry protocols (ECHED and AAPM) have been published. Both protocols neglect the influence of ion chamber dependent parameters on dose determination in proton beams because of the scatter properties of these beams, although the problem has not been studied thoroughly yet. A comparison between water calorimetry and ionisation chamber dosimetry showed a discrepancy of 2.6% between the former method and ionometry following the ECHED protocol. Possibly, a small part of this difference can be attributed to chamber dependent correction factors. Indications for this possibility are found in ionometry measurements. To allow the simulation of complex geometries with different media necessary for the study of those corrections, an existing proton Monte Carlo code (PTRAN, Berger) has been modified. The original code, that applies Mollire`s multiple scattering theory and Vavilov`s energy straggling theory, calculates depth dose profiles, energy distributions and radial distributions for pencil beams in water. Comparisons with measurements and calculations reported in the literature are done to test the program`s accuracy. Preliminary results of the influence of chamber design and chamber materials on dose to water determination are presented.

  20. Evaluation of ion chamber dependent correction factors for ionisation chamber dosimetry in proton beams using a Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, several clinical proton beam therapy facilities have been developed. To satisfy the demand for uniformity in clinical (routine) proton beam dosimetry two dosimetry protocols (ECHED and AAPM) have been published. Both protocols neglect the influence of ion chamber dependent parameters on dose determination in proton beams because of the scatter properties of these beams, although the problem has not been studied thoroughly yet. A comparison between water calorimetry and ionisation chamber dosimetry showed a discrepancy of 2.6% between the former method and ionometry following the ECHED protocol. Possibly, a small part of this difference can be attributed to chamber dependent correction factors. Indications for this possibility are found in ionometry measurements. To allow the simulation of complex geometries with different media necessary for the study of those corrections, an existing proton Monte Carlo code (PTRAN, Berger) has been modified. The original code, that applies Mollire's multiple scattering theory and Vavilov's energy straggling theory, calculates depth dose profiles, energy distributions and radial distributions for pencil beams in water. Comparisons with measurements and calculations reported in the literature are done to test the program's accuracy. Preliminary results of the influence of chamber design and chamber materials on dose to water determination are presented

  1. Energy Dependent DVCS Cross Sections from JLab Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Charles; JLab Hall A Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    In 2010, in experiments E07-007 (hydrogen target) and E08-025 (deuterium target), the Jefferson Lab Hall A collaboration measured the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections at fixed xB = 0 . 36 , at Q2 = 1 . 5 , 1 . 75 , and 2 . 0 GeV2, and at two beam energies, 4.45 and 5.55 GeV. We detected the scattered electron in the Hall A High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS-L), and the coincidence photon in an upgraded 208 element PbF2 calorimeter. Exclusivity is inferred by missing mass in the (e ,e' γ) X reaction. In the unpolarized cross sections, the | DVCS | 2 and ℜe [DVCS† BH ] terms have different kinematic dependencies on the incident beam energy. I present preliminary results on the energy-dependence of the cross sections, and discuss their sensitivity to the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). US DOE, NSF, and French IN2P3 and ANR.

  2. Magnetoelastic beam with extended polymer for low frequency vibration energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Alwathiqbellah; Towfighian, Shahrzad; Younis, Mohammad; Su, Quang

    2016-04-01

    Ambient energy in the form of mechanical kinetic energy is mostly considered waste energy. The process of scavenging and storing such energy is known as energy harvesting. Energy harvesting from mechanical vibration is performed using resonant energy harvesters (EH) with two major goals: enhancing the power scavenged at low frequency sources of vibrations, and increasing the efficiency of scavenging energy by increasing the bandwidth near the resonant frequency. Toward such goals, we propose a piezoelectric EH of a composite cantilever beam with a tip magnet facing another magnet at a distance. The composite cantilever consists of a piezoelectric bimorph with an extended polymer material. With the effect of the nonlinearity of the magnetic force, higher amplitude can be achieved because of the generated bi-stability oscillations of the cantilever beam under harmonic excitation. The contribution of the this paper is to demonstrate lowering the achieved resonant frequency down to 17 Hz compared to 100 Hz for the piezoelectric bimorph beam without the extended polymer. Depending on the magnetic distance, the beam responses are divided to mono and bi-stable regions, for which we investigate static and dynamic behaviors. The dynamics of the system and the frequency and voltage responses of the beam are obtained using the shooting method.

  3. Computer simulations of a low energy proton beam tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhoretto, E.; Schelin, H.R.; Setti, J.A.P.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S.A.; Basilio, A.C.; Rocha, R.; Ribeiro Junior, S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial (CPGEI)]. E-mails: sergei@utfpr.edu.br; edneymilhoretto@yahoo.com; schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br; Evseev, I.; Yevseyeva, O. [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: evseev@iprj.uerj.br; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graducao em Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; Vinagre Filho, U.M. [Instituto de Energia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the recent development of a low energy proton beam tomograph. The proton tomograph prototype (involving UTFPR, UERJ, UFRJ and IEN/CNEN) has been installed and tested at the cyclotron CV-28 of IEN/CNEN. New computer simulations were performed in order to optimize the performance of the scattered proton beam and its aluminum collimator energy losses. The computer code simulates the tomographic measurements with two aluminum collimators (variable aperture from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm in diameter and variable thickness from 4 mm to 8 mm), a water phantom and a Si(Li) detector. The analysis of the exit beam energy spectra in comparison with a perfectly collimated proton beam made it possible to achieve the best quality of reconstructed tomographic images of water phantom. (author)

  4. CSR routine for low energy electron beam in GPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Particle Tracer (GPT) is a particle tracking code, which includes 3D space charge effect based on nonequidistant multigrid Poisson solver or point-to-point method. It is used to investigate beam dynamics in ERL and FEL injectors. We have developed a new routine to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in GPT based on the formalism of Sagan. The routine can calculate 1D-wake functions for arbitrary beam trajectories as well as CSR shielding effect. In particular, the CSR routine does not assume ultrarelativistic electron beam and is therefore applicable at low beam energies in the injector. Energy loss and energy spread caused by CSR effect were checked for a simple circular orbit, and compared with analytic formulas. (author)

  5. Preparation of a beam quality indicator for effective energy determinations of continuum beams: establishment of traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubayashi, M; Kobayashi, H

    1999-01-01

    A new beam quality indicator (BQI) was designed and fabricated to determine effective energies of beams extracted from neutron radiography facilities. Performances of the five new BQIs were compared with the original BQI which was recently proposed and tested by various beams. Non-filtered thermal neutrons, filtered thermal neutrons, and cold neutrons from a guide tube were used in the performance test program. The new BQIs were also examined by four different detection systems using a combination of a Gd converter and a X-ray film, a neutron imaging plate, a cooled charge coupled device camera, and a silicon intensified target tube camera.

  6. Transverse electric and transverse magnetic pulsed-beam decomposition of time-dependent aperture fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Timor; Abuhasira, Dor; Dayan, David

    2012-06-01

    The present contribution is concerned with applying beam-type expansion to a planar aperture time-dependent (TD) electromagnetic field in which the propagating elements, the electromagnetic pulsed-beams, are a priori decomposed into transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) field polarizations. The propagating field is described as a discrete superposition of tilted, shifted, and delayed TE and TM electromagnetic pulsed-beam propagators over the frame spectral lattice. These waveobjects are evaluated by using TD plane-wave spectral representations. Explicit asymptotic expressions for electromagnetic isodiffracting pulsed-quadratic beam propagators are presented, as well as a numerical example. PMID:22673443

  7. Results from the STAR Beam Energy Scan Program

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Lokesh

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of the beam energy scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) is to explore the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The specific physics goal is to search for the phase boundary and the QCD critical point. We present results from Au+Au collisions at various energies collected in the BES program by the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. First results on transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) spectra, $dN/dy$, and average transverse mass ($$) for identified hadrons produced at mid-rapidity for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 GeV are presented. Centrality dependence of $dN/dy$ and $$ are also discussed and compared to corresponding data from other energies. In addition, first results on charged hadron directed ($v_{1}$) and elliptic flow ($v_{2}$) for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 7.7, 11.5, and 39 GeV are presented. New results on event-by-event fluctuations (particle ratio, net-proton and net-charge higher moments) are presented for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 39 GeV.

  8. Beam energy scan using a viscous hydro+cascade model

    CERN Document Server

    Karpenko, Iu A; Huovinen, P; Petersen, H

    2013-01-01

    Following the experimental program at BNL RHIC, we perform a similar "energy scan" using 3+1D viscous hydrodynamics coupled to the UrQMD hadron cascade, and study the collision energy dependence of pion and kaon rapidity distributions and $m_T$-spectra, as well as charged hadron elliptic flow. To this aim the equation of state for finite baryon density from a Chiral model coupled to the Polyakov loop is employed for hydrodynamic stage. 3D initial conditions from UrQMD are used to study gradual deviation from boost-invariant scaling flow. We find that the inclusion of shear viscosity in the hydrodynamic stage of evolution consistently improves the description of the data for Pb-Pb collisions at CERN SPS, as well as of the elliptic flow measurements for Au-Au collisions in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at BNL RHIC. The suggested value of shear viscosity is $\\eta/s\\ge0.2$ for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=6.3\\dots39$ GeV.

  9. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  10. Upgrade of Beam Energy Measurement System at BEPC-II

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M N; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Pyata, E E; Mamoshkina, E V; Harris, F A

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance and profit for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. Many advanced techniques and precise instruments are employed to realize the highly accurate measurement of positron/electron beam energy. During five year's running period, in order to meet the requirement of data taking and improve the capacity of measurement itself, the upgradation of system is continued, which involve the component reformation of laser and optics subsystem, replacement of view-port of the laser to vacuum insertion subsystem, the purchase of electric cooling system for high purity germanium detector, and the improvement of data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrading of system guarantees the smooth and efficient measuring of beam energy at BEPC-II and accommodates the accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III.

  11. Beam dynamics and commissioning of low and medium energy H- beam at Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Satri, Masoomeh Yarmohammadi; Lamehi-Rachti , Mohammad

    The First step of the CERN Large Hadron Collider injectors upgrade (LIU) project is Linac4. It accelerates H- ions to 160 MeV in an 80 m long accelerator housed in a tunnel 12 m underground, presently under construction. It will replace the present 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector of the proton accelerator complex to increase the LHC luminosity. It consists of a 45 keV RF volume source, a twosolenoid Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 352.2 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating the beam to 3 MeV, a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The MEBT houses a fast chopper to selectively remove unwanted micro-bunches in the 352 MHz sequence and avoid losses at capture in the CERN PSB (1 MHz). After chopping, the beam acceleration continues by a 50 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a 100 MeV Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac and a Pi-Mode Structure bringing the beam to the final energy of 160 MeV. Linac4 has been commissioned with a temporary source up to 12 MeV. The beam commissioning stages of Linac4 in LEBT...

  12. Thermo-mechanical modelling of high energy particle beam impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Scapin, M; Dallocchio, A

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented energy intensities of modern hadron accelerators yield special problems with the materials that are placed close to or into the high intensity beams. The energy stored in LHC in a single beam is equivalent to about 80 kg of TNT explosive, stored in a transverse beam area of 0.2 mm×0.2 mm. The materials placed close to the beam are used at, or even beyond, their damage limits. However, it is very difficult to predict structural efficiency and robustness accurately: beam-induced damage occurs in a regime where practical experience does not exist. This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on a copper component due to the impact with a 7 TeV proton beam generated by LHC. The case study represents an accidental case consequent to an abnormal release of the beam, in which 8 bunches irradiate the target directly. The energy delivered on the component is calculated using the FLUKA code and then used as input in the numerical simulations, that are carried out via the FEM code LS-DYNA. ...

  13. On the propagation of a low energy oxygen ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positive ion beams, in the range from about tens eV to several hundred eV are frequently used in RIE and RIBE etching systems. The experimental limitations in this energy range are severe and there are still many unsolved problems. Optimal ion beam focusing and maximum current beam at the substrate target are assured by the adequate ion beam neutralization. The electrons from the target plasma and also the secondary ones resulted from the ion-grid and ion-neutral interactions form a negative space charge that is involved in the ion beam neutralization. After the extraction, both the angular divergence and damping of the beam are essential to settle the position of the substrate. The beam angular divergence is established by the ion trajectories in the extraction region and also is strongly influenced by the ion beam neutralization. The shape and thickness of the space charge near the grid, which in turn is determined by the beam intensity, grid characteristics and target plasma parameters is necessary to be investigated. Positive ion bombardment plays an important role in the plasma treatments of polymers. This was the reason that investigations about the surface modifications of polymers in a positive oxygen ion beam-low density plasma (IB-LDP) system were carried out by our group [2-6]. In such system the electrons of the low-density target plasma neutralize the positive space charge of the beam and also that brought by the beam onto the polymer (insulator) surface. Results concerning the investigations of the IB-LDP system, in oxygen, by Langmuir probe method, in different experimental conditions are given in the present paper. They are compared with those obtained by using Monte Carlo method for elementary processes (ion charge transfer, electronic ionisation) in 'particle in cell' numerical simulation. (authors)

  14. Energy Absorption Capacity of Composite Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Arivalagan; Kandasamy

    2009-01-01

    Local buckling may occur in the compression flange of rectangular hollow-section beams under cyclic repeated loadingarising from earthquakes. Once a local mechanism forms, residual strength rapidly reduces within a few cycles. This is trueeven for compact sections under static bending. This paper aims to study the experimental behaviour and ultimate momentcapacity of unfilled and concrete-filled rectangular hollow sections subjected to cyclic reversible loading. Two types offiller material we...

  15. PHENIX Experiment Results from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan Program

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The PHENIX Experiment at RHIC has conducted a beam energy scan at several collision energies in order to search for signatures of the QCD critical point and the onset of deconfinement. PHENIX has conducted measurements of transverse energy production, muliplicity fluctuations, the skewness and kurtosis of net charge distributions, Hanbury-Brown Twiss correlations, charged hadron flow, and energy loss. The data analyzed to date show no significant indications of the presence of the critical point.

  16. The Beam Energy Tracking System of the LHC Beam Dumping System

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, R A; Carlier, E; Gräwer, G; Voumard, N; Gjelsvik, R

    2005-01-01

    The LHC Beam Dumping System (LBDS) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will be installed around the straight section 6. It comprises per ring 15 horizontally deflecting extraction kickers, followed by 1 quadrupole, 15 vertically deflecting steel septum magnets, 10 dilution kickers and, in a separate cavern several hundred meters away, an external absorber assembly. A beam dump request can occur at any moment during the operation of the collider, from injection at 450 GeV up to top energy at 7 TeV. The Beam Energy Tracking System (BETS) monitors the deflection strength of each active element of the LBDS with respect to the beam energy in order to guarantee the correct extraction trajectory over the complete operational range and under all operational conditions. Its main functions are the acquisition of the beam energy, the generation of the kick strength reference signals for the extraction and dilution kickers, the continuous checking that the kicker high voltage generat...

  17. Analysis of polysilicon micro beams buckling with temperature-dependent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Shamshirsaz, M; Asgari, M B; Tayefeh, M

    2008-01-01

    The suspended electrothermal polysilicon micro beams generate displacements and forces by thermal buckling effects. In the previous electro-thermal and thermo-elastic models of suspended polysilicon micro beams, the thermo-mechanical properties of polysilicon have been considered constant over a wide rang of temperature (20- 900 degrees C). In reality, the thermo-mechanical properties of polysilicon depend on temperature and change significantly at high temperatures. This paper describes the development and validation of theoretical and Finite Element Model (FEM) including the temperature dependencies of polysilicon properties such as thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus. In the theoretical models, two parts of elastic deflection model and thermal elastic model of micro beams buckling have been established and simulated. Also, temperature dependent buckling of polysilicon micro beam under high temperature has been modeled by Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Analytical results and numerical results ...

  18. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  19. Low-Energy Electron Beam Direct Writing Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Takashi; Ando, Atsushi; Kotsugi, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Hidetoshi; Sugihara, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    We proposed an electron beam direct writing (EBDW) system capable of high throughput and maskless operation based on a novel concept of using both low-energy electron beam (EB) and character projection (CP) system. We fabricated an EB optical column of low-energy EBDW equipment and obtained a resist pattern. We also investigated the beam blur and line width roughness (LWR) of lines and spaces (L/S) formed on a resist to change various EB current densities and convergence half angles. The obtained results show that a Coulomb interaction effect markedly affects the beam blur in our EB optical column. Thus, we reduce the number of sources caused by LWR and developed photoresists to obtain small LWR L/S patterns for achieving a high throughput.

  20. Optimization of solenoid based low energy beam transport line for high current H+ beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, R.; Singh, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Roy, S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2015-02-01

    A 20 MeV, 30 mA CW proton linac is being developed at BARC, Mumbai. This linac will consist of an ECR ion source followed by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and Drift tube Linac (DTL). The low energy beam transport (LEBT) line is used to match the beam from the ion source to the RFQ with minimum beam loss and increase in emittance. The LEBT is also used to eliminate the unwanted ions like H2+ and H3+ from entering the RFQ. In addition, space charge compensation is required for transportation of such high beam currents. All this requires careful design and optimization. Detailed beam dynamics simulations have been done to optimize the design of the LEBT using the Particle-in-cell code TRACEWIN. We find that with careful optimization it is possible to transport a 30 mA CW proton beam through the LEBT with 100% transmission and minimal emittance blow up, while at the same time suppressing unwanted species H2+ and H3+ to less than 3.3% of the total beam current.

  1. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  2. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  3. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction. PMID:26628137

  4. Beam Intensity and Energy Control for the SPIRAL2 Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, C.; André, T.; Ducoudret, B.; Doutressoulles, C.; Le Coz, W.; Ledu, G.; Leloir, S.; Loret, S.

    2012-01-01

    TUPB029 - ISBN 878-3-95450-122-9 International audience The first part of the SPIRAL2 facility, which entered last year in the construction phase at GANIL in France, consists of an ion source, a deuteron and a proton source, a RFQ and a superconducting linear accelerator delivering high intensities, up to 5 mA and 40 MeV for the deuteron beams. Diagnostic developments have been done to control both beam intensity and energy by non-interceptive methods at the linac exit. The beam current...

  5. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Montag, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  6. High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-up

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

  7. High Energy Beam Impacts on Beam Intercepting Devices: Advanced Numerical Methods and Experimental Set-Up

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Timmins, M; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2011-01-01

    Beam Intercepting Devices are potentially exposed to severe accidental events triggered by direct impacts of energetic particle beams. State-of-the-art numerical methods are required to simulate the behaviour of affected components. A review of the different dynamic response regimes is presented, along with an indication of the most suited tools to treat each of them. The consequences on LHC tungsten collimators of a number of beam abort scenarios were extensively studied, resorting to a novel category of numerical explicit methods, named Hydrocodes. Full shower simulations were performed providing the energy deposition distribution. Structural dynamics and shock wave propagation analyses were carried out with varying beam parameters, identifying important thresholds for collimator operation, ranging from the onset of permanent damage up to catastrophic failure. Since the main limitation of these tools lies in the limited information available on constitutive material models under extreme conditions, a dedica...

  8. Energy dependence corrections to MOSFET dosimetric sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, T; Butson, M J; Yu, P K N

    2009-03-01

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET's) are dosimeters which are now frequently utilized in radiotherapy treatment applications. An improved MOSFET, clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) which utilizes improved packaging for the MOSFET device has been studied for energy dependence of sensitivity to x-ray radiation measurement. Energy dependence from 50 kVp to 10 MV x-rays has been studied and found to vary by up to a factor of 3.2 with 75 kVp producing the highest sensitivity response. The detectors average life span in high sensitivity mode is energy related and ranges from approximately 100 Gy for 75 kVp x-rays to approximately 300 Gy at 6 MV x-ray energy. The MOSFET detector has also been studied for sensitivity variations with integrated dose history. It was found to become less sensitive to radiation with age and the magnitude of this effect is dependant on radiation energy with lower energies producing a larger sensitivity reduction with integrated dose. The reduction in sensitivity is however approximated reproducibly by a slightly non linear, second order polynomial function allowing corrections to be made to readings to account for this effect to provide more accurate dose assessments both in phantom and in-vivo. PMID:19400548

  9. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  10. Energy dependence of hadronic observables in central Pb+Pb reactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, C; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2005-01-01

    In this contribution the energy dependence of various hadronic observables as measured by the NA49 experiment in the beam energy range between 20 and 158 AGeV is presented. These include m/sub t/ and rapidity distributions, particle ratio fluctuations, as well as HBT radii. The data are put in the context of results from the AGS and RHIC.

  11. Energy recuperation of intense proton beam compensated by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of direct transformation (recuperation) of intense ion beam energy are described. In a recuperator low-energy electrons of a beam are separated by a grid unit and ions are detected by one of the three types of collectors: plane, ''Faraday cylinder'' with a grid in the input hole and without it. The transformation of proton beam energy with current density up to 150 mA/cm2 at current pulse duration of 300 μ and power of ∼ 0.5 kW is realized with the efficiency of 70%, at power up to 30 kW - with the efficiency of about 50%. The investigation results can be used for the development of recuperation systems in thermonuclear facilities

  12. Modeling crossed-beam energy transfer for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, D. J. Y.; Debayle, A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-05-01

    We developed a numerical code that describes both the energy transfer occurring when two or more laser beams overlap in a weakly non-homogeneous plasma, and the beam energy losses associated with the electron-ion collisions. The numerical solutions are validated with both the exact analytical solutions in homogeneous plasmas, and with new approximate analytical solutions in non-homogeneous plasmas that include the aforementioned inverse bremsstrahlung effect. Comparisons with kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are satisfactory, provided the acoustic wave-breaking limit and the self-focusing regime are not reached. An application of the Cross-Beam Energy Transfer model is shown for a typical case of indirect-drive implosion in a gold hohlraum.

  13. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  14. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  15. Beam monitor system for high-energy beam transportation at HIMAC

    CERN Document Server

    Torikoshi, M; Takada, E; Kanai, T; Yamada, S; Ogawa, H; Okumura, K; Narita, K; Ueda, K; Mizobata, M

    1999-01-01

    Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) provides ion beams for radiotherapy of cancers and for other basic researches. High-energy beam transport lines deliver the beams to three treatment rooms and two experiment rooms with the aid of 41 beam monitor units. Each monitor unit consists of a wire grid as a profile monitor, or a combined unit in which the wire grid and a parallel plate ionization chamber are united for an additional measurement of a beam intensity. They are operated in a mixed gas of 80% Ar and 20% CO sub 2. The gas gain of the wire grid achieves about 8000 at an applied voltage of -2700 V. Dynamic ranges of the wire gird and the parallel plate ionization chamber were measured to be 8x10 sup 5 and 1x10 sup 6 in test using ion beams, respectively. A control system of these monitor units offers easy operation, so that operators are almost free from miss-operations. The monitor units are interlocked with a system which protects patients from the undesired irradiation. Five wire grids are use...

  16. Narrow beam dosimetry for high-energy hadrons and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, M; Ulrici, Luisa

    2001-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose were calculated with the latest version of the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA in the case of an anthropomorphic mathematical model exposed to monoenergetic narrow beams of protons, pions and electrons in the energy range 10°— 400 GeV. The target organs considered were right eye, thyroid, thymus, lung and breast. Simple scaling laws to the calculated values are given. The present data and formula should prove useful for dosimetric estimations in case of accidental exposures to high-energy beams.

  17. Mercuric iodide dosimeter response to high energy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewinger, E.; Nissenbaum, J.; Schieber, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide solid state dosimeter response to high energy electron beams of up to 35 MeV is reported. High sensitivity of up to 1.5 V/cGy was observed with a 200 V external bias, as well as several mV/cGy, with no external bias for small volume (approx. 10 mm/sup 3/) detectors. The physical characteristics of the detector response are discussed, showing the feasibility of mercuric iodide as a reliable dosimeter for high energy electron beams.

  18. Pump Intensity Dependence of Two-Beam Coupling in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nouel Y.Kamber; XU Jing-Jun; Sonia M. Mikha; SONG Feng; ZHANG Guo-Quan; ZHANG Xin-Zheng; LIU Si-Min; ZHANG Guang-Yin

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrated experimentally the dependence of two-beam coupling on the incident pump intensity in our samples of doped LiNbO3 crystals. Our results show that there is an optimum pump intensity for the signal beam amplification, which can be easily controlled by doping the LiNbO3 crystal with suitable concentrations of Fe and damage-resistant dopants such as Mg, In, and Zn.

  19. The high-energy dual-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal presents a new experimental facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) to study the effects of irradiation on the first wall and blanket materials of a fusion reactor. A special effort is made to demonstrate the advantages of the Dual Beam Technique (DBT) as a future research tool for materials development within the European Fusion Technology Programme. The Dual-Beam-Technique allows the production both of helium and of damage in thick metal and ceramic specimens by simultaneous irradiation with high energy alpha particles and protons produced by the two KfK cyclotrons. The proposal describes the Dual Beam Technique the planned experimental activities and the design features of the Dual Beam Facility presently under construction. (orig.)

  20. High-precision absolute measurement of CEBAF beam mean energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute measurement of the beam mean energy with an accuracy of one part in 104 or higher is an important demand of the CEBAF Hall A physics program. This accuracy may reduce the uncertainty in the d(e, e'p)p cross section δσ/σ to 1%. The need for such an accurately calibrated beam is not particular to CEBAF; at other electron facilities uncertainty in the incident energy has proven to be among the dominant sources of systematic error. The following methods for solving the problem were considered at both CEBAF and the Yerevan Physics Institute during 1990--1991: Backscattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by the relativistic electron beam. Calculations show that the intensity of the backscattered radiation in a bandwidth of 10-4 near the maximum frequency is about 1 photon per second at 4 GeV and 0.3 mA. Magnetic spectrometers performing as three- and four-magnet chicanes with appropriate detector systems. Such a system was used at SLAC for absolute measurement of the SLC beams energy, where a maximum accuracy of 5 x 10-4 was achieved. Calculations show that a similar accuracy can be achieved for the CEBAF beam in both proposed systems. Measurement of the vertical distribution of synchrotron radiation. Calculations indicate that precision of about 2.5 x 10-5 is achievable for CEBAF

  1. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  2. Several observables sensitive to the symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions induced by high energy radioactive beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Gao-Chan; Li Bao-An; Zuo Wei

    2005-01-01

    Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent hadronic transport model, effects of the symmetry energy on several observables in heavy-ion collisions induced by radioactive beams at intermediate energies are studied. It is found that rapidity distribution of the isospin asymmetry of nucleon emissions, transverse momentum distribution of the ratio of free neutrons to protons at mid-rapidity, kinetic energy distribution of the ratio of π-/π+ as well as evolution of the isospin fractionation are all sensitive to the symmetry energy.

  3. Energy dependence of thermoluminescent response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg and micro LiF:Mg,Ti in clinical beams of electrons by using different simulator objects; Dependencia energetica da resposta TL de dosimetros de CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg e microLiF:Mg,Ti em feixes clinicos de eletrons utilizando diferentes objetos simuladores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, Amanda; Campos, Leticia Lucente, E-mail: abravin@ipen.b, E-mail: rsakuraba@einstein.b, E-mail: lcrodri@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K.; Cruz, Jose Carlos da, E-mail: rsakuraba@einstein.b, E-mail: josecarlosc@einstein.b [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    Yet not so widely applied in radiotherapy, the calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) is used in radioprotection and studies has been demonstrated its great potential for the dosimetry in radiotherapy. This work evaluates the energy dependence of the thermoluminescent answer of the CaSO{sub 4}:D, LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and micro LiF:Mg,Ti in clinical beams of electrons by using water simulators, PMMA and solid water

  4. Temperature-dependent energy band gap variation in self-organized InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Inah [CEA/CNRS/UJF Joint Team ' ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors,' ' Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dong Song, Jin; Lee, Jungil [Nanophotonics Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-10

    We investigated the temperature-dependent variation of the photoluminescence emission energy of self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by conventional Stranski-Krastanov (SK) molecular beam epitaxy and migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MEMBE) and that of MEMBE InAs QDs in a symmetric and an asymmetric In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/GaAs well. The temperature-dependent energy variation of each QD is analyzed in low and high temperature regions, including a sigmoidal behavior of conventional SK quantum dots with the well-known Varshni and semi-empirical Fan models.

  5. High energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of high-energy beams of radioactive species is the most recent advancement in the field of accelerator physics. One of the primary interactions experienced by relativistic heavy ions is the peripheral nuclear collision. Thus, radioactive nuclei are produced as secondary particles from peripheral nuclear fragmentation reactions. These nuclei have trajectories and energies differing little from that of the parent particle. Various radioactive beams produced as a result of these reactions, now available on a regular basis from the Bevalac, are: 11C, 13N, 15O, and 19Ne with sufficient intensity. Besides the interest in such beams for nuclear physics, important applications in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology and in nuclear medicine are discussed

  6. Focal plane internal energy flows of singular beams in astigmatically aberrated low numerical aperture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Monika; Senthilkumaran, P

    2014-09-01

    Singular beams have circulating energy components. When such beams are focused by low numerical aperture systems suffering from astigmatic aberration, these circulating energy components get modified. The phase gradient introduced by this type of aberration splits the higher charge vortices. The dependence of the charge, the aberration coefficient, and the size of the aperture on the nature of the splitting process are reported in this paper. The transverse components of the Poynting vector fields that can be derived from the phase gradient vector field distributions are further decomposed into solenoidal and irrotational components using the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition method. The solenoidal components relate to the orbital angular momentum of the beams, and the irrotational components are useful in the transport of intensity equations for phase retrieval.

  7. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis of Corrected Flexural Waves in Timoshenko Beam – Part II: Application to Coupled Timoshenko Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Park

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodology for the energy flow analysis of coupled Timoshenko beam structures and various numerical applications to verify the developed methodology. To extend the application of the energy flow model for corrected flexural waves in the Timoshenko beam, which is developed in the other companion paper, to coupled structures, the wave transmission analyses of general coupled Timoshenko beam systems are performed. First, power transmission and reflection coefficients for all kinds of propagating waves in the general, coupled Timoshenko beam structures are derived by the wave transmission approach. In numerical applications, the energy flow solutions using the derived coefficients agree well with the classical solutions for various exciting frequencies, damping loss factors, and coupled Timoshenko beam structures. Additionally, the numerical results for the Timoshenko beam are compared with those for the Euler-Bernoulli beam.

  8. [Spin dependent phenomena in medium energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Syracuse University Medium Energy Physics Group was actively engaged in several research projects. A laser was used to polarize muonic atoms with the goal of measuring fundamental spin-dependent parameters in the reaction μ- + 3He → 3H + ν. Time-averaged polarizations of 26.8±2.3% were achieved for the muon in muonic 3He. The new approach uses atomic spin-dependent reactions between laser polarized Rb vapor and muonic helium. To exploit these high polarizations in a muon capture experiment an ion chamber which will detect the recoil tritons and also serve as a polarizing cell. Final data-taking will begin for an experiment to measure the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron. A 288-element hodoscope system which features good timing and precise mechanical tolerances was constructed and evaluated

  9. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  10. Automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jayapandian, J; Amarendra, G; Venugopal-Rao, G; Purniah, B; Viswanathan, B

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting the special BIOS interrupt (INT 1CH) of PC in conjunction with a compatible high-voltage controller card and menu-driven control program, we report here the automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments. The beam experiment consists of monitoring the Doppler broadening lineshape parameters corresponding to the annihilation 511 keV gamma-ray at various positron beam implantation energies. The variation and monitoring of the sample high voltage, which determines positron beam energy, is carried out using a controller add-on card coupled to a 0-30 kV high-voltage unit. The design features of this controller card are discussed. This controller card is housed in a PC, which also houses a multichannel analyser (MCA) card. The MCA stores the Doppler energy spectrum of the annihilation gamma-ray. The interactive control program, written in Turbo C, carries out the assigned tasks. The design features of the automation and results are presented.

  11. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; Denis, A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  12. Recent applications of low energy electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is obvious that radiation processing reduces energy consumption and avoids pollution because the coatings are solventless; but as important these factors may be, they alone do not justify the investment of an electron beam accelerator. With a few examples from the industry, motivations of users to choose electron processing is explained. (author)

  13. High energy physics with polarized beams and targets. [65 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshak, M L [ed.

    1976-01-01

    Sixty-six papers are presented as a report on conference sessions held from August 23-27, 1976, at Argonne National Laboratory. Topics covered include: (1) strong interactions; (2) weak and electromagnetic interactions; (3) polarized beams; and (4) polarized targets. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and for the INIS Atomindex. (PMA)

  14. Solar Power Satellites: Creating the Market for Beamed Energy Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Beamed energy advocates must investigate the potential of major markets like space based solar satellites and space-based nuclear waste disposal. For BEP to succeed, its proponents must work with these possible users to generate interest and resources needed to develop BEP.

  15. Solar Power Satellites: Creating the Market for Beamed Energy Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamed energy advocates must investigate the potential of major markets like space based solar satellites and space-based nuclear waste disposal. For BEP to succeed, its proponents must work with these possible users to generate interest and resources needed to develop BEP.

  16. Energy spread of ion beams passing a gas stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, B.; Kalbitzer, S.; Klatt, Ch.

    1997-05-01

    Since the energy spread of accelerated particle beams is not well known for tandem-type machines, we have measured current-energy distributions for a variety of ion beams delivered by our 3 MV tandem at varying stripper gas pressure. The energy widths of light ions produced from injected negatively charged atoms, such as H - and Fe -, are mainly due to the accelerating voltage ripple, whereas for heavier ions, such as C - and F -, energy straggling in the stripper gas dominates. In case of injected negatively charged molecules, such as NH 2- and CN -, Coulomb explosion in the gas stripper produces satellite peaks on both sides of the unshifted central line. These deviations from Gaussian line shape complicate precise lineshape analyses, as, for example, required in nuclear reaction Doppler spectrometry of vibrational states in target materials. The most relevant charge-exchange processes in the stripper gas will be discussed in some detail.

  17. Vibration piezoelectric energy harvester with multi-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yan, E-mail: yanc@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, Qunying, E-mail: zhangqunying89@126.com; Yao, Minglei, E-mail: yaomingleiok@126.com [Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-traditional Machining Technology of the Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, Liaoning Province (China); Dong, Weijie, E-mail: dongwj@dlut.edu.cn [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian, Liaoning Province (China); Gao, Shiqiao, E-mail: gaoshq@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081, Beijing Province (China)

    2015-04-15

    This work presents a novel vibration piezoelectric energy harvester, which is a micro piezoelectric cantilever with multi-beam. The characteristics of the PZT (Pb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3}) thin film were measured; XRD (X-ray diffraction) pattern and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) image of the PZT thin film were measured, and show that the PZT (Pb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3}) thin film is highly (110) crystal oriented; the leakage current is maintained in nA magnitude, the residual polarisation Pr is 37.037 μC/cm{sup 2}, the coercive field voltage Ec is 27.083 kV/cm, and the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} is 28 pC/N. In order to test the dynamic performance of the energy harvester, a new measuring system was set up. The maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam can achieve 80.78 mV under an acceleration of 1 g at 260 Hz of frequency; the maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam is almost 20 mV at 1400 Hz frequency. .

  18. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  19. Vibration piezoelectric energy harvester with multi-beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel vibration piezoelectric energy harvester, which is a micro piezoelectric cantilever with multi-beam. The characteristics of the PZT (Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47O3 thin film were measured; XRD (X-ray diffraction pattern and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope image of the PZT thin film were measured, and show that the PZT (Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47O3 thin film is highly (110 crystal oriented; the leakage current is maintained in nA magnitude, the residual polarisation Pr is 37.037 μC/cm2, the coercive field voltage Ec is 27.083 kV/cm, and the piezoelectric constant d33 is 28 pC/N. In order to test the dynamic performance of the energy harvester, a new measuring system was set up. The maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam can achieve 80.78 mV under an acceleration of 1 g at 260 Hz of frequency; the maximum output voltage of the single beam of the multi-beam is almost 20 mV at 1400 Hz frequency.

  20. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report summarizes research activities carried out in 1988 in the framework of the government-funded program 'High Energy Density in Matter produced by Heavy Ion Beams'. It addresses fundamental problems of the generation of heavy ion beams and the investigation of hot dense plasmas produced by these beams. Its initial motivation and its long-term goal is the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion by intense heavy ion beams. Two outstanding events deserve to be mentioned explicity, the Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Conference held in Darmstadt and organized by GSI end of June and the first heavy ion beam injected into the new SIS facility in November. The former event attracted more than hundred scientists for three days to the 4th Conference in this field. This symposium showed the impressive progress since the last conference in Washington two years ago. In particular the first beams in MBE-4 at LBL and results of beam plasma interaction experiments at GSI open new directions for future investigations. The ideas for non-Lionvillean injection into storage rings presented by Carlo Rubbia will bring the discussion of driver scenarios into a new stage. The latter event is a milestone for both machine and target experiments. It characterizes the beginning of the commissioning phase for the new SIS/ESR facility which will be ready for experiments at the end of this year. The commissioning of SIS is on schedule and first experiments can start at the beginning of 1990. A status report of the accelerator project is included. Theoretical activities were continued as in previous years, many of them providing guide lines for future experiments, in particular for the radiation transport aspects and for beam-plasma interaction. (orig.)

  1. Self-similarity of negative particle production from the Beam Energy Scan Program at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V

    2015-01-01

    We present the spectra of negative charged particle production in Au+Au collisions from STAR for the first phase of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan Program measured over a wide range of collision energy sqrt s{NN}=7.7-200 GeV, and transverse momentum of produced particle in different centralities at |eta|<0.5. The spectra demonstrate strong dependence on collision energy which enhances with pT. An indication of self-similarity of negative charged particle production in Au+Au collisions is found. The constituent energy loss as a function of energy and centrality of collisions and transverse momentum of inclusive particle was estimated in the $z$-scaling approach. The energy dependence of the model parameters - the fractal and fragmentation dimensions and "specific heat", was studied.

  2. Probing dark energy through scale dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Mariele; Sawicki, Ignacy; Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2013-12-01

    We consider the consequences of having no prior knowledge of the true dark energy model for the interpretation of cosmological observations. The magnitude of redshift-space distortions and weak-lensing shear is determined by the metric on the geodesics of which galaxies and light propagate. We show that, given precise enough observations, we can use these data to completely reconstruct the metric on our past light cone and therefore to measure the scale and time dependence of the anisotropic stress and the evolution of the gravitational potentials in a model-independent manner. Since both dark matter and dark energy affect the visible sector only through the gravitational field they produce, they are inseparable without a model for dark energy: galaxy bias cannot be measured and therefore the distribution of dark matter determined; the peculiar velocity of dark matter can be identified with that of the galaxies only when the equivalence principle holds. Given these limitations, we show how one can nonetheless build tests for classes of dark energy models which depend on making measurements at multiple scales at a particular redshift. They are null tests on the model-independent observables, do not require modeling evolution in time, and do not require any parametrization of the free functions of these models—such as the sound speed. We show that one in principle could rule out or constrain the whole class of the most general scalar-tensor theories even without assuming the quasistatic limit.

  3. High-Energy Electron Beam Application to Air Pollutants Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of electron beam (EB) process in pollutants removal is connected to its high efficiency to transfer high amount of energy directly into the matter under treatment. Disadvantage which is mostly related to high investment cost of accelerator may be effectively overcome in future as the result of use accelerator new developments. The potential use of medium to high-energy high power EB accelerators for air pollutants removal is demonstrated in [1]. The lower electrical efficiencies of accelerators with higher energies are partially compensated by the lower electron energy losses in the beam windows. In addition, accelerators with higher electron energies can provide higher beam powers with lower beam currents [1]. The total EB energy losses (backscattering, windows and in the intervening air space) are substantially lower with higher EB incident energy. The useful EB energy is under 50% for 0.5 MeV and about 95% above 3 MeV. In view of these arguments we decided to study the application of high energy EB for air pollutants removal. Two electron beam accelerators are available for our studies: electron linear accelerators ALIN-10 and ALID-7, built in the Electron Accelerator Laboratory, INFLPR, Bucharest, Romania. Both accelerators are of traveling-wave type, operating at a wavelength of 10 cm. They utilize tunable S-band magnetrons, EEV M 5125 type, delivering 2 MW of power in 4 μ pulses. The accelerating structure is a disk-loaded tube operating in the 2 mode. The optimum values of the EB peak current IEB and EB energy EEB to produce maximum output power PEB for a fixed pulse duration EB and repetition frequency fEB are as follows: for ALIN-10: EEB = 6.23 MeV; IEB =75 mA; PEB 164 W (fEB = 100 Hz, EB = 3.5 s) and for ALID-7: EEB 5.5 MeV; IEB = 130 mA; PEB = 670 W (fEB = 250 Hz, EB = 3.75 s). This paper presents a special designed installation, named SDI-1, and several representative results obtained by high energy EB application to SO2, NOx and VOCs

  4. Beam loading compensation of traveling wave linacs through the time dependence of the rf drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam loading in traveling-wave linear accelerating structures leads to unacceptable spread of particle energies across an extended train of bunched particles due to beam-induced field and dispersion. Methods for modulating the rf power driving linacs are effective at reducing energy spread, but for general linacs do not have a clear analytic foundation. We report here methods for calculating how to modulate the rf drive in arbitrarily nonuniform traveling-wave linacs within the convective-transport (power-diffusion) model that results in no additional energy spread due to beam loading (but not dispersion). Varying group velocity, loss factor, and cell quality factor within a structure, and nonzero particle velocity, are handled.

  5. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, D. [Fermilab; Bao, Y. [UC, Riverside; Hansen, G. [UC, Riverside

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  6. Phase rotation of muon beams for producing intense low-energy muon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Neuffer, D; Hansen, G

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  7. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams.

  8. Energy Dependence of Nuclear Transparency in C(p,2p) Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Leksanov, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Makdisi, Y.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Malki, A.; Nicholson, H.

    2001-01-01

    The transparency of carbon for (p,2p) quasi-elastic events was measured at beam energies ranging from 6 to 14.5 GeV at 90 degrees c.m. The four momentum transfer squared q*q ranged from 4.8 to 16.9 (GeV/c)**2. We present the observed energy dependence of the ratio of the carbon to hydrogen cross sections. We also apply a model for the nuclear momentum distribution of carbon to normalize this transparency ratio. We find a sharp rise in transparency as the beam energy is increased to 9 GeV and ...

  9. Some probe experiments on a high energy cesium ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubach, R. A.; Peppin, G. B.

    1963-03-31

    A probe has been developed which is, in effect, a directional Langmuir probe. The directional quality is necessary for use in a beam of high energy ions to eliminate the effects of the streaming ions on the probe operation. This probe has been utilized to measure the back-streaming (albedo) electron component to verify the bottle model of space-charge neutralization. It has also been possible to infer the density of slow ions in the beam created by gas ionization and to infer a value of the cross section for such gas ionization which .agrees with the anticipated value. (auth)

  10. Energy harvesting under excitation of clamped-clamped beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Ashok; Alomari, Almuatasim; Aggarwal, Mohan; Bandyopadhyay, Alak

    2016-04-01

    In this article, a piezoelectric energy harvesting has been developed experimentally and theoretically based on Euler- Bernoulli Theory. A PVDF piezoelectric thick film has attached along of clamped-clamped beam under sinusoidal base excitation of shaker. The results showed a good agreement between the experimental and simulation of suggested model. The voltage output frequency response function (FRF), current FRF, and output power has been studied under short and open circuit conditions at first vibration mode. The mode shape of the clamped-clamped beam for first three resonance frequency has been modeled and investigated using COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB.

  11. The production and use of ultralow energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R. D.; Armour, D. G.; van den Berg, J. A.; Cook, C. E. A.; Whelan, S.; Zhang, S.; Knorr, N.; Foad, M. A.; Ohno, H.

    2000-02-01

    An ion accelerator, purpose built to produce beams at energies down to 10 eV with current densities in the 10-100 μA cm-2 range, is described. Fitted with dual ion source assemblies, the machine enables ultralow energy ion implantation and the growth of films and multilayers to be carried out under highly controlled conditions. The accelerator delivers ion beams into an ultrahigh vacuum chamber, containing a temperature controlled target stage (range -120 to +1350 °C), where they are used to study the fundamental physics relating to the interaction of ultralow energy ions with surfaces. This knowledge underlies a wide range of ion-beam and plasma-based technologies and, to illustrate its importance, results are presented from investigations designed to determine the optimum conditions for the growth of diamond-like and aluminum films by ion-beam deposition and the formation of ultrashallow junctions in semiconductors by 2.5 keV As+ implantation. The later investigation shows how transient arsenic diffusion, which occurs during post-implant thermal processing, can be controlled by manipulating the substrate temperature during implantation.

  12. Intermediate-energy neutron beam for NCT at MURR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of the high-flux reactors in the USA and it can be used to produce an intense beam of intermediate-energy neutrons for neutron capture therapy. Two methods are being evaluated at MURR to produce such a beam. The first uses a moderator of Al2O3 replacing part of the graphite and water on one side of the core of the reactor to produce a source of predominantly intermediate-energy neutrons. The second method is a filter of 238U between the core and the patient position to pass only intermediate-energy neutrons. The results of these evaluations are presented in this paper along with an outline of the other resources at the University of Missouri-Columbia that are available to support an NCT program. 4 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  13. An energy-based beam hardening model in tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteele, E van de; Dyck, D van; Sijbers, J; Raman, E [Vision Lab, Physics Departement, University of Antwerp (RUCA) (Belgium)

    2002-12-07

    As a consequence of the polychromatic x-ray source, used in micro-computer tomography ({mu}CT) and in medical CT, the attenuation is no longer a linear function of absorber thickness. If this nonlinear beam hardening effect is not compensated, the reconstructed images will be corrupted by cupping artefacts. In this paper, a bimodal energy model for the detected energy spectrum is presented, which can be used for reduction of artefacts caused by beam hardening in well-specified conditions. Based on the combination of the spectrum of the source and the detector efficiency, the assumption is made that there are two dominant energies which can describe the system. The validity of the proposed model is examined by fitting the model to the experimental datapoints obtained on a microtomograph for different materials and source voltages.

  14. A Beam Interlock System for CERN High Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (The European Organisation for Nuclear Research) is one of the largest and most complicated machines envisaged to date. The LHC has been conceived and designed over the course of the last 25 years and represents the cutting edge of accelerator technology with a collision energy of 14TeV, having a stored beam energy over 100 times more powerful than the nearest competitor. Commissioning of the machine is already nderway and operation with beam is intended for Autumn 2007, with 7TeV operation expected in 2008. The LHC is set to answer some of the fundemental questions in theoretical physics, colliding particles with such high energy that the inner workings of the quantum world can be revealed. Colliding particles together at such high energy makes very high demands on machine operation and protection. The specified beam energy requires strong magnetic fields that are made in superconducting dipole magnets, these magnets are kept only around two degrees above absolute zero...

  15. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm2 field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to Dmax for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts

  16. The Energy Dependence of the Saturation Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, M

    2006-01-01

    At low $x \\cong Q^2/W^2 << 1$, in deep inelastic scattering, the photon fluctuates into a $q \\bar q$ vector state that interacts via two gluons with the proton. The energy dependence is determined by the saturation scale, in our approach given by $\\Lambda^2_{sat} (W^2) \\sim (W^2)^{C_2}$. Imposing DGLAP evolution, we find $C_2^{theory} = 0.27$ in agreement with the model-independent analysis of the HERA data. Different values of the exponent $C_2$ are correlated with different ratios of the longitudinal to transverse structure function. This stresses the need for experiments to separate longitudinal and transverse contributions in deep inelastic scattering.

  17. Interaction of turbulence with flexible beams in fluidic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh Yazdi, Amir Hossein

    Advances in the development and fabrication of microelectronics have enhanced the energy efficiency of these devices to such an extent that they can now operate at very low power levels, typically on the order of a few microwatts or less. Batteries are primarily thought of as the most convenient source of power for electronic devices, but in instances where a device needs to be deployed in a difficult-to-access location such as under water, the added weight and especially maintenance of such a power source becomes costly. A solution that avoids this problem and is particularly attractive in a "deploy & forget" setting involves designing a device that continuously harvests energy from the surrounding environment. Piezoelectric energy harvesters, which employ the direct piezoelectric effect to convert mechanical strain into electrical energy, have garnered a great deal of attention in the literature. This work presents an overview of the experimental and analytical results related to fluidic energy extraction from vortex and turbulent flow using piezoelectric cantilever beams. In particular, the development of the FTGF (Fourier Transform-Green's Function) solution approach to the coupled, continuous electromechanical equations governing piezoelectric cantilever beams and the associated TFB (Train of Frozen Boxcars) method, which models the flow of vortices and turbulent eddies over the beams, is discussed. In addition, the behavior of fluidic energy harvesters in decaying isotropic, homogeneous grid turbulence generated by passive, semi-passive and active grids is examined and a novel grid-turbulence forcing model is introduced. An expression for the expected power output of the piezoelectric beam is obtained by utilizing this forcing function model in the single degree-of-freedom electromechanical equations. Furthermore, approximate, closed-form solutions to the theoretical expected power are derived from deterministic turbulence forcing models and are compared with

  18. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raparia, D., E-mail: raparia@bnl.gov; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11786 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  19. Selective in-plane nitrogen doping of graphene by an energy-controlled neutral beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takeru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene promises to improve current electronic devices, sensors, and energy-based devices. To this end, the bonding states between carbon and nitrogen atoms can be manipulated to tailor the properties of the doped graphene. For example, graphitic nitrogen is known to promote desired catalytic activities in graphene fuel-cell systems, resulting from a four-electron reaction. However, established nitrogen-doping methods lack selectivity in dopant chemical identity and in dopant location; both are key factors in graphene property design because the properties depend on the chemical identity and location of the dopant. Here, we utilize a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) technique-with exquisite beam energy control-to dope graphene with nitrogen. Using x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopy, we show that the energy of the nitrogen NB not only determines the chemistry of the nitrogen dopant introduced to graphene, but it also dictates the doping locations within graphene layers. PMID:26559390

  20. Modeling of energy transfer between two crossing smoothed laser beams in a plasma with flow profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaitis, A.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Pesme, D.; Duchateau, G.; Porzio, A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the crossed beam energy transfer (CBET) between laser fields generated by optical smoothing methods. The energy transfer, as well as the angular distribution of the outgoing light fields are investigated for two incident smoothed laser beams in a plasma with a flow gradient, allowing for resonant transfer close to the sonic point. Simulations with the code HARMONY based on time-dependent paraxial light propagation are compared to simulations using a new approach based on paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO). Both approaches show good agreement for the average energy transfer past a short transient period, which is a promising result for the use of the PCGO method as a module within a hydrodynamics code to efficiently compute CBET in mm-scale plasma configurations. Statistical aspects related to role of laser speckles in CBET are considered via an ensemble of different phase plate realizations.

  1. Internal energy flows of coma-affected singular beams in low-numerical-aperture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Monika; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Senthilkumaran, P

    2015-04-01

    The circulating phase gradient component of a singular beam gets modified when focused by a low-numerical-aperature system suffering from coma aberration. The gradient due to this coma aberration splits the higher charge vortex into elementary vortices and distributes them spatially. This splitting depends on the charge and polarity of the incident singular beam as well as the sign and magnitude of the aberration coefficient. The transverse component of the Poynting vector field distribution at the focal plane is decomposed into the curl or solenoidal component and divergence or irrotational component using the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition technique. The solenoidal component that relates to the orbital angular momentum carries the circulating energy, while the irrotational component shows the sources and sinks of the energy. Intriguing results of the study of energy flow around the edge dislocations apart from the point phase defects in the irrotational components are also presented.

  2. Electrical and optoelectrical modification of cadmium sulfide nanobelts by low-energy electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Liu, Manman; Zhao, Mei; Dong, Youqing; Zou, Chao; Yang, Keqin; Yang, Yun; Huang, Shaoming; Zhu, Da-Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we describe a method for modifying electrical and optoelectrical properties of CdS nanobelts using low-energy (lower than 10 keV) e-beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The electrical conductivity of the nanobelts was dramatically improved via the irradiation of e-beams. The modified conductivity of the nanobelts depends on the energy of the e-beam; it exhibits a larger photocurrent and higher external quantum efficiency but slower time-response than that before the modification. A possible mechanism about the modification is the increase of electron accumulation (injected electrons) in the nanobelts due to e-beam irradiation. In addition, the optoelectrical modification could be caused by the trapped electrons in the nanobelts and the decrease of contact resistance between the nanobelts and metal electrodes induced by e-beam irradiation. The results of this work are significant for the in situ study of semiconductor nanostructures in the electron microscope. Besides, the method of electrical and optoelectrical modification presented here has potential application in electronics and optoelectronics.

  3. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  4. Energy composition of high-energy neutral beams on the COMPASS tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitosinkova Klara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS tokamak is equipped with two identical neutral beam injectors (NBI for additional plasma heating. They provide a beam of deuterium atoms with a power of up to ~(2 × 300 kW. We show that the neutral beam is not monoenergetic but contains several energy components. An accurate knowledge of the neutral beam power in each individual energy component is essential for a detailed description of the beam- -plasma interaction and better understanding of the NBI heating processes in the COMPASS tokamak. This paper describes the determination of individual energy components in the neutral beam from intensities of the Doppler-shifted Dα lines, which are measured by a high-resolution spectrometer viewing the neutral beam-line at the exit of NBI. Furthermore, the divergence of beamlets escaping single aperture of the last accelerating grid is deduced from the width of the Doppler-shifted lines. Recently, one of the NBI systems was modified by the removal of the Faraday copper shield from the ion source. The comparison of the beam composition and the beamlet divergence before and after this modification is also presented.

  5. Probing Dark Energy through Scale Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Mariele; Saltas, Ippocratis D; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We consider the consequences of having no prior knowledge of the true dark energy model for the interpretation of cosmological observations. The magnitude of redshift-space distortions and weak-lensing shear is determined by the metric on the geodesics of which galaxies and light propagate. We show that, given precise enough observations, we can use these data to completely reconstruct the metric on our past lightcone and therefore to measure the scale- and time-dependence of the anisotropic stress and the evolution of the gravitational potentials in a model-independent manner. Since both dark matter and dark energy affect the visible sector only through the gravitational field they produce, they are inseparable without a model for dark energy: galaxy bias cannot be measured and therefore the distribution of dark matter determined; the peculiar velocity of dark matter can be identified with that of the galaxies only when the equivalence principle holds. Given these limitations, we show how one can nonetheless...

  6. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kumar; G Rodrigues; U K Rao; C P Safvan; D Kanjilal; A Roy

    2002-11-01

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion beams ranging from a few keV to a few MeV for research in materials sciences, atomic and molecular physics is described. One of the important features of this facility is the availability of relatively large currents of multiply charged positive ions from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source placed entirely on a high voltage platform. All the electronic and vacuum systems related to the ECR source including 10 GHz ultra high frequency (UHF) transmitter, high voltage power supplies for extractor and Einzel lens are placed on a high voltage platform. All the equipments are controlled using a personal computer at ground potential through optical fibers for high voltage isolation. Some of the experimental facilities available are also described.

  7. Size-dependent crystalline fluctuation and growth mechanism of bismuth nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sujuan; Jiang, Yi; Hu, Lijun; Sun, Jianguo; Wan, Piaopiao; Sun, Lidong

    2016-06-01

    Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non-crystalline one. This is promising for applications in nanofabrication where high quality interfaces are desired between two joining parts.Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non

  8. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2014-01-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  9. Time-dependent behavior of RC beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates: interfacial stresses analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyoucef, S.; Tounsi, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Adda Bedia, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    External bonding of fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites has becomes a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. An important failure mode of such strengthened members is the debonding of the FRP plate from the concrete due to high interfacial stresses near the plate ends. For correctly installed FRP plate, failure will occur within the concrete. Accurate predictions of the interfacial stresses are prerequisite for designing against debonding failures. In particular, the interfacial stresses between a beam and soffit plate within the linear elastic range have been addressed by numerous analytical investigations. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of RC beams bonded with thin composite plate was investigated theoretically by including the effect of the adherend shear deformations. The time effects considered here are those that arise from shrinkage and creep deformations of the concrete. This paper presents an analytical model for the interfacial stresses between RC beam and a thin FRP plate bonded to its soffit. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative to the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the beams is taken into account. Numerical results from the present analysis are presented to illustrate the significance of time-dependent of adhesive stresses.

  10. Upgrade of beam energy measurement system at BEPC-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Cai, Xiao; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M. N.; Krasnov, A. A.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Pyata, E. E.; Mamoshkina, E. V.; Harris, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. In order to meet the requirements of data taking and improve the measurement accuracy, the system has continued to be upgraded, which involves the updating of laser and optics subsystems, replacement of a view-port of the laser to the vacuum insertion subsystem, the use of an electric cooling system for a high purity germanium detector, and improvement of the data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrade system guarantees the smooth and efficient measurement of beam energy at BEPC-II and enables accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)(11375206, 10775142, 10825524, 11125525, 11235011), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856700, 2015CB856705), State key laboratory of particle and detection and electronics; and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP); the RFBR grant(14-02-00129-a), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, part of this work related to the design of ZnSe viewports is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (14-50-00080)

  11. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  12. Two-beam type IH-RFQ linear accelerator for low-energy and high intensity heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a two-beam type IH-RFQ (Interdigital H type Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac system to proof the principle of a multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac in Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology. The multi-beam type RFQ linac has several beam channels in a cavity for accelerating high intensity and low energy heavy ion beams. The developed system consists of a two-beam type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multi-beam type cavity, a two-beam type laser ion source with DPIS (Direct Plasma Injection Scheme) and beam analyzers mainly. A a result of the beam acceleration test, the linac system accelerates carbon ions from 5 keV/u to 60 keV/u and generates about 108 mA (2x54 mA/channel) in the total output current. In this paper, we describe the development of the linac system and some results of the beam acceleration test. (author)

  13. Attacking practical quantum key distribution system with wavelength dependent beam splitter and multi-wavelength sources

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hong-Wei; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Li, Fang-Yi; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Guang-Can; Bao, Wan-Su; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Unconditional security of quantum key distribution protocol can be guaranteed by the basic property of quantum mechanics. Unfortunately, the practical quantum key distribution system always have some imperfections, and the practical system may be attacked if the imperfection can be controlled by the eavesdropper Eve. Applying the fatal security loophole introduced by the imperfect beam splitter's wavelength dependent optical property, we propose wavelength-dependent attacking model, which can be applied to almost all practical quantum key distribution systems with the passive state modulation and photon state detection after the practical beam splitter. Utilizing our attacking model, we experimentally demonstrate the attacking system based on practical polarization encoding quantum key distribution system with almost 100% success probability. Our result demonstrate that all practical devices require tightened security inspection for avoiding side channel attacks in practical quantum key distribution experimen...

  14. Study of Effect of Ion Source Energy Spread on RFQ Beam Dynamics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A

    2013-01-01

    With an upgrade to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at REX under consideration a study was launched in order to understand the effect of an increased energy spread from the ion source on the beam dynamics of the RFQ. Due to the increased electron beam potential needed to achieve the upgrade’s charge breeding specification it is expected that the energy spread of the beam will increase from today’s estimated value of approximately +-0.1%. It is shown through beam dynamics simulations that the energy spread can be increased to +-1% without significant degradation of the beam quality output by the RFQ.

  15. Ultraviolet energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolschin, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(s_NN/s_0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence proportional to ln^3(s_NN/s_0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The production of particles with pseudorapidities beyond the beam rapidity is also discussed.

  16. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  17. Wavelength Dependence of a Two-Beam Coupling Measurement on a Fully Functional Photorefractive Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张波; Geon Joon Lee; 刘慧; 龚旗煌; Jiwon Sohn; Jaehoon Hwang; Soo Young Park; Jin-Kyung Lee; Jai-Hyung Lee; Joon-Sung Chang

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the photorefractive properties of a fully functional polymer, 9-(2-Ethyl-hexyl)-3-[2-(4-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)vinyl]-9H-carbazole, using a multiline He-Ne laser. We measured the wavelength-dependent two-beam coupling coefficient, which exhibited a maximal value of 105 cm- 1 at 609 nm under an applied electric field of 84 V/μm at room temperature.

  18. The beam energy calibration system for the BEPC-II collider

    CERN Document Server

    Achasov, M N; Mo, Xiaohu; Muchnoi, N Yu; Qin, Qing; Qu, Huamin; Wang, Yifang; Xu, Jinqiang

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a proposal of the BEPC-II collider beam energy calibration system (IHEP, Beijing). The system is based on Compton backscattering of carbon dioxide laser radiation, producing a beam of high energy photons. Their energy spectrum is then accurately measured by HPGe detector. The high-energy spectrum edge will allow to determine the average electron or positron beam energy with relative accuracy about 3x10^-5.

  19. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element

  20. Crystals channel high-energy beams in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect particle beams, as suggested by E. Tsyganov in 1976. Experimental demonstrations have been carried out for four decades in various laboratories worldwide. In recent tests, a bent crystal inserted into the LHC beam halo successfully channelled and deflected 6.5 TeV protons into an absorber, with reduced secondary irradiation.    Quasimosaic crystal for the LHC (developed by PNPI). Bent crystal technology was introduced at CERN and further developed for the LHC by the UA9 Collaboration. For about ten years, experts from CERN, INFN (Italy), Imperial College (UK), LAL (France), and PNPI, IHEP and JINR (Russia) have been investigating the advantages of using bent crystals in the collimation systems of high-energy hadron colliders. A bent crystal replacing the primary collimator can deflect the incoming halo deeply inside the secondary collimators, improving their absorption efficiency. “The bent crystals we have just tested at the world-record en...

  1. Nanocomposite oxide thin films grown by pulsed energy beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nistor, M., E-mail: mnistor@infim.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, L22, P.O. Box MG-36, 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Petitmangin, A.; Hebert, C. [INSP, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Seiler, W. [LIM, ENSAM, 151 boulevard de l' Hopital, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-04-01

    Highly non-stoichiometric indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were grown by pulsed energy beam deposition (pulsed laser deposition-PLD and pulsed electron beam deposition-PED) under low oxygen pressure. The analysis of the structure and electrical transport properties showed that ITO films with a large oxygen deficiency (more than 20%) are nanocomposite films with metallic (In, Sn) clusters embedded in a stoichiometric and crystalline oxide matrix. The presence of the metallic clusters induces specific transport properties, i.e. a metallic conductivity via percolation with a superconducting transition at low temperature (about 6 K) and the melting and freezing of the In-Sn clusters in the room temperature to 450 K range evidenced by large changes in resistivity and a hysteresis cycle. By controlling the oxygen deficiency and temperature during the growth, the transport and optical properties of the nanocomposite oxide films could be tuned from metallic-like to insulating and from transparent to absorbing films.

  2. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkeev, Yu. P., E-mail: sharkeev@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M. G., E-mail: golkoski@mail.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Akademika Lavrentiev Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Glukhov, I. A., E-mail: gia@ispms.tsc.ru; Eroshenko, A. Yu., E-mail: eroshenko@ispms.tsc.ru; Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Bataev, V. A., E-mail: bataev@vadm.ustu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element.

  3. An Energy Saving System for a Beam Pumping Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongqiang; Liu, Jun; Han, Jiuqiang; Jiang, An

    2016-05-13

    Beam pumping units are widely used in the oil production industry, but the energy efficiency of this artificial lift machinery is generally low, especially for the low-production well and high-production well in the later stage. There are a number of ways for energy savings in pumping units, with the periodic adjustment of stroke speed and rectification of balance deviation being two important methods. In the paper, an energy saving system for a beam pumping unit (ESS-BPU) based on the Internet of Things (IoT) was proposed. A total of four types of sensors, including load sensor, angle sensor, voltage sensor, and current sensor, were used to detect the operating conditions of the pumping unit. Data from these sensors was fed into a controller installed in an oilfield to adjust the stroke speed automatically and estimate the degree of balance in real-time. Additionally, remote supervision could be fulfilled using a browser on a computer or smartphone. Furthermore, the data from a practical application was recorded and analyzed, and it can be seen that ESS-BPU is helpful in reducing energy loss caused by unnecessarily high stroke speed and a poor degree of balance.

  4. An Energy Saving System for a Beam Pumping Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongqiang; Liu, Jun; Han, Jiuqiang; Jiang, An

    2016-01-01

    Beam pumping units are widely used in the oil production industry, but the energy efficiency of this artificial lift machinery is generally low, especially for the low-production well and high-production well in the later stage. There are a number of ways for energy savings in pumping units, with the periodic adjustment of stroke speed and rectification of balance deviation being two important methods. In the paper, an energy saving system for a beam pumping unit (ESS-BPU) based on the Internet of Things (IoT) was proposed. A total of four types of sensors, including load sensor, angle sensor, voltage sensor, and current sensor, were used to detect the operating conditions of the pumping unit. Data from these sensors was fed into a controller installed in an oilfield to adjust the stroke speed automatically and estimate the degree of balance in real-time. Additionally, remote supervision could be fulfilled using a browser on a computer or smartphone. Furthermore, the data from a practical application was recorded and analyzed, and it can be seen that ESS-BPU is helpful in reducing energy loss caused by unnecessarily high stroke speed and a poor degree of balance. PMID:27187402

  5. An Energy Saving System for a Beam Pumping Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongqiang; Liu, Jun; Han, Jiuqiang; Jiang, An

    2016-01-01

    Beam pumping units are widely used in the oil production industry, but the energy efficiency of this artificial lift machinery is generally low, especially for the low-production well and high-production well in the later stage. There are a number of ways for energy savings in pumping units, with the periodic adjustment of stroke speed and rectification of balance deviation being two important methods. In the paper, an energy saving system for a beam pumping unit (ESS-BPU) based on the Internet of Things (IoT) was proposed. A total of four types of sensors, including load sensor, angle sensor, voltage sensor, and current sensor, were used to detect the operating conditions of the pumping unit. Data from these sensors was fed into a controller installed in an oilfield to adjust the stroke speed automatically and estimate the degree of balance in real-time. Additionally, remote supervision could be fulfilled using a browser on a computer or smartphone. Furthermore, the data from a practical application was recorded and analyzed, and it can be seen that ESS-BPU is helpful in reducing energy loss caused by unnecessarily high stroke speed and a poor degree of balance. PMID:27187402

  6. Monte Carlo Commissioning of Low Energy Electron Radiotherapy Beams using NXEGS Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is a report on the commissioning of low energy electron beams of a medical linear accelerator for Monte Carlo dose calculation using NXEGS software (NXEGS version 1.0.10.0, NX Medical Software, LLC. A unique feature of NXEGS is automated commissioning, a process whereby a combination of analytic and Monte Carlo methods generates beam models from dosimetric data collected in a water phantom. This study uses NXEGS to commission 6, 9, and 12 MeV electron beams of a Varian Clinac 2100C using three applicators with standard inserts. Central axis depth-dose, primary axis and diagonal beam profiles, and output factors are the measurements necessary for commissioning of the code. We present a comparison of measured dose distributions with the distributions generated by NXEGS, using confidence limits on seven measures of error. We find that confidence limits are typically less than 3% or 3 mm, but increase with increasing source to surface distance (SSD and depth at or beyond R50. We also investigate the dependence of NXEGS' performance on the size and composition of data used to commission the program, finding a weak dependence on number of dose profiles in the data set, but finding also that commissioning data need be measured at only two SSDs.

  7. Effective source size, radial, angular and energy spread of therapeutic 11C positron emitter beams produced by 12C fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of positron emitter light ion beams in combination with PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and PET–CT (Computed Tomography) imaging could significantly improve treatment verification and dose delivery imaging during radiation therapy. The present study is dedicated to the analysis of the beam quality in terms of the effective source size, as well as radial, angular and energy spread of the 11C ion beam produced by projectile fragmentation of a primary point monodirectional and monoenergetic 12C ion beam in a dedicated range shifter of different materials. This study was performed combining analytical methods describing the transport of particles in matter and the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT+. A high brilliance and production yield of 11C fragments with a small effective source size and emittance is best achieved with a decelerator made of two media: a first liquid hydrogen section of about 20 cm followed by a hydrogen rich section of variable length. The calculated intensity of the produced 11C ion beam ranges from about 5% to 8% of the primary 12C beam intensity depending on the exit energy and the acceptance of the beam transport system. The angular spread is lower than 1 degree for all the materials studied, but the brilliance of the beam is the highest with the proposed mixed decelerator

  8. SEE Measurements and Simulations Using Mono-Energetic GeV-Energy Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Alia, Ruben Garcia; Brugger, Markus; Roed, Ketil; Uznanski, Slawosz; Wrobel, Frederic; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Danzeca, Salvatore; Saigne, Frederic; Spiezia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Single Event Upset (SEU) measurements were performed on the ESA SEU Monitor using mono-energetic GeV-energy hadron beams available in the North Experimental Area at CERN. A 400 GeV proton beam in the H4IRRAD test area and a 120 GeV mixed pion and proton beam at the CERN-EU high Energy Reference Field facility (CERF) were used for this purpose. The resulting cross section values are presented and discussed as well as compared to the several hundred MeV case (typical for standard test facilities) from a physical interaction perspective with the intention of providing a more general understanding of the behavior. Moreover, the implications of the cross section dependence with energy above the several hundred MeV range are analyzed for different environments. In addition, analogous measurements are proposed for Single Event Latchup (SEL), motivated by discussed simulation results. Finally, a brief introduction of the future CHARM (CERN High-energy AcceleratoR Mixed facility) test installation is included.

  9. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B L Ooi; J M Gilbert; A Rashid A Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelec-tric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geome-try for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also pre-sented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  10. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  11. Frequency-dependent variation in the two-dimensional beam pattern of an echolocating dolphin

    OpenAIRE

    Starkhammar, Josefin; Moore, Patrick W.; Talmadge, Lois; Houser, Dorian S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent recordings of dolphin echolocation using a dense array of hydrophones suggest that the echolocation beam is dynamic and can at times consist of a single dominant peak, while at other times it consists of forward projected primary and secondary peaks with similar energy, partially overlapping in space and frequency bandwidth. The spatial separation of the peaks provides an area in front of the dolphin, where the spectral magnitude slopes drop off quickly for certain frequency bands. Thi...

  12. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  13. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  14. Fundamental physics research using a low energy muon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is proposed for the production of true muonium, in which the simultaneous generation of positive and negative muons is utilized in the discovery of new and more compact leptonic atoms. The proposed method, which is based on the use of a low energy muon apparatus, has certain advantages and could lead to the long-awaited appearance of positive and negative muons in the bound state, a goal that has been pursued for a half century. In this apparatus, the formation of true muonium is obtained by frictional cooling with an electron cyclotron resonance plasma,followed by the detection of high energy gamma rays. Simulation studies using the GEANT4 code were applied to the development of this low energy beam apparatus in order to provide evidence for the validity of the frictional cooling principle. (author)

  15. Risk and Machine Protection for Stored Magnetic and Beam Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, B

    2015-01-01

    Risk is a fundamental consideration when designing electronic systems. For most systems a view of risk can assist in setting design objectives, whereas both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of risk is mandatory when considering protection systems. This paper gives an overview of the risks due to stored magnetic and beam energies in high-energy physics, and shows how a risk-based approach can be used to design new systems mitigating these risks, using a lifecycle inspired by IEC 61508. Designing new systems in high-energy physics can be challenging as new and novel techniques are difficult to quantify and predict. This paper shows how the same lifecycle approach can be used in reverse to analyse existing systems, following their operation and first experiences.

  16. Evolution of elliptic and triangular flow as a function of beam energy in a hybrid model

    CERN Document Server

    Auvinen, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Elliptic flow has been one of the key observables for establishing the finding of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at the highest energies of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a sign of collectively behaving matter, one would expect the elliptic flow to decrease at lower beam energies, where the QGP is not produced. However, in the recent RHIC beam energy scan, it has been found that the inclusive charged hadron elliptic flow changes relatively little in magnitude in the energies between 7.7 and 39 GeV per nucleon-nucleon collision. We study the collision energy dependence of the elliptic and triangular flow utilizing a Boltzmann + hydrodynamics hybrid model. Such a hybrid model provides a natural framework for the transition from high collision energies, where the hydrodynamical description is essential, to smaller energies, where the hadron transport dominates. This approach is thus suitable to investigate the relative importance of these two mechanisms for the produ...

  17. Emittance measurements of low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this paper is represented the results of beam profile measurements of He-3(+) beam delivered from ECR ion source at KVI. The beam emittance is estimated by varying quadrupole method. The estimated values for the beam emittance at the different profile grid locations along the transport beam line

  18. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  19. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  20. Analytical solution for beam with time-dependent boundary conditions versus response spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, P.F.; Panahi, K.K. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This paper studies the responses of a uniform simple beam for which the supports are subjected to time-dependent conditions. Analytical solution in terms of series was presented for two cases: (1) Two supports of a simple beam are subjected to a harmonic motion, and (2) One of the two supports is stationary while the other is subjected to a harmonic motion. The results of the analytical solution were investigated and compared with the results of conventional response spectrum method using the beam finite element model. One of the applications of the results presented in this paper can be used to assess the adequacy and accuracy of the engineering approaches such as response spectra methods. It has been found that, when the excitation frequency equals the fundamental frequency of the beam, the results from response spectrum method are in good agreement with the exact calculation. The effects of initial conditions on the responses are also examined. It seems that the non-zero initial velocity has pronounced effects on the displacement time histories but it has no effect on the maximum accelerations. (author)

  1. Replacement of chemical rocket launchers by beamed energy propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Arnault, Anthony; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2014-11-01

    Microwave Rocket is a beamed energy propulsion system that is expected to reach space at drastically lower cost. This cost reduction is estimated by replacing the first-stage engine and solid rocket boosters of the Japanese H-IIB rocket with Microwave Rocket, using a recently developed thrust model in which thrust is generated through repetitively pulsed microwave detonation with a reed-valve air-breathing system. Results show that Microwave Rocket trajectory, in terms of velocity versus altitude, can be designed similarly to the current H-IIB first stage trajectory. Moreover, the payload ratio can be increased by 450%, resulting in launch-cost reduction of 74%. PMID:25402933

  2. Vacuum Chamber for the Measurement System of the Beam Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumova, E.; Achasov, M.; Dong, HaiYi; Qu, HuaMin; Krasnov, A.; Kosarev, A.; Muchnoi, N.; Pyata, E.; Xiao, Qiong; Mo, XiaoHu; Wang, YiFang; Zhukov, A.

    Vacuum chamber for the beam energy measurement system based on the Compton backscattering method is presented. The main elements of the chamber are GaAs entrance viewport and a copper mirror. The viewport design provides baking out of the vacuum chamber up to 250 °C. To produce the viewport, an original technology based on brazing GaAs plate by lead has been developed. The vacuum chambers were installed at the BEPC-II and VEPP-4 M colliders. After installation the residual gas pressure is about 10-10 Torr.

  3. Replacement of chemical rocket launchers by beamed energy propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Arnault, Anthony; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2014-11-01

    Microwave Rocket is a beamed energy propulsion system that is expected to reach space at drastically lower cost. This cost reduction is estimated by replacing the first-stage engine and solid rocket boosters of the Japanese H-IIB rocket with Microwave Rocket, using a recently developed thrust model in which thrust is generated through repetitively pulsed microwave detonation with a reed-valve air-breathing system. Results show that Microwave Rocket trajectory, in terms of velocity versus altitude, can be designed similarly to the current H-IIB first stage trajectory. Moreover, the payload ratio can be increased by 450%, resulting in launch-cost reduction of 74%.

  4. A device for a proton beam energy control for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Medical-Technical Facility for hadron radiotherapy based on the JINR DLNP phasotron has been constructed and put into operation. Upgrading of methods, hardware and software for radiotherapy is one of the main tasks for further development of the Facility. This article concerns one of the fields of this work, that is the development of equipment for dynamic irradiation of a deep lying target - the construction of a device for the proton beam energy control and measurement of its depth-dose curve in a treatment room. (author)

  5. Dynamic Response of Inextensible Beams by Improved Energy Balance Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sfahani, M. G.; Barari, Amin; Omidvar, M.;

    2011-01-01

    with a rotationally flexible root and carrying a lumped mass at an intermediate position along its span. Based on the simple EBM, the variational integral of the non-linear conservative system is established, and the Fourier series expansion is employed to address the governing algebraic equations. An alternate......An improved He's energy balance method (EBM) for solving non-linear oscillatory differential equation using a new trial function is presented. The problem considered represents the governing equations of the non-linear, large-amplitude free vibrations of a slender cantilever beam...

  6. A Device for a Proton Beam Energy Control for Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Agapov, A V; Molokanov, A G; Shvidkii, S V

    2004-01-01

    A Medical-Technical Facility for hadron radiotherapy based on DLNP JINR phasotron has been constructed and put into operation. Upgrading of methods, hardware and software for radiotherapy is one of the main tasks for further development of the Facility. This article concerns one of the fields of this work, that is the development of equipment for dynamic irradiation of deep lying target - the construction of a device for the proton beam energy control and measurement of its depth-dose curve in a treatment room.

  7. Systematic comparison of position and time dependent macroparticle simulations in beam dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroparticle simulation plays an important role in modern accelerator design and operation. Most linear rf accelerators have been designed based on macroparticle simulations using longitudinal position as the independent variable. In this paper, we have done a systematic comparison between using longitudinal position as the independent variable and using time as the independent variable in macroparticle simulations. We have found that, for an rms-matched beam, the maximum relative moment difference for second, fourth moments and beam maximum amplitudes between these two types of simulations is 0.25 percent in a 10 m reference transport system with physical parameters similar to the Spallation Neutron Source linac design. The maximum z-to-t transform error in the space-charge force calculation of the position dependent simulation is about 0.1 percent in such a system. This might cause a several percent error in a complete simulation of a linac with a length of hundreds of meters. Furthermore, the error may be several times larger in simulations of mismatched beams. However, if such errors are acceptable to the linac designer, then one is justified in using position dependent macroparticle simulations in this type of linac design application

  8. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guimei [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  9. Energy-dependent Hamiltonians and their pseudo-Hermitian interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Znojil, Miloslav; Bila, Hynek; Jakubsky, Vit

    2003-01-01

    The concept of energy-dependent forces in quantum mechanics is re-analysed. We suggest a simplification of their study via the representation of each self-adjoint and energy-dependent Hamiltonian H=H(E) with real spectrum by an auxiliary non-Hermitian operator K which remains energy-independent. Practical merits of such an approach to the Schroedinger equations with energy-dependent potentials are illustrated using their quasi-exactly solvable example.

  10. Scattering with absorptive interaction: Energy-dependent potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1983-05-01

    The energy dependence and analytic structure of the effective interaction for elastic scattering of composite particles are investigated using Feshbach's projection technique. A generalized Levinson theorem is established for complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent interactions. The analytical results are illustrated by means of Argand diagrams for a solvable model and the effect of energy averaging is discussed. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive, energy-dependent potentials, Levinson theorem.

  11. Exact fan-beam compensated reconstruction formula for time-dependent affine deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is dedicated to the reduction of reconstruction artefacts due to motions occurring during the acquisition of computerized tomographic projections. This problem has to be solved when imaging moving organs such as the lungs or the heart. The proposed method belongs to the class of motion compensated algorithms, where the model of motion is included in the reconstruction formula. The questions that have to be answered in this approach are: first what conditions the deformation has to verify to allow the reconstruction of the object from the projections acquired sequentially during the deformation? and second how can we reconstruct the object in that case? Here we solve these questions in the particular case of general time-dependent affine deformations. We treat the problem of admissibility conditions on the deformation in the parallel-beam and in the fan-beam cases. Then we propose for both geometries exact reconstruction methods based on re-binning or sequential FBP formulae. (author)

  12. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  13. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  14. Transport of intense proton beam in the presence of subdominant species in a low energy beam transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, P. Sing; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of space-charge-dominated low energy proton beam in the presence of H2+ and H3+ beams has been studied in a solenoid based transport system using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Multispecies envelope equation and random search technique have been used to transport and match the primary beam considering two options. The PIC simulation shows the formation of hollow distribution of H2+ and H3+ beams around the proton beam in the first case where the waist of the proton beam is formed in between the solenoids and it is absent in the second case where the beam size is kept large in between the solenoids. Separation of hollow distribution appears more distinct as the proton fraction is increased and is almost independent of the combination of H2+ and H3+ beams for a given proton fraction. This effect helps to reject the unwanted species more effectively. The evolution of rms size and emittance of the proton beam has been studied in the presence of a circular aperture using KV and Gaussian distributions for the species in both the cases.

  15. History-Dependent Problems with Applications to Contact Models for Elastic Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosz, Krzysztof; Kalita, Piotr; Migórski, Stanisław; Ochal, Anna, E-mail: ochal@ii.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science (Poland); Sofonea, Mircea [Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique (France)

    2016-02-15

    We prove an existence and uniqueness result for a class of subdifferential inclusions which involve a history-dependent operator. Then we specialize this result in the study of a class of history-dependent hemivariational inequalities. Problems of such kind arise in a large number of mathematical models which describe quasistatic processes of contact. To provide an example we consider an elastic beam in contact with a reactive obstacle. The contact is modeled with a new and nonstandard condition which involves both the subdifferential of a nonconvex and nonsmooth function and a Volterra-type integral term. We derive a variational formulation of the problem which is in the form of a history-dependent hemivariational inequality for the displacement field. Then, we use our abstract result to prove its unique weak solvability. Finally, we consider a numerical approximation of the model, solve effectively the approximate problems and provide numerical simulations.

  16. Simulation of Head-on Beam-Beam Limitations in Future High Energy Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) project calls for studies in a new regime of beam-beam interactions. While the emittance damping due to synchrotron radiation is still slower than in past or existing lepton colliders, it is significantly larger than in other hadron colliders. The slow reduction of the emittance is profitable for higher luminosity in term of transverse beam size at the interaction points and also to mitigate long-range beam-beam effects, potentially allowing for a reduction of the crossing angle between the beams during the operation. In such conditions, the strength of head-on beam-beam interactions increases, potentially limiting the beam brightness. 4D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations are performed in order to assess these limitations.

  17. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  18. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T.; Yan, Z.; Hajj, M.

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of cantilever-based piezoelectric energy harvesting systems is usually performed using coupled equations that represent the mechanical displacement and the voltage output. These equations are then solved simultaneously. In contrast to this representation, we use analytical solutions of the governing equation to derive an algebraic equation of the power as a function of the beam displacement, electromechanical coefficients, and the load resistance. Such an equation can be more useful in the design of such harvesters. Particularly, the mechanical displacement is computed from a mechanical governing equation with modified natural frequency and damping ratio that account for the electromechanical coupling. The voltage and the harvested power are then obtained by relating them directly to the mechanical displacement. We validate the proposed analysis by comparing its solution including the tip displacement and harvested power with those of numerical simulations of the governing equations. To demonstrate the generality of the proposed approach, we consider the cases of base excitation, galloping, and autoparametric vibration. The model proposed in this study simplifies the electromechanical coupling problem for practical applications of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesting systems.

  19. Beam energy absolute measurement using K-edge absorption spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented of absolute energy measurement with an accuracy of triangle Ε ∼ 10-4Εo by direct measurement of the bend angle in a high-precision magnetic dipole using two opposite-direction short (about 2 mm long) high-field-intensity magnets (bar Β dipole much-lt Βshortmag) installed at each end and two K-edge absorption spectrometers. Using these spectrometers and the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation created by the short magnets, a bend angle of 4.5 arc deg for the CEBAF energy bandwidth can be measured with an accuracy of a few units of 10-6 rad, and the main sources of systematic errors are the absolute measurement of the field integral and the determination of the centroid of the synchrotron beam at a wavelength equal to the K-edge absorption of the chosen substance

  20. Enhanced creation of high energy particles in colliding laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchiev, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The creation of particles by two colliding strong laser beams is considered. It is found that the electron-positron pairs created in the laser field via the Schwinger mechanism may recollide after one or several oscillations in the field. Their collision can take place at high energy, which the pair gains from the field. As a result, high energy gamma quanta can be created by inelastic scattering or annihilation of the pair. Moreover, heavy particles such as muon pairs may also be created via the annihilation $e^+ + e^-\\rightarrow \\mu^+ + \\mu^- $. The probability of $e^-e^+$ collision is greatly enhanced due to a strong alignment of the electron and positron momenta with the electric field. The found muon creation rate exponentially exceeds the rate predicted by the direct Schwinger mechanism for muons, while the photon creation rate exponentially exceeds photon emission due to the fermion oscillation.

  1. Energy Dependent Isospin Asymmetry in Mean-Field Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaitanos, T

    2011-01-01

    The Lagrangian density of Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) theory with non-linear derivative (NLD) interactions is applied to isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. We study the symmetry energy and the density and energy dependences of nucleon selfenergies. At high baryon densities a soft symmetry energy is obtained. The energy dependence of the isovector selfenergy suppresses the Lane-type optical potential with increasing energy and predicts a $\\rho$-meson induced mass splitting between protons and neutrons in isospin asymmetric matter.

  2. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.; Cerra, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow “pencil” beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source, or b) during the traversal of a point source, is a unifying concept. The “universal source strength” of air kerma rate at a meter from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose.

  3. Particle-in-cell mode beam dynamics simulation of the low energy beam transport for the SSC-linac injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Chen; HE Yuan; YUAN You-Jin; YAO Qing-Gao; WANG Zhi-Jun; CHANG Wei; LIU Yong; XIA Jia-Wen

    2011-01-01

    A new SSC-linac system (injector into separated sector cyclotron) is being designed in the HIRFL (heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou). As part of SSC-Linac, the LEBT (low energy beam transport) consists of seven solenoids, four quadrupoles, a bending magnet and an extra multi-harmonic buncher. The total length of this segment is about 7 meters. The beam dynamics in this LEBT has been studied using three-dimensional PIC (particle-in-cell) code BEAMPATH. The simulation results show that the continuous beam from the ion source is first well analyzed by a charge-to-mass selection system, and the beam of the selected charge-to-mass ratio is then efficiently pre-bunched by a multi-harmonic buncher and optimally matched into the RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole) for further acceleration. The principles and effects of the solenoid collimation channel are discussed, and it could limit the beam emittance by changing the aperture size.

  4. Universality and geometry dependence in the class of the nonlinear molecular beam epitaxy equation

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, I. S. S.; Oliveira, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report extensive numerical simulations of growth models belonging to the nonlinear molecular beam epitaxy (nMBE) class, with flat and curved geometries. In both $d=1+1$ and $2+1$, we find that growth regime height distributions (HDs), spatial and temporal covariances are universal, but geometry-dependent, while the critical exponents are the same for flat and curved interfaces. Therefore the nMBE class does split into subclasses, as also does the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class. Applying t...

  5. Energy and time spreads of a particle beam used in APM technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo code has been developed to simulate neutron and alpha production in the time correlated associated particle method (TCAPM). The atomic and molecular composition of the deuterium beam, tritium ratio in the target, slowing-down and straggling of deuterons as well as the angular dependence of emitted neutrons and alpha particles are both taken into account in these calculations. The following physical characteristics are obtained: mean energy of detected alpha particles and their spread, mean time of flight and its spread values for alpha particles, alpha and associated neutron spectra as well as neutron spatial cone distribution. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Beam structure and transverse emittance studies of high-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A visual diagnostic technique has been developed to monitor and study ion-beam structure, shape, and size along a transport line. In this technique, a commercially available fluorescent screen is used in conjunction with a video camera. The visual representation of the beam structure is digitized enhanced through false-color coding, and displayed on a TV monitor for on-line viewing. The digitized information is stored for further off-line processing (e.g.,extraction of beam profiles). An optional wire grid placed upstream of the fluor screen adds the capability of measuring transverse emittance (or angular spread). This technique allows real-time observation of the beam response to parameter changes (e.g., evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position)

  7. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  8. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guanglei; Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Yang, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic micro-bunching in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multi-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the performance of HGHG-FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A numerical example demonstrates that, with about 84keV RMS uniform and/or saddle slice energy spread, the 30th harmonic radiation can be directly generated by a single-stage seeding scheme for a soft x-ray FEL f...

  9. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Patriarca, A.; Nauraye, C.; Moignier, C.; Pomorski, M.; Moignau, F.; Heinrich, S.; Tromson, D.; Mazal, A.

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy‑1. A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min‑1, in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min‑1 to 5.52 Gy min‑1. Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam.

  10. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Patriarca, A; Nauraye, C; Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Moignau, F; Heinrich, S; Tromson, D; Mazal, A

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy(-1). A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min(-1), in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min(-1) to 5.52 Gy min(-1). Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam. PMID:27499356

  11. Dosimetric characteristics of four PTW microDiamond detectors in high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Patriarca, A.; Nauraye, C.; Moignier, C.; Pomorski, M.; Moignau, F.; Heinrich, S.; Tromson, D.; Mazal, A.

    2016-09-01

    Small diamond detectors are useful for the dosimetry of high-energy proton beams. However, linear energy transfer (LET) dependence has been observed in the literature with such solid state detectors. A novel synthetic diamond detector has recently become commercially available from the manufacturer PTW-Freiburg (PTW microDiamond type 60019). This study was designed to thoroughly characterize four microDiamond detectors in clinical proton beams, in order to investigate their response and their reproducibility in high LET regions. Very good dosimetric characteristics were observed for two of them, with good stability of their response (deviation less than 0.4% after a pre-irradiation dose of approximately 12 Gy), good repeatability (coefficient of variation of 0.06%) and a sensitivity of approximately 0.85 nC Gy-1. A negligible dose rate dependence was also observed for these two microDiamonds with a deviation of the sensitivity less than 0.7% with respect to the one measured at the reference dose rate of 2.17 Gy min-1, in the investigated dose rate range from 1.01 Gy min-1 to 5.52 Gy min-1. Lateral dose profile measurements showed the high spatial resolution of the microDiamond oriented with its stem perpendicular to the beam axis and with its small sensitive thickness of about 1 μm in the scanning profile direction. Finally, no significant LET dependence was found with these two diamond dosimeters in comparison to a reference ionization chamber (model IBA PPC05). These good results were in accordance to the literature. However, this study showed also a non reproducibility between the devices in terms of stability, sensitivity and LET dependence, since the two other microDiamonds characterized in this work showed different dosimetric characteristics making them not suitable for proton beam dosimetry with a maximum difference of the peak-to-plateau ratio of 6.7% relative to the reference ionization chamber in a clinical 138 MeV proton beam.

  12. Beam and spin dynamics of hadron beams in intermediate-energy ring accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis beam and spin dynamics of ring accelerators are described. After a general theoretical treatment methods for the beam optimization and polarization conservation are discussed. Then experiments on spin manipulation at the COSY facility are considered. Finally the beam simulation and accelerator lay-out for the HESR with regards to the FAIR experiment are described. (HSI)

  13. Future of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first exploratory phase of a very successful Beam Energy Scan Program at RHIC was completed in 2014 with Au+Au collisions at energies ranging from 7 to 39 GeV. Data sets taken earlier extended the upper limit of energy range to the √sNN of 200 GeV. This provided an initial look into the uncharted territory of the QCD phase diagram, which is considered to be the single most important graph of our field. The main results from BES phase I, although effected by large statistical errors (steeply increasing with decreasing energy), suggest that the highest potential for discovery of the QCD Critical Point lies bellow √sNN 20 GeV. Here, we discuss the plans and the preparation for phase II of the BES program, with an order of magnitude larger statistics, which is planned for 2018-2019. The BES II will focus on Au+Au collisions at √sNN from 20 to 7 GeV in collider mode, and from √sNN 7 to 3.5 GeV in the fixed target mode, which will be run concurrently with the collider mode operation

  14. Future of the beam energy scan program at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odyniec Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first exploratory phase of a very successful Beam Energy Scan Program at RHIC was completed in 2014 with Au+Au collisions at energies ranging from 7 to 39 GeV. Data sets taken earlier extended the upper limit of energy range to the √sNN of 200 GeV. This provided an initial look into the uncharted territory of the QCD phase diagram, which is considered to be the single most important graph of our field. The main results from BES phase I, although effected by large statistical errors (steeply increasing with decreasing energy, suggest that the highest potential for discovery of the QCD Critical Point lies bellow √sNN 20 GeV. Here, we discuss the plans and the preparation for phase II of the BES program, with an order of magnitude larger statistics, which is planned for 2018-2019. The BES II will focus on Au+Au collisions at √sNN from 20 to 7 GeV in collider mode, and from √sNN 7 to 3.5 GeV in the fixed target mode, which will be run concurrently with the collider mode operation.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of absorbed dose and linear energy transfer in therapeutic proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville, Dal A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2016-02-01

    The biological response resulting from proton therapy depends on both the absorbed dose in the irradiated tissue and the linear energy transfer (LET) of the beam. Currently, optimization of proton therapy treatment plans is based only on absorbed dose. However, recent advances in proton therapy delivery have made it possible to vary the LET distribution for potential therapeutic gain, leading to investigations of using LET as an additional parameter in plan optimization. Having a method to measure and verify both absorbed dose and LET as part of a quality assurance program would be ideal for the safe delivery of such plans. Here we demonstrated the potential of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and LET. We calibrated the ratio of ultraviolet (UV) to blue emission intensities from Al2O3:C OSL detectors as a function of LET to facilitate LET measurements. We also calibrated the intensity of the blue OSL emission for absorbed dose measurements and introduced a technique to correct for the LET-dependent dose response of OSL detectors exposed to therapeutic proton beams. We demonstrated the potential of our OSL technique by using it to measure LET and absorbed dose under new irradiation conditions, including patient-specific proton therapy treatment plans. In the beams investigated, we found the OSL technique to measure dose-weighted LET within 7.9% of Monte Carlo-simulated values and absorbed dose within 2.5% of ionization chamber measurements.

  16. Scheme for Low Energy Beam Transport with a Non-Neutralized Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Prost, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-23

    A typical Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) design relies on dynamics with nearly complete beam space charge neutralization over the entire length of the LEBT. This paper argues that, for a beam with modest perveance and uniform current density distribution when generated at the source, a downstream portion of the LEBT can be un-neutralized without significant emittance growth.

  17. US oil dependency and energy security; Dependance petroliere et securite energetique americaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, P. [Institut francais des Relations Internationals, 75 - Paris (France)]|[Universite Pierre Mendes-France-IEPE-CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2002-07-01

    The three papers of this document were written in the framework of a seminar organized the 30 may 2002 by the IFRI in the framework of its program Energy and Climatic Change. The first presentation deals with the american oil policy since 1980 (relation between the oil dependence and the energy security, the Reagan oil policy, the new oil policy facing the increase of the dependence). The second one deals with the US energy security (oil security, domestic energy security, policy implications). The last presentation is devoted to the US oil dependence in a global context and the problems and policies of international energy security. (A.L.B.)

  18. Mechanical and electrical impedance matching in a piezoelectric beam for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewnik, A.; Grześ, P.; Walendziuk, W.

    2015-11-01

    A piezoelectric beam is one of transducers for energy harvesting. It provides easy implementation and good performance in changing mechanical stress into electric voltage. In order to maximize output power, it is important to provide mechanical and electrical impedance matching. In the paper the authors proposed a methodology which allows to find values of lumped elements in an electromechanical model after completing appropriate measurements. Due to linear equations, it is possible to model a beam in both mechanical and electrical ways, and match the best load depending of frequency. The proposed model of a piezoelectric cantilever shows a potential use of these devices in micro scale as a cantilever which is a part of a silicon structure. Moreover, in the paper, the authors discuss mechanical aspects of using a weight as the way to tune the piezoelectric beam to a specific frequency. The electrical aspect of matching the source impedance with load, which is based on an electrical model of a piezoelectric transducer, is also presented. In the paper a mathematical model was verified by an experiment in which a laboratory stand equipped with a vibration generator, a piezoelectric energy harvester and acceleration sensors was used.

  19. Chemical freeze-out parameters in Beam Energy Scan Program of STAR at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC has completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program to understand the phase structure of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The bulk properties of the system formed in Au+Au collisions at different center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV have been studied from the data collected in the year 2010 and 2011. The centrality and energy dependence of mid-rapidity ($|y|$ < 0.1) particle yields, and ratios are presented here. The chemical freeze-out parameters are extracted using measured particle ratios within the framework of a statistical model.

  20. Chemical freeze-out parameters in Beam Energy Scan Program of STAR at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sabita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The STAR experiment at RHIC has completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I program to understand the phase structure of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD. The bulk properties of the system formed in Au+Au collisions at different center of mass energy √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV have been studied from the data collected in the year 2010 and 2011. The centrality and energy dependence of mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1 particle yields, and ratios are presented here. The chemical freeze-out parameters are extracted using measured particle ratios within the framework of a statistical model.

  1. Chemical freeze-out parameters in Beam Energy Scan Program of STAR at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabita

    2015-03-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC has completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES-I) program to understand the phase structure of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The bulk properties of the system formed in Au+Au collisions at different center of mass energy √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV have been studied from the data collected in the year 2010 and 2011. The centrality and energy dependence of mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) particle yields, and ratios are presented here. The chemical freeze-out parameters are extracted using measured particle ratios within the framework of a statistical model.

  2. Surface energies for molecular beam epitaxy growth of HgTe and CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berding, M. A.; Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Sher, A.

    1991-10-01

    We present results for the surface binding energies for HgTe and CdTe that will serve as input for molecular beam epitaxy growth models. We have found that the surface binding energies are surface orientation dependent and are not simply proportional to the number of first-neighbor bonds being made to the underlying layer. Moreover, because of the possibility of charge transfer between cation and anion surface states, one may have large differences between the binding energy for the first and the last atom in a given layer, and these differences will be different for the narrow-gap, less ionic materials than for the wide gap, ionic materials. We also find that the surface states associated with an isolated surface atom or vacancy are extended in materials with small gaps and small effective masses, and thus call into question the modeling of surface binding by simple pair interactions.

  3. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2008-12-01

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  4. Performance Limitations in the LHC due to Parasitic Beam-beam Encounters- Parameter Dependence, Scaling, and PACMAN Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Giachino, R; Metral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Trad, G; Buffat, X; Kaltchev, D

    2013-01-01

    A novel type of 2.76 m long slotted, or perforated, strip-line pick-up, or kicker electrode structure, for CSRe stochastic cooling of non-relativistic particle beams with β~ 0.7 is presented. It is installed inside a bending vacuum chamber with the output signal taken from the downstream end. This slotted structure features a sufficiently broad bandwidth, good beam coupling impedance, low losses and a comparatively easy mechanical construction and installation into the CSRe dipole chamber. In this paper the electrode structure and pickup tank, as well as the beam test results will be presented.

  5. Plunger lifetime measurements after Coulomb excitation at intermediate beam energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackstein, Matthias; Dewald, Alfred; Fransen, Christoph; Ilie, Gabriela; Jolie, Jan; Melon, Barbara; Pissulla, Thomas; Rother, Wolfram; Zell, Karl-Oskar [University of Cologne (Germany); Petkov, Pavel [University of Cologne (Germany); INRNE (Bulgaria); Chester, Aaron; Adrich, Przemyslaw; Bazin, Daniel; Bowen, Matt; Gade, Alexandra; Glasmacher, Thomas; Miller, Dave; Moeller, Victoria; Starosta, Krzysztof; Stolz, Andreas; Vaman, Constantin; Voss, Philip; Weissharr, Dirk [Michigan State Univerity (United States); Moeller, Oliver [TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Two recoil-distance-doppler-shift (RDDS) experiments were performed at the NSCL/MSU using Coulomb excitations of the projectile nuclei {sup 110}Pd, {sup 114}Pd at beam energies of 54 MeV/u in order to investigate the evolution of deformation of neutron rich paladium isotopes. The experimental set-up consisted of a dedicated plunger device, developed at the University of Cologne, the SEGA Ge-array and the S800 spectrometer. Lifetimes of the 2{sub 1}{sup +}-states in {sup 110}Pd and {sup 114}Pd were derived from the analysis of the {gamma}-line-shapes as well as from the measured decay-curves. Special features of the data analysis, e.g. features originating from the very high recoil velocities, are discussed.

  6. Ion recombination correction for very high dose-per-pulse high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parallel-plate ionization chamber is the recommended tool for the absorbed dose measurement in pulsed high-energy electron beams. Typically, the electron beams used in radiotherapy have a dose-per-pulse value less then 0.1 cGy/pulse. In this range the factor to correct the response of an ionization chamber for the lack of complete charge collection due to ion recombination (ksat) can be properly evaluated with the standard 'two voltage' method proposed by the international dosimetric reports. Very high dose-per-pulse electron beams are employed in some special Linac dedicated to the Intra-Operatory-Radiation-Therapy (IORT). The high dose-per-pulse values (3-13 cGy/pulse) characterizing the IORT electron beams allow to deliver the therapeutic dose (10-20 Gy) in less than a minute. This considerably reduces the IORT procedure time, but some dosimetric problems arise because the standard method to evaluate ksat overestimates its value by 20%. Moreover, if the dose-per-pulse value >1 cGy/pulse, the dependence of ksat on the dose-per-pulse value cannot be neglected for relative dosimetry. In this work the dependence of ksat on the dose-per-pulse value is derived, based on the general equation that describes the ion recombination in the Boag theory. A new equation for ksat, depending on known or measurable quantities, is presented. The new ksat equation is experimentally tested by comparing the absorbed doses to water measured with parallel-plate ionization chambers (Roos and Markus) to that measured using dose-per-pulse independent dosimeters, such as radiochromic films and chemical Fricke dosimeters. These measurements are performed in the high dose-per-pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) electron beams of the IORT dedicated Linac Hitesys Novac7 (Aprilia--Latina, Italy). The dose measurements made using the parallel-plate chambers and those made using the dose-per-pulse independent dosimeters are in good agreement (1 cGy/pulse) electron-beam dosimetry

  7. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta Majumdar, M R

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar energy, beamed solar energy, LSC, dielectric mirror, optical fibre, Photo-Voltaic

  8. Parametric scaling studies of the energy confinement time for neutral beam heated Heliotron E plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic analysis of the global energy confinement time for neutral beam heated Heliotron E plasmas has been performed with a 1-D, time independent transport analysis code, PROCTR-Mod. From a regression analysis of a representative sample selection of the presented data sets, the global energy confinement time, τEG(ms), is found to scale as τEG=13n-bareαPheatβBγ, where α=0.53±0.10, β=-0.71±0.09, and γ=0.35±0.14; the error bar indicates the 95% confidence region deduced from the limited data points; n-bare(1014cm-3) is the line average electron density; Pheat(MW) is the neutral beam heating power; and B(T) is the vacuum magnetic field at the magnetic axis. The data analysis shows that the favourable density dependence partially offsets the unfavourable power dependence and that anomalous electron transport loss becomes dominant in the overall energy balance as the beam power and the plasma density are increased. An alternative scaling law is also presented, which is to fit τEG(ms) by an 'offset linear' law, τEG=ζB2+ηe>/Pheat, where ζ=1.1±0.33 and η=15.0±1.9; e>(1014cm-3) is the volume average electron density. The latter scaling is found to provide a better fit to the presented data sets, in spite of its simple form. The parametric scaling of the local electron thermal diffusivity, χe, is also discussed on the basis of the kinetic analysis. (author). 40 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  9. STAR Results from the RHIC Beam Energy Scan-I

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Energy Scan (BES) program is being pursued at RHIC to study the QCD phase diagram, and search for the possible QCD phase boundary and possible QCD critical point. The data for Phase-I of the BES program have been collected for Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$) of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. These collision energies allowed the STAR experiment to cover a wide range of baryon chemical potential $\\mu_{B}$ (100--400 MeV) in the QCD phase diagram. We report on several interesting results from the BES Phase-I covering the high net-baryon density region. These results shed light on particle production mechanism and freeze-out conditions, first-order phase transition and "turn-off" of QGP signatures, and existence of a critical point in the phase diagram. Finally, we give an outlook for the future BES Phase-II program and a possible fixed target program at STAR.

  10. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengzheng, E-mail: liuz@frib.msu.edu; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-11

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR), to be implemented upstream of each FRIB cryomodule, as part of the direct loss monitoring system to fulfill the needs of machine protection. - Highlights: • Traditional BLM is not effective for beam loss monitoring at FRIB low energy linac segments. • We developed LMR to intercept a small portion of beam loss and output voltage signals. • We made a prototype LMR and demonstrated its functionality to monitor small beam losses. • The LMR is very sensitive for small beam losses and is independent of beam current. • The LMR is especially useful for loss monitoring at low energy ion/proton accelerators.

  11. Energy Dependence of Nuclear Transparency in C (p,2p) Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksanov, A.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Heppelmann, S.; Kawabata, T.; Makdisi, Y.; Malki, A.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Yoshida, H.; Zhalov, D.

    2001-11-01

    The transparency of carbon for (p,2p) quasielastic events was measured at beam momenta ranging from 5.9 to 14.5 GeV/c at 90° c.m. The four-momentum transfer squared (Q2) ranged from 4.7 to 12.7 (GeV/c)2. We present the observed beam momentum dependence of the ratio of the carbon to hydrogen cross sections. We also apply a model for the nuclear momentum distribution of carbon to obtain the nuclear transparency. We find a sharp rise in transparency as the beam momentum is increased to 9 GeV/c and a reduction to approximately the Glauber level at higher energies.

  12. Energy dependence of nuclear transparency in C (p,2p) scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksanov, A; Alster, J; Asryan, G; Averichev, Y; Barton, D; Baturin, V; Bukhtoyarova, N; Carroll, A; Heppelmann, S; Kawabata, T; Makdisi, Y; Malki, A; Minina, E; Navon, I; Nicholson, H; Ogawa, A; Panebratsev, Y; Piasetzky, E; Schetkovsky, A; Shimanskiy, S; Tang, A; Watson, J W; Yoshida, H; Zhalov, D

    2001-11-19

    The transparency of carbon for (p,2p) quasielastic events was measured at beam momenta ranging from 5.9 to 14.5 GeV/c at 90 degrees c.m. The four-momentum transfer squared (Q2) ranged from 4.7 to 12.7 (GeV/c)(2). We present the observed beam momentum dependence of the ratio of the carbon to hydrogen cross sections. We also apply a model for the nuclear momentum distribution of carbon to obtain the nuclear transparency. We find a sharp rise in transparency as the beam momentum is increased to 9 GeV/c and a reduction to approximately the Glauber level at higher energies. PMID:11736334

  13. Impact parameter dependence of isospin effects on the mass dependence of balance energy

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Sakshi; Sood, Aman D.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on the balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the mass range 48-270 for two sets of isobaric systems with N/Z = 1 and 1.4 using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. Our fndings reveal the dominance of Coulomb repulsion in isospin effects on balance energy as well as its mass dependence throughout the range of the colliding geometry.

  14. Prospects for ultra-low-energy muon beam at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakule, Pavel [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)], E-mail: p.bakule@rl.ac.uk; Matsuda, Yasuyuki [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Miyake, Yasuhiro; Nagamine, Kanetada; Shimomura, Koichiro; Strasser, Patrick; Makimura, Shunshuke [Muon Science Laboratory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2009-02-21

    Spin-polarized ultra-low-energy muons (LE-{mu}{sup +}) with energies in eV-keV range provide a sensitive magnetic microprobe for studying near-surface regions, thin-film samples, multi-layered materials, etc. with depth resolution on a nanometer scale. Yet, worldwide there is currently only one (continuous) source of low-energy muons that is routinely used for such measurements. A pulsed source with many unique parameters (such as low-energy resolution of {approx}14 eV, time resolution of 7 ns, low background and spot size of just 4 mm) has been demonstrated at RIKEN-RAL muon facility at ISIS, but its use is limited by a rate of only 15 {mu}{sup +}/s. The method of low-energy muon generation is based on a resonant laser ionization of thermal energy muonium and is ideally suited for a pulsed muon source such as J-PARC MUSE, since the pulse structure of the generated LE-{mu}{sup +} is then determined by the laser pulse duration. The double pulse structure of the surface muon beam can, therefore, be converted to a single LE-{mu}{sup +} pulse with a pulse duration that can be as short as 1 ns and can also be externally triggered. J-PARC is designed to deliver surface muon beam with rates up to 4x10{sup 8} {mu}{sup +}/s and direct transfer of the same laser technology from RIKEN-RAL to J-PARC would provide a LE-{mu}{sup +} beam with rates comparable to the existing continuous LE-{mu}{sup +} beam at PSI ({approx}10{sup 4} LE-{mu}{sup +}/s). An improvement in the laser pulse energy could lead to a higher efficiency and higher rates up to 10{sup 6} LE-{mu}{sup +}/s may be possible. Construction of an intense LE-{mu}{sup +} beamline at J-PARC MUSE would open up the possibility to do routine depth-dependent {mu}SR measurements with thin film samples, with the muon implantation depth as low as 1 nm. In addition, the unique capability to synchronize the muon implantation with the sample excitation (e.g. by another laser or rf pulse) would allow to carry out pump

  15. Studies for the determination of the beam energy with Compton backscattered photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng; Judin, Vitali; Huttel, Erhard; Schuh, Marcel; Streichert, Max; Papash, Alexander; Nasse, Michael J.; Hertle, Edmund; Mueller, Anke-Susanne [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The method of resonant depolarization which is now used for determination of beam energy (2.5 GeV) at ANKA becomes cumbersome for lower beam energies. As an alternative method, a compact Compton backscattering setup with a storage cavity of laser and appropriate detection system is proposed. In the presentation, the preliminary design of the setup and simulation results are present.

  16. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  17. Beam Performance and Luminosity Limitations in the High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR)

    CERN Document Server

    Lehrach, A; Hinterberger, F; Maier, R; Prasuhn, D

    2006-01-01

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron and storage ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams with dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), resulting in demanding beam parameter of two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities up to 2*10^32 cm-2 s-1, and high resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10^-5, respectively. To reach these beam parameters very powerful phase space cooling is needed, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effect of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction is investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  18. Beam performance and luminosity limitations in the high-energy storage ring (HESR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrach, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Hinterberger, F.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2006-06-01

    The high-energy storage ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an antiproton synchrotron storage ring in the momentum range 1.5-15 GeV/ c. An important feature of this new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams and dense internal targets (e.g. pellet targets), which results in demanding beam parameter requirements for two operation modes: high luminosity mode with peak luminosities to 2×10 32 cm -2 s -1, and high-resolution mode with a momentum spread down to 10 -5. To reach these beam parameters one needs a very powerful phase space cooling, utilizing high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. The effects of beam-target scattering and intra-beam interaction are investigated in order to study beam equilibria and beam losses for the two different operation modes.

  19. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  20. Design and delivery of beam monitors for the energy-upgraded linac in J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akihiko; Ouchi, Nobuo; Oguri, Hidetomo; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Miyao, Tomoaki; Ikegami, Masanori

    2015-02-01

    In the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) linac, an energy-upgrade project has started to achieve a design beam power of 1 MW at the exit of the downstream synchrotron. To account for the significant beam parameter upgrades, we will use the newly-fabricated beam monitors for the beam commissioning. This paper discusses the design and assembly of the beam position monitor, phase monitor, current monitor, transverse profile monitor, and beam loss monitor for the energy-upgraded linac. We periodically installed the newly-fabricated monitors for the upgraded beam line, as well as for longitudinal matching, because of the frequency jump between the original RF cavity and the newly-developed cavity. We employed two debunchers to correct for momentum spread and jitter. To account for the new debunchers, we fabricated and installed additional pairs of phase monitors in order to tune the debunchers to the adequate RF set point. Finally, we propose commissioning plans to support the beam monitor check. We will begin to establish the 181-MeV operation to confirm the proper functioning of beam monitors. Herein, we will examine the response to changes of the knobs that control the quadrupole magnets after the energy upgrade. After proper functioning of the beam monitors is confirmed, we will use the new beam monitors to establish the 400-MeV acceleration operation.

  1. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Perivolaropoulos, L

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  2. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  3. Probing Balance Energy Using Momentum- and Isospin-Dependent Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ji-Yan; ZUO Wei; MA Lei; ZHANG Fang; LI Bao-An

    2007-01-01

    @@ Using the momentum- and isospin-dependent Boltmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we investigate the transverse flow and balance energy in two isotopic colliding systems 48Ca+58Fe and 48Cr+58Ni by adopting different symmetry potentials. By comparing the results between the two colliding systems, we find that the difference between the balance energies of two isotopic systems can be considered as a sensitive probe to the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  4. Chromatic energy filter and characterization of laser-accelerated proton beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Al-Omari, Husam

    2012-07-01

    The application of laser accelerated protons or ions for particle therapy has to cope with relatively large energy and angular spreads as well as possibly significant random fluctuations. We suggest a method for combined focusing and energy selection, which is an effective alternative to the commonly considered dispersive energy selection by magnetic dipoles. Our method is based on the chromatic effect of a magnetic solenoid (or any other energy dependent focusing device) in combination with an aperture to select a certain energy width defined by the aperture radius. It is applied to an initial 6D phase space distribution of protons following the simulation output from a Radiation Pressure Acceleration model. Analytical formula for the selection aperture and chromatic emittance are confirmed by simulation results using the TRACEWIN code. The energy selection is supported by properly placed scattering targets to remove the imprint of the chromatic effect on the beam and to enable well-controlled and shot-to-shot reproducible energy and transverse density profiles.

  5. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions with Minimal Neutrino Energy Dependence -- A NuWro Truth Study

    CERN Document Server

    Pickering, Luke

    2016-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo truth study examining nuclear effects in charged-current neutrino interactions using observables constructed in the transverse plane. Three distributions are introduced that show very weak dependence on neutrino flux and its associated uncertainty. Measurements comparing these distributions between quasi-elastic-like and single charged pion final states will provide new constraints of nuclear effects. It is suggested that the on-axis position in the NuMI beam provides the correct flux to take advantage of this reduced energy dependence in measuring nuclear effect-generated transverse imbalances.

  6. Membrane Thickness Dependence of Nanopore Formation with a Focused Helium Ion Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furat Sawafta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state nanopores are emerging as a valuable tool for the detection and characterization of individual biomolecules. Central to their success is the realization of fabrication strategies that are both rapid and flexible in their ability to achieve diverse device dimensions. In this paper, we demonstrate the membrane thickness dependence of solid-state nanopore formation with a focused helium ion beam. We vary membrane thickness in situ and show that the rate of pore expansion follows a reproducible trend under all investigated membrane conditions. We show that this trend shifts to lower ion dose for thin membranes in a manner that can be described quantitatively, allowing devices of arbitrary dimension to be realized. Finally, we demonstrate that thin, small-diameter nanopores formed with our approach can be utilized for high signal-to-noise ratio resistive pulse sensing of DNA.

  7. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  8. Uncertainty of the beam energy measurement in the e+e- collision using Compton backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiao-Hu

    2014-10-01

    The beam energy is measured in the e+e- collision by using Compton backscattering. The uncertainty of this measurement process is studied by virtue of analytical formulas, and the special effects of variant energy spread and energy drift on the systematic uncertainty estimation are also studied with the Monte Carlo sampling technique. These quantitative conclusions are especially important for understanding the uncertainty of the beam energy measurement system.

  9. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  10. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do

  11. Modelling the energy absorbed during a laser beam metal melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between a high-density laser beam and a metallic surface produces a deep narrow melted area that has a characteristic keyhole geometric pattern. The amount of energy absorbed by the meal will depend on the parameters of the laser being applied, and the nature and geometry of the piece. In this paper, a formulation is presented which makes it possible to quantitatively determine the amount of energy absorbed by the metal as a function of a series of experimental parameters. The formulation that has been developed is especially applicable in bead-on-plate tests commonly used to analyze laser-metal interactions in laser technology research. The formulation applies specifically to two types of aluminium alloys. Al-Mg-Si and Al-Zn-Mg. (Author) 15 refs

  12. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5×1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  13. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  14. Summary of LHC MD 398: Verification of the dependence of the BCTF measurements on beam position and bunch length

    CERN Document Server

    Krupa, Michal; Gasior, Marek; Lefevre, Thibaut; Soby, Lars; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the MD was to study the dependency of bunch-by-bunch intensity measurements to beam position and bunch length variations. Large beam position offsets in IR4 and varying bunch length were introduced to compare the performance of the presently installed Fast Beam Current Transformers with the new Integrating Current Transformer and the new Wall Current Transformer. This note explains all the procedures of the LHC MD 398, which took place on 20/07/2015, and presents the obtained results.

  15. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  16. Energy-dependent intracellular translocation of proparathormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L L; MacGregor, R R; Cohn, D V

    1977-01-01

    We previously suggested that after synthesis, proparathormone is transferred from rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi region where its conversion to parathormone occurs. We have attempted to define more closely this transfer process. In the first type of study, bovine parathyroid slices were incubated with [3H]leucine for 10 min and then radioisotope labeling was restricted by addition of a large excess of nonradioactive leucine. Under these conditions, more than 90% of the initially labeled proparathormone was converted to parathormone in 40 min. Lowered temperature in the chase period markedly inhibited the conversion. Several chemical agents were employed individually in the chase period to examine their effect on the conversion process. Antimycin A, dinitrophenol, oligomycin, and anaerobiosis (N2) inhibited the conversion, whereas sodium flouride and cycloheximide had no effect. In the second type of study, parathyroid slices were incubated with [3H]leucine for the entire incubation period. Lowered temperature and inhibitors of energy metabolism and microtubular function all lengthened the interval (lag) between the initial synthesis of [3H]parathormone. Cycloheximide, Tris, and chloroquine decreased the rates of protein synthesis and conversion, respectively, but none had any effect on the lag. We interpret the lag to represent the time of transit for proparathormone from rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi region. We conclude that this transfer process is independent of the synthesis of the prohormone and its conversion to the hormone. Moreover, this translocation requires metabolic energy and appears to be mediated by microtubules.

  17. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Pouzoulet, F.; Mazal, A.

    2016-01-01

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens’ model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec, for Wilkens’ model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec. The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens’ model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm-1. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis.

  18. Energy distribution of projectile fragment particles in heavy ion therapeutic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Tomura, Hiromi; Futami, Yasuyuki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    Production of fragment particles in a patient`s body is one of important problems for heavy charged particle therapy. It is required to know the yield and the energy spectrum for each fragment element - so called `beam quality` to understand the effect of therapeutic beam precisely. In this study, fragment particles produced by practical therapeutic beam of HIMAC were investigated with using tissue-equivalent material and a detector complex. From the results, fragment particles were well identified by difference of their atomic numbers and the beam quality was derived. Responses of the detectors in this energy region were also researched. (author)

  19. Generation of high energy and good beam quality pulses with a master oscillator power amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Z.Xiong; Nicholas Moore; Chen Tao; G.C.Lim; Weiling Huang(黄维玲); Dexiu Huang(黄德修)

    2004-01-01

    A high efficiency and high peak power laser system with short-pulse and good beam quality has been demonstrated by using a master oscillator power amplifier with two-pass amplification configuration. The master oscillator, end-pumped with a fiber-coupled laser diode array, provides low power but excellent beam quality pulses, and the amplifier boosts the pulse energy by orders without significant beam quality degradation. Short pulses of 8.5 ns with energy up to 130 mJ and approximately diffraction limited beam quality have been demonstrated.

  20. High energy backward-Compton scattering γ beam for particle and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GeV photon beam at SPring-8 is produced by backward-Compton scattering of laser photons from 8 GeV electrons. The maximum energy of the photon will be above 3 GeV, and the beam intensity will be 107 photons/sec. Polarization of the photon beam will be 100% at the maximum energy with fully polarized laser photons. We report the outline of the quark nuclear physics project with this high-quality high-intensity beam. (author)

  1. Effect of the density dependent symmetry energy on fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Vinayak, Karan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the density dependence of symmetry energy on fragmentation is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD) Model. We have used the reduced isospin-dependent cross-section with soft equation of state to explain the experimental findings for the system 79_Au^197 + 79_Au^197 for the full colliding geometry. In addition to that we have tried to study the collective response of the momentum dependent interactions(MDI) and symmetry energy towards the multifragmentation

  2. Sensitivity of nuclear stopping towards density dependent symmetry energy

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayak, Karan Singh; Kumar, Suneel

    2011-01-01

    The effect of density dependent symmetry energy on nuclear-stopping is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD). We have used the reduced isospin-dependent cross-section with soft(S) equation of state for the systems having different isostopic content, to explore the various aspects of nuclear stopping. The aim is to pin down the nature of the nuclear stopping with density dependent symmetry energy. Nuclear stopping is found to be sensitive towards the various fo...

  3. Development of an energy selector system for laser-driven proton beam applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, V.; Bijan Jia, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Margarone, D.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Stancampiano, C.; Tramontana, A.

    2014-03-01

    Nowadays, laser-driven proton beams generated by the interaction of high power lasers with solid targets represent a fascinating attraction in the field of the new acceleration techniques. These beams can be potentially accelerated up to hundreds of MeV and, therefore, they can represent a promising opportunity for medical applications. Laser-accelerated proton beams typically show high flux (up to 1011 particles per bunch), very short temporal profile (ps), broad energy spectra and poor reproducibility. In order to overcome these limitations, these beams have be controlled and transported by means of a proper beam handling system. Furthermore, suitable dosimetric diagnostic systems must be developed and tested. In the framework of the ELIMED project, we started to design a dedicated beam transport line and we have developed a first prototype of a beam line key-element: an Energy Selector System (ESS). It is based on permanent dipoles, capable to control and select in energy laser-accelerated proton beams. Monte Carlo simulations and some preliminary experimental tests have been already performed to characterize the device. A calibration of the ESS system with a conventional proton beam will be performed in September at the LNS in Catania. Moreover, an experimental campaign with laser-driven proton beam at the Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University in Belfast is already scheduled and will be completed within 2014.

  4. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR [University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reactors in the US are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1,000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive Al, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube

  5. Polarization of high-energy electrons traversing a laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kotkin, G L; Serbo, V G

    1998-01-01

    When polarized electrons traverse a region where the laser light is focused their polarization varies even if their energy and direction of motion are not changed. This effect is due to interference of the incoming electron wave and an electron wave scattered at zero angle. Equations are obtained which determine the variation of the electron density matrix, and their solutions are given. The change in the electron polarization depends not only on the Compton cross section but on the real part of the forward Compton amplitude as well. It should be taken into account, for example, in simulations of the $e \\to \\gamma$ conversion for future $\\gamma \\gamma$ colliders.

  6. The low-energy-beam and ion-trap facility at NSCL/MSU

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Lawton, D; Lofy, P; Morrissey, D J; Ottarson, J; Ringle, R; Schury, P; Sun, T; Varentsov, V; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the low-energy-beam and ion-trap (LEBIT) project is to convert the high-energy exotic beams produced at NSCL/MSU into low-energy low-emittance beams. This beam manipulation will be done by a combination of a high-pressure gas stopping cell and a radio-frequency quadrupole ion accumulator and buncher. The first experimental program to profit from the low-energy beams produced will be high-accuracy mass measurements on very short-lived isotopes with a 9.4 T Penning trap system. The status of the project is presented with an emphasis on recent stopping tests range of 100 MeV/A sup 4 sup 0 Ar sup 1 sup 8 sup + ions in a gas cell.

  7. Scenario for Precision Beam Energy Calibration in FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Koop, I A

    2015-01-01

    The resonance depolarization method was very successfully used in the experiments at LEP, where the mass of the Z-boson was determined with the relative uncertainty [1, 2]. In the future FCC-ee circular electron-positron collider the luminosity at Z-peak (beam energy 45.5 GeV) is expected be 4-5 orders of magnitude higher and one goal is to perform the same experiments as at LEP, but with much greater accuracy, approaching the level of [3]. Obviously this can be done only by measuring the spin precession frequency. But there are many problems which still need to be solved on the way towards a complete design. The first one: the self-polarization takes too long a time. The Sokolov-Ternov polarization time is about 250 hours at Z-peak. One approach is to install the special field-asymmetric polarizing wigglers to make the self-polarization time much shorter [4, 5] and to utilize only few percent of the polarization degree to measure the resonance spin precession frequency. But these very strong wigglers substan...

  8. Preservation effect of high energy electron beam on kyoho grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoho grapes were kept in cold storage of-0.5 degree C ∼ 0.5 degree C, RH 85% ∼ 95% after irradiation of 400, 700, 1000, 1500, 2500 Gy and SO2 treatment, and the antiseptic effect and storage quality were studied. The result showed that high energy electron beam could control the growth of bacteria, mould, yeast, coliform, alleviate the deterioration of grapes during storage. Irradiation below the dose 1000 Gy can decrease the respiration intensity, prevent the decreasing of titratable acid, ascorbic acid content, and keep higher activity of SOD enzyme. The Vc content was 3.79 mg /100 g after 700 Gy irradiation 90 days, the titratable acid and total soluble sugar content were 0.348%, 11.44%, and the activity of SOD was 14.89 U /g, which was higher than the control significantly (P 2 bleaching spot. Integrate the effects on microorganism control and grape quality, treatment of 700 Gy had the best preservation effect in this study. After preserved for 98 d, the good fruit rate of 700 Gy treatment was 93.33% , significantly higher than other treatments (P < 0.05). (authors)

  9. Equivalence between deep energy-dependent and shallow angular momentum dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently Baye showed that supersymmetry can be applied to determine a shallow l-dependent potential phase equivalent to a deep potential, assumed to be energy-independent and have Panli forbidden states (PFS), for α-α scattering. The PFS are eliminated by this procedure. Such deep potentials are generated as equivalent local potentials (ELP) to the Resonating Group Model (RGM) and are generally energy-dependent. To eliminate this E-dependence as required for the application of Baye's method, l-dependent, but E-independent, deep local potentials were generated by the exact inversion method of Marchenko. Subsequently, the supersymmetric method was used to eliminate the PFS, ensuring that the generalized Levinson theorem is satisfied. As an example, the method was applied to the simple model of two dineutrons scattering in the RGM, where the deep ELP of Horiuchi has a substantial energy-dependence and one PFS only for l=O. 16 refs., 5 figs

  10. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  11. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  12. Separable representation of energy-dependent optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.

  13. SHOCK IMPACT OF HIGH ENERGY/INTENSITY BEAMS WITH MATTER AND HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Sancho, Juan; Schmidt, Rudiger

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the damage caused to the equipment (beamdump, collimators etc) in case of an accident involving full impact of the LHC beam. First, the FLUKA code [1] is used to calculate the proton energy loss in solid carbon and this energy loss data is used as input to a two–dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 [2] to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of the target. The BIG2 code is run for 5 μs and the density distribution at the end of this ...

  14. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  15. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates

  16. A microwave chip-based beam splitter for low-energy guided electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, J; Weber, Ph; Hommelhoff, P

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the splitting of a low-energy electron beam by means of a microwave pseudopotential formed above a planar chip substrate. Beam splitting arises from smoothly transforming the transverse guiding potential for an electron beam from a single-well harmonic confinement into a double-well, thereby generating two separated output beams with $5\\,$mm lateral spacing. Efficient beam splitting is observed for electron kinetic energies up to $3\\,$eV, in excellent agreement with particle tracking simulations. Furthermore, we present a beam splitter potential that is numerically optimized towards coherent and adiabatic splitting of guided electron wave packets. Prospects for electron-based quantum matter-wave optics applications are discussed.

  17. Fragmentation Cross Sections of 12C on Different Targets at Beam Energies from 50 to 100 MeV/Nucleon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Bao-An; ZHANG Feng-Shou; ZHOU Hong-Yu

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation cross sections of reactions 12C+2H,12C,14N,16O at beam energies from 50 to 100 MeV/nucleon are investigated using the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Langevin equation model.It is found that fragment species increase approximately with the increasing target mass.The fragment species and some fragments production cross sections in reactions of 12C+12C,14N,16O show an obvious variation at the beam energies from 50 to 80 MeV/nucleon.However the calculated fragment production cross sections do not change much when the incident energy increases from 80 to 100 MeV/nucleon.

  18. Tackling Dependency: The EU and its Energy Security Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europe is facing a future of augmenting energy demands, domestic depletion, high prices and other energy-political challenges. Climate change, infrastructure resilience, producers' coercive energy policy and the EU's internal market failures have put stress on the EU's emerging energy policy and inspired the union to address its challenges with greater enthusiasm than before. Some of the EU's challenges call for strategic choices of a magnitude that EU is not used to handle. The aim of this report is therefore to identify, analyse and assess the political side of Europe's energy predicament and import dependency. Against the background of increasing dependence on energy imports, the report tries to answer questions: what are the key dimensions of Europe's energy security and what are their consequences?

  19. Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer on Exciton Dimensionality

    OpenAIRE

    Junis Rindermann, Jan; Pozina, Galia; Monemar, Bo; Hultman, Lars; Amano, Hiroshi; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of resonance energy transfer from Wannier-Mott excitons to an organic overlayer on exciton dimensionality. We exploit the excitonic potential disorder in a single quantum well to tune the balance between localized and free excitons by scaling the Boltzmann distribution of excitons through temperature. Theoretical calculations predict the experimentally observed temperature dependence of resonance energy transfer and allow us to quantify the contribution of locali...

  20. DEPENDENCE OF DAMPING CHARACTERISTICS OF A BEAM WITH DAMPING RUBBER MAGNETIC POWDER ON RUBBER PROPERTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Zeng He; Huiming Zheng; Ning Zhang

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever beam with Damping Material Applying Rubber Magnetic Powder (DRM)has been investigated.Two methods are selected to hold DRM to a vibrating steel beam,one is to attach DRM by the magnetic attractive force (called DRM beam) and the other by adhesive bonding (called AB-DRM beam).Different from the damping property of AB-DRM beam caused by shear deformation of damping material,the damping property of DRM beam is characterized by the sliding frictional loss together with the internal loss of damping material.The authors established a formulation to predict the damping characteristics of DRM beam,which was validated experimentally.It is found that rubber material loss factor/β has a decisive influence on damping improvement of DRM beam versus AB-DRM beam.If/β is smaller than the critical value around 0.8255,a valid range of vibratory amplitude always exists in which DRM beam can achieve better damping than AB-DRM beam;conversely,if/β is bigger than the critical value,the valid range does not exist when slide occurs.Such results are used to determine the merits and limitations of DRM and develop design guidelines.

  1. Study on Size-Dependent Young’s Modulus of a Silicon Nano beam by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young’s modulus of a silicon nano beam with a rectangular cross-section is studied by molecular dynamics method. Dynamic simulations are performed for doubly clamped silicon nano beams with lengths ranging from 4.888 to 12.491 nm and cross-sections ranging from 1.22 nm ×1.22 nm to 3.39 nm × 3.39 nm. The results show that Young’s moduli of such small silicon nano beams are much higher than the value of Young’s modulus for bulk silicon. Moreover, the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus of the Si nano beam are strongly dependent not only on the size of the nano beam but also on surface effects. Young’s modulus increases significantly with the decreasing of the thickness of the silicon nano beam. This result qualitatively agrees with one of the conclusions based on a semi continuum model, in which the surface relaxation and the surface tension were taken into consideration. The impacts of the surface reconstruction with (2 ×1) dimmers on the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus are studied in this paper too. It is shown that the surface reconstruction makes the silicon nano beam stiffer than the one without the surface reconstruction, resulting in a higher resonant frequency and a larger Young’s modulus

  2. Nuclear fragmentation of high-energy light-ion beams in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light-ion beams ranging between carbon and neon with energies of a few hundred MeV/u offer favorable conditions for the treatment of deep-seated tumors. Nuclear fragmentation experiments are presented to study favorable therapy beams simultaneously in thick water target. Comparative measurements with 10B, 12C, 14N, 16O beams are described. (R.P.) 5 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Calculation of energy spectra for the therapeutic electron beams from depth-dose curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note the algorithm for calculation of the electron energy spectrum from the depth-dose curve was tested by data on a 4 MeV linear accelerator with scanning beam. A Perspex phantom with cellulose triacetate dosimetric films was irradiated on a conveyor moving perpendicularly to the area of beam scanning, thus simulating irradiation by broad beam. Excellent agreement between measured and calculated spectra is claimed. (U.K.)

  4. RF broad-beam low-energy ion source with electron compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zykov A. V.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of single-grid RF ion source with 250 mm beam diameter and 1A beam current have been studied. Energy distribution functions of electrons and ions emitted by the source have been measured. It is shown that the emitted electron current is sufficient for full ion beam current compensation. The technique of ion to electron current ratio control allowing to change this ratio in wide range is proposed. Using the ICP in the source allows to rich high current density in the low ion energy range with the possibility of independent control of ion energy and current density.

  5. Measurement of low energy longitudinal polarised positron beams via a Bhabha polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, G; Alexander, Gideon; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of a longitudinal polarised positron beam in an $e^+e^-$ linear collider calls for its polarisation monitoring and measurement at low energies near its production location. Here it is shown that a relatively simple Bhabha scattering polarimeter allows, at energies below 5000 MeV, a more than adequate positron beam longitudinal polarisation measurement by using only the final state electrons. It is further shown that out of the three, 10, 250 or 5000 MeV positron beam energy locations, where the polarisationmeasurement in the TESLA linear collider can be performed, the 250 MeV site is best suited for this task.

  6. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  7. A Layer Correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T P A; Aleksa, M; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Arik, E; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K; Banfi, D; Baron, S; Barr, A J; Beccherle, R; Beck, H P; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Benchekroun, D; Benjamin, D P; Benslama, K; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Bernabeu, J; Bertelsen, H; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Boonekamp, M; Bosman, M; Bourdarios, C; Broklova, Z; Burckhart Chromek, D; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Calvet, D; Canneri, M; Capeans Garrido, M; Caprini, M; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Catinaccio, A; Cauz, D; Cavalli, D; Cavalli Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cetin, S A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chouridou, S; Ciobotaru, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, B; Cobal, M; Cogneras, E; Conde Muino, P; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Cornelissen, T; Correard, S; Corso Radu, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cuneo, S; Cwetanski, P; Da Silva, D; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Darbo, G; Davidek, T; De, K; Defay, P O; Dekhissi, B; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Dobos, D; Dobson, M; Dolgoshein, B A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouchi, C; Drohan, J; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, P; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Eifert, T F; Einsweiler, K; El Kacimi, M; Elsing, M; Emelyanov, D; Escobar, C; Etienvre, A I; Fabich, A; Facius, K; Fakhr-Edine, A I; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farthouat, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fayard, L; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fenyuk, A; Fergusson, D; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Filippini, G; Flick, T; Fournier, D; Francavilla, P; Francis, D; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, M; Gallop, B J; Gameiro, S; Gan, K K; Garcia, R; Garcia, C; Gavrilenko, I L; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Ghodbane, N; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Glonti, G; Göttfert, T.; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gomez, M D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Goujdami, D; Grahn, K J; Grenier, P; Grigalashvili, N; Grishkevich, Y; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Härtel, R.; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hance, M; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R J; Heinemann, F E W; Henriques Correia, A; Henss, T; Hervas, L; Higon, E; Hill, J C; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hruska, I; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hulsbergen, W; Hurwitz, M; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Jansen, E; Jen-La Plante, I; Johansson, P D C; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Jorgensen, S; Joseph, J; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Karyukhin, A; Kataoka, M; Kayumov, F; Kazarov, A; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Kerschen, N; Kersten, S; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khramov, E; Khristachev, A; Khubua, J; Kittelmann, T H; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Kolos, S; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T Z; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V; Kudin, L G; Kulchitsky, Y; Lacasta, C; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Lari, T; Le Bihan, A C; Lechowski, M; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lester, C G; Liang, Z; Lichard, P; Liebig, W; Lipniacka, A; Lokajicek, M; Louchard, L; Lourerio, K F; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Ma, H; Mackeprang, R; Maio, A; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mandelli, L; Maneira, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, F; Mathes, M; Mazzanti, M; McFarlane, K W; McPherson, R; Mchedlidze, G; Mehlhase, S; Meirosu, C; Meng, Z; Meroni, C; Mialkovski, V; Mikulec, B; Milstead, D; Minashvili, I; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Moed, S; Monnier, E; Moorhead, G; Morettini, P; Morozov, S V; Mosidze, M; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E W J; Munar, A; Myagkov, A; Nadtochi, A V; Nakamura, K; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Newcomer, F M; Nikitine, I; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S B; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, S; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paolone, V; Parodi, F; Parsons, J; Parzhitskiy, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passmored, S M; Pater, J; Patrichev, S; Peez, M; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petti, R; Phillips, P W; Pina, J; Pinto, B; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poppleton, A; Poveda, J; Pralavorio, P; Pribyl, L; Price, M J; Prieur, D; Puigdengoles, C; Puzo, P; Røhne, O.; Ragusa, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reeves, K; Reisinger, I; Rembser, C; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Reznicek, P; Ridel, M; Risso, P; Riu, I; Robinson, D; Roda, C; Roe, S; Rohne, O; Romaniouk, A; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Ruiz, A; Rusakovich, N; Rust, D; Ryabov, Y F; Ryjov, V; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Salzburger, A; Sandaker, H; Santamarina Rios, C; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Sauvage, G; Says, L P; Schaefer, M; Schegelsky, V A; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, C; Schultes, J; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seixas, J M; Seliverstov, D M; Serin, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalanda, N; Shaw, C; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Silva, J; Simion, S; Simonyan, M; Sloper, J E; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, O; Soloviev, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Spano, F; Speckmayer, P; Stancu, S; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Straessner, A; Suchkov, S I; Suk, M; Szczygiel, R; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, F; Tas, P; Tayalati, Y; Tegenfeldt, F; Teuscher, R; Thioye, M; Tikhomirov, V O; Timmermans, C J W P; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Tremblet, L; Troncon, C; Tsiareshka, P; Tyndel, M; Karagoez Unel, M; Unal, G; Unel, G; Usai, G; Van Berg, R; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vandelli, W; Vannucci, F; Vartapetian, A; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vasilyeva, L; Vazeille, F; Vernocchi, F; Vetter-Cole, Y; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; de Vivie, J B; Volpi, M; Vu Anh, T; Wang, C; Warren, M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Wells, P S; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wiessmann, M; Wilkens, H; Williams, H H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yasu, Y; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zhang, H; Zhelezko, A; Zhou, N

    2011-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by 11% to 25% compared to the response at the electromagnetic scale.

  8. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  9. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  10. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO2 parallel plates without energy loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a pair of grooved SiO2 parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams

  11. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO2 parallel plates without energy loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    Using a pair of grooved SiO2 parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800-2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  12. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, Lionel R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  13. The Utrecht 850 kV cascade generator I. Beam deflection and energy control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braams, C.M.; Smith, P.B.

    1960-01-01

    The beam deflection magnet and energy control system of the Utrecht cascade generator are described. The uniform-field magnet has entrance and exit slits located outside the magnetic held. Since the cascade generator produces a vertical beam, the most convenient choice for the angle of deflection wa

  14. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF HIGH-ENERGY BUNCHED BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN, J.M.

    2007-06-25

    Stochastic cooling of 100 GeV/nucleon bunched beams has been achieved in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The physics and technology of the longitudinal cooling system are discussed, and plans for a transverse cooling system are outlined.

  15. LET effects of high energy ion beam irradiation on polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Shu; Kanzaki, Kenichi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yoshida, Yoichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sugimoto, Masaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    Thin films of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) were irradiated with 2-20 MeV H{sup +} and He{sup +} ion beams. The beams caused heterogeneous reactions of crosslinking and main chain scission in the films. The relative efficiency of the crosslinking was drastically changed in comparison with that of main chain scission. The anomalous change in the molecular weight distribution was analyzed with increasing irradiation fluence, and the ion beam induced reaction radius; track radius was determined for the radiation sources by the function of molecular weight dispersion. Obtained values were 59{+-}15 A and 14{+-}6 A for 2 MeV He{sup +} and 20 MeV H{sup +} ion beams respectively. (author)

  16. Change of texture, microdeformation and hardness in surface layer of TiNi alloy depending on the number of pulses of electron beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, L. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Markov, A. B., E-mail: a.markov@hq.tsc.ru; Yakovlev, E. V., E-mail: yakovev@lve.hcei.tsc.ru; Ozur, G. E., E-mail: ozur@lve.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Rotshtein, V. P., E-mail: vrotshtein@yahoo.com [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Mironov, Yu. P., E-mail: myp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This work comprises a study of the influence of the pulse number of low-energy high-current electron beam (LEHCEB) exposure on the value and character of distribution of residual elastic stresses, texturing effects and the relationship between structural-phase states and physical and mechanical properties of the modified surface layers of TiNi alloy. LEHCEB processing of the surface of TiNi samples was carried out using a RITM-SP [3] installation. Energy density of electron beam was constant at E{sub s} = 3.9 ± 0.5 J/cm{sup 2}; pulse duration was 2.8 ± 0.3 μs. The number of pulses in the series was changeable, (n = 2–128). It was shown that as the result of multiple LEHCEB processing of TiNi samples, hierarchically organized multilayer structure is formed in the surface layer. The residual stress field of planar type is formed in the modified surface layer as following: in the direction of the normal to the surface the strain component ε{sub ⊥} < 0 (compressing strain), and in a direction parallel to the surface, the strain component ε{sub ||} > 0 (tensile deformation). Texturing effects and the level of residual stresses after LEHCEB processing of TiNi samples with equal energy density of electron beam (∼3.8 J/cm{sup 2}) depend on the number of pulses and increase with the rise of n > 10.

  17. Performance of electronic devices submitted to X-rays and high energy proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G., E-mail: shila@if.usp.br [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Renato Archer, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Santos, R.B.B.; Gimenez, S.P. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H.; Barbosa, M.D.L. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Seixas, L.E.; Melo, W.; Lima, J.A. de [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Renato Archer, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    In this work we have studied the radiation effects on MOSFET electronic devices. The integrated circuits were exposed to 10 keV X-ray radiation and 2.6 MeV energy proton beam. We have irradiated MOSFET devices with two different geometries: rectangular-gate transistor and circular-gate transistor. We have observed the cumulative dose provokes shifts on the threshold voltage and increases or decreases the transistor's off-state and leakage current. The position of the trapped charges in modern CMOS technology devices depends on radiation type, dose rate, total dose, applied bias and is a function of device geometry. We concluded the circular-gate transistor is more tolerant to radiation than the rectangular-gate transistor.

  18. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO2 in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance

  19. Two-Loop Beam and Soft Functions for Rapidity-Dependent Jet Vetoes

    CERN Document Server

    Gangal, Shireen; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Jet vetoes play an important role in many analyses at the LHC. Traditionally, jet vetoes have been imposed using a restriction on the transverse momentum $p_{Tj}$ of jets. Alternatively, one can also consider jet observables for which $p_{Tj}$ is weighted by a smooth function of the jet rapidity $y_j$ that vanishes as $|y_j| \\to \\infty$. Such observables are useful as they provide a natural way to impose a tight veto on central jets but a looser one at forward rapidities. We consider two such rapidity-dependent jet veto observables, $\\mathcal{T}_{Bj}$ and $\\mathcal{T}_{Cj}$, and compute the required beam and dijet soft functions for the jet-vetoed color-singlet production cross section at two loops. At this order, clustering effects from the jet algorithm become important. The dominant contributions are computed fully analytically while corrections that are subleading in the limit of small jet radii are expressed in terms of finite numerical integrals. Our results enable the full NNLL' resummation and are an ...

  20. Polarization-dependent single-beam laser-induced grating-like effects on titanium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, Santiago [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico)], E-mail: camachol@cicese.mx; Evans, Rodger [Departamento de Optica, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California 22860 (Mexico); Escobar-Alarcon, Luis [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico DF 11801 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Miguel A. [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n, esq. Jesus Carranza, Toluca, Estado de Mexico 50120 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    In this paper we present results on polarization-dependent laser-induced effects on titanium (Ti) thin films. We irradiated the titanium films, in ambient air, using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 9 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz). Using a series of pulses of fluence well below the ablation threshold, it was possible to form grating-like structures, whose grooves run parallel to the linear polarization of the incident beam. No grating-like structures were obtained when circularly polarized light was used. Our results revealed the remarkable formation of tiny (100 nm and even smaller diameter) craters, which self-arrange quasi-periodically along the ridges (never on the valleys) of the grating-like structure. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the laser-induced changes on the surface of the titanium films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the irradiated areas on the titanium films. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the grooves in the grating-like structure, build up from the laser-induced oxidation of titanium. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that periodic surface structures are reported to be induced below the ablation threshold regime, with the grooves made of crystalline metal oxide, in this case TiO{sub 2} in the well-known Rutile phase. The laser irradiated areas on the film acquired selective (upon recording polarization) holographic reflectance.

  1. Separable Representation of Energy-Dependent Optical Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Hlophe, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background. One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity e...

  2. Reconstruction-plane-dependent weighted FDK algorithm for cone beam volumetric CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang

    2005-04-01

    The original FDK algorithm has been extensively employed in medical and industrial imaging applications. With an increased cone angle, cone beam (CB) artifacts in images reconstructed by the original FDK algorithm deteriorate, since the circular trajectory does not satisfy the so-called data sufficiency condition (DSC). A few "circular plus" trajectories have been proposed in the past to reduce CB artifacts by meeting the DSC. However, the circular trajectory has distinct advantages over other scanning trajectories in practical CT imaging, such as cardiac, vascular and perfusion applications. In addition to looking into the DSC, another insight into the CB artifacts of the original FDK algorithm is the inconsistency between conjugate rays that are 180° apart in view angle. The inconsistence between conjugate rays is pixel dependent, i.e., it varies dramatically over pixels within the image plane to be reconstructed. However, the original FDK algorithm treats all conjugate rays equally, resulting in CB artifacts that can be avoided if appropriate view weighting strategy is exercised. In this paper, a modified FDK algorithm is proposed, along with an experimental evaluation and verification, in which the helical body phantom and a humanoid head phantom scanned by a volumetric CT (64 x 0.625 mm) are utilized. Without extra trajectories supplemental to the circular trajectory, the modified FDK algorithm applies reconstruction-plane-dependent view weighting on projection data before 3D backprojection, which reduces the inconsistency between conjugate rays by suppressing the contribution of one of the conjugate rays with a larger cone angle. Both computer-simulated and real phantom studies show that, up to a moderate cone angle, the CB artifacts can be substantially suppressed by the modified FDK algorithm, while advantages of the original FDK algorithm, such as the filtered backprojection algorithm structure, 1D ramp filtering, and data manipulation efficiency, can be

  3. Polarization of high-energy electrons traversing a laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation). Phys. Dept.; Perlt, H. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leipzig University, 04109, Leipzig, BRD (Germany)

    1998-02-21

    When polarized electrons traverse a region where the laser light is focused their polarization varies even if their energy and direction of motion are not changed. This effect is due to interference of the incoming electron wave and an electron wave scattered at zero angle. Equations are obtained which determine the variation of the electron-density matrix, and their solutions are given. The change in the electron polarization depends not only on the Compton cross section but on the real part of the forward Compton amplitude as well. It should be taken into account, for example, in simulations of the e{yields}{gamma} conversion for future {gamma}{gamma} colliders. (orig.). 16 refs.

  4. Reactions of Laser Ablated Metal Plasma with Molecular Alcohol Beams: Dependence of the Produced Cluster Ion Species on the Beam Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Dong-Mei; LI Hai-Yang; ZHANG Shu-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The gas phase reactions of metal plasma with alcohol clusters were studied by time of flight mass spectrometry(TOFMS) using laser ablation-molecular beam (LAMB) method. The significant dependence of the product cluster ions on the molecular beam conditions was observed. When the plasma acted on the low density parts of the pulsed molecular beam, the metal-alcohol complexes M+An (M=Cu, Al, Mg, Ni and A=C2H5OH, CH3OH) were the dominant products, and the sizes of product ion clusters were smaller. While the plasma acted on the high density part of the beam, however, the main products turned to be protonated alcohol clusters H+An and, as the reactions of plasma with methanol were concerned, the protonated water-methanol complexes H3O+(CH3OH)n with a larger size(n≤ 12 for ethanol and n≤24 for methanol). Similarly, as the pressure of the carrier helium gas was varied from1 × 105 to 5 × 105 Pa, the main products were changed from M+An to H+An and the sizes of the clusters also increased. The changes in the product clusters were attributed to the different formation mechanism of the output ions,that is, the M+An ions came from the reaction of metal ion with alcohol clusters, while H+An mainly from collisional reaction of electron with alcohol clusters.

  5. Effects of a dielectric material in an ion source on the ion beam current density and ion beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y., E-mail: yutaka-fujiwara@aist.go.jp; Sakakita, H.; Nakamiya, A. [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Innovative Plasma Processing Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S. [Innovative Plasma Processing Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand a strong focusing phenomenon that occurs in a low-energy hydrogen ion beam, the electron temperature, the electron density, and the space potential in an ion source with cusped magnetic fields are measured before and after the transition to the focusing state using an electrostatic probe. The experimental results show that no significant changes are observed before or after the transition. However, we found unique phenomena that are characterized by the position of the electrostatic probe in the ion source chamber. Specifically, the extracted ion beam current density and energy are obviously enhanced in the case where the electrostatic probe, which is covered by a dielectric material, is placed close to an acceleration electrode.

  6. Beam test of multi-bunch energy compensation system in the accelerator test facility at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam test of the multi-bunch energy compensation system (ECS) was performed using the ΔF method with the 2856±4.327 HMz accelerating structures in the accelerator test facility (ATF) at KEK. The 1.54 GeV S-band linac of the ATF was designed to accelerate a multi-bunch beam the consists of 20 bunches with 2.8 ns spacing. The multi-bunch beam with 2.0 x 1010 electrons/bunch has an energy deviation of about 8.5% at the end of the linac due to transient beam loading without ECS. The ATF linac is the injector of the ATF damping ring (DR), whose energy acceptance is ±0.5%. The beam loading compensation system is necessary in the ATF linac for the successful injection of multi-bunch into DR. The rf system of the linac consists of 8 regular rf units with the SLED system and 2 ECS rf units without the SLED system. The accelerating structures of the regular units are driven at 2856 MHz and the 2 ECS structures are operated with slightly different rf frequencies of 2856±4.327 MHz. In the beam test, we have succeeded in compressing the multi-bunch energy spread within the energy acceptance of the DR using ΔF ECS. The principle of the beam loading compensation system of KEK-ATF and the experimental results are described in this paper. (author)

  7. Energy saving estimation on radiation process. Electron beam curing of paint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Hideaki (Nihon Parkerizing Co., Ltd., Tokyo); Maekawa, H.; Ito, Y.; Nishikawa, I.; Fujii, H.; Murata, K.

    1982-01-01

    When the quantity of paint used for industrial coating is assumed to be 420,000 tons, it is estimated that the area being coated is 2.8 billion m/sup 2/, the petroleum required for pretreatment steam, drying and baking is 1.68 million tons, and the required amount of energy saving is 120,000 tons per year in terms of petroleum. The authors examined how the adoption of electron beam curing for surface coating contributes to the energy saving. So far, it has been said that electron beam curing is more efficient than thermal or light curing in energy consumption, but the premise condition was not clear. The theoretical energy requirement for thermal curing, light curing and electron beam curing was calculated and compared. The comparison of the measured values was also performed. The amount of energy required for thermal curing, UV light curing and electron beam curing was roughly 100:10:1, and the cost of energy for them was 50:5:1. In spite of the large merit of electron beam curing, it has not spread as expected, because of the repayment cost of the facility and the cost of inert gas required for the process. Energy saving is brought about by electron beam curing, but the overall cost must be examined case by case.

  8. A study on the proton beam energy(50 MeV) measurement and diagnosis (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jong Suh; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yoo Suk; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Lee, Ji Sub; Hah, Hang Hoh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    The main purpose of this project is the precise ion measurement of proton beam energy extracted at RF 25.89 MHz from the MC-50 cyclotron of SF type. There are several method for particle energy measurement. We measured the 50 MeV proton energy by using the E-{Delta}E method in 1993. And also in our experiment used range, reapproval of energy of extracted proton beam at RF 25.89 MHz was performed, which attained the same energy with the result used elastic scattering within the error range. 10 figs, 2 pix, 3 tabs, 3 refs. (Author).

  9. Determination of the LEP Beam Energy using Radiative Fermion-pair Events, 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    We present a determination of the LEP beam energy using "radiative return" fermion-pair events recorded at centre-of-mass energies from 183 GeV to 209 GeV. We find no evidence of a disagreement between the OPAL data and the LEP Energy Workings Group's standard calibration. Including the energy- averaged 11 MeV uncertainty in the standard determination, the beam energy we obtain from the OPAL data is higher than that obtained from the LEP calibration by 0+-34(stat.)+-27(syst.)MeV

  10. High-energy beams of radioactive nuclei and their biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several exploratory measurements have been conducted with radioactive beams to test the feasibility of using these beams to measure effective stopping power of heterogeneous media for heavy charged particles. Such measurements will provide direct information on the average electron density and average stopping number of a target with an unknown heterogeneous beam path. This information, once obtained with a suitable radioactive beam, can be used in equations to calculate the energy of any heavy particle of therapeutic choice so that the Bragg peak of the therapeutic beam can be placed on the tumor volume. A beam of high-energy heavy ions was collimated to a diameter of 1.58 cm (PEBA has a good positional accuracy as long as the beam diameter is less than 2 cm), and made to enter target materials (mixed or homogeneous) positioned between the detector banks and centered along the beam axis. Measurements have been made with 11C and 19Ne beams, but the short half-life of 19Ne (19 sec) allows prompt repeated measurements, making that nucleus very interesting for these purposes. Only the results obtained with it are reported

  11. Low energy electron beam processing in Europe at the end of the 20th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overview of low energy electron beam processing in Europe was presented. The presentation contained the following topics: the early installations, years of growth, stagnation, status 1999 and the future of this technology

  12. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M. R., E-mail: mrvasquez@coe.upd.edu.ph [Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50–100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  13. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  14. Chromaticity of the lattice and beam stability in energy-recovery linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2011-12-23

    Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators promising to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and hold the promise of delivering electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. Use of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities converts ERLs into nearly perfect 'perpetuum mobile' accelerators, wherein the beam is accelerated to a desirable energy, used, and then gives the energy back to the RF field. One potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam break-up instability that could severely limit the available beam current. In this paper, I present a method of suppressing these dangerous effects using a natural phenomenon in the accelerators, viz., the chromaticity of the transverse motion.

  15. A cryogenically cooled, ultra-high-energy-resolution, trap-based positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natisin, M. R., E-mail: mnatisin@physics.ucsd.edu; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    A technique is described to produce a pulsed, magnetically guided positron beam with significantly improved beam characteristics over those available previously. A pulsed, room-temperature positron beam from a buffer gas trap is used as input to a trap that captures the positrons, compresses them both radially and axially, and cools them to 50 K on a cryogenic CO buffer gas before ejecting them as a pulsed beam. The total energy spread of the beam formed using this technique is 6.9 ± 0.7 meV FWHM, which is a factor of ∼5 better than the previous state-of-the-art, while simultaneously having sub-microsecond temporal resolution and millimeter spatial resolution. Possible further improvements in beam quality are discussed.

  16. Material identification based upon energy-dependent attenuation of neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-06

    Various technologies pertaining to identifying a material in a sample and imaging the sample are described herein. The material is identified by computing energy-dependent attenuation of neutrons that is caused by presence of the sample in travel paths of the neutrons. A mono-energetic neutron generator emits the neutron, which is downscattered in energy by a first detector unit. The neutron exits the first detector unit and is detected by a second detector unit subsequent to passing through the sample. Energy-dependent attenuation of neutrons passing through the sample is computed based upon a computed energy of the neutron, wherein such energy can be computed based upon 1) known positions of the neutron generator, the first detector unit, and the second detector unit; or 2) computed time of flight of neutrons between the first detector unit and the second detector unit.

  17. Dependence of the OER and RBE on neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the results of a new series of biological intercomparisons of various neutron beams from facilities all over the world using an established line of cells in vitro. The RBE experiments were designed to take advantage of the fact that, with cells in culture, variations within an experiment are much smaller than those between experiments. Consequently, neutron facilities were intercompared in pairs within a given experiment, using cells from a common culture irradiated on the same day. To determine values for the oxygen enhancement ratio for neutrons generated by a range of energies, cells were irradiated while sealed in ampules. Hypoxia was achieved by using a high cell concentration

  18. Bioeffects of Low Energy Ion Beam Implantation: DNA Damage, Mutation and Gene Transter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Mingli; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    Low-energy ion beam implantation(10~200 keV)has been proved to have a wide range of biological effects and is broadly used in the breeding of crops and micro-organisms.To understand its mechanisms better and facilitate its applications,the developments in the bioeffects of low energy ion beam implantation in the past twenty years are summarized in this paper.

  19. Frontiers of particle beam and high energy density plasma science using pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the symposium on “Frontiers of Particle Beam and High Energy Density Plasma Science using Pulse Power Technology” held in November 20-21, 2009 at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected. The papers reflect the present status and resent progress in the experiment and theoretical works on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  20. A novel rice transformation method mediated by low energy ion beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Transfer the foreign DNA into rice via ion beam was first reported in 1994 in our lab. In this study, we aimed to establish an efficient transformation system mediated by low energy ion beam. Factors influenced the transformation were carefully investigated, including type of ion, parameters of ion energy, dose and dose rate, and plant genotype and receptors. Molecular and genetic characterization of a large number of these plants (more than 250 independent transgenic plants) provided the basis information of this system.

  1. Numerical Studies of Electromagnetic Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large energy anisotropy, free energy is available to drive transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instabilities. Such slow-wave transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be described by the so-called Darwin model, which neglects the fast-wave portion of the displacement current. The Weibel instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the Weibel instability using the Beam Eigenmode And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  2. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  3. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-01

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  4. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  5. Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Mohamed Y., E-mail: zakaria@vt.edu; Al-Haik, Mohammad Y.; Hajj, Muhammad R. [Virginia Tech, Norris Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2015-07-13

    Previous attempts to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations have been based on attaching a beam to a moving wing or structure. Here, we exploit self-excited oscillations of a fluttering composite beam to harvest energy using piezoelectric transduction. Details of the beam properties and experimental setup are presented. The effects of preset angle of attack, wind speed, and load resistance on the levels of harvested power are determined. The results point to a complex relation between the aerodynamic loading and its impact on the static deflection and amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations on one hand and the load resistance and level of power harvested on the other hand.

  6. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio [National Institute of Nuclear Physics INFN-LNS, Catania 95125 (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  7. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  8. Application of Energy Finite Element Method in Active Vibration Control of Piezoelectric Intelligent Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the transmission and equilibrium relationship of vibration energy in beam-like structures, the Galerkin weighted residual method was applied to equation discretization. An equivalent transformation of feedback element was suggested to develop the Energy Finite Element model of a composite piezoelectric cantilever beam driven by harmonic excitation on lateral direction, with both systems with and without time delay being studied and the power input estimation of harmonic excitation was discussed for the resolution of Energy Finite Element function. Then the energy density solutions of the piezoelectric coupling beam through Energy Finite Element Method (EFEM and classical wave theory were compared to verify the EFEM model, which presented a good accordance. Further investigation was undertaken about the influence of control parameters including the feedback gain and arrangement of piezoelectric patches on characteristics of system energy density distribution.

  9. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  10. A particle-in-cell mode beam dynamics simulation of medium energy beam transport for the SSC-Linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Chen; XU Meng-Xin; HE Shou-Bo; XIA Jia-Wen; HE Yuan; YUAN You-Jin; LU Yuan-Rong; LIU Yong; WANG Zhi-Jun; DU Xiao-Nan; YAO Qing-Gao; LIU Ge

    2012-01-01

    A new linear accelerator system,called the SSC-Linac injector,is being designed at HIRFL (the heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou).As part of the SSC-Linac,the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) consists of seven magnetic quadrupoles,a re-buncher and a diagnose box.The total length of this segment is about 1.75 m.The beam dynamics simulation in MEBT has been studied using the TRACK 3D particlein-cell code,and the simulation result shows that the beam accelerated from the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) matches well with the acceptance of the following drift tube linac (DTL) in both the transverse and longitudinal phase spaces,and that most of the particles can be captured by the final sector focusing cyclotronfor further acceleration.The longitudinal emittance of the RFQ and the longitudinal acceptance of the DTL was calculated in detail,and a multi-particle beam dynamics simulation from the ion source to the end of the DTL was done to verify the original design.

  11. A particle-in-cell mode beam dynamics simulation of medium energy beam transport for the SSC-Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chen; He, Yuan; Yuan, You-Jin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Du, Xiao-Nan; Yao, Qing-Gao; Liu, Ge; Xu, Meng-Xin; He, Shou-Bo; Xia, Jia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    A new linear accelerator system, called the SSC-Linac injector, is being designed at HIRFL (the heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou). As part of the SSC-Linac, the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) consists of seven magnetic quadrupoles, a re-buncher and a diagnose box. The total length of this segment is about 1.75 m. The beam dynamics simulation in MEBT has been studied using the TRACK 3D particle-in-cell code, and the simulation result shows that the beam accelerated from the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) matches well with the acceptance of the following drift tube linac (DTL) in both the transverse and longitudinal phase spaces, and that most of the particles can be captured by the final sector focusing cyclotron for further acceleration. The longitudinal emittance of the RFQ and the longitudinal acceptance of the DTL was calculated in detail, and a multi-particle beam dynamics simulation from the ion source to the end of the DTL was done to verify the original design.

  12. Analysis of an energy harvesting piezoelectric beam with energy storage circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate (distributed-parameter) models of energy harvesting piezoelectric beams have recently been presented and experimentally validated. However, these studies were limited in their practical significance since the external electrical load was assumed to be a simple linear impedance (resistor or capacitor), without any means of energy storage. This paper presents and validates experimentally a mathematical model of a base-excited piezoelectric cantilever connected across an energy storage circuit comprising a diode in series with a capacitor. The resulting half-wave AC–DC rectification enables the capacitor to retain a part of the harvested energy (i.e. accumulate a mean voltage). The Euler–Bernoulli beam model with piezoelectric coupling is used. The resulting wave equation is transformed into modal space using the analytical modal analysis method (AMAM). The Shockley diode equation is used to model the current. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved for a prescribed base motion input using a numerical integration routine. The analysis of the same cantilever connected across an unrectified capacitor is also performed for comparative purposes. Theoretical studies show that, for the case of the rectified capacitor, as well as the unrectified capacitor, the energy harvesting effect does not have a dampening effect on the steady-state vibration. However, whereas the resonance frequency of the unrectified system is a function of the load, the resonance frequency of the rectified system is fixed at a value that is very close to the open circuit resonance frequency of the unrectified system. The theoretical findings are validated by the experimental results. (paper)

  13. Biomedical applications of medium energy particle beams at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At LAMPF an 800-MeV proton accelerator is used to produce intense beams of secondary protons, pi mesons, and muons which are being employed in several areas of biomedical research. The primary proton beam is used to produce short-lived radioisotopes of clinical interest. Carefully tailored secondary proton beams are used to obtain density reconstructions of samples with a dose much less than that required by x-ray CT scanners. The elemental composition of tissue samples is being determined non-destructively with muonic x-ray analysis. Finally, an extensive program, with physical, biological, and clinical components, is underway to evaluate negative pi mesons for use in cancer radiotherapy. The techniques used in these experiments and recent results are described

  14. Evaluation of the relative effectiveness of LiF-based TL detectors for electron radiotherapy beams over the energy range 6-20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahajowski, D.; Gora, E.; Rozwadowska-Bogusz, B.; Lesiak, J.; Polak, B.; Kabat, D.; Zawadzki, P. [Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow Branch, Garncarska 11, 31-115 Krakow (Poland); Waligorski, M.P.R. [Centre of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow Branch, Garncarska 11, 31-115 Krakow (Poland); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: z5waligo@cyf-kr.edu.pl

    2008-02-15

    We have performed systematic measurements of the efficiency, C{sub E}=/, of MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and LiB (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Mn,Si) thermoluminescence (TL) detectors exposed to electron radiotherapy beams of nominal energy 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV relative to Co-60 or 6 MV photon beams ( is the average TL output of a batch of detectors exposed to a given dose of photon beam radiation or to a beam of electrons of energy E). The TL detectors were sintered pellets of 4.5 mm diameter and ca. 0.8 mm thickness. Detectors were exposed in water to 2 Gy at respective energy-dependent depths d{sub max} applied in clinical dosimetry. The obtained results were re-calculated versus mean electron energy in the beam at depths d{sub max}. We found that, for clinical purposes, both types of TL detectors show no energy dependence: presented as average values over the investigated energy range, for MTS-N detectors =1.07{+-}1.1% and for LiB =1.03{+-}1.7%. Thus, while no correction is required for dose values estimated by LiB TLDs, the under-response of MTS-N detectors exposed to a beam of electrons has to be corrected by about 7%. At mean energy of electrons in therapeutic electron beams below about 5 MeV a decline in the response of both types of TL detectors is observed.

  15. On the Casimir Energy of Frequency Dependent Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, N; Weigel, H

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum polarization (or Casimir) energies can be straightforwardly computed from scattering data for static field configurations whose interactions with the fluctuating field are frequency independent. In effective theories, however,such interactions are typically frequency dependent. As a consequence, the relationship between scattering data and the Green's function is modified, which may or may not induce additional contributions to the vacuum polarization energy. We discuss several examples that naturally include frequency dependent interactions: (i) scalar electrodynamics with a static background potential, (ii) an effective theory that emerges from integrating out a heavy degree of freedom, and (iii) quantum electrodynamics coupled to a frequency dependent dielectric material. In the latter case, we argue that introducing dissipation as required by the Kramers-Kronig relations requires the consideration of the Casimir energy within a statistical mechanics formalism, while in the absence of dissipation we...

  16. Energy dependence of scatter components in multispectral PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution images in PET based on small individual detectors are obtained at the cost of low sensitivity and increased detector scatter. These limitations can be partially overcome by enlarging discrimination windows to include more low-energy events and by developing more efficient energy-dependent methods to correct for scatter radiation from all sources. The feasibility of multispectral scatter correction was assessed by decomposing response functions acquired in multiple energy windows into four basic components: object, collimator and detector scatter, and trues. The shape and intensity of these components are different and energy-dependent. They are shown to contribute to image formation in three ways: useful (true), potentially useful (detector scatter), and undesirable (object and collimator scatter) information to the image over the entire energy range. With the Sherbrooke animal PET system, restoration of detector scatter in every energy window would allow nearly 90% of all detected events to participate in image formation. These observations suggest that multispectral acquisition is a promising solution for increasing sensitivity in high resolution PET. This can be achieved without loss of image quality if energy-dependent methods are made available to preserve useful events as potentially useful events are restored and undesirable events removed

  17. High energy density in matter produced by heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the activities of the GSI Darmstadt (FRG) during 1985 concerning inertial confinement fusion by heavy ion beams. Short communications and abstracts are presented concerning a Z-pinch experiment, heavy ion pumped lasers and X-ray spectroscopy, the study of ion-ion collisions, a RFQ development and beam transport studies, accelerator theory, targets for SIS/ESR experiments, the rayleigh-Taylor instability, studies on the equation of state for matter under high pressure, as well as the development of computer codes. (HSI)

  18. Implement and commissioning of the beam energy feedback system in BEPCII linac

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shaozhe; Liu, Rong; Huang, Xuefang; Qian, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure the beam quality and meet the requirements introduced by the BEPCII storage ring, the beam energy feedback system has been developed at the exit of the linac. This paper describes the implementation and commissioning of this system in detail. The energy feedback system consists of an energy measurement unit, an application software and an execution unit. In order to ensure the real-time monitoring and adjustment of beam energy, we need to introduce a non-interceptive type of online beam energy measurement method which is on the first try in China and the effective mechanism of energy adjustment to achieve this goal. The adjustment of energy is achieved by adjusting the output microwave phase of the RF power source station. The system was put into operation in March 16th, 2016 and achieved the desired results. It can effectively eliminate the low point of the injection rate caused by the fluctuation of the beam center energy and has played an important role in maintaining a high constant inj...

  19. Time-energy relation of the n{sub T}OF neutron beam: energy standards revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, G.; Colonna, N. E-mail: nicola.colonna@ba.infn.it; Marrone, S.; Tagliente, G.; Heil, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mosconi, M.; Moreau, C.; Mengoni, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Angelopoulos, A.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Benlliure, J.; Berthomieux, E.; Bisceglie, E.; Calvino, P.; Capote, R.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Coceva, C.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dababneh, S.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Furman, W.I.; Goncalves, I.F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Ioannides, K.G.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kaeppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kitis, G.; Koehler, P.E.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M.I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Mastinu, P.F.; Milazzo, P.M.; Molina-Coballes, A.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Peskov, V.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Policarpo, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.M.; Rapp, W.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Savvidis, E.; Soares, J.C.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.M.N.; Terlizzi, R.; Tsangas, N.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-21

    The accurate determination of neutron cross-sections as a function of the neutron energy at a time-of-flight facility requires a precise knowledge of the time-energy relation for the neutron beam. For the n{sub T}OF neutron beam at CERN, produced by spallation of high-energy protons on a Pb target, the time-energy relation is connected to the production mechanism and to the subsequent moderation process. A calibration of the neutron energy scale is proposed based on detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the facility. This time-energy relation has been experimentally validated by means of dedicated measurements of standard energy resonances, from 1 eV to approximately 1 MeV. On the basis of the present measurements, it is proposed to correct the energy of the 1.3 eV resonance of {sup 193}Ir, which is commonly considered as an energy standard.

  20. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  1. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  2. Sensitivity of inelastic response to numerical integration of strain energy. [for cantilever beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    The exact solution to the quasi-static, inelastic response of a cantilever beam of rectangular cross section subjected to a bending moment at the tip is obtained. The material of the beam is assumed to be linearly elastic-linearly strain-hardening. This solution is then compared with three different numerical solutions of the same problem obtained by minimizing the total potential energy using Gaussian quadratures of two different orders and a Newton-Cotes scheme for integrating the strain energy of deformation. Significant differences between the exact dissipative strain energy and its numerical counterpart are emphasized. The consequence of this on the nonlinear transient responses of a beam with solid cross section and that of a thin-walled beam on elastic supports under impulsive loads are examined.

  3. Time-energy relation of the nTOF neutron beam standards revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Lorusso, G; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Pol, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Assimakopoulos, P A; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Benlliure, J; Berthomieux, E; Bisceglie, E; Coceva, C; Calvino, P; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V Yu; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W I; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E M; Goverdovski, A A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Ioannides, K G; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F K; Karamanis, D; Ketlerov, V; Kitis, G; Köhler, P E; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; MOsconi, M; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Mastinu, P F; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Neves, F; O'Brien, S; Oberhummer, Heinz; Pancin, J; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Peskov, Vladimir; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Pretel, C; Quesada, J M; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Savvidis, E; Soares, J C; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L M N; Terlizzi, R; Tsangas, N; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-01-01

    The accurate determination of neutron cross-sections as a function of the neutron energy at a time-of-flight facility requires a precise knowledge of the time-energy relation for the neutron beam. For the n _TOF neutron beam at CERN, produced by spallation of high-energy protons on a Pb target, the time-energy relation is connected to the production mechanism and to the subsequent moderation process. A calibration of the neutron energy scale is proposed based on detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the facility. This time-energy relation has been experimentally validated by means of dedicated measurements of standard energy resonances, from 1 eV to approximately 1 MeV. On the basis of the present measurements, it is proposed to correct the energy of the 1.3 eV resonance of /sup 193/Ir, which is commonly considered as an energy standard.

  4. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied sulfuric acid aerosol nucleation in an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear contribution from ion-induced nucleation and consider this to be the first unambiguous observation of the ion...

  5. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nummela, S; Dendooven, P; Heikkinen, P; Huikari, J; Nieminen, A; Jokinen, A; Rinta-Antila, S; Rubchenya, V.; Aysto, J

    2002-01-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q = +2-->q = +1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler, T

  6. High Energy Electron Reconstruction in the BeamCal

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses methods of particle reconstruction in the forward region detectors of future e+ e− linear colliders such as ILC or CLIC. At the nominal luminosity the innermost electromagnetic calorimeters undergo high particle fluxes from the beam-induced background. In this prospect, different methods of the background simulation and signal electron reconstruction are described.

  7. An Energy Filter for Slow Positron Beam Using Cosine Coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.S.Yu; B.Y.Wang; 等

    2001-01-01

    A novel charged-particle velocity filter for slow positron beam has been successfully built and tested.It is a pure magnetic system composed of three magnetic fields,two of them are pure dipole magnetic fields generated by two symmetrically put cosine coils.The physical principle and the performance of the cosine coils are reviewed.

  8. MeV Argon ion beam generation with narrow energy spread

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jiancai; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Shun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven particle acceleration has shown remarkable progresses in generating multi-GeV electron bunches and 10s of MeV ion beams based on high-power laser facilities. Intense laser pulse offers the acceleration field of 1012 Volt per meter, several orders of magnitude larger than that in conventional accelerators, enabling compact devices. Here we report that a highly-collimated argon ion beam with narrow energy spread is produced by irradiating a 45-fs fully-relativistic laser pulse onto an argon cluster target. The highly-charged (Argon ion with charge state of 16+) heavy ion beam has a minimum absolute energy spread of 0.19 MeV per nucleon at the energy peak of 0.39 MeV per nucleon. we identify a novel scheme from particle-in-cell simulations that greatly reduces the beam energy spread. The laser-driven intense plasma wakefield has a strong modulation on the ion beam in a way that the low energy part is cut off. The pre-accelerated argon ion beam from Coulomb explosion thus becomes more mono-energetic ...

  9. Space charge compensation on the low energy beam transport of Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)733270; Scrivens, Richard; Jesus Castillo, Santos

    Part of the upgrade program in the injector chains of the CERN accelerator complex is the replacement of the the proton accelerator Linac2 for the brand new Linac4 which will accelerate H$^-$ and its main goal is to increase the beam intensity in the next sections of the LHC accelerator chain. The Linac4 is now under commissioning and will use several ion sources to produce high intensity unbunched H$^-$ beams with different properties, and the low energy beam transport (LEBT) is the system in charge of match all these different beams to the Radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The space charge forces that spread the beam ions apart of each other and cause emittance growth limits the maximum intensity that can be transported in the LEBT, but the space charge of intense unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the generated ions by the impact ionization of the residual gas, which creates a source of secondary particles inside the beam pipe. For negative ion beams, the effect of the beam electric field is to ex...

  10. Emittance and Energy Diagnostics for Electron Beams with Large Momentum Spread

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Thibaut, Lefevre; Enrico, Bravin

    Olvegård, M. 2013. Emittance and Energy Diagnostics for Electron Beams with Large Momentum Spread. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 1036. 75 pp. Uppsala. ISBN 978-91-554-8646-4. Following the discovery of the Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider, there is demand for precision measurements on recent findings. The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC, is a candidate for a future linear electron-positron collider for such precision measurements. In CLIC, the beams will be brought to collisions in the multi-TeV regime through high gradient acceleration with high frequency RF power. A high intensity electron beam, the so-called drive beam, will serve as the power source for the main beam, as the drive beam is decelerated in special structures, from which power is extracted and transfered to the main beam. When the drive beam is decelerated the beam quality deteriorates and the momentum spread increases, which make...

  11. Lattice design of medium energy beam transport line for n spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1 GeV H- injector linac is being designed at RRCAT for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source (ISNS). The front-end of the injector linac will consist of Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, which will accelerate the H- beam from 50 keV to 3 MeV. The beam will be further accelerated in superconducting Single Spoke Resonators (SSRs). A Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line will be used to transport the beam from the exit of RFQ to the input of SSR. The main purpose of MEBT is to carry out beam matching from RFQ to SSR, and beam chopping. In this paper, we describe the optimization criteria for the lattice design of MEBT. The optimized lattice element parameters are presented for zero and full (15 mA) current case. Beam dynamics studies have been carried out using an envelope tracing code Trace-3D. Required beam deflection angle due to the chopper housed inside the MEBT for beam chopping has also been estimated. (author)

  12. Calculation of depth-dose distribution of intermediate energy heavy-ion beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of the interactions between intermediate energy heavy-ion beam and target matter, a method to calculate the depth-dose distribution of heavy-ion beams with intermediate energy (10 -100 MeV/u) is presented. By comparing high energy beams where projectile fragmentation is overwhelm ing with lowenergies where energy straggling is the sole factor instead, a crescent energy spread with increasing depth and a simple fragmentation assumption were included for the depth-dose calculation of the intermediate energy beam. Rel ative depth-dose curves of carbon and oxygen ion beams with intermediate energie s were computed according to the method here. Comparisons between the calculated relative doses and measurements are shown. The calculated Bragg curves, especially the upstream and downstream Bragg peaks, agree with the measured data. Differences between the two results appear only around the peak regions because of th e limitations of the calculation and experimental conditions, but the calculated curves generally reproduce the measured data within the experimental errors. Th e reasons for the divergences were analyzed carefully and the magnitudes of the deviations are given.

  13. A performance-enhanced energy harvester for low frequency vibration utilizing a corrugated cantilevered beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jin, SeungSeop; Jang, Seon-Jun; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2014-03-01

    This note proposes a performance-enhanced piezoelectric energy harvester by replacing a conventional flat cantilevered beam with a corrugated beam. It consists of a proof mass and a sinusoidally or trapezoidally corrugated cantilevered beam covered by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Compared to the conventional energy harvester of the same size, it has a more flexible bending stiffness and a larger bonding area of the PVDF layer, so higher output voltage from the device can be expected. In order to investigate the characteristics of the proposed energy harvester, analytical developments and numerical simulations on its natural frequency and tip displacement are carried out. Shaking table tests are also conducted to verify the performance of the proposed device. It is clearly shown from the tests that the proposed energy harvester not only has a lower natural frequency than an equivalent sized standard energy harvester, but also generates much higher output voltage than the standard one.

  14. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  15. Pseudo Slice Energy Spread in Dynamics of Electron Beams Moving through Magnetic Bends

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    In the previous canonical formulation of beam dynamics for an electron bunch moving ultrarelativistically through magnetic bending systems, we have shown that the transverse dynamics equation for a particle in the bunch has a driving term which behaves as the centrifugal force caused by the particle's initial potential energy due to collective particle interactions within the bunch. As a result, the initial potential energy at the entrance of a bending system, which we call pseudo (kinetic) energy, is indistinguishable from the usual kinetic energy offset from the design energy in its perturbation to particle optics through dispersion and momentum compaction. In this paper, in identifying this centrifugal force on particles as the remnant of the CSR cancellation effect in transverse particle dynamics, we show how the dynamics equation in terms of the canonical momentum for beam motion on a curved orbit is related to the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem for wakefields for beam motion on a straight path. It is shown tha...

  16. Parametric and Internal Resonances of an Axially Moving Beam with Time-Dependent Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamadev Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear vibration of a travelling beam subjected to principal parametric resonance in presence of internal resonance is investigated. The beam velocity is assumed to be comprised of a constant mean value along with a harmonically varying component. The stretching of neutral axis introduces geometric cubic nonlinearity in the equation of motion of the beam. The natural frequency of second mode is approximately three times that of first mode; a three-to-one internal resonance is possible. The method of multiple scales (MMS is directly applied to the governing nonlinear equations and the associated boundary conditions. The nonlinear steady state response along with the stability and bifurcation of the beam is investigated. The system exhibits pitchfork, Hopf, and saddle node bifurcations under different control parameters. The dynamic solutions in the periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic forms are captured with the help of time history, phase portraits, and Poincare maps showing the influence of internal resonance.

  17. Discrimination of damages depending on the types of lactic dehydrogenase isozymes in electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27,LDH) was a tetrameric molecule. The five different combinations of two different polypeptide chains can be readily identified by electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography. Injury patterns of LDH activity following electron-beam irradiation was investigated by assaying activities of three isozymes (pig heart LDH;M4, rabbit muscle LDH;H4, chicken heart LDH;M3H1). Following results were obtained in the electron beam irradiation to three kinds of LDH isozymes: 1) Each isozyme has respective different reactivities to the electron beam irradiation. 2) Among the isozymes, M4 enzyme was increased its enzymatic activity by the irradiations of low-level doses. 3) For the H4 enzymes, an increasing phenomenon of -SH group was found in the low-level doses of electron beam irradiation. (author)

  18. Peculiarities of temperature dependent ion beam sputtering and channeling of crystalline bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langegger, Rupert; Hradil, Klaudia; Steiger-Thirsfeld, Andreas; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the surface evolution of focused ion beam treated single crystalline Bi(001) with respect to different beam incidence angles and channeling effects. 'Erosive' sputtering appears to be the dominant mechanism at room temperature (RT) and diffusion processes during sputtering seem to play only a minor role for the surface evolution of Bi. The sputtering yield of Bi(001) shows anomalous behavior when increasing the beam incidence angle along particular azimuthal angles of the specimen. The behavior of the sputtering yield could be related to channeling effects and the relevant channeling directions are identified. Dynamic annealing processes during ion irradiation retain the crystalline quality of the Bi specimen allowing ion channeling at RT. Lowering the specimen temperature to T = -188 °C reduces dynamic annealing processes and thereby disables channeling effects. Furthermore unexpected features are observed at normal beam incidence angle. Spike-like features appear during the ion beam induced erosion, whose growth directions are not determined by the ion beam but by the channeling directions of the Bi specimen.

  19. Nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high energy beam propagation through the atmosphere; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert A.; Wilson, Leroy E.

    Various papers on nonlinear optical beam manipulation and high-energy beam propagation through the atmosphere are presented. Individual topics addressed include: suppression of Raman amplification using large Stokes seeds, review of multiple-short-pulse SBS experiments and theory, laser-induced gratings for beam manipulation in a gas, considerations for computing realistic atmospheric distortion parameter profiles, effect of turbulent diffusion on laser propagation, use of multiple photon processes in krypton for laser guiding of electron beams, effect of ionization on intense electron beam propagation in low-pressure media, lidar measurements of the troposphere and middle atmosphere, seasonal and diurnal changes in cloud obscuration to visible and IR energy transmission, new cloud composite climatologies using meteorological satellite imagery, effect of neutral atmospheric structure on beam propagation, small-scale electron density fluctuations in a disturbed ionospheric environment, and SDIO radio frequency communications in a structured environment.

  20. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Saidi, Wissam A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Scudiero, Louis, E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Chemistry Department and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  1. Photon energy dependence of graphite valence band photoelectron intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masaru, E-mail: m-tkzw@fc.ritsumei.ac.j [Research Organization of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Namba, Hidetoshi [Department of Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Daimon, Hiroshi [Department of Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    We have measured two-dimensional photoelectron spectra of graphite with various photon energies. We investigated the photon energy dependence of the valence band dispersions of graphite at vicinity of Fermi level which appear at Brillouin zone (BZ) corners. We found that the photoelectron intensities of the Fermi surfaces were, however, very different even when the photon energies are selected to see the same symmetry planes of BZ. This intensity difference of the Fermi surfaces is well reproduced by considering the 'photoemission structure factor' for three-dimensional nature of graphite.

  2. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature

  3. SU‐C‐105‐05: Reference Dosimetry of High‐Energy Electron Beams with a Farmer‐Type Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, B; Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate gradient effects and provide Monte Carlo calculated beam quality conversion factors to characterize the Farmer‐type NE2571 ion chamber for high‐energy reference dosimetry of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose to water and to the gas in a fully modeled NE2571 chamber as a function of depth in a water phantom. Electron beams incident on the surface of the phantom are modeled using realistic BEAMnrc accelerator simulations and electron beam spectra. Beam quality conversion factors are determined using calculated doses to water and to air in the chamber in high‐energy electron beams and in a cobalt‐60 reference field. Calculated water‐to‐air stopping power ratios are employed for investigation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor. Results: An upstream shift of 0.3–0.4 multiplied by the chamber radius, r-cav, both minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor with depth and reduces the difference between the beam quality specifier (R{sub 5} {sub 0}) calculated using ion chamber simulations and that obtained with simulations of dose‐to‐water in the phantom. Beam quality conversion factors are obtained at the reference depth and gradient effects are optimized using a shift of 0.2r-cav. The photon‐electron conversion factor, k-ecal, amounts to 0.906 when gradient effects are minimized using the shift established here and 0.903 if no shift of the data is used. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are investigated and amount to between 0.4 to 1.1% depending on assumptions used. Conclusion: The calculations obtained in this work characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of high‐energy electron beams. These results will be useful as the AAPM continues to review their reference dosimetry protocols.

  4. SU‐C‐105‐05: Reference Dosimetry of High‐Energy Electron Beams with a Farmer‐Type Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate gradient effects and provide Monte Carlo calculated beam quality conversion factors to characterize the Farmer‐type NE2571 ion chamber for high‐energy reference dosimetry of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose to water and to the gas in a fully modeled NE2571 chamber as a function of depth in a water phantom. Electron beams incident on the surface of the phantom are modeled using realistic BEAMnrc accelerator simulations and electron beam spectra. Beam quality conversion factors are determined using calculated doses to water and to air in the chamber in high‐energy electron beams and in a cobalt‐60 reference field. Calculated water‐to‐air stopping power ratios are employed for investigation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor. Results: An upstream shift of 0.3–0.4 multiplied by the chamber radius, r-cav, both minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor with depth and reduces the difference between the beam quality specifier (R50) calculated using ion chamber simulations and that obtained with simulations of dose‐to‐water in the phantom. Beam quality conversion factors are obtained at the reference depth and gradient effects are optimized using a shift of 0.2r-cav. The photon‐electron conversion factor, k-ecal, amounts to 0.906 when gradient effects are minimized using the shift established here and 0.903 if no shift of the data is used. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are investigated and amount to between 0.4 to 1.1% depending on assumptions used. Conclusion: The calculations obtained in this work characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of high‐energy electron beams. These results will be useful as the AAPM continues to review their reference dosimetry protocols

  5. Efficiencies of thermodynamics when temperature-dependent energy levels exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Takuya

    2016-03-14

    Based on a generalized form of the second law of thermodynamics, in which the temperature-dependent energy levels of a system are appropriately included in entropy generation, we show that the effect reasonably appears in efficiencies of thermodynamic processes. PMID:26890276

  6. Energy-Dependent Fission Q Values Generalized for All Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2008-09-25

    We generalize Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q values on incident neutron energy, E{sub n}, for all major and minor actinides. These Q(E{sub n}) parameterizations are included in the ENDL2008 release. This paper describes calculations of energy-dependent fission Q values based on parameterizations of the prompt energy release in fission [1], developed by Madland [1] to describe the prompt energy release in neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. The energy release is then related to the energy deposited during fission so that experimentally measurable quantities can be used to obtain the Q values. A discussion of these specific parameterizations and their implementation in the processing code for Monte Carlo neutron transport, MCFGEN, [2] is described in Ref. [3]. We extend this model to describe Q(E) for all actinides, major and minor, in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) 2008 release, ENDL2008.

  7. Anomalous electron heating and energy balance in an ion beam generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma described in this report is generated by a 15 to 34 kV ion beam, consisting primarily of protons, passing through an H2 gas cell neutralizer. Plasma ions (or ion-electron pairs) are produced by electron capture from (or ionization of) gas molecules by beam ions and atoms. An explanation is provided for the observed anomalous behavior of the electron temperature (T/sub e/): a step-lite, nearly two-fold jump in T/sub e/ as the beam current approaches that which minimizes beam angular divergence; insensitivity of T/sub e/ to gas pressure; and the linear relation of T/sub e/ to beam energy

  8. Surface chemical reactions induced by well-controlled molecular beams: translational energy and molecular orientation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Michio, E-mail: okada@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j, E-mail: mokada@cw.osaka-u.ac.j [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 and 1-2 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2010-07-07

    I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams suggest that the translational energy of the incident molecules plays a significant role. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. Oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility for controlling surface chemical reactions by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of achieving material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for creating new materials on surfaces with well-controlled chemical reactions. (topical review)

  9. Design of low energy beam transport for new LANSCE H+ injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Y. K.; Draganic, I. N.; Fortgang, C. M.; Garnett, R. W.; Kurennoy, S. S.; McCrady, R. C.; O'Hara, J. F.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2014-07-01

    The present LANSCE injector utilizes two 750-keV Cockcroft-Walton (CW) based injectors for simultaneous injection of H+ and H- beams into 800-MeV accelerator. To reduce long-term operational risks, the new project to replace the existing H+ CW injector with a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is underway [1]. The new injector requires a Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). An ion source and 2-solenoid magnetic LEBT have been designed and optimized to transport beams over a wide range of space-charge neutralization and transverse emittance, while allowing sufficient space for diagnostics and a beam deflector. The design layout minimizes the beam size in the LEBT and potential emittance growth due to solenoid aberrations and nonlinear space-charge forces. This paper describes the details of the LEBT design activity.

  10. Design of low energy beam transport for new LANSCE H{sup +} injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Y.K., E-mail: batygin@lanl.gov; Draganic, I.N.; Fortgang, C.M.; Garnett, R.W.; Kurennoy, S.S.; McCrady, R.C.; O’Hara, J.F.; Rybarcyk, L.J.

    2014-07-01

    The present LANSCE injector utilizes two 750-keV Cockcroft–Walton (CW) based injectors for simultaneous injection of H{sup +} and H{sup −} beams into 800-MeV accelerator. To reduce long-term operational risks, the new project to replace the existing H{sup +} CW injector with a Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator is underway [1]. The new injector requires a Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). An ion source and 2-solenoid magnetic LEBT have been designed and optimized to transport beams over a wide range of space-charge neutralization and transverse emittance, while allowing sufficient space for diagnostics and a beam deflector. The design layout minimizes the beam size in the LEBT and potential emittance growth due to solenoid aberrations and nonlinear space-charge forces. This paper describes the details of the LEBT design activity.

  11. Audit of high energy therapy beams in hospital oncology departments by the National Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993 the output of every high energy radiotherapy beam used clinically in New Zealand was measured by National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) staff using independent dosimetry equipment. The purpose of this was to audit the dosimetry that is used by hospital physicists for the basis of patient treatments, and to uncover any errors that may be clinically significant. This report analyses the uncertainties involved in comparing the NRL and hospital measurements, and presents the results of the 1993 audit. The overall uncertainty turns out to be about 1.5%. The results for linear accelerator photon beams are consistent with a purely random variation within this uncertainty. Electron beams show some small errors beyond the expected uncertainty. Gamma beams have the potential to be the most accurately measured, but in practice are less accurately measured than linear accelerator beams. None of the disagreements indicated an error of clinical significance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostic Challenges for LHC Operation at high Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, OR

    2014-01-01

    This contribution will present the role of beam diagnostics in facing the challenges posed by running the LHC close to its design energy of 7TeV. Machine protection will be ever more critical, with the quench level of the magnets significantly reduced, so relying heavily on the beam loss system, abort gap monitor, interlocks on the beam position and fast beam current change system. Non-invasive profile monitoring also becomes more of a challenge, with standard synchrotron light imaging limited by diffraction and rest gas ionization monitoring dominated by space charge effects. There is also a requirement to better understand beam instabilities, of which several were observed during Run I, leading to the need for synchronised bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn information from many distributed instrumentation systems. All of these challenges will be discussed along with the strategies adopted to overcome them.

  13. Design of the low energy beam transport line for the China spallation neutron source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-Hai; OUYANG Hua-Fu; FU Shi-Nian; ZHANG Sua-Shun; HE Wei

    2008-01-01

    The design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line, which locates between the ion source and the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), has been completed with the TRACE3D code. The design aims at perfect matching, primary chopping, a small emittance growth and sufficient space for beam diagnostics. The line consists of three solenoids, three vacuum chambers, two steering magnets and a pre-chopper. The total length of LEBT is about 1.74 m. This LEBT is designed to transfer 20 mA of H-pulsed beam from the ion source to the RFQ. An induction cavity is adopted as the pre-chopper.The electrostatic octupole steerer is discussed as a candidate. A four-quadrant aperture for beam scraping and beam position monitoring is designed.

  14. Damage evaluation in metal structures subjected to high energy deposition due to particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Dallocchio, A

    2011-01-01

    The unprecedented energy intensities of modern hadron accelerators yield special problems with the materials that are placed close to or into the high intensity beams. The energy stored in a single beam of LHC particle accelerator is equivalent to about 80 kg of TNT explosive, stored in a transverse beam area with a typical value of 0.2 mm×0.2 mm. The materials placed close to the beam are used at, or even beyond, their damage limits. However, it is very difficult to predict structural efficiency and robustness accurately: beam-induced damage for high energy and high intensity occurs in a regime where practical experience does not exist. The interaction between high energy particle beams and metals induces a sudden non uniform temperature increase. This provokes a dynamic response of the structure entailing thermal stress waves and thermally induced vibrations or even the failure of the component. This study is performed in order to estimate the damage on a copper component due to the impact with a 7 TeV pro...

  15. Dual-source multi-energy CT with triple or quadruple x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Energy-resolved photon-counting CT (PCCT) is promising for material decomposition with multi-contrast agents. However, corrections for non-idealities of PCCT detectors are required, which are still active research areas. In addition, PCCT is associated with very high cost due to lack of mass production. In this work, we proposed an alternative approach to performing multi-energy CT, which was achieved by acquiring triple or quadruple x-ray beam measurements on a dual-source CT scanner. This strategy was based on a "Twin Beam" design on a single-source scanner for dual-energy CT. Examples of beam filters and spectra for triple and quadruple x-ray beam were provided. Computer simulation studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of material decomposition for multi-contrast mixtures using both tri-beam and quadruple-beam configurations. The proposed strategy can be readily implemented on a dual-source scanner, which may allow material decomposition of multi-contrast agents to be performed on clinical CT scanners with energy-integrating detector.

  16. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.;

    atmospheric conditions using a 580 MeV electron beam to ionize the volume of the reaction chamber. We find a clear and significant contribution from ion induced nucleation and consider this to be an unambiguous observation of the ion-effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions not far......The effect of ions in aerosol nucleation is a subject where much remains to be discovered. That ions can enhance nucleation has been shown by theory, observations, and experiments. However, the exact mechanism still remains to be determined. One question is if the nature of the ionization affects...... the nucleation. This is an essential question since many experiments have been performed using radioactive sources that ionize differently than the cosmic rays which are responsible for the majority of atmospheric ionization. Here we report on an experimental study of sulphuric acid aerosol nucleation under near...

  17. Wien filter for cooled low-energy radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nummela, S. E-mail: saara.nummela@phys.jyu.fi; Dendooven, P.; Heikkinen, P.; Huikari, J.; Nieminen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubchenya, V.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-01

    A Wien filter for cooled radioactive ion beams has been designed at Ion Guide Isotope Separator On Line technique (IGISOL). The purpose of such device is to eliminate doubly charged ions from the mass separated singly charged ions, based on q=+2{yields}q=+1 charge exchange process in an ion cooler. The performance of the Wien filter has been tested off-line with a discharge ion source as well as on-line with a radioactive beam. The electron capture process of cooled q=+2 ions has been investigated in a radiofrequency quadrupole ion cooler with varying partial pressures of nitrogen. Also, the superasymmetric fission production yields of 68

  18. Path dependence in energy systems and economic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Energy systems are subject to strong and long-lived path dependence, owing to technological, infrastructural, institutional and behavioural lock-ins. Yet, with the prospect of providing accessible cheap energy to stimulate economic development and reduce poverty, governments often invest in large engineering projects and subsidy policies. Here, I argue that while these may achieve their objectives, they risk locking their economies onto energy-intensive pathways. Thus, particularly when economies are industrializing, and their energy systems are being transformed and are not yet fully locked-in, policymakers should take care before directing their economies onto energy-intensive pathways that are likely to be detrimental to their long-run prosperity.

  19. Energy dependences of sensitivity and errors of some neutron dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental determination of sensitivities of the DN-A-1 and SNM-14 neutron dosimeters with combined polyethylene moderators at various neutron energies used in radiation control behind the shielding of JINR accelerators and reactors are presented. Energy dependences of sensitivities of these dosimeters are constructed. The obtained sensitivities and known neutron spectra around JINR nuclear physical installations permit to evaluate the errors of dosimeters when measuring the neutron equivalent dose in the fields with these spectra. The SNM-14 device with a combined moderator could be used as a neutron dosimeter with 30% accuracy in 0.4 eV - 20 MeV energy range. The error of the DN-A-1 device at 20 MeV energy is 40%. The results on evaluation of neutron equivalent dose over essential neutron energy range are presented

  20. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0). PMID:27515566

  1. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  2. Measurements of absorbed energy distributions in water from pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of the use of a holographic interferometer to measure the energy deposition as a function of depth in water from pulsed electron beams, together with a brief description of the interferometer and the technique of generating a hologram are presented. The holographic interferometer is used to measure the energy deposition as a function of depth in water from various pulsed beams of monoenergetic electrons in the energy range from 1.0 to 2.5 MeV. These results are compared to those computed by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, ETRAN-15, for the same electron energies. After the discrepancies between the measured and computed results are evaluated, reasonable agreement is found between the measured and computed absorbed energy distributions as a function of depth in water. An evalutation of the response of the interferometer as a function of electron intensities is performed. A comparison among four energy deposition curves that result from the irradiation of water with pulsed electron beams from a Febetron accelerator, model 705, is presented. These pulsed beams were produced by the same vacuum diode with the same charging voltage. The results indicate that the energy distribution of the electrons in the pulsed beam is not always constant. A comparison of the energy deposition curves that result from the irradiation of water with electron pulses from different vacuum diodes but the same charging voltage is presented. These results indicate again that the energy distribution of the electrons in the pulsed beam may vary between vacuum diodes. These differences would not be realized by using a totally absorbing metal calorimeter and Faraday Cup

  3. Fiscal 1998 research report. Application technology of next-generation high-density energy beams; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Jisedai komitsudo energy beam riyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Survey was made on application technologies of next- generation high-density energy beams. For real application of laser power, application to not exciting source of YAG crystal but machining directly is highly efficient. For generation of semiconductor laser high-power coherent beam, phase synchronization and summing are large technological walls. Short pulse, high intensity and high repeatability are also important. Since ultra-short pulse laser ends before heat transfer to the periphery, it is suitable for precise machining, in particular, ultra-fine machining. To use beam sources as tool for production process, development of transmission, focusing and control technologies, and optical fiber and device is indispensable. Applicable fields are as follows: machining (more than pico seconds), surface modification (modification and functionalization of tribo- materials and biocompatible materials), complex machining, fabrication of quantum functional structured materials (thin film, ultra-fine particle), agriculture, ultra-precise measurement, non-destructive measurement, and coherent chemistry in chemical and environment fields. (NEDO)

  4. Entrance Channel Dependence of the Isospin Effects of the Nuclear Stopping inIntermediate Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨艳芳; 刘建业; 左维; 郭文军; 赵强

    2001-01-01

    The entrance channel dependence of the isospin effects of nuclear stopping in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions has been studied by using an isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics with three different kinds of symmetry potentials. It is shown that nuclear stopping is sensitive to the beam energy, the impact parameter and the mass of the colliding system, especially very sensitive to the isospin dependence of the in-medium nucleonnucleon cross section, but insensitive to the symmetry potential and the neutron-to-proton ratio of the colliding system. From this investigation, it is proposed that nuclear stopping can be used as a new probe to extract the information on the isospin dependence of the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Baffes, C; Leibfritz, J; Oplt, S; Rakhno, I

    2013-01-01

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type RF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a Helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. In addition, the potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  6. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  7. Low Energy Scanned Electron-Beam Dose Distribution in Thin Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Hjortenberg, P. E.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1975-01-01

    Thin radiochromic dye film dosimeters, calibrated by means of calorimetry, make possible the determination of absorbed-dose distributions due to low-energy scanned electron beam penetrations in moderately thin coatings and laminar media. For electrons of a few hundred keV, calibrated dosimeters...... on different backings (wood, aluminum, and iron) for scanned electron beams (Emax = 400 keV) having a broad energy spectrum and diffuse incidence, such as those used in radiation curing of coatings, textiles, plastics, etc. Theoretical calculations of such distributions of energy depositions are relatively...

  8. BROADBAND CONCEPT OF ENERGY HARVESTING IN BEAM VIBRATING SYSTEMS FOR POWERING SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Rysak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent demand for powering small sensors for wireless health monitoring triggered activities in the field of small size efficient energy harvesting devices. We examine energy harvesting in an aluminium beam with a piezoceramic patch subjected to kinematic harmonic excitation and impacts. Due to a mechanical stopper applied, inducing a hardening effect in the spring characteristic of the beam resonator, we observed a broader frequency range for the fairly large power output. Impact nonlinearities caused sensitivity to initial conditions and appearance of multiple solutions. The occurrence of resonant solution associated with impacts increased efficiency of the energy harvesting process.

  9. Energy-spread measurement of triple-pulse electron beams based on the magnetic dispersion principle

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Huang; Ding, Hengsong; Yang, Anmin; Wang, Minhong

    2016-01-01

    The energy-spread of the triple-pulse electron beam generated by the Dragon-II linear induction accelerator is measured using the method of energy dispersion in the magnetic field. A sector magnet is applied for energy analyzing of the electron beam, which has a bending radius of 300 mm and a deflection angle of 90 degrees. For each pulse, both the time-resolved and the integral images of the electron position at the output port of the bending beam line are recorded by a streak camera and a CCD camera, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate an energy-spread of less than +-2.0% for the electron pulses. The cavity voltage waveforms obtained by different detectors are also analyzed for comparison.

  10. In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

    1983-09-26

    Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

  11. Note: High-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon, E-mail: mems@jnu.ac.kr [MEMS and Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  12. Note: high-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g.

  13. The edge transient-current technique (E-TCT) with high energy hadron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorišek, Andrej; Cindro, Vladimir; Kramberger, Gregor; Mandić, Igor; Mikuž, Marko; Muškinja, Miha; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel way to investigate the properties of silicon and CVD diamond detectors for High Energy Physics experiments complementary to the already well-established E-TCT technique using laser beam. In the proposed setup the beam of high energy hadrons (MIPs) is used instead of laser beam. MIPs incident on the detector in the direction parallel to the readout electrode plane and perpendicular to the edge of the detector. Such experiment could prove very useful to study CVD diamond detectors that are almost inaccessible for the E-TCT measurements with laser due to large band-gap as well as to verify and complement the E-TCT measurements of silicon. The method proposed is being tested at CERN in a beam of 120 GeV hadrons using a reference telescope with track resolution at the DUT of few μm. The preliminary results of the measurements are presented.

  14. Development of low energy ion beam system for space charge compensation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy ion beam system for space charge compensation (SCC) experiments was developed and evaluated. This system was designed for observation of SCC of a positive ion beam with an electron beam. The system consisted of the ion source chamber and the SCC experiment chamber. The ion source chamber was equipped with the compact microwave ion source for low voltage extraction. Ion current at initial position of the analysis chamber was 84 μA at extraction voltage of 500 V, and satisfied a condition to observe the SCC effect clearly. In order to evaluate the SCC, we measured the arrival ion current by supplying thermionic electrons, which were extracted from a tungsten filament driven by ac voltage. As the electron supply, the arrival ion current increased from 40 to 68 μA at the potential of filament of +3 eV which produced the thermionic electron with extremely low energy extracted by space charge of the ion beam

  15. Development of the techniques for food processing with low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sterilization technology of rice (unpolished rice and paddy), wheat and buckwheat was developed. It was homogenous irradiation of low energy electron beam on the surface of them by use of a grain rotator. Samples were rice (Nihonbare, Koshihikari and from Ibaraki), wheat (ASW) and buckwheat (Hitachiakisoba). The electron beams and gamma ray irradiated the sample. The viable bacterial number, viscosity and TBA value were determined. Although γ-ray showed decrease of qualities such as viscosity and oxidation of lipid, low energy electron beam resulted small these changes. The part of damage of starch and lipid irradiated with the electron beam were outside of points reached by electrons. Accordingly, the part of damage in unpolished rice was removed by abrasive milling. Aseptic rice was obtained with keeping the qualities of edible parts. (S.Y.)

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of an energy-reinforced braking radiation photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of a photon beam raised towards high energies, its experimental implementation, the definition of a gamma spectrometry method which aimed at checking various hypotheses used in the beam theoretical study. After a presentation of the theory of phenomena of electron braking radiation, of materialisation of photons into positon-negaton pair, and of issues related to multiple Coulomb diffusion, the author reports the study of the different solutions which allow a photon beam to be obtained. A braking radiation of mono-kinetic electron has been used. This braking radiation is reinforced by absorption of low energy protons in a column of lithium hydride. The author describes how the beam is built up, and the experimental approach. He describes how raw data are processed to get rid of the influence of the multiple Coulomb diffusion and of the braking radiation. Experimental results are compared with those obtained by convolution of photon spectra and differential cross section

  17. Note: high-efficiency energy harvester using double-clamped piezoelectric beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingmei; Wu, Xuan; Parmar, Mitesh; Lee, Dong-weon

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been reported, which is realized by using a double-clamped piezoelectric beam, based on uniaxial stretching strain. The buckling mechanism is applied to maximize axial stress in the double-clamped beam. The voltage generated by using the double-clamped piezoelectric beam is higher than that generated by using other conventional structures, such as bending cantilevers coated/sandwiched with piezoelectric film, which is proven both theoretically and experimentally. The power generation efficiency is enhanced by further optimizing the double-clamped structure. The optimized high-efficiency energy harvester utilizing double-clamped piezoelectric beams generates a peak output power of 80 μW, under an acceleration of 0.1g. PMID:24593401

  18. Understanding Supernova Neutrino Physics using Low-Energy Beta-Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Jachowicz, N.; McLaughlin, G.C.

    2005-01-01

    We show that fitting linear combinations of low-energy beta-beam spectra to supernova-neutrino energy-distributions reconstructs the response of a nuclear target to a supernova flux in a very accurate way. This allows one to make direct predictions about the supernova-neutrino signal in a terrestrial neutrino detector.

  19. Low dimensional modeling of a non-uniform, buckled piezoelectric beam for vibrational energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Louis; Moehlis, Jeff; McMeeking, Robert

    2015-06-01

    A model is developed for a non-uniform piezoelectric beam suitable for analyzing energy harvesting behavior. System dynamics are projected onto a numerically developed basis to produce energy functions which are used to derive equations of motion for the system. The resulting model reproduces the experimentally observed transition to chaos while providing a conservative estimate of power output and bandwidth.

  20. Low-energy electron beams through ultra-thin foils, applications for electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aken, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis has discussed two electron microscopy applications that make use of ultra-thin foils: the tunnel junction emitter and the low-energy foil corrector. Both applications have in common that the electron beam is sent through the thin foil at low energy. Part of the electrons will scatter in

  1. Experiments with low energy ion beam transport into toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The stellarator-type storage ring for accumulation of multi- Ampere proton and ion beams with energies in the range of $100~AkeV$ to $1~AMeV$ is designed at Frankfurt university. The main idea for beam confinement with high transversal momentum acceptance was presented in EPAC2006. This ring is typically suited for experiments in plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The accumulator ring with a closed longitudinal magnetic field is foreseen with a strength up to $6-8~T$. The experiments with two room temperature 30 degree toroids are needed. The beam transport experiments in toroidal magnetic fields were first described in EPAC2008 within the framework of a proposed low energy ion storage ring. The test setup aims on developing a ring injection system with two beam lines representing the main beam line and the injection line. The primary beam line for the experiments was installed and successfully commissioned in 2009. A special diagnostics probe for \\textit{"in situ"} ion beam detection was installed.This...

  2. Polarization beam combination technique for gain saturation effect compensation in high-energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junchi; Peng, Yujie; Su, Hongpeng; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-06-01

    To compensate for the gain saturation effect in the high-energy laser amplifier, a modified polarization beam combination (PBC) method is introduced to reshape temporal waveform of the injected laser pulse to obtain a controlled high-energy laser pulse shape after amplification. One linearly polarized beam is divided into two orthogonal polarized beams, which spatially recombine together collinearly after propagating different optical paths with relative time delay in PBC structure. The obtained beam with polarization direction being rotated by the following half wave plate is divided and combined again to reform a new beam in another modified polarization beam structure. The reformed beam is injected into three cascaded laser amplifiers. The amplified pulse shape can be controlled by the incident pulse shape and amplifier gain, which is agreeable to the simulation by the Frank-Nodvik equations. Based on the simple method, the various temporal waveform of output pulse with tunable 7 to 20 ns pulse duration can be obtained without interferometric fringes.

  3. Polarization beam combination technique for gain saturation effect compensation in high-energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junchi; Peng, Yujie; Su, Hongpeng; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-06-01

    To compensate for the gain saturation effect in the high-energy laser amplifier, a modified polarization beam combination (PBC) method is introduced to reshape temporal waveform of the injected laser pulse to obtain a controlled high-energy laser pulse shape after amplification. One linearly polarized beam is divided into two orthogonal polarized beams, which spatially recombine together collinearly after propagating different optical paths with relative time delay in PBC structure. The obtained beam with polarization direction being rotated by the following half wave plate is divided and combined again to reform a new beam in another modified polarization beam structure. The reformed beam is injected into three cascaded laser amplifiers. The amplified pulse shape can be controlled by the incident pulse shape and amplifier gain, which is agreeable to the simulation by the Frank-Nodvik equations. Based on the simple method, the various temporal waveform of output pulse with tunable 7 to 20 ns pulse duration can be obtained without interferometric fringes.

  4. Design of a compact Faraday cup for low energy, low intensity ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, E. D.; Sosa, A.; Andreazza, W.; Bravin, E.; Lanaia, D.; Voulot, D.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Beam intensity is one of the key parameters in particle accelerators, in particular during machine commissioning, but also during operation for experiments. At low beam energies and low intensities a number of challenges arise in its measurement as commonly used non-invasive devices are no longer sensitive enough. It then becomes necessary to stop the beam in order to measure its absolute intensity. A very compact Faraday cup for determining ion beam currents from a few nanoamperes down to picoamperes for the HIE-ISOLDE post-accelerator at CERN has been designed, built and tested with beam. It has a large aperture diameter of 30 mm and a total length of only 16 mm, making it one of the most compact designs ever used. In this paper we present the different steps that were involved in the design and optimization of this device, including beam tests with two early prototypes and the final monitor. We also present an analysis of the losses caused by secondary particle emission for different repelling electrode voltages and beam energies. Finally, we show that results obtained from an analytical model for electron loss probability combined with Monte Carlo simulations of particles trajectories provide a very good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Periodic inversion and phase transition of finite energy Airy beams in a medium with parabolic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Weiping; Zhu, Dayu; Wang, Ruimin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-04-20

    We study periodic inversion and phase transition of normal, displaced, and chirped finite energy Airy beams propagating in a parabolic potential. This propagation leads to an unusual oscillation: for half of the oscillation period the Airy beam accelerates in one transverse direction, with the main Airy beam lobe leading the train of pulses, whereas in the other half of the period it accelerates in the opposite direction, with the main lobe still leading - but now the whole beam is inverted. The inversion happens at a critical point, at which the beam profile changes from an Airy profile to a Gaussian one. Thus, there are two distinct phases in the propagation of an Airy beam in the parabolic potential - the normal Airy and the single-peak Gaussian phase. The length of the single-peak phase is determined by the size of the decay parameter: the smaller the decay, the smaller the length. A linear chirp introduces a transverse displacement of the beam at the phase transition point, but does not change the location of the point. A quadratic chirp moves the phase transition point, but does not affect the beam profile. The two-dimensional case is discussed briefly, being equivalent to a product of two one-dimensional cases.

  6. High efficiency energy extraction from a relativistic electron beam in a strongly tapered undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, Nicholas; Duris, Joe; Gadjev, Ivan; Polyaniy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Fedurin, Mikhail; Swinson, Christina; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Gover, Avi

    2016-01-01

    We present results of an experiment where, using a 200 GW CO2 laser seed, a 65 MeV electron beam was decelerated down to 35 MeV in a 54 cm long strongly tapered helical magnetic undulator, extracting over 30$\\%$ of the initial electron beam energy to coherent radiation. These results demonstrate unparalleled electro-optical conversion efficiencies for a relativistic beam in an undulator field and represent an important step in the development of high peak and average power coherent radiation sources.

  7. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Feng, Y [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); East Carolina University, Rockville, MD (United States); Zhou, L [New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Ahmad, M; Deng, J [New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Nguyen, K; Griffin, M [William Backus Hospital, Norwich, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  8. High energy solar beam testing in the JPL 25-ft space simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications to the individual components in the solar simulation system to improve performance and reduce costs are described. The improvements include: an increase in lamp power from 20 KW to 30 KW; a family of solar beams from 8 to 18.5 feet in diameter at intensities related to beam size with a maximum intensity of 12 solar constants over a 9 ft. diameter; and up to 1.1 megawatts of simulated solar energy in the lamp array.

  9. Energy regeneration model of self-consistent field of electron beams into electric power*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmin, B. N.; Ryzhov, D. R.; Trifanov, I. V.; Snezhko, A. A.; Savelyeva, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider physic-mathematical models of electric processes in electron beams, conversion of beam parameters into electric power values and their transformation into users’ electric power grid (onboard spacecraft network). We perform computer simulation validating high energy efficiency of the studied processes to be applied in the electric power technology to produce the power as well as electric power plants and propulsion installation in the spacecraft.

  10. Noninvasive measurement of micron electron beam size of high energy using diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, G A

    2003-01-01

    Treatments of the usage of diffraction radiation from the relativistic electrons moving though a conductive slit for the transverse beam size measurement encounter hard limitation of the method sensitivity for the electron energy larger than 1 GeV. We consider in this article a possibility of application of the artificial phase shift, which can take place when transverse electron position varies. This allows us to realize the measurements of transverse size of supper-relativistic electron beams with the small emittance.

  11. Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique to measure the fragmentation of a high-energy carbon beam

    OpenAIRE

    De Lellis, G.; Buontempo., S; Di Capua, F.; Marotta, A; Migliozzi, P.; Petukhov, Y.; Pistillo, C; Russo, A; Lavina, L. Scotto; Strolin, P.(Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università Federico II di Napoli, 80125 , Naples, Italy); Tioukov, V.; Ariga, A.(Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern, Switzerland); Naganawa, N.; Toshito, T.; Furusawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Beams of Carbon nuclei are used or planned to be used in various centers for cancer treatment around the world because of their therapeutic advantages over proton beams. The knowledge of the fragmentation of Carbon nuclei when they interact with the human body is important to evaluate the spatial profile of their energy deposition in the tissues, hence the damage to the tissues neighboring the tumor. In this respect, the identification of the fragmentation products is a key element. We presen...

  12. Characterization of a new ionization chamber in radiotherapy beams: angular dependence and variation of response with distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonas O; Linda V E, Caldas

    2012-10-01

    A new double faced ionization chamber was constructed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminum and graphite. It was irradiated in standard radiotherapy beams ((60)Co and X-rays). The response variation with distance and the angular dependence of this ionization chamber were evaluated. It was verified that the chamber response follows the inverse square law within a maximum variation of 11.2% in relation to the reference value. For the angular dependence it showed good agreement with international standards.

  13. Resonant principle for operation of energy recuperator for a magnetized electron beam: A numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Astrelin, V. T.; Koidan, V. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.

    2002-04-01

    The problem of energy recuperator for a high current sheet electron beam used to drive a millimeter-waves generator is considered. There are two main obstacles to solving the problem. The first one is the presence of a magnetic field guiding beam electrons. The second obstacle is significant energy and angular spreads of the electrons in the waste beam. To overcome these obstacles, we suggest a novel scheme of a recuperator. The main idea of the proposed scheme is the use of a decelerating electrical field together with a guiding magnetic field that has longitudinal and spatial periodic transverse components. Resonance of a bounce electron motion with the cyclotron motion in this field gives a strong increase in the Larmour radius of electrons with the energy in a narrow interval. The decelerated electrons with the resonance energy fall away from the beam and are absorbed by a collector at a proper potential. It is shown that efficiency of this novel scheme can reach about 80% even if the sheet beam has a broad energy spectrum.

  14. Dependence on neutron energy of the OER and RBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trials of neutrons as an alternative to x-rays for the radiotherapy of human cancer are underway in Great Britain, the United States, Continental Europe and Japan. A major obstacle to the pooling of clinical data and to the comparison of results is the fact that the various machines used for neutron therapy include a wide range of different neutron energies with consequent variations in biological effectiveness. Various efforts have been made to make biological intercomparisons between the various neutron beams with a variety of biological systems. The present report summarize the results of a new series of biological intercomparisons based on measurements at facilities around the world using an established line of cells cultured in vitro

  15. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  16. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  17. Collision energy dependence of elliptic flow splitting between particles and their antiparticles from an extended multiphase transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Based on an extended multiphase transport model, which includes mean-field potentials in both the partonic and hadronic phases, uses the mix-event coalescence, and respects charge conservation during the hadronic evolution, we have studied the collision energy dependence of the elliptic flow splitting between particles and their antiparticles. This extended transport model reproduces reasonably well the experimental data at lower collision energies but only describes qualitatively the elliptic flow splitting at higher beam energies. The present study thus indicates the existence of other mechanisms for the elliptic flow splitting besides the mean-field potentials and the need of further improvements of the multiphase transport model.

  18. Determination of the Beam-Spin Asymmetry of Deuteron Photodisintegration in the Energy Region $E_\\gamma=1.1-2.3$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zachariou, Nicholas; Ivanov, Nikolay Ya; Sargsian, Misak M; Avakian, Robert; Feldman, Gerald; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Anderson, M D; Pereira, S Anefalos; Avakian, H; Badui, R A; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Baturin, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Glazier, D I; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mattione, P T; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeeev, V I; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Camacho, C Munoz; Net, L A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Senderovich, I; Sharabian, Y G; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-01-01

    The beam-spin asymmetry, $\\Sigma$, for the reaction $\\gamma d\\rightarrow pn$ has been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) for six photon-energy bins between 1.1 and 2.3 GeV, and proton angles in the center-of-mass frame, $\\theta_{c.m.}$, between $25^\\circ$ and $160^\\circ$. These are the first measurements of beam-spin asymmetries at $\\theta_{c.m.}=90^\\circ$ for photon-beam energies above 1.6 GeV, and the first measurements for angles other than $\\theta_{c.m.}=90^\\circ$. The angular and energy dependence of $\\Sigma$ is expected to aid in the development of QCD-based models to understand the mechanisms of deuteron photodisintegration in the transition region between hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom, where both effective field theories and perturbative QCD cannot make reliable predictions.

  19. Energy distribution of fast electrons accelerated by high intensity laser pulse depending on laser pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Morace, Alessio; Hata, Masayasu; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of high-energy electron generation on the pulse duration of a high intensity LFEX laser was experimentally investigated. The LFEX laser (λ = 1.054 and intensity = 2.5 – 3 x 1018 W/cm2) pulses were focused on a 1 mm3 gold cubic block after reducing the intensities of the foot pulse and pedestal by using a plasma mirror. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration of the intense laser pulse could be set to either 1.2 ps or 4 ps by temporally stacking four beams of the LFEX laser, for which the slope temperature of the high-energy electron distribution was 0.7 MeV and 1.4 MeV, respectively. The slope temperature increment cannot be explained without considering pulse duration effects on fast electron generation.

  20. Divergences in the vacuum energy for frequency-dependent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilevich, D. V.

    2009-03-01

    We propose a method for determining ultraviolet divergences in the vacuum energy for systems whose spectrum of perturbations is defined through a nonlinear spectrum problem, i.e., when the fluctuation operator itself depends on the frequency. The method is applied to the plasma shell model, which describes some properties of the interaction of electromagnetic field with fullerenes. We formulate a scalar model, which simplifies the matrix structure, but keeps the frequency dependence of the plasma shell, and calculate the ultraviolet divergences in the case when the plasma sheet is slightly curved. The divergent terms are expressed in terms of surface integrals of corresponding invariants.