WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam emission spectroscopy

  1. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  2. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, F., E-mail: federica.bonomo@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati - CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cristofaro, S. [Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  3. Optics of beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. J.; Yu, Y.; Chen, R.; Lyu, B.; Wu, Y. F.; Yuan, B. D.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2018-01-01

    128-channel Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic basing on neutral beam injection (NBI) has recently been developed on EAST tokamak. It can diagnose plasma density fluctuation with a sample rate of 1 MHz and a spatial resolution of 1–3 cm, according to the diagnosing spatial positions. The Doppler-shifted beam emission line is led through prisms, lens groups and mirrors, and finally divided into two detection branches. By means of rotating the rotation mirror in the optical path, the viewing area, which is a 20 cm × 10 cm rectangle, can be moved from plasma core to edge. Three-cavity-interference filter with a center frequency of 659 nm and a bandwidth of 1.59 nm is used to eliminate the interference background Dα signal and carbon radiation. First experimental results show high performance of this diagnostic.

  4. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  5. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam.

  6. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, O.; Beigman, I. L.; Vainshtein, L. A.; Schweer, B.; Kantor, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Xu, Y.; Krychowiak, M.; Lehnen, M.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T-e(r, t) and electron density ne(r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed

  7. Self-calibrating magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which we call ''static'' and ''dynamic.'' A detailed analysis shows that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarization analyzers are installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of complete static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. The main merit of this scheme relies on the fact that it is self-calibrating with respect to both the characteristics of the mirror and the transmission of the different polarization channels, the latter item implying that it is uniquely based on relative measurements of spectra. Further advantages are a greater flexibility with regard to different kinds of diagnostics and the circumstance that the technical equipment is less involved. The above scheme is based on a detection system of moderate etendue exploiting a large spectral domain, which is the regime where static polarimetry usually operates. It is also possible, however, to work with large etendue and a small spectral domain, such as commonly adopted in dynamic polarimetry. Using such a regime, static polarimetry loses the advantages mentioned above but gains, as a new advantage, the benefit of a comparatively lower level of photon noise. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. 'Beam-emission spectroscopy' diagnostics also measure edge fast-ion light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W W; Bortolon, A; McKee, G R; Smith, D R

    2011-01-01

    Beam-emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics normally detect fluctuations in the light emitted by an injected neutral beam. Under some circumstances, however, light from fast ions that charge exchange in the high neutral-density region at the edge of the plasma make appreciable contributions to the BES signals. This 'passive' fast-ion D α (FIDA) light appears in BES signals from both the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). One type of passive FIDA light is associated with classical orbits that traverse the edge. Another type is caused by instabilities that expel fast ions from the core; this light can complicate measurement of the instability eigenfunction.

  9. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  10. Emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    This 16th article in the series of biennial reviews of emission spectroscopy surveys with emphasis the emission spectrochemical literature appearing in referred publications during 1976 and 1977. Books and general reviews of emission spectroscopy and closely related subjects are considered in the first section, whereas specific reviews and texts are included in each of the five tropical sections. Spectral descriptions and classifications are examined in the second section. An abbreviated instrumentation section follows, and standards, samples, calibrations, and calculations are evaluated in the fourth section. The emphasis on excitation sources reflects the size of section five. In the sixth section, important applications are explored

  11. Status of electron temperature and density measurement with beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, O; Schweer, B; Pospieszczyk, A; Lehnen, M; Samm, U; Unterberg, B; Beigman, I L; Vainshtein, L A; Kantor, M; Xu, Y; Krychowiak, M

    2008-01-01

    Beam emission spectroscopy on thermal helium is used at the TEXTOR tokamak as a reliable method to obtain radial profiles of electron temperature T e (r, t) and electron density n e (r, t). In this paper the experimental realization of this method at TEXTOR and the status of the atomic physics employed as well as the major factors for the measurement's accuracy are evaluated. On the experimental side, the hardware specifications are described and the impact of the beam atoms on the local plasma parameters is shown to be negligible. On the modeling side the collisional-radiative model (CRM) applied to infer n e and T e from the measured He line intensities is evaluated. The role of proton and deuteron collisions and of charge exchange processes is studied with a new CRM and the impact of these so far neglected processes appears to be of minor importance. Direct comparison to Thomson scattering and fast triple probe data showed that for high densities n e > 3.5 x 10 19 m -3 the T e values deduced with the established CRM are too low. However, the new atomic data set implemented in the new CRM leads in general to higher T e values. This allows us to specify the range of reliable application of BES on thermal helium to a range of 2.0 x 10 18 e 19 m -3 and 10 eV e < 250 eV which can be extended by routine application of the new CRM.

  12. Development of a high current 60 keV neutral lithium beam injector for beam emission spectroscopy measurements on fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, G.; Dunai, D.; Lampert, M.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Németh, J.; Bató, S.; Nam, Y. U.; Hu, G. H.; Zoletnik, S.

    2018-01-01

    A 60 keV neutral lithium beam system was designed and built up for beam emission spectroscopy measurement of edge plasma on the KSTAR and EAST tokamaks. The electron density profile and its fluctuation can be measured using the accelerated lithium beam-based emission spectroscopy system. A thermionic ion source was developed with a SiC heater to emit around 4-5 mA ion current from a 14 mm diameter surface. The ion optic is following the 2 step design used on other devices with small modifications to reach about 2-3 cm beam diameter in the plasma at about 4 m from the ion source. A newly developed recirculating sodium vapour neutralizer neutralizes the accelerated ion beam at around 260-280 °C even during long (manipulation techniques are applied to allow optimization, aiming, cleaning, and beam modulation. The maximum 60 keV beam energy with 4 mA ion current was successfully reached at KSTAR and at EAST. Combined with an efficient observation system, the Li-beam diagnostic enables the measurement of the density profile and fluctuations on the plasma turbulence time scale.

  13. Sub-millisecond electron density profile measurement at the JET tokamak with the fast lithium beam emission spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réfy, D. I.; Brix, M.; Gomes, R.; Tál, B.; Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D.; Kocsis, G.; Kálvin, S.; Szabolics, T.; JET Contributors

    2018-04-01

    Diagnostic alkali atom (e.g., lithium) beams are routinely used to diagnose magnetically confined plasmas, namely, to measure the plasma electron density profile in the edge and the scrape off layer region. A light splitting optics system was installed into the observation system of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic at the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which allows simultaneous measurement of the beam light emission with a spectrometer and a fast avalanche photodiode (APD) camera. The spectrometer measurement allows density profile reconstruction with ˜10 ms time resolution, absolute position calculation from the Doppler shift, spectral background subtraction as well as relative intensity calibration of the channels for each discharge. The APD system is capable of measuring light intensities on the microsecond time scale. However ˜100 μs integration is needed to have an acceptable signal to noise ratio due to moderate light levels. Fast modulation of the beam up to 30 kHz is implemented which allows background subtraction on the 100 μs time scale. The measurement covers the 0.9 localized modes.

  14. Consistency checks in beam emission modeling for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punyapu, Bharathi; Vattipalle, Prahlad; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Baruah, Ujjwal Kumar; Crowley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    In positive neutral beam systems, the beam parameters such as ion species fractions, power fractions and beam divergence are routinely measured using Doppler shifted beam emission spectrum. The accuracy with which these parameters are estimated depend on the accuracy of the atomic modeling involved in these estimations. In this work, an effective procedure to check the consistency of the beam emission modeling in neutral beam injectors is proposed. As a first consistency check, at a constant beam voltage and current, the intensity of the beam emission spectrum is measured by varying the pressure in the neutralizer. Then, the scaling of measured intensity of un-shifted (target) and Doppler shifted intensities (projectile) of the beam emission spectrum at these pressure values are studied. If the un-shifted component scales with pressure, then the intensity of this component will be used as a second consistency check on the beam emission modeling. As a further check, the modeled beam fractions and emission cross sections of projectile and target are used to predict the intensity of the un-shifted component and then compared with the value of measured target intensity. An agreement between the predicted and measured target intensities provide the degree of discrepancy in the beam emission modeling. In order to test this methodology, a systematic analysis of Doppler shift spectroscopy data obtained on the JET neutral beam test stand data was carried out

  15. Comparison between different methods of magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which are called 'static' and 'dynamic'. It is shown that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarisation analysers is installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of self-calibrating static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectroscopy of highly charged gadolinium ions with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A

    2013-01-01

    We present extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of highly charged gadolinium ions obtained with an electron beam ion trap at electron energies of 0.53–1.51 keV. The electron energy dependence of the spectra in the 5.7–11.3 nm range is compared with calculation with the flexible atomic code. (paper)

  17. Active beam spectroscopy for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Hellermann, M.; Giroud, C.; Jaspers, R.; Hawkes, N.C.; Mullane, M.O.; Zastrow, K.D.; Krasilnikov, A.; Tugarinov, S.; Lotte, P.; Malaquias, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2003-01-01

    The latest status of 'Active Beam' related spectroscopy aspects as part of the ITER diagnostic scenario is presented. A key issue of the proposed scheme is based on the concept that in order to achieve the ultimate goal of global data consistency, all particles involved, that is, intrinsic and seeded impurity ions as well as helium ash ions and bulk plasma ions and also the plasma background data (e.g. magnetic and electric fields, electron density and temperature profiles) need to be addressed. A further sensible step in this direction is the decision of exploiting both a dedicated low-energy, low-power diagnostic beam (DNB, 2.2 MW 100 keV/amu) as well as the high-power, high-energy heating beams (HNB, 17 MW 500 keV/amu) for maximum diagnostic information. The authors report some new aspects referring to the use of DNB for motional Stark effect (MSE) where the main idea is to treat both beams (HNB and DNB) as potential diagnostic tools with complementary roles. The equatorial ports for the DNB promise excellent spatial resolution, however, the angles are less favourable for a polarimetric MSE exploitation. HNB can be used as probe beam for diagnosing slowing-down fusion alpha with a birth energy of 3,5 MeV

  18. Nanoscale Terahertz Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Kim, Hyewon; Colvin, Vicki L.

    By utilizing plasmonic coupling to an AFM probe, we demonstrate Laser Terahertz Emission Nanoscopy (LTEN) with sub-20 nm resolution. We demonstrate the resolution by imaging a single gold nanorod on an InAs substrate....

  19. Simultaneous multiple element detection by particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy as a tool for metallomic studies: determinations of metal binding with apo-transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C Derrick; Brumaghim, Julia L; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    Particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy (PB/HC-OES) is presented as a tool for the determination of metal ion loading in transferrin (Tf). The elemental specificity of optical emission spectroscopy provides a means of assessing metal ion concentrations as well as the relative amounts of metal per unit protein concentration (up to 2 moles of Fe per mole of protein). The PB/HC-OES method allows for the simultaneous detection of metal content (Fe (I) 371.99, Ni (I) 341.41 nm, Zn (I) 213.86 nm, and Ag (I) 338.28 nm in this case), as well as elemental carbon and sulfur (C (I) 156.14 nm and S (I) 180.73 nm) that are reflective of the protein composition and concentration. Quantification for the metal species is based on calibration functions derived from aqueous solutions, with limits of detection for the entire suite being less than 1.0 μM. Determinations in this manner eliminate much of the ambiguity inherent in UV-VIS absorbance determinations of Tf metal binding. Validation of this method is obtained by analyzing loading response of Fe(3+) into Tf using the PB/HC-OES method and comparing the results with those of the standard UV-VIS absorbance method. Maximum Fe(3+) loading of Tf (based on the number of available binding sites) was determined to be 71.2 ± 4.7% by the PB/HC-OES method and 67.5 ± 2.5% for the UV-VIS absorbance method. Element emission ratios between the dopant metals and the carbon and sulfur protein constituents allow for concentration independent determinations of metal binding into Tf. Loading percentages were determined for Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Ag(+) into Tf with maximum loading values of 19.5 ± 0.4%, 41.0 ± 4.4%, and 141.2 ± 4.3%, respectively. While of no apparent biological significance, Ag(+) presents an interesting case as a surrogate for Pt(2+), whose binding with Tf has shown to be quite different from the other metals. A different mode from the others is indeed observed, and is consistent with conjecture on the Pt(2

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  1. Visible and UV emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monier-Garbet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Visible and ultra-violet emission spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic technique extensively used in contemporary fusion experiments. Theoretical plasma models are required to derive the relevant physical parameters. These models are reviewed in the first part of this paper. They allow spectral line intensities and radiative power losses to be calculated from the knowledge of the detailed atomic physics processes occurring in the plasma. In tokamak plasma experiments, impurity contamination and transport are important concerns. Basic spectroscopic methods used in their understanding are described. They include the determination of impurity concentrations either by line emission modelling (through the use of an impurity transport code), or by direct charge-exchange recombination measurement. They also include the evaluation of neutral particle fluxes at the plasma periphery. Finally, the experimental techniques used in the derivation of impurity transport coefficients are reported

  2. Evaluation of beam divergence of a negative hydrogen ion beam using Doppler shift spectroscopy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, A. J.; Bharathi, P.; Pandya, K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bhuyan, M.; Yadav, R. K.; Tyagi, H.; Gahlaut, A.; Chakraborty, A.

    2018-01-01

    The Doppler Shift Spectroscopy (DSS) diagnostic is in the conceptual stage to estimate beam divergence, stripping losses, and beam uniformity of the 100 keV hydrogen Diagnostics Neutral Beam of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. This DSS diagnostic is used to measure the above-mentioned parameters with an error of less than 10%. To aid the design calculations and to establish a methodology for estimation of the beam divergence, DSS measurements were carried out on the existing prototype ion source RF Operated Beam Source in India for Negative ion Research. Emissions of the fast-excited neutrals that are generated from the extracted negative ions were collected in the target tank, and the line broadening of these emissions were used for estimating beam divergence. The observed broadening is a convolution of broadenings due to beam divergence, collection optics, voltage ripple, beam focusing, and instrumental broadening. Hence, for estimating the beam divergence from the observed line broadening, a systematic line profile analysis was performed. To minimize the error in the divergence measurements, a study on error propagation in the beam divergence measurements was carried out and the error was estimated. The measurements of beam divergence were done at a constant RF power of 50 kW and a source pressure of 0.6 Pa by varying the extraction voltage from 4 kV to10 kV and the acceleration voltage from 10 kV to 15 kV. These measurements were then compared with the calorimetric divergence, and the results seemed to agree within 10%. A minimum beam divergence of ˜3° was obtained when the source was operated at an extraction voltage of ˜5 kV and at a ˜10 kV acceleration voltage, i.e., at a total applied voltage of 15 kV. This is in agreement with the values reported in experiments carried out on similar sources elsewhere.

  3. Nuclear spectroscopy with fast exotic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The often surprising properties of neutron-rich nuclei have prompted extensive experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the driving forces behind the dramatic changes encountered in the exotic regime. Challenging discovery experiments that search for new isotopes in the quest to delineate the limits of nuclear existence provide fundamental benchmarks for nuclear theory, addressing the question what combinations of protons and neutrons can be made into nuclei. As will be discussed here, the existence of certain nuclear species and their production cross sections can provide a first glimpse at nuclear structure effects in the most exotic regime. Striving for more detail on the evolution of nuclear structure, in-beam nuclear spectroscopy with fast beams and thick reaction targets—where γ-ray spectroscopy is used to tag the final state—provides information on the single-particle structure as well as on collective degrees of freedom in nuclei that are available for experiments at beam rates of only a few ions/s. This article will outline—with the example of shell evolution along the N = 40 isotone line—how in-beam experiments measure complementary observables, starting from the nuclear existence and production cross sections to the collective and single-particle properties of the lowest-lying excited states in the vicinity of the very neutron-rich Ti, Cr and Fe N = 40 isotones. The interplay of experimental results and theory will be emphasized at the intersection of nuclear structure and reactions in the joined quest of unraveling the driving forces of shell evolution. (paper)

  4. FTIR Emission spectroscopy of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Woerkom, P. C. M.

    A number of vibrational spectroscopic techniques are available For the study of surfaces, such as ATR, IR reflection-absorption, IR emission, etc. Infrared emission is hardly used, although interesting applications are possible now due to the high sensitivity of Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectrometers. Two examples, where infrared emission measurements are very fruitful, will be given. One is the investigation of the curing behaviour of organic coatings, the other is the in situ study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Undoubtedly, infrared emission measurements offer a number of specific advantages in some cases. Especially the less critical demands on the sample preparation are important.

  5. Hydrogen beam stopping and beam emission data for LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, H.P.; Anderson, H. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kato, T.; Murakami, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    A set of data are presented for estimating neutral hydrogen beam stopping and Balmer alpha beam emission for the fast neutral beams from the H{sup -} source at the Large Helical Device. The data are presented as economised look-up tables and are suitable for plasmas with arbitrary mixtures of light impurity nuclei up to neon, with impurity species Ar{sup 18+} and Fe{sup 26+} also included. The data stem from very many level collisional-radiative modelling using the most up-to-date fundamental ion and electron impact cross-section information. Fortran routines are available for accessing the computer archived data files and assembling the composite coefficients for mixed impurity plasmas. (author)

  6. Characterizing Exoplanet Habitability with Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Results from NASA’s Kepler mission and other recent exoplanet surveys have demonstrated that potentially habitable exoplanets are relatively common, especially in the case of low-mass stellar hosts. The next key question that must be addressed for such planets is whether or not these worlds are actually habitable, implying they could sustain surface liquid water. Only through investigations of the potential habitability of exoplanets and through searches for biosignatures from these planets will we be able to understand if the emergence of life is a common phenomenon in our galaxy. Emission spectroscopy for transiting exoplanets (sometimes called secondary eclipse spectroscopy) is a powerful technique that future missions will use to study the atmospheres and surfaces of worlds orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby, low-mass stars. Emission observations that span the mid-infrared wavelength range for potentially habitable exoplanets provide opportunities to detect key habitability and life signatures, and also allow observers to probe atmospheric and surface temperatures. This presentation will outline the case for using emission spectroscopy to understand if an exoplanet can sustain surface liquid water, which is believed to be a critical precursor to the origin of life.

  7. Practical and research aspects of beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, S.

    1974-01-01

    Practical aspects of the application of low-energy accelerators to research in beam-foil spectroscopy are discussed, and the kinds of equipment and associated costs are described in some detail. Some typical beam-foil experiments, emphasizing the most recent studies, are treated so as to show how relatively simple facilities can be used to produce physics of great interest

  8. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp 1 P 1 -levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He + + He at 10 keV and He 2+ + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr q+ (q=7-9) and Xe q+ (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p 2 P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p 3 P 1 -level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs

  9. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  10. Applications of beam-foil spectroscopy to atomic collisions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1976-01-01

    Some selected papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Beam-Foil Spectroscopy, whose results are of particular pertinence to ionic collision phenomena in solids, are reviewed. The topics discussed include solid target effects and means of surmounting them in the measurement of excited projectile ion lifetimes for low-energy heavy element ions; the electron emission accompanying the passage of heavy particles through solid targets; the collision broadening of X rays emitted from 100 keV ions moving in solids; residual K-shell excitation in chlorine ions penetrating carbon; comparison between 40 MeV Si on gaseous SiH4 targets at 300 mtorr and 40 MeV Si on Al; and the emergent surface interaction in beam-foil spectroscopy. A distinct overlap of interests between the sciences of beam-foil spectroscopy and atomic collisions in solids is pointed out.

  11. Neutron emission spectroscopy for magnetic confinement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellne, J

    2001-10-01

    Neutron diagnostics for plasmas of tokamaks in measurements of flux and energy distribution (spectrum) of the neutron emission are discussed. Neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) is the most exacting of these diagnostics and the one least developed relative to its potential, instrumentally and functionally. The use and results of NES are reviewed to illustrate NES diagnostic functions from the beginning of fusion research in the 50's to the latest achievements in the sub-ignited plasmas at JET 1997. The advancement of NES diagnostics are projected to the next step experiments planned to be conducted close to ignition at ITER. The potential role of NES to handle several essential diagnostic functions on ITER are compared with the present plans for a neutron diagnostics complement without employment of state-of-the-art spectrometry methods.

  12. Neutron emission spectroscopy for magnetic confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaellne, J.

    2001-10-01

    Neutron diagnostics for plasmas of tokamaks in measurements of flux and energy distribution (spectrum) of the neutron emission are discussed. Neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) is the most exacting of these diagnostics and the one least developed relative to its potential, instrumentally and functionally. The use and results of NES are reviewed to illustrate NES diagnostic functions from the beginning of fusion research in the 50's to the latest achievements in the sub-ignited plasmas at JET 1997. The advancement of NES diagnostics are projected to the next step experiments planned to be conducted close to ignition at ITER. The potential role of NES to handle several essential diagnostic functions on ITER are compared with the present plans for a neutron diagnostics complement without employment of state-of-the-art spectrometry methods

  13. Improving depth resolutions in positron beam spectroscopy by concurrent ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Marco; Dalla, Ayham; Ibrahim, Alaa M.; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas; Böttger, Roman; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard

    2018-05-01

    The depth resolution of mono-energetic positron annihilation spectroscopy using a positron beam is shown to improve by concurrently removing the sample surface layer during positron beam spectroscopy. During ion-beam sputtering with argon ions, Doppler-broadening spectroscopy is performed with energies ranging from 3 keV to 5 keV allowing for high-resolution defect studies just below the sputtered surface. With this technique, significantly improved depth resolutions could be obtained even at larger depths when compared to standard positron beam experiments which suffer from extended positron implantation profiles at higher positron energies. Our results show that it is possible to investigate layered structures with a thickness of about 4 microns with significantly improved depth resolution. We demonstrated that a purposely generated ion-beam induced defect profile in a silicon sample could be resolved employing the new technique. A depth resolution of less than 100 nm could be reached.

  14. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of 79 Br 35 Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed

  15. Atomic data for beam-stimulated plasma spectroscopy in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Schlummer, T.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Schultz, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of high energy atoms into a confined plasma volume is an established diagnostic technique in fusion research. This method strongly depends on the quality of atomic data for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS), motional Stark effect (MSE) and beam-emission spectroscopy (BES). We present some examples of atomic data for CXRS and review the current status of collisional data for parabolic states of hydrogen atoms that are used for accurate MSE modeling. It is shown that the collisional data require knowledge of the excitation density matrix including the off-diagonal matrix elements. The new datasets for transitions between parabolic states are used in an extended collisional-radiative model. The ratios between the σ- and π-components and the beam-emission rate coefficients are calculated in a quasi-steady state approximation. Good agreement with the experimental data from JET is found which points out to strong deviations from the statistical distribution for magnetic sublevels

  16. Laser spectroscopy in an lithium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Sylvester, G.; Olivares, I.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured in a collimated and non-collimated atomic lithium beam by means of a diode laser. Spectral lines with a similar linewidth as the lines observed before in a stationary lithium vapor were observed in the non-collimated beam. The spatial structure of the gas region which emits fluorescence permits to observe in situ the hyperfine levels of lithium atoms: each level corresponds to a relatively plane and well defined region. This indicates that the atoms leave the oven following straight lines (otherwise the collisions would produce diffuse regions), which is in correspondence to the high values of the free mean path expected for the gas at this density, and the extension of the shadow left at the condensation plate. In the collimated beam (diameter D=1 mm, and divergence of 90 mrad), the absorption spectra has a width of 450 MHz (12 deg K or less), which permits the measurement of the hyperfine structure. In this case, from the absorption data we obtained ρD=2 x 10 14 atoms/m 2 . The temperature obtained from the Doppler width is consistent with the temperature obtained from the beam geometry. The lithium atom flow was measured with a quartz thickness monitor and based on estimates of the initial oven temperature and density measurements. Fluorescence measurements have better sensitivity ab do not present problems in the base line due to etalon effects. It is possible to observe the detail structure of the side wings in the line spectra

  17. On-line spectroscopy with thermal atomic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, C.; Guimbal, P.; Klapisch, R.; Saint Simon, M. de; Serre, J.M.; Touchard, F.; Duong, H.T.; Jacquinot, P.; Juncar, P.

    1981-01-01

    On-line high resolution laser spectroscopy experiments have been performed in which the light from a cw tunable dye laser interacts at right angles with a thermal atomic beam. sup(76-98)Rb, sup(118-145)Cs and sup(208-213)Fr have been studied using the ionic beam delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator at CERN while sup(20-31)Na and sup(38-47)K have been studied by setting the apparaturs directly on-line with the PS 20 GeV proton beam. The principle of the method is briefly explained and some results concerning nuclear structure are given. (orig.)

  18. High resolution laser spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, K.; Hefter, U.; Hering, P.

    1977-01-01

    The combination of high resolution laser spectroscopy with the technique of molecular beams allows a very detailed beam research since molecules or atoms in specific quantum states can be sampled yielding previously unavailable sources of data. In these experiments a Na/Na 2 beam emerges from a 0.2 mm nozzle and is collimated by a 2 mm wide slit 50 cm downstream. To probe the molecules a single mode Ar + -laser was used which can be tuned within the gain profile of the laser line (8 GHz) to several transitions between specific levels in the ground state and second electronically excited state of the Na 2 molecule. (Auth.)

  19. Electron beam imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic nanoantenna resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesseur, E. J. R.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoantennas are metal structures that provide strong optical coupling between a nanoscale volume and the far field. This coupling is mediated by surface plasmons, oscillations of the free electrons in the metal. Increasing the control over the resonant plasmonic field distribution opens up a wide range of applications of nanoantennas operating both in receiving and transmitting mode. This thesis presents how the dispersion and confinement of surface plasmons in nanoantennas are resolved and further engineered. Fabrication of nanostructures is done using focused ion beam milling (FIB) in metallic surfaces. We demonstrate that patterning in single-crystal substrates allows us to precisely control the geometry in which plasmons are confined. The nanoscale properties of the resonant plasmonic fields are resolved using a new technique developed in this thesis: angle- and polarization controlled cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy. The use of a tightly focused electron beam allows us to probe the optical antenna properties with deep subwavelength resolution. We show using this technique that nanoantennas consisting of 500-1200 nm long polycrystalline Au nanowires support standing plasmon waves. We directly observe the plasmon wavelengths which we use to derive the dispersion relation of guided nanowire plasmons. A 590-nm-long ridge-shaped nanoantenna was fabricated using FIB milling on a single-crystal Au substrate, demonstrating a level of control over the fabrication impossible with polycrystalline metals. CL experiments show that the ridge supports multiple-order resonances. The confinement of surface plasmons to the ridge is confirmed by boundary-element-method (BEM) calculations. The resonant modes in plasmonic whispering gallery cavities consisting of a FIB-fabricated circular groove are resolved. We find an excellent agreement between boundary element method calculations and the measured CL emission from the ring-shaped cavities. The calculations show

  20. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 −5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm −3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  1. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10 -5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 10 4 atoms cm -3 . The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  2. Characterisation of neutral hydrogen beam by means of active balmer-a-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, C.

    1999-01-01

    Neutral particle beams are used in thermal nuclear experiments for plasma heating and current drive, and as a diagnostic tool for active spectroscopy. Within the frame of this thesis eight viewing lines for H α -spectroscopy have been installed at the end of the injector to observe the fully established neutral beam. The viewing lines are all parallel to the horizontal plane and include small angles with the beam axis, in order to make use of the Doppler effect which separates the signals from the three energy components from each other and from the H α -emission of the thermal particles. A multi-Gaussian fit code has been applied to give the amplitudes, positions and widths of the Gauss shaped signals. From this data, the beam composition and, including the physics processes in the acceleration and neutralisation sections, the ion species fractions in the source have been calculated. Furthermore, the vertical density profile and an estimation of the absolute particle density distribution based on an absolute calibration resulted. From the line positions the exact acceleration voltage has been obtained. The line widths allow an estimate of the horizontal divergence. During this work, two ion sources, the 'Pagoda' and the 'Sourcette', have been investigated to obtain the ion species ratio and beam profile. The comparison of the spectroscopic with the calorimetric results gives a useful insight into the beam steering geometry. (author)

  3. Characterisation of neutral hydrogen beam by means of active balmer-a-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, C

    1999-01-01

    Neutral particle beams are used in thermal nuclear experiments for plasma heating and current drive, and as a diagnostic tool for active spectroscopy. Within the frame of this thesis eight viewing lines for H{sub {alpha}}-spectroscopy have been installed at the end of the injector to observe the fully established neutral beam. The viewing lines are all parallel to the horizontal plane and include small angles with the beam axis, in order to make use of the Doppler effect which separates the signals from the three energy components from each other and from the H{sub {alpha}}-emission of the thermal particles. A multi-Gaussian fit code has been applied to give the amplitudes, positions and widths of the Gauss shaped signals. From this data, the beam composition and, including the physics processes in the acceleration and neutralisation sections, the ion species fractions in the source have been calculated. Furthermore, the vertical density profile and an estimation of the absolute particle density distribution based on an absolute calibration resulted. From the line positions the exact acceleration voltage has been obtained. The line widths allow an estimate of the horizontal divergence. During this work, two ion sources, the 'Pagoda' and the 'Sourcette', have been investigated to obtain the ion species ratio and beam profile. The comparison of the spectroscopic with the calorimetric results gives a useful insight into the beam steering geometry. (author)

  4. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Peterson, V.J.; Floyd, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This atlas of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy records the spectra of the elements in a way that would reveal the general nature of the spectra, in all their simplicity or complexity; and offers a definitive summary of the most prominent spectral lines of the elements, i.e., those most likely to be useful for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations; it provides reliable estimates, based on the recorded experimental spectra, of the powers of detection of the listed prominent lines; and assesses the very important problem of spectral interferences. The atlas is composed of three main sections. Part I is concerned with the historical aspects of compilations of spectral information. Part II is based on 232 wavelength scans of 70 elements. Each of the wavelength scans covers an 80 nm spectral region. These scans allow a rapid comparison of the background and spectral line intensities emitted in the ICP and provide a ready means for identification of the most prominent lines of each element and for estimation of the trace element analytical capabilities of these lines. A listing of 973 prominent lines with associated detection limits is also presented. Part III addresses the problem of spectral interferences. On this topic a detailed collection of coincidence profiles is presented for 281 of the most prominent lines, each with profiles of ten of the most prevalent concomitants superimposed. (Auth.)

  5. Beam line design for synchrotron spectroscopy in the VUV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M R

    1980-01-01

    The character of the radiation source provided by an electron storage ring is briefly reviewed from the point of view of utilization for VUV spectroscopy. The design of beam line components is then considered with special reference to the problems of contamination of optical surfaces and vacuum protection. The issues involved in designing mirrors for use with storage rings are considered with emphasis on the questions of power dissipation, image quality and materials selection.

  6. Beam line design for synchrotron spectroscopy in the VUV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The character of the radiation source provided by an electron storage ring is briefly reviewed from the point of view of utilization for VUV spectroscopy. The design of beam line components is then considered with special reference to the problems of contamination of optical surfaces and vacuum protection. The issues involved in designing mirrors for use with storage rings are considered with emphasis on the questions of power dissipation, image quality and materials selection

  7. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based on single beam splitting and geometric configuration for effective signal enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-05

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS.

  8. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  9. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  10. PLASMA EMISSION BY COUNTER-STREAMING ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Petruzzellis, L. T.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Pavan, J., E-mail: luiz.ziebell@ufrgs.br, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu, E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-02-10

    The radiation emission mechanism responsible for both type-II and type-III solar radio bursts is commonly accepted as plasma emission. Recently Ganse et al. suggested that type-II radio bursts may be enhanced when the electron foreshock geometry of a coronal mass ejection contains a double hump structure. They reasoned that the counter-streaming electron beams that exist between the double shocks may enhance the nonlinear coalescence interaction, thereby giving rise to more efficient generation of radiation. Ganse et al. employed a particle-in-cell simulation to study such a scenario. The present paper revisits the same problem with EM weak turbulence theory, and show that the fundamental (F) emission is not greatly affected by the presence of counter-streaming beams, but the harmonic (H) emission becomes somewhat more effective when the two beams are present. The present finding is thus complementary to the work by Ganse et al.

  11. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  13. Practical and research aspects of beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashkin, S.

    1975-01-01

    The application of a heavy-ion accelerator to research in beam-foil spectroscopy requires certain capital equipment which is somewhat unorthodox when viewed from the standpoint of conventional, low-energy nuclear physics. It is necessary that people who wish to expand their accelerator work to include beam-foil studies understand the nature and cost of such major apparatus. We will survey the equipment needs, starting with the particle analyzer at the output of the accelerator and including the equipment used in a variety of beam-foil experiments. Electronic and computer devices will not be discussed since they are essentially identical with those employed in nuclear studies. Considerable attention will be given to optical spectrometers and spectographs including simple instruments which might be used by a laboratory just getting started in beam-foil research, or which has limited financial resources. Attention will be given to the production and use of the exciter foils. We will then discuss some typical beam-foil experiments having to do with the excitation, detection, and analysis of spectral lines from electronic levels in multiply-ionized atoms, and also with the measurement of the mean lives of such levels. Finally, we will review some of the special properties of the beam-foil light source as regards the population of the magnetic sub-states of a given level. Recent work on the character of the emitted light will be presented. That work will deal specifically with the origin of the polarization of the light. The relevant experiments involve varying the angle between the plane of the exciter foil and the particle velocity. (author)

  14. Evaluation of two-beam spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    A two-beam spectroscopy (TBS) system is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. This new spectroscopic technique uses correlations between components of emitted light separated by a small difference in angle of propagation. It is thus a non-perturbing plasma diagnostic which is shown to provide local (as opposed to line-of-sight averaged) information about fluctuations in the density of light sources within a plasma - information not obtainable by the usual spectroscopic methods. The present design is an improvement on earlier systems proposed in a thesis by Rostler

  15. Electron beams formed by photoelectric field emission

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, C H

    2001-01-01

    Previous measurements of electron emission by cw laser-irradiated tungsten needles have been extended to pulsed laser irradiation using a 7-ns long, doubled Nd : YAG laser at intensities up to 10 sup 1 sup 1 W/m sup 2. The results show that the mechanism for emission changes from the tunnelling mechanism observed in the cw case, characterized by exponential voltage dependence, to an ablative mechanism characterized by very weak voltage dependence. The observed emission has a threshold around 10 sup 1 sup 1 W/m sup 2 , just below the damage threshold for the needles. Using needles with a 1-mu m tip radius at voltages up to 50 kV, current densities as high as 10 sup 1 sup 1 A/m sup 2 were observed.

  16. A beam intensity profile monitor based on secondary electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdoz, A.R.; Birchall, J.; Campbell, J.R.; Davis, C.A.; Davison, N.E.; Mosscrop, D.R.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Sekulovich, A.M.; Van Oers, W.T.H.; MIschke, R.E.

    1991-03-01

    Two dual function intensity profile monitors have been designed for a measurement of parity violation in antiproton-proton scattering at about 230 MeV using longitudinally polarized protons. Each device contains a set of split secondary electron emission (SEM) foils to determine the median of the beam current distribution (in x and y). The split foils, coupled through servoamplifiers and operational amplifiers to upstream air core steering magnets, have demonstrated the ability to hold the beam position stable to within ± 3 μm after one hour of data taking with a 100 nA, 15 mm FWHM Gaussian beam. (Author) 16 refs., 10 figs., tab

  17. Laser-Induced-Emission Spectroscopy In Hg/Ar Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lutfollah; Blasenheim, Barry J.; Janik, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced-emission (LIE) spectroscopy used to probe low-pressure mercury/argon discharge to determine influence of mercury atoms in metastable 6(Sup3)P(Sub2) state on emission of light from discharge. LIE used to study all excitation processes affected by metastable population, including possible effects on excitation of atoms, ions, and buffer gas. Technique applied to emissions of other plasmas. Provides data used to make more-accurate models of such emissions, exploited by lighting and laser industries and by laboratories studying discharges. Also useful in making quantitative measurements of relative rates and cross sections of direct and two-step collisional processes involving metastable level.

  18. Active spectroscopy upgrades and neutral beam injection on LTX- β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Biewer, Theodore; Canik, John; Reinke, Matthew; Bell, Ronald; Boyle, Dennis; Guttenfelder, Walter; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Thomas; Majeski, Richard; Merino, Enrique

    2017-10-01

    The LTX- β upgrade includes the addition of neutral beam injection (NBI) and increased active spectroscopy. Typical plasmas have been and are expected to remain inboard limited, at 14 cm with minor radii of 18-23 cm. The NBI, 35 Amps of 20 keV particles, will enable active diagnosis of ion velocity distribution profiles through charge exchange (CHERS). 18 CHERS views will cover more than a full minor radius, each sampling 2 cm of major radius. The system has both a set of beam directed ``active'' views and a symmetric set of views pointing away from the beam for stray light subtraction. Along with measuring ion temperatures and impurity transport, the CHERS diagnostic will measure the plasma rotation profiles. The recently described low recycling regime is predicted to allow for high rotational velocities due to the low neutral drag. The planned NBI has been predicted to give on axis velocities near 100 km/s. Flow shear is expected to increase confinement in this regime by suppressing trapped electron mode and other microturbulence enhanced transport. Upgrades to the Thomson scattering system, including an array of polychromators and a new camera, will assist in diagnosing the low density hot edge in this low recycling regime. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Multiphoton Ionization Detection in Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of Isolde Beams

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The experiments using the multiphoton ionization technique have been continued in the beginning of 1990 with stable beam tests on the modified apparatus and with another radioactive beam time on Yb. Higher laser power and an increased vacuum in the ionization region (see figure) yielded a further gain in sensitivity, mainly due to the better suppression of the background ions produced in rest gas collisions. For even Yb isotopes we have now reached a detection efficiency of $\\epsilon$~=~1~x~10$^{-5}$ ions per incoming atom at a background count rate of 30~ions from a beam of 5~x~10$^9$. This sensitivity was high enough for spectroscopy on $^{157}$Yb, where the typical ISOLDE yield of 5~x~10$^7$Yb ions is covered by an isobaric contamination of more than 10$^{10}$ ions. Measurements have also been performed on $^{175}$Yb. These give the first precise value for the magnetic moment of this isotope, $\\mu$~=~0.766(8)$ mu _{N} $, which agrees rather well with the magnetic moment of the isotone $^{177}$Hf. The isoto...

  20. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  1. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  2. Deep ultraviolet emission in hexagonal boron nitride grown by high-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, T. Q. P.; Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Rousseau, E.; Summerfield, A.; Mellor, C. J.; Cho, Y.; Cheng, T. S.; Albar, J. D.; Eaves, L.; Foxon, C. T.; Beton, P. H.; Novikov, S. V.; Gil, B.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the opto-electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride grown by high temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We combine atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet to compare the quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown either on sapphire or highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. For both substrates, the emission spectra peak at 235 nm, indicating the high optical quality of hexagonal boron nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The epilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite demonstrate superior performance in the deep ultraviolet (down to 210 nm) compared to those on sapphire. These results reveal the potential of molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene, and more generally, for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures and devices by means of a scalable technology.

  3. Schemes of Superradiant Emission from Electron Beams and "Spin-Flip Emission of Radiation"

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A

    2005-01-01

    A unified analysis for Superradiant emission from bunched electron beams in various kinds of radiation scheme is presented. Radiation schemes that can be described by the formulation include Pre-bunched FEL (PB-FEL), Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR), Smith-Purcell Radiation, Cerenkov-Radiation, Transition-Radiation and more. The theory is based on mode excitation formulation - either discrete or continuous (the latter - in open structures). The discrete mode formulation permits simple evaluation of the spatially coherent power and spectral power of the source. These figures of merit of the radiation source are useful for characterizing and comparing the performance of different radiation schemes. When the bunched electron beam emits superradiantly, these parameters scale like the square of the number of electrons, orders of magnitude more than spontaneous emission. The formulation applies to emission from single electron bunches, periodically bunched beams, or emission from a finite number of bunches in a...

  4. SU-F-J-46: Feasibility of Cerenkov Emission for Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraiqat, I; Rehemtulla, A; Lam, K; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Clarke, R [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission (CE) is a promising tool for online tumor microenvironment interrogation and targeting during radiotherapy. In this work, we utilize CE generated during radiotherapy as a broadband excitation source for real-time absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate the feasibility of CE spectroscopy using a controlled experiment of materials with known emission/absorption properties. Methods: A water tank is irradiated with 20 MeV electron beam to induce Cerenkov emission. Food coloring dyes (Yellow #5, Red #40, and Blue #1), which have known emission/absorption properties were added to the water tank with increasing concentration (1 drop (0.05 mL), 2 drops, and 4 drops from a dispenser bottle). The signal is collected using a condensing lens which is coupled into a 20m optical fiber that is fed into a spectrometer that measures the emitted spectra. The resulting spectra from water/food coloring dye solutions were normalized by the reference spectrum, which is the Cerenkov spectrum of pure water, correcting for both the nonlinearity of the broadband Cerenkov emission spectrum as well as the non-uniform spectral response of the spectrometer. The emitted spectra were then converted into absorbance and their characteristics were analyzed. Results: The food coloring dye had a drastic change on the Cerenkov emission, shifting its wavelength according to its visible color. The collected spectra showed various absorbance peaks which agrees with tabulated peak positions of the dyes added within 0.3% for yellow, 1.7% for red, and 0.16% for blue. The CE peak heights proportionally increased as the dye concentration is increased. Conclusion: This work shows the potential for real-time functional spectroscopy using Cerenkov emission during radiotherapy. It was demonstrated that molecule identification as well as relative concentration can be extracted from the Cerenkov emission color shift.

  5. Nonlinear ultrasonic spectroscopy and acoustic emission in SHM of aircrafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Krofta, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, SI (2012), s. 36-40 ISSN 1213-3825 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : NDT * structural health monitoring * acoustic emission * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * time reversal mirrors Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...

  7. Emission Spectroscopy of the 4X Source Discharge With and Without N2 Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Horace Vernon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-14

    This tech note summarizes the December, 1988 emission spectroscopy measurements made on the 4X source discharge with and without N₂ gas added to the H + Cs discharge. This study is motivated by the desire to understand why small amounts of N₂ gas added to the source discharge results in a reduction in the H⁻ beam noise. The beneficial effect of N₂ gas on H⁻ beam noise was first discovered by Bill Ingalls and Stu Orbesen on the ATS SAS source. For the 4X source the observed effect is that when N2 gas is added to the discharge the H⁻ beam noise is reduced about a factor of 2.

  8. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  9. Characterization of a nondestructive beam profile monitor using luminescent emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Variola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The LHC (large hadron collider [LHC study group: LHC. The large hadron collider conceptual design; CERN/AC/95-05] is the future p-p collider under construction at CERN, Geneva. Over a circumference of 26.7 km a set of cryogenic dipoles and rf cavities will store and accelerate proton and ion beams up to energies of the order of 7 TeV. Injection in LHC will be performed by the CERN complex of accelerators, starting from the source and passing through the linac, the four booster rings, the proton synchrotron (PS, and super proton synchrotron (SPS accelerators. One of the main constraints on LHC performance is emittance preservation along the whole chain of CERN accelerators. The accepted relative normalized emittance blowup after filamentation is ±7%. To monitor the beam and the emittance blowup process, a study of different prototypes of nonintercepting beam profile monitors has been performed. In this context a monitor using the luminescent emission of gases excited by ultrarelativistic protons (450 GeV was developed and tested in the SPS ring. The results of beam size measurements and their evolution as a function of the machine parameters are presented. The image quality and resolution attainable in the LHC case have been assessed. A first full characterization of the luminescence cross section, spectrum, decay time, and afterglow effect for an ultrarelativistic proton beam is provided. Some significant results are also provided for lead ion beams.

  10. Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission Spectroscopy Over a Broad Range of Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hannah; Wilkinson, John; Tighe, Meghanne; McLallen, Walter; McGuire, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis is a common application of nuclear physics that allows elemental and isotopic information about materials to be determined from accelerated light ion beams One of the best know ion beam analysis techniques is Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy, which can be used ex vacuo to identify the elements of interest in almost any solid target. The energies of the gamma-rays emitted by excited nuclei will be unique to each element and depend on its nuclear structure. For the most sensitivity, the accelerated ions should exceed the Coulomb barrier of the target, but many isotopes are known to be accessible to PIGE even below the Coulomb barrier. To explore the sensitivity of PIGE across the periodic table, PIGE measurements were made on elements with Z = 5, 9, 11-15, 17, 19-35, 37, 42, 44-48, 53, 56, 60, 62, 73, and 74 using 3.4 MeV protons. These measurements will be compared with literature values and be used as a basis for comparison with higher-energy proton beams available at the University of Notre Dame's St. Andre accelerator when it comes online this Fall. The beam normalization technique of using atmospheric argon and its 1459 keV gamma-ray to better estimate the integrated beam on target will also be discussed. Funded by the NSF REU program and the University of Notre Dame.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission spectroscopy on thermonuclear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbing, B.J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) enables one to infer the radial profile of the electron temperature in tokamaks. The Dutch FOM institute for plasma physics has designed, built, installed and operated a grating polychromator for ECE measurements at JET. This thesis deals with a few instrumental aspects of this project and with applications of ECE measurements in tokamak physics studies. Ch. 3 and 4 deal with the wave transport in ECE systems. In Ch. 3 a method is developed to infer the mode conversion, which is a source for transmission losses, in a waveguide component from the antenna pattern of its exit aperture. In Ch. 4 the design and manufacture of the waveguide transition system to the grating polychromator are described. In Ch. 5 a method is reported for calibration of the spectrometers, based on the use of a microwave source which simulates a large area blackbody of very high temperature. The feasibility of the method is tested by applying it to two different ECE systems. In Ch. 6 a study of heat pulse propagation in tokamak plasma's, based on measurement of the electron temperature with the grating polychromator, is presented. 105 refs.; 48 figs.; 8 tabs

  12. Latitudinal beaming of Jupiter's low frequency radio emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.K.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L.; Thieman, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    By comparing Rae 1 and Imp 6 satelite measurements of Jupiter's radio emissions near 1 MHz with recent Voyager 1 and 2 observations in the same frequency range it is now possible to study the properties of the low frequency radiation pattern over a 10 0 range of latitudes with respect to the Jovian rotation equator. These observations, which cover a wider latitudinal range than is possible from the earth, are consistent with many aspect of earlier ground-based measurements that have been used to infer a sharp beaming pattern for the decameter wavelength emissions. We find marked, systematic changes in the statistical occurrence probability distributions with system III central meridian longitude as the Jovigraphic latitude of the observer changes over this range. Moreover, simultaneous observations by the two Voyager spacecraft, which are separated by up to 3 0 in Jovigraphic latitude, suggest that the instantaneous beam width may be no more than a few degrees at times. The new hectometer wave results can be interpreted in terms of a narrow, curved sheet at a fixed magnetic latitude into which the emission is beamed to escape the planet

  13. Development of a Reference Database for Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques are non-destructive analytical techniques used to identify the composition and structure of surface layers of materials. The applications of these techniques span environmental control, cultural heritage and conservation, materials and fusion technologies. The particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy technique in particular, is a powerful tool for detecting light elements in certain depths of surface layers. This publication describes the coordinated effort to measure and compile cross section data relevant to PIGE analysis and make these data available to the community of practice through a comprehensive online database.

  14. A multiwire secondary emission profile monitor for small emittance beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.; Bonnard, J.; Humbert, G.; Leblond, B.; Saury, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary emission monitor using two multiwire grids separated by a positively biased collector has been constructed and tested with a 1 GeV electron beam at the Orsay Linac. The monitor installed just before the electron-positron converter has 8 gold-plated-tungsten wires of 0.1 mm diameter equally spaced 0.2 mm apart in each plane. Each wire is connected with an integrator using a low-bias current operational amplifier. The wire planes and the collector are moved into the beam by a stepping motor : that allows beam-position verification. We measured narrow profiles for 1 Amp peak current pulses of 30 nanoseconds width. Profiles are displayed on a scope and allow emittance determination by the three gradient method. Such a monitor is very useful to control the electron beam position and dimensions on the converter, because the positron source dimensions are rather bigger than those of the incident beam and the geometrical acceptance of the positron Linac is limited

  15. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  16. Some applications of ballistic electron emission microscopy/spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 2 (1998), s. 365-372 ISSN 0587-4246. [Scanning Probe Spectroscopy and Related Methods - SPS'97 /1./. Poznan, 15.07.1997-18.07.1997] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/97/0427 Keywords : field emission electron microscopes * nanostructured materials * Schottky effect Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.344, year: 1998

  17. Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is a vital part of the active protection of the LHC accelerators' elements. It should provide the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. The LHC BLM system will use ionization chambers as standard detectors but in the areas where very high dose rates are expected, the Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) chambers will be employed because of their high linearity, low sensitivity and fast response. The SEM needs a high vacuum for proper operation and has to be functional for up to 20 years, therefore all the components were designed according to the UHV requirements and a getter pump was included. The SEM electrodes are made of Ti because of its Secondary Emission Yield (SEY) stability. The sensitivity of the SEM was modeled in Geant4 via the Photo-Absorption Ionization module together with custom parameterization of the very low energy secondary electron production. ...

  18. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    . In principle, a direct product from NB surveys are line fluxes for the selected objects. However, as the effective bandpasses of NB interference filters in the fast convergent beams of survey telescopes cannot be made with tophat bandpass shapes, flux measurements for individual objects have uncertainties. We...... studies have shown that weak extended Ly α emission might be a typical property around star-forming galaxies at high redshifts; but a recent non-detection of such emission for a sample of Ly α emitter z ¡­ 2 has raised the question whether the halo properties change with time. As this more typical Ly α...... emission is to weak to be detected for individual objects, stacking analysis is required. We performed such an analysis with an independent sample and find a halo consistent with measurements at higher redshifts....

  19. Stimulated X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy in Transition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Mercadier, Laurent; Majety, Vinay P.; Marinelli, Agostino; Lutman, Alberto; Guetg, Marc W.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Boutet, Sébastien; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason; Koralek, Jake; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kern, Jan; Fuller, Franklin D.; Pastor, Ernest; Fransson, Thomas; Zhang, Yu; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Rohringer, Nina; Bergmann, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified K α x-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an x-ray free electron laser to create the 1 s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over 4 orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1 s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ˜1.7 eV FWHM is constant over 3 orders of magnitude, pointing to the buildup of transform limited pulses of ˜1 fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and a shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated x-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities of ˜1020 W /cm2 for the incoming x-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) x-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, and materials science.

  20. Characterization of a nondestructive beam profile monitor using luminescent emission

    CERN Document Server

    Variola, A; Ferioli, G

    2007-01-01

    The LHC (large hadron collider) [LHC study group: LHC. The large hadron collider conceptual design; CERN/AC/95-05] is the future p-p collider under construction at CERN, Geneva. Over a circumference of 26.7 km a set of cryogenic dipoles and rf cavities will store and accelerate proton and ion beams up to energies of the order of 7 TeV. Injection in LHC will be performed by the CERN complex of accelerators, starting from the source and passing through the linac, the four booster rings, the proton synchrotron (PS), and super proton synchrotron (SPS) accelerators. One of the main constraints on LHC performance is emittance preservation along the whole chain of CERN accelerators. The accepted relative normalized emittance blowup after filamentation is ±7%. To monitor the beam and the emittance blowup process, a study of different prototypes of nonintercepting beam profile monitors has been performed. In this context a monitor using the luminescent emission of gases excited by ultrarelativistic protons (450 GeV) ...

  1. Beam-transport system for high-resolution heavy-ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, P.; Kashy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A method is given to adjust a beam-transport system to the requirements of high-energy resolution heavy-ion spectroscopy. The results of a test experiment performed on a MP tandem with a 12 C beam are shown. A drastic improvement in energy resolution is obtained for a kinematical factor K=1/p dp/dtheta=0.12 [fr

  2. New methods and applications in emission spectroscopy (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.

    1960-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy, are already well-established instrumental analytical technique, has in recent years known important developments. Two mains factors are responsible; firstly the demands of metallurgy for purer and purer materials or alloys which are increasingly complex and difficult to analyse by chemical means; secondly, progress in optics, especially in the production of gratings, and in electronics in the field of photomultiplier tubes. We will not here catalogue all the new applications and methods, but we will consider a few amongst the most representative outside the conventional field. (author) [fr

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS)...

  4. Tracking of azobenzene isomerization by X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, H

    2014-09-11

    Cis-trans isomerizations are among the fundamental processes in photochemistry. In azobenzene or its derivatives this dynamics is, due to its reversibility, one of the reactions widely used in photostimulation of molecular motors or in molecular electronics. Though intensively investigated in the optical regime, no detailed study exists in the X-ray regime so far. Because the X-ray emission spectroscopy echoes the electronic structure sensitive to the geometry, this theoretical report based on the density functional theory and its time-dependent version presents different nitrogen K-edge X-ray emission spectra for cis and trans isomers with close interrelation to their electron configuration. Considering the spectrum along the isomerization path, these structural signatures can be utilized to probe the isomerization dynamics in the excited molecule. The scheme can further be generalized to the element specific photoreactions.

  5. Pulsed Electron Beam Spectroscopy for Temperature Measurements in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Collisional Quenching Data ............................................ 26 C. Improvements to Pulsed E-Beam System...neutral g informati vibrationa The e-be flow m e Developm Shock T applicatio employs continuo mtorr are of an e-beam g the elect are acce through...the f irst two advantages result in improved signal/noise ratio over continuous e-beam systems and a shorter exposure time. The third advantage of a

  6. Positron beam lifetime spectroscopy of atomic scale defect distributions in bulk and microscopic volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.; Brown, B.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a defect analysis capability based on two positron beam lifetime spectrometers: the first is based on a 3 MeV electrostatic accelerator and the second on our high current linac beam. The high energy beam lifetime spectrometer is operational and positron lifetime analysis is performed with a 3 MeV positron beam on thick samples. It is being used for bulk sample analysis and analysis of samples encapsulated in controlled environments for insitu measurements. A second, low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopies is under development at the LLNL high current positron source. This beam will enable defect specific, 3-D maps of defect concentration with sub-micron location resolution and when coupled with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes it will enable new levels of defect concentration mapping and defect identification

  7. A Method for Eliminating Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Jan 2015. PA#14562. 14. ABSTRACT Modulated absorption-emission thermometry (MAET) is a non-intrusive, radiometric technique for measuring line-of...ANSI Std. 239.18 1 Integrity  Service  Excellence A Method for Eliminating Beam Steering Error for Modulated Absorption- Emission Thermometry

  8. Characterization and Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Ball Plasmoid Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas at atmospheric pressure serve many purposes, from ionization sources for ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to plasma-assisted wound healing. Of the many naturally occurring ambient plasmas, ball lightning is one of the least understood; there is currently no solid explanation in the literature for the formation and lifetime of natural ball lightning. With the first measurements of naturally occurring ball lightning being reported last year, we have worked to replicate the natural phenomenon in order to elucidate the physical and chemical processes by which the plasma is sustained at ambient conditions. We are able to generate ball-shaped plasmoids (self-sustaining plasmas) that are analogous to natural ball lightning using a high-voltage, high-current, pulsed DC system. Improvements to the discharge electronics used in our laboratory and characterization of the plasmoids that are generated from this system will be described. Infrared emission spectroscopy of these plasmoids reveals emission from water and hydroxyl radical -- fitting methods for these molecular species in the complex experimental spectra will be presented. Rotational temperatures for the stretching and bending modes of H2O along with that of OH will be presented, and the non-equilibrium nature of the plasmoid will be discussed in this context. Cen, J.; Yuan, P,; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001. Dubowsky, S.E.; Friday, D.M.; Peters, K.C.; Zhao, Z.; Perry, R.H.; McCall, B.J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 376, 39-45.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon laser plasma ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon laser plasma generated by an Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse width 7 ns, fluence 4-52 J cm-2) is studied by optical emission spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight. Up to C4+ ions are detected with the ion flux strongly dependent on the laser fluence. The increase in ion charge with the laser fluence is accompanied by observation of multicharged ion lines in the optical spectra. The time-integrated electron temperature Te is calculated from the Boltzmann plot using the C II lines at 392.0, 426.7, and 588.9 nm. Te is found to increase from ∼0.83 eV for a laser fluence of 22 J cm-2 to ∼0.90 eV for 40 J cm-2. The electron density ne is obtained from the Stark broadened profiles of the C II line at 392 nm and is found to increase from ∼ 2 . 1 × 1017cm-3 for 4 J cm-2 to ∼ 3 . 5 × 1017cm-3 for 40 J cm-2. Applying an external electric field parallel to the expanding plume shows no effect on the line emission intensities. Deconvolution of ion time-of-flight signal with a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for each charge state results in an ion temperature Ti ∼4.7 and ∼6.0 eV for 20 and 36 J cm-2, respectively.

  10. The use of EXOGAM for in-beam spectroscopy of proton drip-line nuclei with radioactive ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, M.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gros, S.; McGuirk, B. M.; Turk, G.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rossé, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stézowski, O.; Bhattacharyya, S.; De France, G.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Nyakó, B. M.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Porquet, M. G.; Prévost, A.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G. C.

    2009-08-01

    One of the first fusion-evaporation experiments using radioactive ion beams was performed at GANIL in order to study proton-rich nuclei of the light rare-earth region. The low production cross-section of the exotic species of interest, in combination with the low intensity of the beam and its induced background, demanded the use of a highly efficient experimental setup. This consisted of the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer coupled for the first time with both the DIAMANT charged-particle array and the VAMOS recoil spectrometer. In this report the experimental challenges of such studies will be discussed and the experimental achievements of the in-beam spectroscopy of proton drip-line nuclei using EXOGAM will be presented.

  11. Beam-foil spectroscopy of chlorine and sulfur ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frot, D.; Barchewitz, R.; Cukier, M.; Bruneau, J.

    1987-01-01

    We report on the measurement of spectra of highly stripped chlorine and sulfur ions in the energy ranges of, respectively, 2900 - 3500 eV and 2300 - 2600 eV. The spectra have been obtained after excitation of ions travelling through a thin carbon foil. X-rays emitted by the emerging beam are analysed with a Johann-type bent crystal spectrometer. The observation angle with respect to the beam axis is 54 0 . The interpretation of the spectra is performed by comparing experimental results with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculated energies and intensities. All the lines are interpreted by 2p - ls transitions (K α spectrum) in excited ions with, respectively, H-, He-, Li-, Be- and B-like electron structures

  12. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  13. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  15. E-beam irradiation effect on CdSe/ZnSe QD formation by MBE: deep level transient spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovsky, V I; Litvinov, V G; Sadofyev, Yu G

    2004-01-01

    CdSe/ZnSe structures containing 1 or 15 thin (3-5 monolayers) CdSe layers were studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS spectra consisted of peaks from deep levels (DLs) and an additional intense peak due to electron emission from the ground quantized level in the CdSe layers. Activation energy of this additional peak correlated with an energy of the CdSe-layer emission line in the CL spectra. Electron-beam irradiation of the structure during the growth process was found to influence the DLTS and CL spectra of the CdSe layers, shifting the CdSe-layer emission line to the long-wave side. The obtained results are explained using the assumption that e-beam irradiation stimulates the formation of quantum dots of various sizes in the CdSe layers

  16. Correlative Raman spectroscopy and focused ion beam for targeted phase boundary analysis of titania polymorphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangum, John S.; Chan, Lisa H.; Schmidt, Ute; Garten, Lauren M.; Ginley, David S.; Gorman, Brian P.

    2018-05-01

    Site-specific preparation of specimens using focused ion beam instruments for transmission electron microscopy is at the forefront of targeting regions of interest for nanoscale characterization. Typical methods of pinpointing desired features include electron backscatter diffraction for differentiating crystal structures and energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy for probing compositional variations. Yet there are situations, notably in the titanium dioxide system, where these techniques can fail. Differentiating between the brookite and anatase polymorphs of titania is either excessively laborious or impossible with the aforementioned techniques. However, due to differences in bonding structure, Raman spectroscopy serves as an ideal candidate for polymorph differentiation. In this work, a correlative approach utilizing Raman spectroscopy for targeted focused ion beam specimen preparation was employed. Dark field imaging and diffraction in the transmission electron microscope confirmed the region of interest located via Raman spectroscopy and demonstrated the validity of this new method. Correlative Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and focused ion beam is shown to be a promising new technique for identifying site-specific preparation of nanoscale specimens in cases where conventional approaches do not suffice.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  18. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  19. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  20. High Precision, Sensitive, Near-IR Spectroscopy in a Fast Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porambo, Michael; Kreckel, Holger; Mills, Andrew; Perera, Manori; Siller, Brian; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-10-01

    In the low temperatures and pressures of the interstellar medium (ISM), molecular ions play key roles as reactants and intermediates, as well as physical probes of the interstellar environment. As such, high resolution laboratory spectra of these ions aid in further understanding the chemistry and physics of the ISM. There are many challenges to high resolution molecular ion spectroscopy in the laboratory, though. To combat these challenges, we have built a fast ion beam spectrometer that possesses rigorous ion-neutral discrimination, high sensitivity and resolution, and mass identification capabilities. The primary components of the system are a cold cathode ion source, an electrostatic ion optical system for steering and focusing the extracted ion beam, an ion beam-laser overlap region where the spectroscopy takes place, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass studies of the ion beam. The spectra are obtained using a highly sensitive spectroscopic technique called Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). By calibrating the spectra with an optical frequency comb, line centers of transitions can be determined to future, a supersonic expansion discharge source will take the place of the current cold cathode in order to create an ion beam with much lower rotational temperature. We have recorded near-infrared rovibronic transitions of the 1-0 Meinel band of N2+as a proof of concept of this setup. In addition to analyzing the lineshapes of the transitions, the line center of the Q22(14.5) line was determined to an accuracy of ~8 MHz. Presently, we are working to extend our ion beam spectroscopy to the study of mid-infrared vibrational transitions of other molecular ions using a Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser tunable from 2.8 to 4.8 μm.

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography by using fan beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihisa

    1992-01-01

    A multislice fan beam collimator which has parallel collimation along the cephalic-caudul axis of a patient and converging collimation within planes that are perpendicular to that axis was designed for a SPECT system with a rotating scintillation camera, and it was constructed by the lead casting method which was developed in recent years. A reconstruction algorithm for fan beam SPECT was formed originally by combining the reconstruction algorithm of the parallel beam SPECT with that of the fan beam X-ray CT. The algorithm for fan beam SPECT was confirmed by means of computer simulation and a head phantom filled with diluted radionuclide. Not only 99m Tc but also 123 I was used as a radionuclide. A SPECT image with the fan beam collimator was compared with that of a parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator which was routinely used for clinical and research SPECT studies. Both system resolution and sensitivity of the fan beam collimator were ∼20% better than those of the parallel hole collimator. Comparing SPECT images obtained from fan beam collimator with those of parallel hole collimator, the SPECT images using fan beam collimator had far better resolution. A fan beam collimator is a useful implement for the SPECT study. (author)

  2. A study of molecular effects in beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Veje, E.

    1979-01-01

    Relative populations of ns + nd levels in hydrogen as functions of the principal quantum number n have been measured with beams of H + , H 2 + , and H 3 + impinging on thin carbon foils at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu. Enhancements of 20% and 45% for dimer and trimer clusters are observed uniformly for all levels. A possible explanation in terms of screening of the Coulomb repulsion between the protons inside the foil, thus reducing the effective thickness of the foil, is given. All relative populations closely follow an nsup(P) power law with p = -4.0 and -3.7 at 25 keV/amu and 100 keV/amu, respectively, in perfect analogy with atomic collision experiments. O + /O 2 + -foil excitations at 100 keV and 155 keV show a simular molecular effect, but in reverse with a larger mean charge produced by the dimer. (Auth.)

  3. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-04-18

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc{sup 18+} yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy ({approx}1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg{sup 11+}, while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F{sup 6+}. (orig.)

  4. Calibration of the ISOLDE acceleration voltage using a high-precision voltage divider and applying collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A.; Catherall, R.; Hochschulz, F.; Kramer, J.; Neugart, R.; Rosendahl, S.; Schipper, J.; Siesling, E.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Yordanov, D.T.; Nortershauser, W.

    2011-01-01

    A high-voltage divider with accuracy at the ppm level and collinear laser spectroscopy were used to calibrate the highvoltage installation at the radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. The accurate knowledge of this voltage is particularly important for collinear laser spectroscopy measurements. Beam velocity measurements using frequencycomb based collinear laser spectroscopy agree with the new calibration. Applying this, one obtains consistent results for isotope shifts of stable magnesium isotopes measured using collinear spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy on laser-cooled ions in a trap. The long-term stability and the transient behavior during recovery from a voltage dropout were investigated for the different power supplies currently applied at ISOLDE.

  5. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} 6s7s {sup 1}S{sub 0}) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm{sup 3} and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s{sup 1}S{sub 0} state via the intercombination 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 1} state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 Degree-Sign C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  6. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s 2 1 S 0 ↔ 6s7s 1 S 0 ) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm 3 and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s 1 S 0 state via the intercombination 6s6p 3 P 1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  7. Coherent emission from relativistic beam-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical model for the production of high-power, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation from unmagnetized, relativistic beam-plasma interactions is studied. Emphasis is placed on the injected-beam system, for which the dominant portion of the radiation is emitted near the point where the beam enters the plasma. In such systems, frequencies much larger than the plasma frequency and power levels many orders of magnitude above that predicted by single-particle radiation have been observed experimentally. A two-step process is proposed to explain these observations: electrostatic bunching of the beam followed by coherent radiation by the bunches. The first step, beam bunching, produces large-amplitude electrostatic waves. A Green's function analysis is employed to understand the convective growth of those waves near the plasma boundary; their saturation amplitude is found by applying conservation of energy to the beam-plasma system. An azimuthally symmetric model is used to compute the saturated spectrum analytically, and a relatively simple expression is found. The second step, the interaction of the electron beam with the electrostatic spectrum, leads to the production of high-power, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation. From a detailed analysis of the phase-space evolution of the trapped beam, an analytic expression for the electromagnetic spectrum is found as a function of angle and frequency

  8. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  9. Ion beam nanopatterning and micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis on HOPG for testing FIB performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archanjo, B.S., E-mail: bsarchanjo@inmetro.gov.br [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maciel, I.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, MG 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Peripolli, S.B.; Damasceno, J.C. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais (PEMM), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, CEP 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jorio, A. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias 25250-020, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, MG 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    This work reports Ga{sup +} focused ion beam nanopatterning to create amorphous defects with periodic square arrays in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and the use of Raman spectroscopy as a new protocol to test and compare progresses in ion beam optics, for low fluence bombardment or fast writing speed. This can be ultimately used as a metrological tool for comparing different FIB machines and can contribute to Focused Ion Beam (FIB) development in general for tailoring nanostructures with higher precision. In order to do that, the amount of ion at each spot was varied from about 10{sup 6} down to roughly 1 ion per dot. These defects were also analyzed by using high resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The sensitivities of these techniques were compared and a geometrical model is proposed for micro-Raman spectroscopy in which the intensity of the defect induced D band, for a fixed ion dose, is associated with the diameter of the ion beam. In addition, the lateral increase in the bombarded spot due to the cascade effect of the ions on graphite surface was extracted from this model. A semi-quantitative analysis of the distribution of ions at low doses per dot or high writing speed for soft modification of materials is discussed. -- Highlights: {yields} Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface is bombarded using a focused ion beam. {yields} Raman spectroscopy is used to propose a new protocol to test focused ion beam optics. {yields} Scattering diameter of the ions on HOPG surface is experimentally obtained. {yields} Optical limitations of the ion column in fast writing speed are discussed. {yields} Small level of modifications is considered for changing graphene conductive properties.

  10. Ultrarelativistic electron beam spatial size estimation from angular distribution emission in thin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goponov, Yu.A.; Sidnin, M.A. [Belgorod National Research University, Belgorod (Russian Federation); Sumitani, K.; Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan); Vnukov, I.E., E-mail: vnukov@bsu.edu.ru [Belgorod National Research University, Belgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-01

    The use of ultrarelativistic electron (positron) emission in thin crystals to estimate particle beam spatial sizes for projected electron–positron colliders is proposed. The existing position-sensitive X-ray range detectors restrict the minimum value of the measured beam size to a level of approximately 10 μm, which is far greater than the planned sizes of collider beams. We propose to estimate the electron (positron) beam divergence over the diffracted transition radiation from angular distribution measurements. The spatial size can be obtained from the calculated beam emittance or the experimental emittance, which is measured during the earlier stage of acceleration using optical transition or optical diffraction radiation. The problem of crystal destruction under the influence of a high-intensity electron beam is discussed. The use of surface parametric X-ray radiation, where the problem of crystal destruction is almost absent, to measure the electron beam parameters is also discussed.

  11. Ultrarelativistic electron beam spatial size estimation from angular distribution emission in thin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goponov, Yu. A.; Sidnin, M. A.; Sumitani, K.; Takabayashi, Y.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2016-02-01

    The use of ultrarelativistic electron (positron) emission in thin crystals to estimate particle beam spatial sizes for projected electron-positron colliders is proposed. The existing position-sensitive X-ray range detectors restrict the minimum value of the measured beam size to a level of approximately 10 μm, which is far greater than the planned sizes of collider beams. We propose to estimate the electron (positron) beam divergence over the diffracted transition radiation from angular distribution measurements. The spatial size can be obtained from the calculated beam emittance or the experimental emittance, which is measured during the earlier stage of acceleration using optical transition or optical diffraction radiation. The problem of crystal destruction under the influence of a high-intensity electron beam is discussed. The use of surface parametric X-ray radiation, where the problem of crystal destruction is almost absent, to measure the electron beam parameters is also discussed.

  12. Temporal structure of double plasma frequency emission of thin beam-heated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Gavrilenko, D. Ye.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Popov, S. S.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sudnikov, A. V.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Trunev, Yu. A.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    In the work presented here dynamics of spiky microwave emission of a beam-heated plasma near the double plasma frequency in ˜100 GHz band was studied. The plasma is heated by 80 keV, ˜2 MW, sub-ms electron beam that is injected into the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The beam-heated plasma diameter is of the order of the emitted wavelength. Modulation of individual emission spikes in the microwave radiation is found. The radiation dynamics observed can be attributed to a small number of compact emitting zones that are periodically distorted.

  13. The field emission properties of high aspect ratio diamond nanocone arrays fabricated by focused ion beam milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.L. Wang, Q. Wang, H.J. Li, J.J. Li, P. Xu, Q. Luo, A.Z. Jin, H.F. Yang and C.Z. Gu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High aspect ratio diamond nanocone arrays are formed on freestanding diamond film by means of focused ion beam (FIB milling technology and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD method. The structure and phase purity of an individual diamond nanocone are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The result indicates that the diamond cones with high aspect ratio and small tip apex radius can be obtained by optimizing the parameters of FIB milling and diamond growth. The diamond nanocone arrays were also used to study the electron field emission properties and electric field shielding effect, finding high emission current density, low threshold and weak shielding effect, all attributable to the high field enhancement factor and suitable cone density of the diamond nanocone emitter

  14. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  15. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Infrared Emission From Inorganic and Organic Substances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, C.S; Brown, E; Hommerich, U; Trivedi, S. B; Snyder, A. P; Samuels, A. C

    2006-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been established as a powerful method for identifying trace elemental contaminants by analyzing the atomic spectral emission lines that result subsequent to plasmas generated by laser power...

  16. Neutron spectroscopy measurements and modeling of neutral beam heating fast ion dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellesen, C; Sunden, E Andersson; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Johnson, M Gatu; Hjalmarsson, A; Kaellne, J; Ronchi, E; Sjoestrand, H; Weiszflog, M; Albergante, M; Ballabio, L; Gorini, G; Tardocchi, M; Giacomelli, L; Jenkins, I; Voitsekhovitch, I

    2010-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the neutron emission from beam-target reactions in fusion plasmas at the Joint European Torus (JET) has been investigated. Different beam energies as well as injection angles were used. Both measurements and simulations of the energy spectrum were done. The measurements were made with the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR. Simulations of the neutron spectrum were based on first-principle calculations of neutral beam deposition profiles and the fast ion slowing down in the plasma using the code NUBEAM, which is a module of the TRANSP package. The shape of the neutron energy spectrum was seen to vary significantly depending on the energy of the beams as well as the injection angle and the deposition profile in the plasma. Cross validations of the measured and modeled neutron energy spectra were made, showing a good agreement for all investigated scenarios.

  17. 4D in-beam positron emission tomography for verification of motion-compensated ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Richter, Christian; Durante, Marco; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Rietzel, Eike; Bert, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Clinically safe and effective treatment of intrafractionally moving targets with scanned ion beams requires dedicated delivery techniques such as beam tracking. Apart from treatment delivery, also appropriate methods for validation of the actual tumor irradiation are highly desirable. In this contribution the feasibility of four-dimensionally (space and time) resolved, motion-compensated in-beam positron emission tomography (4DibPET) was addressed in experimental studies with scanned carbon ion beams. Methods: A polymethyl methracrylate block sinusoidally moving left-right in beam's eye view was used as target. Radiological depth changes were introduced by placing a stationary ramp-shaped absorber proximal of the moving target. Treatment delivery was compensated for motion by beam tracking. Time-resolved, motion-correlated in-beam PET data acquisition was performed during beam delivery with tracking the moving target and prolonged after beam delivery first with the activated target still in motion and, finally, with the target at rest. Motion-compensated 4DibPET imaging was implemented and the results were compared to a stationary reference irradiation of the same treatment field. Data were used to determine feasibility of 4DibPET but also to evaluate offline in comparison to in-beam PET acquisition. Results: 4D in-beam as well as offline PET imaging was found to be feasible and offers the possibility to verify the correct functioning of beam tracking. Motion compensation of the imaged β + -activity distribution allows recovery of the volumetric extension of the delivered field for direct comparison with the reference stationary condition. Observed differences in terms of lateral field extension and penumbra in the direction of motion were typically less than 1 mm for both imaging strategies in comparison to the corresponding reference distributions. However, in-beam imaging retained a better spatial correlation of the measured activity with the delivered

  18. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of secondary electron emission due to ion beam milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahady, Kyle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tan, Shida [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Greenzweig, Yuval [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Livengood, Richard [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Raveh, Amir [Intel Israel Ltd., Haifa (Israel); Fowlkes, Jason D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rack, Philip [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of secondary electron emission resulting from focused ion beam milling of a copper target. The basis of this study is a simulation code which simulates ion induced excitation and emission of secondary electrons, in addition to simulating focused ion beam sputtering and milling. This combination of features permits the simulation of the interaction between secondary electron emission, and the evolving target geometry as the ion beam sputters material. Previous ion induced SE Monte Carlo simulation methods have been restricted to predefined target geometries, while the dynamic target in the presented simulations makes this study relevant to image formation in ion microscopy, and chemically assisted ion beam etching, where the relationship between sputtering, and its effects on secondary electron emission, is important. We focus on a copper target, and validate our simulation against experimental data for a range of: noble gas ions, ion energies, ion/substrate angles and the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. We then provide a detailed account of the emission of secondary electrons resulting from ion beam milling; we quantify both the evolution of the yield as high aspect ratio valleys are milled, as well as the emission of electrons within these valleys that do not escape the target, but which are important to the secondary electron contribution to chemically assisted ion induced etching.

  20. Simulations and Measurements of Secondary Electron Emission Beam Loss Monitors for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Daniel; Holzer, E B; Ferioli, G; Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) is a part of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring system, which is providing the number of particles lost from the primary hadron beam by measuring the radiation field induced by their interaction with matter surrounding the beam pipe. SEM detectors will be used in the high dose rate environments of LHC because of their low sensitivity and excellent linearity. The design of SEM consists of two bias electrodes separating the produced secondary electrons from the Ti signal electrode placed in a vacuum steel cylinder. The response of the chamber was tested with bunched and continuous proton beams and compared with a reference detector and GEANT4 simulations.

  1. Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential due to electron beam emission or impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential is well understood in the double Maxwellian model of the natural space environment. In this paper, however, the author points out that triple-root jumps in spacecraft potential may also occur during photoemission or electron beam emission from a spacecraft. Impact of an incoming electron beam on a spacecraft may also cause triple-root jumps provided that the beam, ambient plasma, and surface parameters satisfy certain inequality conditions. The parametric conditions under which such beam induced triple-root jumps may occur are presented

  2. Ion spectroscopy for improvement of the physical beam model for therapy planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arico, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Helium and carbon ions enable a more conformal dose distribution, narrower penumbra and higher relative biological effectiveness than photon and proton radiotherapy. However, they may undergo nuclear fragmentation in the patient tissues and the arising secondary fragments affect the delivered biological dose distributions. Currently there is a lack of data regarding ion nuclear fragmentation. One reason is the large size (up to some meters) of the experimental setups required for the investigations. In this thesis a new method is presented, which makes use of versatile pixelated semiconductor detectors (Timepix). This method is based on tracking of single particles and pattern recognition of their signals in the detectors. Measurements were performed at the HIT facility. The mixed radiation field arising from 430 MeV/u carbon ion beams and 221 MeV/u helium ion beams in water and in PMMA targets was investigated. The amounts of primary (carbon or helium) ions detected behind targets with the same water equivalent thickness (WET) were found to be in agreement within the statistical uncertainties. However, more fragments (differences up to 20% in case of H) and narrower lateral particle distributions were measured behind the PMMA than the water targets. The spectra of ions behind tissue surrogates and corresponding water targets with the same WET were analysed. The results obtained with adipose and inner bone surrogates and with the equivalent water phantoms were found to be consistent within the uncertainties. Significant differences in the results were observed in the case of lung and cortical bone surrogates when compared to the water phantoms. The experimental results were compared to FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. This comparison could contribute to enhance the ion interaction models currently implemented for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ion beams.

  3. Coherent multi-dimensional spectroscopy at optical frequencies in a single beam with optical readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Hélène; Palato, Samuel; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast coherent multi-dimensional spectroscopies form a powerful set of techniques to unravel complex processes, ranging from light-harvesting, chemical exchange in biological systems to many-body interactions in quantum-confined materials. Yet these spectroscopies remain complex to implement at the high frequencies of vibrational and electronic transitions, thereby limiting their widespread use. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of two-dimensional spectroscopy at optical frequencies in a single beam. Femtosecond optical pulses are spectrally broadened to a relevant bandwidth and subsequently shaped into phase coherent pulse trains. By suitably modulating the phases of the pulses within the beam, we show that it is possible to directly read out the relevant optical signals. This work shows that one needs neither complex beam geometries nor complex detection schemes in order to measure two-dimensional spectra at optical frequencies. Our setup provides not only a simplified experimental design over standard two-dimensional spectrometers but its optical readout also enables novel applications in microscopy.

  4. Neutron Spectroscopy for pulsed beams with frame overlap using a double time-of-flight technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrig, K. P.; Goldblum, B. L.; Brown, J. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Harasty, M.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.

    2018-01-01

    A new double time-of-flight (dTOF) neutron spectroscopy technique has been developed for pulsed broad spectrum sources with a duty cycle that results in frame overlap, where fast neutrons from a given pulse overtake slower neutrons from previous pulses. Using a tunable beam at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, neutrons were produced via thick-target breakup of 16 MeV deuterons on a beryllium target in the cyclotron vault. The breakup spectral shape was deduced from a dTOF measurement using an array of EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. Simulation of the neutron detection efficiency of the scintillator array was performed using both GEANT4 and MCNP6. The efficiency-corrected spectral shape was normalized using a foil activation technique to obtain the energy-dependent flux of the neutron beam at zero degrees with respect to the incoming deuteron beam. The dTOF neutron spectrum was compared to spectra obtained using HEPROW and GRAVEL pulse height spectrum unfolding techniques. While the unfolding and dTOF results exhibit some discrepancies in shape, the integrated flux values agree within two standard deviations. This method obviates neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy challenges posed by pulsed beams with frame overlap and opens new opportunities for pulsed white neutron source facilities.

  5. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy/Spectroscopy on Au/Titanylphthalocyanine/GaAs Heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcan, S; Roch, T; Strasser, G; Smoliner, J; Franke, R; Fritz, T

    2007-01-01

    In this article Au/titanylphthalocyanine/GaAs diodes incorporating ultra smooth thin films of the archetypal organic semiconductor titanylphthalocyanine (TiOPc) were investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy/Spectroscopy (BEEM/S). Analyzing the BEEM spectra, we find that the TiOPc increases the BEEM threshold voltage compared to reference Au/GaAs diodes. From BEEM images taken we conclude that our molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) grown samples show very homogeneous transmission, compare to wet chemically manufactured organic films. The barrier height measured on the Au- TiOPc-GaAs is V b ∼ 1.2eV, which is in good agreement with the data found in [T. Nishi, K. Tanai, Y. Cuchi, M. R. Willis, and K. Seki Chem. Phys. Lett., vol. 414, pp. 479-482, 2005.]. The results indicate that TiOPc functions as a p-type semiconductor, which is plausible since the measurements were carried out in air [K. Walzer, T. Toccoli, A. Pallaori, R. Verucchi, T. Fritz, K. Leo, A. Boschetti, and S. Iannotte Surf. Scie., vol. 573, pp. 346-358, 2004

  6. Superradiant and stimulated-superradiant emission in prebunched electron-beam radiators. II. Radiation enhancement schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Further enhancement of the intense coherent superradiant and stimulated-superradiant emission from prebunched electron beams is possible, in schemes of prebunched beam radiation devices, and particularly free electron laser (FEL. The enhancement of coherent power and spectral power by use of a waveguide, particularly at the zero-slippage condition, is evaluated. A special scheme of a stimulated-superradiance FEL oscillator is analyzed and is shown to feature ultimate radiative energy conversion efficiency (near 100%.

  7. Rapid analysis of the chemical composition of agricultural fibers using near infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen S. Kelley; Roger M. Rowell; Mark Davis; Cheryl K. Jurich; Rebecca Ibach

    2004-01-01

    The chemical composition of a variety of agricultural biomass samples was analyzed with near infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy. These samples were selected from a wide array of agricultural residue samples and included residues that had been subjected to a variety of di2erent treatments including solvent extractions and chemical...

  8. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  9. High-stable secondary-emission monitor for accelerated electron beam current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudnikov, I.A.; Saksaganskij, G.L.; Bazhanov, E.B.; Zabrodin, B.V.

    1977-01-01

    A secondary-emission monitor for a 10 to 30 MeV electron beam (beam current is 10 -4 to 10 -2 A) is described. The monitor comprises a measuring electrode unit, titanium discharge-type pump, getter made of porous titanium, all enclosed in a metal casing. The measuring unit comprises three electrodes made of 20 μm aluminium foil. The secondary emission coefficient (5.19%+-0.06% for the electron energy of 20 MeV) is maintained stable for a long time. The monitor detects pulses of up to some nanoseconds duration. It is reliable in operation, and is recommended for a wide practical application

  10. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  11. Quantitative emission from femtosecond microplasmas for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taschuk, M T; Kirkwood, S E; Tsui, Y Y; Fedosejevs, R [Department of Electical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6H 2V4 (Canada)

    2007-04-15

    An ongoing study of the scaling of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to microjoule pulse energies is being conducted to quantify the LIBS process. The use of microplasmas for LIBS requires good understanding of the emission scaling in order to maximize the sensitivity of the LIBS technique at low energies. The quantitative scaling of emission of Al, Cu and Si microplasmas from 100 {mu}J down to 100 nJ is presented. The scaling of line emission from major and minor constituents in Al 5052 alloy is investigated and evaluated for analytical LIBS. Ablated crater volume scaling and emission efficiency for Si microplasmas are investigated.

  12. Proceeding of the workshop on gamma-ray spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, photon and RI beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Masumi; Sugita, Michiaki; Hayakawa, Takehito [eds.

    1998-03-01

    Three time since 1992, we have held the symposia entitled `Joint Spectroscopy Experiments Utilizing JAERI Tandem-Booster Accelerator` at the Tokai Research Establishment. In the symposia, we have mainly discussed the plans of experiments to be done in this joint program. The joint program started in 1994. Several experiments have been made since and some new results have already come up. This symposium `Gamma-ray Spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, Photon and RI beams` was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. Because this symposium is the first occasion after the program started, the first purpose of the symposium is to present and discuss the experimental results so far obtained using the JAERI Tandem-Booster. The second purpose of the symposium is to discuss new possibilities of gamma-ray spectroscopy using new resources such as RI-beam and Photon-beam. The participants from RIKEN, Tohoku University and JAERI Neutron Science Research Center presented the future plans of experiments with RI-beam at each facility. Compared with these nuclear beams, photon beam provides a completely new tool for the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, which is achieved by inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electron and laser beams. The 23 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Beam emission spectroscopy studies in a H-/D- beam injector

    OpenAIRE

    Barbisan, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The limited availability of the present energetic resources and the climate changes induced by the increase of the level of CO2 in the atmosphere are pushing humanity to completely rethink the ways to produce and consume energy. In the long term, a significant contribution to the solution of the world energy issue may come from nuclear fusion: the raw materials, deuterium and lithium, are worldwide accessible and in sufficient quantity to feed the future fusion reactors for several centuries. ...

  14. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lastras-Martínez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD spectroscopy of GaAs(001 grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  15. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martínez, A., E-mail: alm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx, E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F. [Instituto de Investigación en Comunicación Optica, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Alvaro Obregón 64, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78000 (Mexico); Lastras-Montaño, L. A. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Lastras-Montaño, M. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  16. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  17. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  18. Stimulated emission depletion-based raster image correlation spectroscopy reveals biomolecular dynamics in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Dörlich, René M; Blomley, Rosmarie; Gradl, Dietmar; Oppong, Emmanuel; Cato, Andrew C B; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study fast molecular dynamics such as protein diffusion or receptor-ligand interactions inside living cells and tissues. By analysing spatio-temporal correlations of fluorescence intensity fluctuations from raster-scanned microscopy images, molecular motions can be revealed in a spatially resolved manner. Because of the diffraction-limited optical resolution, however, conventional raster image correlation spectroscopy can only distinguish larger regions of interest and requires low fluorophore concentrations in the nanomolar range. Here, to overcome these limitations, we combine raster image correlation spectroscopy with stimulated emission depletion microscopy. With imaging experiments on model membranes and live cells, we show that stimulated emission depletion-raster image correlation spectroscopy offers an enhanced multiplexing capability because of the enhanced spatial resolution as well as access to 10-100 times higher fluorophore concentrations.

  19. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio

  20. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it; Sartori, E. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  1. SO2 EMISSION MEASUREMENT BY DOAS (DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND COSPEC (CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY AT MERAPI VOLCANO (INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The SO2 is one of the volcanic gases that can use as indicator of volcano activity. Commonly, SO2 emission is measured by COSPEC (Correlation Spectroscopy. This equipment has several disadvantages; such as heavy, big in size, difficulty in finding spare part, and expensive. DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy is a new method for SO2 emission measurement that has advantages compares to the COSPEC. Recently, this method has been developed. The SO2 gas emission measurement of Gunung Merapi by DOAS has been carried out at Kaliadem, and also by COSPEC method as comparation. The differences of the measurement result of both methods are not significant. However, the differences of minimum and maximum result of DOAS method are smaller than that of the COSPEC. It has range between 51 ton/day and 87 ton/day for DOAS and 87 ton/day and 201 ton/day for COSPEC. The measurement of SO2 gas emission evaluated with the seismicity data especially the rockfall showed the presence of the positive correlation. It may cause the gas pressure in the subsurface influencing instability of 2006 eruption lava.   Keywords: SO2 gas, Merapi, DOAS, COSPEC

  2. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  3. X-Band Microwave Noise Emission from Beam-Produced Sheet Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Manheimer, W. M.; Meger, R. A.; Pechacek, R. E.

    1998-11-01

    Large area sheet plasmas have been produced at NRL for radar beam steering applications(J. Mathew, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77(10), p. 1982(1996).)(R. F. Fernsler, et al., Physics of Plasmas 5, 2137(1998).). In these experiments a 3-5 kilovolt, <50 mA/cm^2, 1 cm x 60 cm area pulsed electron beam confined by a 15-350 Gauss magnetic field, is injected into a 20-100 mTorr oxygen background. The beam electrons ionize the gas, producing a 1-5 cm thick, 60 cm x 60 cm planar plasma. The emission of microwave energy from the plasma is an important consideration in the sensitivity calculations for radar applications. The microwaves emitted from the plasma are often many times the background level, and thus above the theoretical predictions for bremsstrahlung emission, which is produced as collisions accelerate the plasma electrons. The tentative explanation for this excess emission is the two stream instability between the plasma electrons and the electron beam which produces them. This paper will discuss the frequency and polarization dependence of the spontaneous microwave emission in the X-band as a function of the applied magnetic field and the background gas pressure.

  4. Acoustic emission study on 50 years old reinforced concrete beams under bending and shear tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; de Boer, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Acoustic Emission (AE) measurement of several tests carried out on reinforced concrete beams sawn from a 50 years old concrete bridge – Ruytenschildt bridge. The purpose of these tests is to provide additional information to the already executed in-situ load testing on the

  5. MM-wave emission by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Mekler, K. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Popov, S. S.; Postupaev, V. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Sorokina, N. V.; Trunev, Yu. A.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    There are described electromagnetic spectra of radiation emitted by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam in a double plasma frequency band. Experimental studies were performed at the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The electron beam had the following parameters: 70-110 keV for the electron energy, 1-10 MW for the beam power and 30-300 μs for its duration. The spectrum was measured in 75-230 GHz frequency band. The frequency of the emission follows variations in electron plasma density and magnetic field strength. The specific emission power on the length of the plasma column is estimated on the level 0.75 kW/cm.

  6. MM-wave emission by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, I. A., E-mail: Ivanov@inp.nsk.su; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Popov, S. S.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Vyacheslavov, L. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V.; Sorokina, N. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Avenue, Novosibirsk 630092 (Russian Federation); Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Trunev, Yu. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Polosatkin, S. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Avenue, Novosibirsk 630092 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    There are described electromagnetic spectra of radiation emitted by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam in a double plasma frequency band. Experimental studies were performed at the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The electron beam had the following parameters: 70–110 keV for the electron energy, 1–10 MW for the beam power and 30–300 μs for its duration. The spectrum was measured in 75–230 GHz frequency band. The frequency of the emission follows variations in electron plasma density and magnetic field strength. The specific emission power on the length of the plasma column is estimated on the level 0.75 kW/cm.

  7. Directional sound beam emission from a configurable compact multi-source system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2018-01-12

    We propose to achieve efficient emission of highly directional sound beams from multiple monopole sources embedded in a subwavelength enclosure. Without the enclosure, the emitted sound fields have an indistinguishable or omnidirectional radiation directivity in far fields. The strong directivity formed in the presence of the enclosure is attributed to interference of sources under degenerate Mie resonances in the enclosure of anisotropic property. Our numerical simulations of sound emission from the sources demonstrate the radiation of a highly directed sound beam of unidirectional or bidirectional patterns, depending on how the sources are configured inside the enclosure. Our scheme, if achieved, can solve the challenging problem of poor directivity of a subwavelength sound system, and can guide beam forming and collimation by miniaturized devices.

  8. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  9. Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy in Dy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Okada, Kozo; Kotani, Akio.

    1994-01-01

    The excitation spectrum of the L 3 -M 5 X-ray emission of Dy compounds in the pre-edge region of Dy L 3 X-ray absorption near edge structure (L 3 -XANES) is theoretically investigated based upon the coherent second order optical formula with multiplet coupling effects. The spectral broadening of the excitation spectrum is determined by the M 5 core hole lifetime, being free from the L 3 core hole lifetime. The fine pre-edge structure of the L 3 edge due to the 2p→4f quadrupole transition can be seen in the excitation spectrum, while this structure is invisible in the conventional XANES, in agreement with the recent experimental results. We clarify the conditions for the excitation spectrum to be regarded as the absorption spectrum with a smaller width. The resonant X-ray emission spectra for various incident photon energies around the L 3 edge are also calculated. (author)

  10. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  11. Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.-H.; Augustsson, A.; Englund, C.-J.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present now a possible way to carry out soft-x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of liquids. The liquid cell has a window to attain compatibility with UHV conditions of the spectrometer and beamline. The synchrotron radiation enters the liquid cell through a 100nm-thick silicon nitride window and the emitted x-rays exit through the same window. This allows in particular liquid solid interfaces to be studied. Such a liquid cell has been used to study the electronic structure of a variety of systems ranging from water solutions of inorganic salts and inertial drugs to nano materials and actinide compounds in their wet conditions

  12. Airborne measurement of aircraft emissions using passive infrared FT spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschberger, P.; Lindermeir, E.; Tank, V. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Optoelektronik

    1997-12-01

    For the first time emissions from aircraft jet engines where measured inflight by use of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The instrument works in a non-intrusive mode observing the plume from the cabin and detecting the emitted infrared radiation. Applying nonlinear inversion techniques the concentrations and emission indices of the infrared active gas components are calculated. Besides CO, CO{sub 2}, and water vapor the separate acquisition of NO and NO{sub 2} is of special interest. For the ATTAS research aircraft as a first carrier the emission index of NO{sub x}, EI(NO{sub x}), is in the range of 5-7.5 g(NO{sub 2})/(kg fuel) with a ratio NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} of 12-22%. The precision of the measurement system is better than 5%, the estimated accuracy depends on the species and ranges between 5-25%. This report presents a summary of the results including a comparison of measured data and ground-to-altitude correlation models. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  13. Three-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography using cone beam collimation (CB-SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Manglos, S.H.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A simple and economically practical method of improving the sensitivity of camera-based SPECT was developed using converging (cone-beam) collimation. This geometry is particularly advantageous for SPECT devices using large field-of-view cameras in imaging smaller, centrally located activity distributions. Geometric sensitivities, spatial resolutions, and fields-of-view of a cone-beam collimator having a focal length of 48 cm and a similarly designed parallel hole collimator were compared analytically. At 15 cm from the collimator surface the point-source sensitivity of the cone-beam collimator was 2.4 times the sensitivity of the parallel-hole collimator. SPECT projection data (simulated using Monte Carlo methodology) were reconstructed using a 3-D filtered backprojection algorithm. Cone-beam emission CT (CB-SPECT) seems potentially useful for animal investigations, pediatric studies, and for brain imaging

  14. Control of stopping position of radioactive ion beam in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.F., E-mail: yangxf@ribf.riken.jp [School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Wakui, T. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Imamura, K. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Fujita, T. [Dept. of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tsutsui, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Y. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dept. of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yoshida, N.; Shirai, H. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro, Tokyo152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Y.; Hayasaka, M. [Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Arai, S.; Muramoto, S. [Dept. of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Wada, M.; Sonoda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei with extremely low yields by measuring nuclear spins and moments, a new laser spectroscopy technique – “OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher) has been proposed in recent years. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated by means of a considerable amount of offline and online studies of various atoms in superfluid helium. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, trapping atoms in the observation region of laser is a key step. Therefore, a method which enables us to trap accelerated atoms at a precise position in He II is highly needed for performing experiment. In this work, a technique making use of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is established for checking the stopping position of beam based on the LISE++ calculation. The method has been tested and verified by on-line experiments with the {sup 84,85,87}Rb beam. Details of the experimental setup, working procedure and testing results of this method are presented.

  15. In-beam measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting and prospects for antihydrogen spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diermaier, M.; Jepsen, C. B.; Kolbinger, B.; Malbrunot, C.; Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Zmeskal, J.; Widmann, E.

    2017-06-01

    Antihydrogen, the lightest atom consisting purely of antimatter, is an ideal laboratory to study the CPT symmetry by comparison with hydrogen. With respect to absolute precision, transitions within the ground-state hyperfine structure (GS-HFS) are most appealing by virtue of their small energy separation. ASACUSA proposed employing a beam of cold antihydrogen atoms in a Rabi-type experiment, to determine the GS-HFS in a field-free region. Here we present a measurement of the zero-field hydrogen GS-HFS using the spectroscopy apparatus of ASACUSA's antihydrogen experiment. The measured value of νHF=1,420,405,748.4(3.4) (1.6) Hz with a relative precision of 2.7 × 10-9 constitutes the most precise determination of this quantity in a beam and verifies the developed spectroscopy methods for the antihydrogen HFS experiment to the p.p.b. level. Together with the recently presented observation of antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m downstream of the production region, the prerequisites for a measurement with antihydrogen are now available within the ASACUSA collaboration.

  16. In-beam measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting and prospects for antihydrogen spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diermaier, M; Jepsen, C B; Kolbinger, B; Malbrunot, C; Massiczek, O; Sauerzopf, C; Simon, M C; Zmeskal, J; Widmann, E

    2017-06-12

    Antihydrogen, the lightest atom consisting purely of antimatter, is an ideal laboratory to study the CPT symmetry by comparison with hydrogen. With respect to absolute precision, transitions within the ground-state hyperfine structure (GS-HFS) are most appealing by virtue of their small energy separation. ASACUSA proposed employing a beam of cold antihydrogen atoms in a Rabi-type experiment, to determine the GS-HFS in a field-free region. Here we present a measurement of the zero-field hydrogen GS-HFS using the spectroscopy apparatus of ASACUSA's antihydrogen experiment. The measured value of ν HF =1,420,405,748.4(3.4) (1.6) Hz with a relative precision of 2.7 × 10 -9 constitutes the most precise determination of this quantity in a beam and verifies the developed spectroscopy methods for the antihydrogen HFS experiment to the p.p.b. level. Together with the recently presented observation of antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m downstream of the production region, the prerequisites for a measurement with antihydrogen are now available within the ASACUSA collaboration.

  17. Beam Dynamics Simulations of Optically-Enhanced Field Emission from Structured Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Grote, D. [LLNL, Livermore; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Vay, J.-L. [LBNL, Berkeley

    2014-01-01

    Structured cathodes - cathodes with a segmented emission surface - are finding an increasing number of applications and can be combined with a variety of emission mechanisms, including photoemission and field emission. These cathodes have been used to enhance the quantum efficiency of metallic cathodes when operated as plasmonic cathodes, have produced high-current electron bunches though field emission from multiple tips, and can be used to form beams with transverse segmentations necessary for improving the performance of accelerator-based light sources. In this report we present recent progress towards the development of finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations using the emission process in structured cathodes based on the WARP framework. The simulations give further insight on the localized source of the emitted electrons which could be used for additional high-fidelity start-to-end simulations of electron accelerators that employ this type of electron source.

  18. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  19. In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of the neutron rich 39Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohler, D.; Dombradi, Zs.; Achouri, N.L.; Angelique, J.C.; Bastin, B.; Azaiez, F.; Baiborodin, D.; Borcea, R.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In order to clarify the role of proton excitations across the Z = 14 subshell closure in neutron-rich Si isotopes, we investigated the structure of the 14 39 Si 25 isotope, having three neutron-hole configurations with respect to an N = 28 core. The excited states of 39 Si were studied by in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy trough fragmentation of radioactive beams. The experiment was performed at the GANIL facility in France. The radioactive beams were produced by the fragmentation of the stable 48 Ca beam of 60 MeV/u energy and 4μA intensity on a 12 C target in the SISSI device. The cocktail beam produced was impinged onto a 9 Be target. The nuclei produced in the secondary fragmentation reaction were selected and unambiguously identified by the SPEG spectrometer. In the performed experiment the 39 Si nuclei were obtained via 1p, 1p1n, 2p1n and 2p2n knockout reactions from the 40,41 P and 42,43 S secondary beams. To measure the γ rays emitted from the excited states, the secondary target was surrounded by the 4π 'Chateau de Crystal' array consisting of 74 BaF 2 scintillators. The γ-ray spectra were generated by gating event-by-event on the incoming secondary beam particles and the ejectiles after the secondary target. For the γ rays emitted by the fast moving fragments accurate Doppler correction was performed. From the obtained γ spectra of 39 Si displayed in Figure 1, two strong γ transitions at 163 and 397 keV as well as weaker ones at 303, 657, 906, 1143 and 1551 keV have been identified. γγ coincidences were obtained in 39 Si after having added all data from the various reaction channels giving rise to 39 Si. Analysing these data the 163 keV transition was found to be in coincidence with the 657, 1143 and 1551 keV ones, but not with the 397 keV transition. The two lines of the 303+397 keV doublet are in mutual coincidence, and one or both of them are found in coincidence with the 906 keV transition.

  20. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C 2 ). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed

  1. Multiple track Doppler-shift spectroscopy system for TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Reale, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    A Doppler-shift spectroscopy system has been installed on the TFTR neutral beam injection system to measure species composition during both conditioning and injection pulses. Two intensified vidicon detectors and two spectrometers are utilized in a system capable of resolving data from up to twelve ion sources simultaneously. By imaging the light from six ion sources onto one detector, a cost-effective system has been achieved. Fiber optics are used to locate the diagnostic in an area remote from the hazards of the tokamak test cell allowing continuous access, and eliminating the need for radiation shielding of electronic components. Automatic hardware arming and interactive data analysis allow beam composition to be computed between tokamak shots for use in analyzing plasma heating experiments. Measurements have been made using lines of sight into both the neutralizer and the drift duct. Analysis of the data from the drift duct is both simpler and more accurate since only neutral particles are present in the beam at this location. Comparison of the data taken at these two locations reveals the presence of partially accelerated particles possessing an estimated 1/e half-angle divergence of 15 0 and accounting for up to 30% of the extracted power

  2. Effect of analytical proton beam irradiation on lead-white pigments, characterized by EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Gonzalez, Victor; Vezin, Hervé; Touati, Nadia; Calligaro, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Analytical techniques using proton beams with energy in the MeV range are commonly used to study archeological artefact and artistic objects. However ion beams can induce alteration of fragile materials, which is notably the case of easel paintings, limiting the use of these techniques. We used continuous wave EPR and pulse EPR spectroscopy to reveal the effect of 3 MeV proton irradiation on lead carbonates, which were extensively employed as white pigments from the antiquity to the 20th century. Two kinds of paramagnetic centers were identified in cerussite (PbCO3): the first one is CO3- radicals formed by hole trapping by CO32- ions, and the second one is NO32- radical resulting from electron trapping by NO3- impurities. Hydrocerussite (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2) is the most darkened material under proton beam, however it exhibits no NO32- radicals and 20 times less CO3- radicals than cerussite. Consequently these paramagnetic centers are not directly responsible for the darkening of lead-white pigments. We proposed that their higher instability in hydrocerussite might be at the origin of the formation of color centers in this material.

  3. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  4. Study of atmospheric air AC glow discharge using optical emission spectroscopy and near infrared diode laser cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Wang, Chuji; Dibble, Theodore S.

    2008-11-01

    AC glow discharges were generated in atmospheric pressure by applying high voltage AC in the range of 3500-15000 V to a pair of stainless steel electrodes separated by an air gap. The discharges were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The electronic (Tex), vibrational (Tv), and rotational (Tr) temperatures were measured. Spectral stimulations of the emission spectra of several vibronic bands of the 2^nd positive system of N2, the 1^st negative system of N2^+, the (0,1,2,3-0) bands of NO (A-X), and the (0-0) band of OH (A-X), which were obtained under various plasma operating conditions, show that Tr, Tv, and Tex are in the ranges of 2000 - 3800, 3500 - 5000, and 6000 - 10500^ K, respectively. Emission spectra show that OH concentration increases while NO concentration decreases with an increase of electrode spacing. The absorption spectra of H2O and OH overtone in the near infrared (NIR) were measured by the cw-CRDS with a telecommunications diode laser at wavelength near 1515 nm.

  5. Ultrafast emission spectroscopy of exploding nanoaluminum in Teflon: Observations of aluminum fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Rusty W.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2011-08-01

    A multifunctional reactive material with Al nanoparticles and TeflonAF oxidizer is studied after laser flash-heating by time-resolved emission spectroscopy. At shorter times the emission is dominated by a broadband continuum peaked at 250 nm, originating from the Al core. At longer times, during an ablation process confined by thick optical windows, in addition to a broadband component, atomic Al emission bands and Al and AlF absorptions are observed. The AlF time dependence suggests that part of the AlF is created in the condensed-phase core and part in the dense plasma associated with confined ablation.

  6. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    it a powerful technique for molecular studies in a wide variety of environments. A picosecond-time-resolved measurement of the complete Is X-ray emission spectrum captures the transient photoinduced changes and includes the weak valence-to-core (vtc) emission lines that correspond to transitions from occupied......We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...

  7. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was

  8. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Plasma in Hybrid Pulsed Laser Deposition System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Jelínek, Miroslav; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, Suppl. D (2002), s. 292-298 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * pulsed laser deposition * RF discharge Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  9. Programs in Fortran language for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three programs, written in FORTRAN IV language, for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy from data stored in files on floppy disks have been developed. They are intended, respectively, for the analyses of: 1) waters, 2) granites and slates, and 3) different kinds of geological materials. (Author) 8 refs

  10. Emission Spectroscopy of OH Radical in Water-Argon Arc Plasma Jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašláni, Alan; Sember, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, April (2014), "952138"-"952138" ISSN 2314-4920 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Emission spectroscopy * OH radical * arc plasma jet Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.538, year: 2014 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jspec/2014/952138/abs/

  11. Diagnosis of the local thermal equilibrium by optical emission spectroscopy in the evolution of electric discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A.; Velazquez P, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work applies the technique of optical emission spectroscopy to diagnose the temperature of the species generated in plasma in the transition to glow discharge arc. Whit this diagnosis is possible to determine the local thermal equilibrium conditions of the discharge. (Author)

  12. Impact of oxygen chemistry on the emission and fluorescence spectroscopy of laser ablation plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, K. C.; Brumfield, B. E.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen present in the ambient gas medium may affect both laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) emission through a reduction of emission intensity and persistence. In this study, an evaluation is made on the role of oxygen in the ambient environment under atmospheric pressure conditions in LIBS and laser ablation (LA)-LIF emission. To generate plasmas, 1064 nm, 10 ns pulses were focused on an aluminum alloy sample. LIF was performed by frequency scanning a CW laser over the 396.15 nm (3s24s 2S1/2 → 3s23p 2P°3/2) Al I transition. Time-resolved emission and fluorescence signals were recorded to evaluate the variation in emission intensity caused by the presence of oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure (po) in the atmospheric pressure environment using N2 as the makeup gas was varied from 0 to 400 Torr O2. 2D-fluorescence spectroscopy images were obtained for various oxygen concentrations for simultaneous evaluation of the emission and excitation spectral features. Results showed that the presence of oxygen in the ambient environment reduces the persistence of the LIBS and LIF emission through an oxidation process that depletes the density of atomic species within the resulting laser-produced plasma (LPP) plume.

  13. Breaking Abbe's diffraction resolution limit in fluorescence microscopy with stimulated emission depletion beams of various shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, T A; Engel, E; Hell, S W

    2001-12-01

    We report on the generation of various hole-centered beams in the focal region of a lens and investigate their effectiveness to break the diffraction barrier in fluorescence microscopy by stimulated emission. Patterning of the phase of the stimulating beam across the entrance pupil of the objective lens produces point-spread-functions with twofold, fourfold, and circular symmetry, which narrow down the focal spot to 65-100 nm. Comparison with high-resolution confocal images exhibits a resolution much beyond the diffraction barrier. Particles that are only 65-nm apart are resolved with focused light.

  14. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-06

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface-plasma mirror-driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry.

  15. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  16. On the nature of emissions of polymethyl methacrylate excited by an electron beam of subnanosecond or nanosecond duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleshko, V. I.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2017-02-01

    The results of studies of the physical nature of emissions produced in polymethyl methacrylate excited by electron beams of a subnanosecond or a nanosecond duration are presented. The spatial, amplitude, and spectral-kinetic properties of emissions have been examined under an electron beam energy density varying from 10-4 to 4 × 10-1 J/cm2. It has been found that cathodoluminescence is the primary type of emission under low energy densities of the electron beam. When the energy density of a nanosecond electron beam and/or the number of pulses of excitation by a subnanosecond electron beam were increased, an electrical breakdown of polymethyl methacrylate occurred in the irradiated region. This process was accompanied by a burst of emission of dense, low-temperature plasma.

  17. Emission of a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, Darryl [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Harfouche, A. [Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumédiène, B.P. no 32, El Alia, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Fromager, Michael; Ait-Ameur, Kamel [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique, Unité Mixte de Recherche de Recherche 6252, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Caen Basse Normandie, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Ingénieurs de Caen, Boulevard Maréchal Juin, F14050 Caen (France); Forbes, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.forbes@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa)

    2016-02-15

    Light beams with a flat-top intensity profile have found many applications in both pure and applied studies, but are not the natural modes of conventional light sources such as lasers. Moreover, such light beams are also not the eigenmodes of the wave equation in a vacuum and so change their intensity profile dramatically during propagation. Here we overcome both these limitations and create a propagation invariant flat-top beam from a microchip laser. By optical feedback into the excited medium we are able to create emission that is an incoherent mix of two spatial modes, a Gaussian and a donut, so that the sum is a flat-top beam that maintains its shape to infinity. Such miniature sources that emit structured light will be attractive for integrated light-based technologies. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the generation of a flat-top beam from a microchip laser. • The flat-top beam is shape-invariant during propagation. • By optical feedback we can select the desired shape from the microchip laser.

  18. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Richter, Philipp [Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP) (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H II Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show that due to GSA, magnetic fields will affect the spectra of diffuse gas with high signal-to-noise(S/N) ratio under the condition that photon-excitation is much more efficient than thermal collision.

  19. Observation of damage process in RC beams under cucle bending by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Ohtsu, Masayasu; Tsuji, Nobuyuki; Yasuoka, Daisuke

    1997-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures are generally applied to construction of buildings and bridges, and are imposed on cyclic loading incessantly. It is considered that detected acoustic emission (AE) waveforms are associated with the damage degree and the fracture mechanisms of RC structures. Therefor, the cyclic bending tests are applied to damaged RC beam specimens. To evaluate the interior of the damaged RC beams, the AE source kinematics are determined by 'SiGMA' procedure for AE moment tensor analysis. By using 'SiGMA' procedure, AE source kinematics, such as source locations, crack types, crack orientations and crack motions, can be identified. The results show the applicability to observation of the fracture process under cyclic bending load and evaluation the degree of damage of RC beam.

  20. Beam profile measurement of ES-200 using secondary electron emission monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ebrahimi Basabi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, different designs have been introduced for measurement beam profile accelerators. Secondary electron emission monitors (SEM are one of these devices which have been used for this purpose. In this work, a SEM has been constructed to measure beam profile of ES-200 accelerator, a proton electrostatic accelerator which is installed at SBU. Profile grid for both planes designed with 16 wires which are insulated relative to each other. The particles with maximum energy of 200 keV and maximum current of 400 μA are stopped in copper wires. Each of the wires has an individual current-to-voltage amplifier. With a multiplexer, the analogue values are transported to an ADC. The ADCs are read out by a microcontroller and finally profile of beam shows by a user interface program

  1. Secondary emission monitor for keV ion and antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, Alejandro; Bravin, Enrico; Harasimowciz, Janusz; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01

    Beam profile monitoring of low intensity keV ion and antiproton beams remains a challenging task. A Sec- ondary electron Emission Monitor (SEM) has been de- signed to measure profiles of beams with intensities below 107 and energies as low as 20 keV. The monitor is based on a two stage microchannel plate (MCP) and a phosphor screen facing a CCD camera. Its modular design allows two different operational setups. In this contribution we present the design of a prototype and discuss results from measurements with antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment at CERN. This is then used for a characterization of the monitor with regard to its possible future use at different facilities.

  2. The search for radio emission from exoplanets using LOFAR low-frequency beam-formed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jake D.; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Zarka, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Detection of radio emission from exoplanets can provide information on the star-planet system that is very difficult or impossible to study otherwise, such as the planet’s magnetic field, magnetosphere, rotation period, orbit inclination, and star-planet interactions. Such a detection in the radio domain would open up a whole new field in the study of exoplanets, however, currently there are no confirmed detections of an exoplanet at radio frequencies. In this study, we discuss our ongoing observational campaign searching for exoplanetary radio emissions using beam-formed observations within the Low Band of the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). To date we have observed three exoplanets: 55 Cnc, Upsilon Andromedae, and Tau Boötis. These planets were selected according to theoretical predictions, which indicated them as among the best candidates for an observation. During the observations we usually recorded three beams simultaneously, one on the exoplanet and two on patches of nearby “empty” sky. An automatic pipeline was created to automatically find RFI, calibrate the data due to instrumental effects, and to search for emission in the exoplanet beam. Additionally, we observed Jupiter with LOFAR with the same exact observational setup as the exoplanet observations. The main goals of the Jupiter observations are to train the detection algorithm and to calculate upper limits in the case of a non-detection. Data analysis is currently ongoing. Conclusions reached at the time of the meeting, about detection of or upper limit to the planetary signal, will be presented.

  3. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  4. On the early history of field emission including attempts of tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleint, C.

    1993-04-01

    Field emission is certainly one of the oldest surface science techniques, its roots reaching back about 250 years to the time of enlightenment. An account of very early studies and of later work is given but mostly restricted to Leipzig and to pre-Müllerian investigations. Studies of field emission from metal tips were carried out in the 18th century by Johann Heinrich Winkler who used vacuum pumps built by Jacob Leupold, a famous Leipzig mechanic. A short account of the career of Winkler will be given and his field emission experiments are illustrated. Field emission was investigated again in Leipzig much later by Julius Edgar Lilienfeld who worked on the improvement of X-ray tubes. He coined the terms ‘autoelektronische Entladung’ of ‘Äona-Effekt’ in 1922, and developed degassing procedures which are very similar to modern ultra-high vacuum processing. A pre-quantum mechanical explanation of the field emission phenomena was undertaken by Walter Schottky. Cunradi (1926) tried to measure temperature changes during field emission. Franz Rother, in a thesis (1914) suggested by Otto Wiener, dealt with the distance dependence of currents in vacuum between electrodes down to 20 nm. His habilitation in 1926 was an extension of his early work but now with field emission tips as a cathode. We might look at his measurements of the field emission characteristics in dependence on distance as a precursor to modern tunneling spectroscopy as well.

  5. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/μm and the emission field at 1 mA/cm 2 decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/μm. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters

  6. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  7. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  8. Current control of the electron beam formed in the magnetron gun with a secondary-emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Reshetnyak, N.G.; Zakutin, V.V.; Chertishchev, I.A.; Romas'ko, V.P.; Dovbnyan, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Data are reported on electron beam generation and beam current control in two types of secondary-emission cathode magnetron guns. The influence of the magnetic field value and field distribution on the formation of the beam and its parameters has been investigated in the electron energy range between 20 and 150 keV. The influence of local magnetic field variations on the cathode and the electron beam characteristics has been studied. The possibility to control the electron beam current in various ways has been demonstrated

  9. Beam-foil-gas spectroscopy - A technique for studying steady-state non-equilibrium processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, W. S.; Veje, E.; Carriveau, G.; Anderson, N.

    1971-01-01

    When a thin foil is inserted in the beam of a beam-gas experiment, the beam particle state populations are driven far from their beam-gas equilibrium values. Downstream from the foil, the 'new beam' and gas species interact to produce a new equilibrium, usually different from the beam-gas equilibrium. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate this effect and to show how relative cross-section measurements can be used to study the beam-foil interaction.

  10. Multiwire secondary-emission monitor and the emittance measurement of the AGS beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.; Chiang, I.H.; Smith, G.A.; Soukas, A.

    1983-01-01

    For CBA injection the transverse emittances and the Twiss parameters of the AGS beam have to be well defined to minimize the phase space dilution in CBA. Althoug there exists a profile monitor device at U165, there are three reasons why construction of multiwire profile monitor system at three locations from U500 to U168 is required: (1) the dispersion function is not zero at U165 which makes it harder to interpret the measurement; (2) the original single wire device takes five minutes to traverse the whole beam; (3) a three station multiwire system can provide the profile information at all locations in one pulse which makes on-line analysis possible. In summary, a set of three stations of Multiwire Secondary Emission Monitor (MSEM) has been built and installed in the fast external beam line for the measurement of beam profiles. Each unit consists of two planes each with 30 nickel wires having a diameter of 5 mils. The signal is linear within the range of 10 10 to 10 13 incident protons on the wire and the resolution of the signal is well within a few percent. A least-square fitting routine has been used to extract the emittance and phase space parameters of the beam. The emittances obtained at various intensities will help us to understand the AGS acceleration process and to choose the optimal injection scheme for CBA

  11. On radiation emission from a microbunched beam with wavefront tilt and its experimental observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we compare experimental observations and theory of radiation emission from a microbunched beam with microbunching wavefront tilt with respect to the direction of motion. The theory refers to the work Tanaka et al. (2004) , which predicts, in this case, exponential suppression of coherent radiation along the kicked direction. The observations refer to a recent experiment performed at the LCLS (Nuhn et al., 2015; Lutman etal., 2016), where a microbunched beam was kicked by a bend and sent to a radiator undulator. The experiment resulted in the emission of strong coherent radiation that had its maximum along the kicked direction of motion, when the undulator parameter was detuned to a value larger than the nominal one. We first analyze the theory in detail, and we confirm the correctness of its derivation according to the conventional theory of radiation emission from charged particles. Subsequently, we look for possible peculiarities in the experiment, which may not be modeled by the theory. We show that only spurious effects are not accounted for. We conclude that the experiment defies explanation in terms of the conventional theory of radiation emission.

  12. Effect of laser-induced crater depth in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emission features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Michela; Cristoforetti, Gabriele; Hidalgo, Montserrat; Iriarte, Daniela; Legnaioli, Stefano; Palleschi, Vincenzo; Salvetti, Azenio; Tognoni, Elisabetta

    2005-07-01

    The influence of crater depth on plasma properties and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emission has been evaluated. Laser-induced plasmas were generated at the surface and at the bottom of different craters in a copper sample. Plasmas produced at the sample surface and at the bottom of the craters were spatially and temporally resolved. LIBS emission, temperature, and electronic number density of the plasmas were evaluated. It is shown that the confinement effect produced by the craters enhances the LIBS signal from the laser-induced plasmas.

  13. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  14. Detecting and understanding extragalactic Lyman α emission using 3D spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Herenz, Edmund Christian (Master of Science)

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we use integral-field spectroscopy to detect and understand of Lyman α (Lyα) emission from high-redshift galaxies. Intrinsically the Lyα emission at λ = 1216 Å is the strongest recombination line from galaxies. It arises from the 2p → 1s transition in hydrogen. In star-forming galaxies the line is powered by ionisation of the interstellar gas by hot O- and B- stars. Galaxies with star-formation rates of 1 - 10 Msol/year are expected to have Lyα luminosities of 42 dex - 4...

  15. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  16. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  17. Characterizing a multi-MeV e-beam induced plasma through visible spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Ribiere, Maxime; Maisonny, Rémi; Ritter, Sandra; Plouhinec, Damien; Auriel, Gérard

    2016-10-01

    High energy electrons interaction and propagation mechanisms in solid targets have a broad range of applications in high energy density physics. The latter include fast ignition for inertial fusion research, production of ultra-high mechanical stress levels, plasma interactions with e-beam particles in electron diodes, radiative hydrodynamic models...This paper presents the results from recent experiments conducted on the multi-MeV generator ASTERIX operated at CEA-Gramat. This high flux density electron beam was launched from an aluminum cathode onto an aluminum-tantalum target for voltage and current of 2.4 MeV and 55 kA, respectively. A set of optical diagnostics were fielded in all of the experiments, including a UV-visible spectrometers and a fast imaging. The imaging data obtained during the experiment allowed for the ablated species velocity to be determined. based on spectroscopic analysis, the light emission was attributed to aluminum and tantalum excited atoms and ions. The analysis of this time-integrated spectrum based on radiative transfer model clearly unveiled two distinct regions of the plasma over its expansion: a hot core surrounded by a cold vapor. A quantitative analysis of these results is presented.

  18. Angle-resolved conical emission spectra from filamentation in a solid with an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cheng; Li, ZiXi; Hua, LinQiang; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-09-15

    Filamentation dynamics in fused silica are investigated using an Airy pattern and a Gaussian laser beam. The angle-resolved conical emission spectra are measured and compared with the predictions of several models. Our experimental observations are consistent with the X-waves model in both cases. This indicates that both laser beams spontaneously evolve into nonlinear X-waves and suggests a universal evolution of filaments in fused silica, regardless of the initial laser beam profile.

  19. Plasma emission spectroscopy of solids irradiated by intense XUV pulses from a free electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzelzainis, T.W.J.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Fajardo, M.; Fäustlin, R.; Heimann, P.A.; Hájková, Věra; Juha, Libor; Jurek, Karel; Khattak, F.Y.; Kozlová, Michaela; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Nagler, B.; Nelson, A.J.; Rosmej, F.B.; Soberierski, R.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Vinko, S.M.; Wark, J. S.; Whitcher, T.; Riley, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), 109-112 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : XUV emission spectroscopy * free-electron laser * warm dense matter Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.206, year: 2010

  20. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  1. Carrier dynamics in low-temperature grown GaAs studied by terahertz emission spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Pashkin, Alexej; Kužel, Petr; Khazan, M.; Schnüll, S.; Wilke, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2001), s. 1303-1306 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : ultrafast dynamics of free carriers * GaAs * time-domain terahertz emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.128, year: 2001

  2. The Application of Moessbauer Emission Spectroscopy to Industrial Cobalt Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, J. van de; Berge, P. J. van; Craje, M. W. J.; Kraan, A. M. van der

    2002-01-01

    The application of Moessbauer emission spectroscopy to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for the gas-to-liquids process was investigated. It was shown that Moessbauer emission spectroscopy could be used to study the oxidation of cobalt as a deactivation mechanism of high loading cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Oxidation was observed under conditions that are in contradiction with the bulk cobalt phase thermodynamics. This can be explained by oxidation of small cobalt crystallites or by surface oxidation. The formation of re-reducible Co 3+ species was observed as well as the formation of irreducible Co 3+ and Co 2+ species that interact strongly with the alumina support. The formation of the different cobalt species depends on the oxidation conditions. Iron was used as a probe nuclide to investigate the cobalt catalyst preparation procedure. A high-pressure Moessbauer emission spectroscopy cell was designed and constructed, which creates the opportunity to study cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under realistic synthesis conditions.

  3. Neutron emission in neutral beam heated KSTAR plasmas and its application to neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu, E-mail: jgkwak@nfri.re.kr; Kim, H.S.; Cheon, M.S.; Oh, S.T.; Lee, Y.S.; Terzolo, L.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We measured the neutron emission from KSTAR plasmas quantitatively. • We confirmed that neutron emission is coming from neutral beam-plasma interactions. • The feasibility study shows that the fast neutron from KSTAR could be used for fast neutron radiography. - Abstract: The main mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) program is exploring the physics and technologies of high performance steady state Tokamak operation that are essential for ITER and fusion reactor. Since the successful first operation in 2008, the plasma performance is enhanced and duration of H-mode is extended to around 50 s which corresponds to a few times of current diffusion time and surpassing the current conventional Tokamak operation. In addition to long-pulse operation, the operational boundary of the H-mode discharge is further extended over MHD no-wall limit(β{sub N} ∼ 4) transiently and higher stored energy region is obtained by increased total heating power (∼6 MW) and plasma current (I{sub p} up to 1 MA for ∼10 s). Heating system consists of various mixtures (NB, ECH, LHCD, ICRF) but the major horse heating resource is the neutral beam(NB) of 100 keV with 4.5 MW and most of experiments are conducted with NB. So there is a lot of production of fast neutrons coming from via D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and it is found that most of neutrons are coming from deuterium beam plasma interaction. Nominal neutron yield and the area of beam port is about 10{sup 13}–10{sup 14}/s and 1 m{sup 2} at the closest access position of the sample respectively and neutron emission could be modulated for application to the neutron radiography by varying NB power. This work reports on the results of quantitative analysis of neutron emission measurements and results are discussed in terms of beam-plasma interaction and plasma confinement. It also includes the feasibility study of neutron radiography using KSTAR.

  4. Monitoring Damage Using Acoustic Emission Source Location and Computational Geometry in Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Maximino C. Ongpeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive testing in reinforced concrete (RC for damage detection is still limited to date. In monitoring the damage in RC, 18 beam specimens with varying water cement ratios and reinforcements were casted and tested using a four-point bending test. Repeated step loads were designed and at each step load acoustic emission (AE signals were recorded and processed to obtain the acoustic emission source location (AESL. Computational geometry using a convex hull algorithm was used to determine the maximum volume formed by the AESL inside the concrete beam in relation to the load applied. The convex hull volume (CHV showed good relation to the damage encountered until 60% of the ultimate load at the midspan was reached, where compression in the concrete occurred. The changes in CHV from 20 to 40% and 20 to 60% load were five and 13 times from CHV of 20% load for all beams, respectively. This indicated that the analysis in three dimensions using CHV was sensitive to damage. In addition, a high water-cement ratio exhibited higher CHV formation compared to a lower water-cement ratio due to its ductility where the movement of AESL becomes wider.

  5. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  6. A study of carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates using thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, M. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is useful for identifying mineralogies including carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates. Each of these groups of minerals has a distinct emissivity profile that allows for general identification (e.g., carbonate). Laboratory data are being collected that suggest the potential for determining specific composition of these minerals (e.g., calcite, magnesite). Previous studies of Mars suggest that the above groups of minerals should be present. On Mars fine-grained mineralogies are likely to be intimately mixed due to aeolian activity. Mixtures of calcite with palagonite will be studied to determine the volume percent requirement for salt identification and to understand the complexities of fine-grained mixtures observed by thermal emission. Further work with mixtures will include sulfate and phosphate mineralogies.

  7. Ion beam emission within a low energy focus plasma (0.1 kJ) operating with hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Aragi, Gamal E. [Nuclear Research Center, Cairo (Egypt). Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Dept.

    2010-06-15

    An investigation of energetic ion beam emission from a low energy plasma focus (0.1 kJ Mather type) device operating with hydrogen gas is studied. The ion beam emission is investigated using time-integrated and time-resolved detectors. The present plasma focus device is powered by a capacitor bank of 1 {mu}F at 18 kV maximum charging voltage. The correlation of ion beam intensity with filling gas pressure indicates that the beam emission is maximized at the optimum pressure for the focus formation at peak current. Energy of ions is determined with a time-of-flight (TOF) method, taking into account distance from the center electrode to the detection plane. (orig.)

  8. Emission spectrochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rives, R.D.; Bruks, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The emission spectrochemical method of analysis based on the fact that atoms of elements can be excited in the electric arc or in the laser beam and will emit radiation with characteristic wave lengths is considered. The review contains the data on spectrochemical analysis, of liquids geological materials, scheme of laser microprobe. The main characteristics of emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescent analysis, are aeneralized

  9. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  10. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariotti, D.

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  11. Nuclear Ground State Properties in Strontium by Fast Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of strontium isotopes with A=78 to A=100 were measured by collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy. Nuclear spins, moments and changes in mean square charge radii are extracted from the data. The spins and moments of most of the odd isotopes are explained in the framework of the single particle model. The changes in mean square charge radii show a decrease with increasing neutron number below the N=50 shell closure. Above N=50 the charge radii increase regularly up to N=59 before revealing a strong discontinuity, indicating the onset of strong ground state deformation. A comparison of the droplet model shows that for the transitional isotopes below and above N=50, the zero point quadrupole motion describes part of the observed shell effect. Calculations carried out in the Hartree-Fock plus BCS model suggest an additional change in the surface region of the charge distribution at spherical shape. From these calculations it is furthermore proposed, that the isotopes $^7

  12. Optical emission and mass spectroscopy of plasma processes in reactive DC pulsed magnetron sputtering of aluminium oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Pokorný, Petr; Bočan, Jiří; Fitl, Přemysl; Lančok, Ján; Musil, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), 697-700 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100718; GA AV ČR KAN400100653; GA ČR GP202/09/P324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : reactive magnetron sputtering * alumina * plasma spectroscopy * mass spectroscopy * optical emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2010

  13. Note: Micro-channel array crucible for isotope-resolved laser spectroscopy of high-temperature atomic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Vyacheslav; Bartlett, Joshua H.; Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Castro, Alonso

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel compact design for a multichannel atomic oven which generates collimated beams of refractory atoms for fieldable laser spectroscopy. Using this resistively heated crucible, we demonstrate spectroscopy of an erbium sample at 1300 °C with improved isotopic resolution with respect to a single-channel design. In addition, our oven has a high thermal efficiency. By minimizing the surface area of the crucible, we achieve 2000 °C at 140 W of applied electrical power. As a result, the design does not require any active cooling and is compact enough to allow for its incorporation into fieldable instruments.

  14. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miaja-Avila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3  keV spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe(2,2^{′}-bipyridine_{3}]^{2+} and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  15. Comparison of Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy for Biodistribution Analysis of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chertok, Beata; Cole, Adam J.; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) have been widely studied for use in targeted drug delivery. Analysis of MNP biodistribution is essential to evaluating the success of targeting strategies and the potential for off-target toxicity. This work compared the applicability of inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in assessing MNP biodistribution. Biodistribution was evaluated in 9L-glioma bearing rats administered with MNP (12-...

  16. Analysis of two colliding laser-produced plasmas by emission spectroscopy and fast photography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Ake, C., E-mail: citlali.sanchez@ccadet.unam.m [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Mustri-Trejo, D. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Garcia-Fernandez, T. [Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico, Prolongacion San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, Mexico DF, C.P. 09790 (Mexico); Villagran-Muniz, M. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    In this work two colliding laser-induced plasmas (LIP) on Cu and C were studied by means of time resolved emission spectroscopy and fast photography. The experiments were performed using two opposing parallel targets of Cu and C in vacuum, ablated with two synchronized ns lasers. The results showed an increased emission intensity from copper ions Cu II (368.65, 490.97, 493.16, 495.37 and 630.10 nm) and Cu III (374.47 and 379.08 nm) due to the ionization that occurs during collisions of Cu and C species. It was found that the optimum delay between pulses, which yields the maximum emission enhancement of Cu ions, depends on the sampling distance. On the other hand, the emission intensity of C lines, C II (426.70 nm), C III (406.99 and 464.74 nm) and C IV (465.83 nm), decreased and the formation of C{sub 2} molecules was observed. A comparison between the temporal evolution of the individual plasmas and their collision performed by combining imaging and the time resolved emission diagnostics, revealed an increase of the electron temperature and electron density and the splitting of the plume into slow and fast components.

  17. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte emissions analyzed by coupled thermogravimetric/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Simon; Larsson, Fredrik; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years the use of Li-ion batteries has increased rapidly, powering small as well as large applications, from electronic devices to power storage facilities. The Li-ion battery has, however, several safety issues regarding occasional overheating and subsequent thermal runaway. During such episodes, gas emissions from the electrolyte are of special concern because of their toxicity, flammability and the risk for gas explosion. In this work, the emissions from heated typical electrolyte components as well as from commonly used electrolytes are characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy and FT-IR coupled with thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, when heating up to 650 °C. The study includes the solvents EC, PC, DEC, DMC and EA in various single, binary and ternary mixtures with and without the LiPF6 salt, a commercially available electrolyte, (LP71), containing EC, DEC, DMC and LiPF6 as well as extracted electrolyte from a commercial 6.8 Ah Li-ion cell. Upon thermal heating, emissions of organic compounds and of the toxic decomposition products hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphoryl fluoride (POF3) were detected. The electrolyte and its components have also been extensively analyzed by means of infrared spectroscopy for identification purposes.

  18. The emission spectroscopy for evaluation of concentration of the metal vapor concentration in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarakovskis, A.; Gromuls, I.; Tale, I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Evaluation of the absolute concentration of the impurity metal vapors in plasma using emission spectroscopy requires development of the principles and procedure of in situ calibration of equipment. Several approaches can be used for calibration of the equipment. In the case the emission rate of single metal atom under ionizing conditions is known, the calibration of the spectroscopic equipment reduces to the calibration in radiometric units (irradiance). For unknown emission rate the routine calibration procedure involves use of the set of etalons of material under investigation with known concentration of impurity metal. For evaluation of impurity concentration in plasma it is necessary to develop a corresponding plasma source having certain plasma parameters - temperature and concentration of electrons and metal vapors in concentration, which can be measured independent procedure. Present report deals with problems of estimation of Ga impurity concentration in ISSTOK ( Portugal) tokamak plasma using decay data of atom emission lines. Emission spectra of Ga atoms show that collisions with hydrogen electrons and ions results in ionization of Ga followed by multi step radiative recombination. The main emission lines corresponds to the capture of electron to the 4s 2 5p (639 nm), transition 4s 2 5p - 4s 2 5s (1,211 μm ); and transition to the ground state 4s 2 5s - 4s 2 4p (403 nm). Some of the excited state lifetimes obtained from decay kinetics are reported. Analysis of emission line intensity ratios together with lifetime data will allow elaborate the procedure for evaluation of Ga impurity concentration in the tokamak plasma

  19. A rapid screening method for heavy metals in biological materials by emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, E C; Sadler, P A

    1981-06-02

    A semi-quantitative screening method for heavy metals in biological material is described. The metals are complexed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and potassium sodium tartrate. The solutions are adjusted to pH 4 and then extracted into chloroform. The chloroform phase is evaporated onto a matrix mixture of lithium fluoride and graphite. The sample is analysed by direct current arc emission spectroscopy using a 3 metre grating spectrograph. The spectra are recorded on a photographic plate. The method is developed on aqueous and spiked samples and then applied to in vivo samples containing toxic levels of heavy metals. Atomic absorption spectroscopy is used to check standard concentrations and to monitor the efficiency of the extraction procedure.

  20. Dipole γ-ray emission in fusion heavy-ion reactions: beam energy dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Inglima, G.; Boiano, A.; De Rosa, A.; Di Pietro, M.; La Commara, M.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Cardella, G.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Pagano, A.; Pellegriti, N.; Piattelli, P.; Pirrone, S.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Baran, V.; Glodariu, T.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the prompt dipole γ-ray emission, related with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, in the 40Ar + 92Zr and 36Ar + 96Zr fusion reactions at Elab= 15 and 16 MeV/nucleon, respectively, with the aim to probe its evolution with incident energy. These reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, the 132Ce compound nucleus at an average excitation energy of 304 MeV with identical spin distribution. Fusionlike events were selected by detecting high-energy γ-rays in coincidence with evaporation residues. By studying the differential γ-ray multiplicity spectra of the considered reactions, it was shown that the dipole γ-ray intensity increases by ˜14% for the more charge asymmetric system. This result, associated with those reported for the 32,36S + 100,96Mo reaction pair at lower beam energies, implies a "rise and fall" trend of the prompt dipole γ-ray emission in the studied beam energy range with a maximum value at 9 MeV/nucleon.

  1. Dipole γ-ray emission in fusion heavy-ion reactions: beam energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; De Rosa, A.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Di Pietro, M.; Romoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Di Toro, M.; Maiolino, C.; Pellegriti, N.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the prompt dipole γ-ray emission, related with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, in the 40Ar + 92Zr and 36Ar + 96Zr fusion reactions at Elab= 15 and 16 MeV/nucleon, respectively, with the aim to probe its evolution with incident energy. These reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, the 132Ce compound nucleus at an average excitation energy of 304 MeV with identical spin distribution. Fusionlike events were selected by detecting high-energy γ-rays in coincidence with evaporation residues. By studying the differential γ-ray multiplicity spectra of the considered reactions, it was shown that the dipole γ-ray intensity increases by ∼14% for the more charge asymmetric system. This result, associated with those reported for the 32,36S + 100,96Mo reaction pair at lower beam energies, implies a 'rise and fall' trend of the prompt dipole γ-ray emission in the studied beam energy range with a maximum value at 9 MeV/nucleon

  2. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  3. Study on detection of electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy and comparison of the ESR spectrum of electron beams and γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiming; Ha Yiming; Wang Feng

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted to detect electron beam irradiated food by ESR spectroscopy. The white pepper powder, paprika powder, cumin powder and pistachios were used as test materials to study the feature changes of ESR spectrum and the relationship between ESR intensity and irradiation dose in different doses, the shape variation of ESR spectrum in γ-rays and electron beams in the same sample was also compared. The results showed that the ESR spectrum of 4 kinds of irradiated samples was obviously different before and after irradiation, the intensity of ESR signal increased with the increasing of the absorbed dose. The dose above 432 Gy could be detected in white pepper powder and pistachios, the dose above 875 Gy could be detected in paprika powder and cumin powder. The ESR intensity of all samples decreased during the storage time (200 d), even after 200 days the ESR method could also be used to detect whether or not the samples have been irradiated. The same dosage of y-rays and electron beams has no significant influence on the shape of ESR spectrum, however, the difference of irradiation mechanism caused slight impact on ESR intensity. The results could provide the technical basis for the application of ESR method in detecting electron beam irradiated food. (authors)

  4. Remote gas analysis of aircraft exhausts using FTIR-emission-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, J.; Schaefer, K. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    FITR emission spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component analyzing technique was investigated to determine the composition of aircraft exhausts at ground level. A multi-layer radiative transfer interpretation software based on a line-by-line computer algorithm using the HITRAN data base was developed. Measurements were carried out with different engine types to determine the traceable gas species and their detection limits. Finally validation measurements were made to compare the results of the system to those of conventional equipment. (author) 8 refs.

  5. Hard x-ray emission spectroscopy: a powerful tool for the characterization of magnetic semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Rovezzi, Mauro; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to introduce the x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) techniques to the materials scientist working with magnetic semiconductors (e.g. semiconductors doped with 3d transition metals) for applications in the field of spin-electronics. We focus our attention on the hard part of the x-ray spectrum (above 3 keV) in order to demonstrate a powerful element- and orbital-selective characterization tool in the study of bulk electronic struct...

  6. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  7. Emission spectroscopy of argon ferrocene mixture jet in a low pressure plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, N.; Tak, A.K.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Shukla, A.; Meher, K.C.; Ghorui, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy is employed to measure the plasma temperature and species identification in a reactor used for studying homogenous nucleation and growth of iron nano particle. Reactor employs segmented non transferred plasma torch mounted on water cooled cylindrical chamber. The plasma jet passes through graphite nozzle and expands in low pressure reactor. Ferrocene is fed into the nozzle where it mixes with Argon plasma jet. A high resolution spectrograph (SHAMROCK 303i, resolution 0.06 nm) has been used to record the spectra over a wide range. Identification of different emission lines has been done using NIST database. Lines from (700 to 860nm) were considered for calculation of temperature. Spectra were recorded for different axial location, pressure and power. Temperature was calculated using Maxwell Boltzman plot method. Variation in temperature with pressure and location is presented and possible reasons for different behaviour are explored. (author)

  8. Electrolytic cell-free 57Co deposition for emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyabkin, Dmitry V.; Procházka, Vít; Miglierini, Marcel; Mašláň, Miroslav

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for an electrochemical preparation of samples for emission Mössbauer spectroscopy (EMS) and Mössbauer sources. The proposed electrolytic deposition procedure does not require any special setup, not even an electrolytic cell. It utilizes solely an electrode with a droplet of electrolyte on its surface and the second electrode sunk into the droplet. Its performance is demonstrated using two examples, a metallic glass and a Cu stripe. We present a detailed description of the deposition procedure and resulting emission Mössbauer spectra for both samples. In the case of a Cu stripe, we have performed EMS measurements at different stages of heat-treatment, which are required for the production of Mössbauer sources with the copper matrix.

  9. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  10. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157 nm F2 laser and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925 nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1 wt% feasible.

  11. Transition rates and transition rate diagrams in atomic emission spectroscopy: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Zdeněk, E-mail: weissz@leco.cz [LECO Instrumente Plzeň, s.r.o., Plaská 66, 323 00 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Steers, Edward B.M. [London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB (United Kingdom); Pickering, Juliet C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    In low pressure plasmas with low electron densities, such as glow discharges, radiative de-excitation is a major de-excitation process of most excited states. Their relative de-excitation rates can be determined by emission spectroscopy, making it possible to study excitation processes in these discharges. This is in contrast to denser plasmas, in which such considerations are usually based on relative populations of excited states and concepts related to thermodynamic equilibrium. In the approach using reaction rates rather than populations, a convenient tool is the recently introduced formalism of transition rate diagrams. This formalism is reviewed, its relevance to different plasmas is discussed and some recent results on glow discharge excitation of manganese, copper and iron ions are presented. The prospects for the use of this formalism for the comparison of rate constants and cross sections for charge transfer reactions with argon ions of elements of interest in analytical glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. - Highlights: • Radiative deexcitation is a major deexcitation process in some plasmas. • Rates of radiative transitions can be presented in transition rate diagrams. • Transition rate diagrams can be calculated based on emission spectra. • Transition rate diagrams can indicate collisional excitation processes. • Transition rate diagrams of Fe II, Cu II, Mn II in a glow discharge plasma are reviewed.

  12. HYDRO2GEN: Non-thermal hydrogen Balmer and Paschen emission in solar flares generated by electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, M. K.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. Sharp rises of hard X-ray (HXR) emission accompanied by Hα line profiles with strong red-shifts up to 4 Å from the central wavelength, often observed at the onset of flares with the Specola Solare Ticinese Telescope (STT) and the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), are not fully explained by existing radiative models. Moreover, observations of white light (WL) and Balmer continuum emission with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRISH) reveal strong co-temporal enhancements and are often nearly co-spatial with HXR emission. These effects indicate a fast effective source of excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms in flaring atmospheres associated with HXR emission. In this paper, we investigate electron beams as the agents accounting for the observed hydrogen line and continuum emission. Methods: Flaring atmospheres are considered to be produced by a 1D hydrodynamic response to the injection of an electron beam defining their kinetic temperatures, densities, and macro velocities. We simulated a radiative response in these atmospheres using a fully non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach for a 5-level plus continuum hydrogen atom model, considering its excitation and ionisation by spontaneous, external, and internal diffusive radiation and by inelastic collisions with thermal and beam electrons. Simultaneous steady-state and integral radiative transfer equations in all optically thick transitions (Lyman and Balmer series) were solved iteratively for all the transitions to define their source functions with the relative accuracy of 10-5. The solutions of the radiative transfer equations were found using the L2 approximation. Resulting intensities of hydrogen line and continuum emission were also calculated for Balmer and Paschen series. Results: We find that inelastic collisions with beam electrons strongly increase excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms from the chromosphere to photosphere. This leads to an increase in Lyman continuum

  13. Absolute ozone densities in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma using two-beam UV-LED absorption spectroscopy and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaikhum, A.; Schröder, D.; Schröter, S.; Gibson, A. R.; Niemi, K.; Friderich, J.; Greb, A.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2017-11-01

    The efficient generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) is an increasingly important topic, e.g. for the treatment of temperature sensitive biological samples in the field of plasma medicine. A 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (rf) driven APPJ device operated with helium feed gas and small admixtures of oxygen (up to 1%), generating a homogeneous glow-mode plasma at low gas temperatures, was investigated. Absolute densities of ozone, one of the most prominent ROS, were measured across the 11 mm wide discharge channel by means of broadband absorption spectroscopy using the Hartley band centred at λ = 255 nm. A two-beam setup with a reference beam in Mach-Zehnder configuration is employed for improved signal-to-noise ratio allowing high-sensitivity measurements in the investigated single-pass weak-absorbance regime. The results are correlated to gas temperature measurements, deduced from the rotational temperature of the N2 (C 3 {{{\\Pi }}}u+ \\to B 3 {{{\\Pi }}}g+, υ = 0 \\to 2) optical emission from introduced air impurities. The observed opposing trends of both quantities as a function of rf power input and oxygen admixture are analysed and explained in terms of a zero-dimensional plasma-chemical kinetics simulation. It is found that the gas temperature as well as the densities of O and O2(b{}1{{{Σ }}}g+) influence the absolute O3 densities when the rf power is varied.

  14. Optimizing the e-beam profile of a single carbon nanotube field emission device for electric propulsion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fujioka Mologni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies on field emission (FE arrays comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNT as an electron source for electric propulsion system show remarkably promising results. Design parameters for a carbon nanotube (CNT field-emission device operating on triode configuration were numerically simulated and optimized in order to enhance the e-beam focusing quality. An additional focus gate (FG was integrated to the device to control the profile of the emitted e-beam. An axisymmetric finite element model was developed to calculate the electric field distribution on the vacuum region and a modified Fowler-Nordheim (FN equation was used to evaluate the current density emission and the effective emitter area. Afterward, a FE simulation was employed in order to calculate the trajectory of the emitted electrons and define the electron-optical properties of the e-beam. The integration of the FG was fully investigated via computational intelligence techniques. The best performance device according to our simulations presents a collimated e-beam profile that suits well for field emission displays, magnetic field detection and electron microscopy. The automated computational design tool presented in this study strongly benefits the robust design of integrated electron-optical systems for vacuum field emission applications, including electrodynamic tethering and electric propulsion systems.

  15. Gold removal rate by ion sputtering as a function of ion-beam voltage and raster size using Auger electron spectroscopy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehning, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Gold removal rate was measured as a function of ion beam voltage and raster size using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Three different gold thicknesses were developed as standards. Two sputter rate calibration curves were generated by which gold sputter rate could be determined for variations in ion beam voltage or raster size

  16. Measurement of titanium in hip-replacement patients by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Chris F; McKibbin, Craig; Rahanu, Monika; Langton, David; Taylor, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Background Patients with metal-on-metal hip replacements require testing for cobalt and chromium. There may also be a need to test for titanium, which is used in the construction of the femoral stem in total hip replacements. It is not possible to use quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry due to interferences. Methods Titanium was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy using the emission line at 336.1 nm and Y (internal standard) at 371.0 nm. Internal quality control materials were prepared for blood and serum and concentrations assigned using a sector field-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. A candidate whole blood certified reference material was also evaluated. Results The method had detection and quantitation limits of 0.6 and 1.9 µg/L, respectively. The respective bias (%) and measurement uncertainty ( U) (k = 2) were 3.3% and 2.0 µg/L (serum) and - 1.0% and 1.4 µg/L (whole blood). The respective repeatability and intermediate precision (%) were 5.1% and 10.9% (serum) and 2.4% and 8.6% (whole blood). The concentration of titanium was determined in patients' samples, serum (median = 2.4 µg/L, n = 897) and whole blood (median = 2.4 µg/L, n = 189). Serum is recommended for monitoring titanium in patients, since the concentration is higher than in whole blood and the matrix less problematic. In hip fluid samples, the concentrations were much higher (mean 58.5 µg/L, median 5.1 µg/L, n = 83). Conclusions A method based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was developed and validated for measuring titanium in clinical samples.

  17. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  18. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, H.; Minowa, T.; Shimazu, M.

    1988-01-01

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 10 3 cm -3 at the ionization area. (author)

  19. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  20. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy for the combustion analysis of series production engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Bernd; Moeser, Petra; Hentschel, Werner

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents a device that detects light emerging from the combustion inside a series production automotive engine. Simultaneous time and wavelength resolution is achieved by this system and it can be applied in a simple manner to either diesel or spark ignition (SI) engines without any geometrical modification or the combustion chamber. An optical probe is inserted into spark plug or glow plug. A fiber is connected to the probe and leads the light to a spectrograph, which provides spectral analysis in the UV and visible wavelength ranges. An intensified streak camera with time resolution in the microsecond range completes the detection unit. This measuring system enables time-resolved emission spectroscopy applied to the light emitted during the combustion in a series production engine. Time-resolved emission spectra are presented from both a diesel and an SI engine. The time behavior of the internal temperature in a diesel engine combustion chamber and its dependence on engine speed and load are measured with this setup using a multiple two-color method. In an SI engine, the time behavior of the emissions of specific molecules or radicals is detected. Thus, differences in the combustion process are demonstrated to be caused by operation with different fuels.

  1. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  2. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  3. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  4. Electron beam technology for multipollutant emissions control from heavy fuel oil-fired boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Ostapczuk, Anna; Licki, Janusz

    2010-08-01

    The electron beam treatment technology for purification of exhaust gases from the burning of heavy fuel oil (HFO) mazout with sulfur content approximately 3 wt % was tested at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology laboratory plant. The parametric study was conducted to determine the sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) removal efficiency as a function of temperature and humidity of irradiated gases, absorbed irradiation dose, and ammonia stoichiometry process parameters. In the test performed under optimal conditions with an irradiation dose of 12.4 kGy, simultaneous removal efficiencies of approximately 98% for SO2, and 80% for NO(x) were recorded. The simultaneous decrease of PAH and one-ringed aromatic hydrocarbon (benzene, toluene, and xylenes [BTX]) concentrations was observed in the irradiated flue gas. Overall removal efficiencies of approximately 42% for PAHs and 86% for BTXs were achieved with an irradiation dose 5.3 kGy. The decomposition ratio of these compounds increased with an increase of absorbed dose. The decrease of PAH and BTX concentrations was followed by the increase of oxygen-containing aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations. The PAH and BTX decomposition process was initialized through the reaction with hydroxyl radicals that formed in the electron beam irradiated flue gas. Their decomposition process is based on similar principles as the primary reaction concerning SO2 and NO(x) removal; that is, free radicals attack organic compound chains or rings, causing volatile organic compound decomposition. Thus, the electron beam flue gas treatment (EBFGT) technology ensures simultaneous removal of acid (SO2 and NO(x)) and organic (PAH and BTX) pollutants from flue gas emitted from burning of HFO. This technology is a multipollutant emission control technology that can be applied for treatment of flue gas emitted from coal-, lignite-, and HFO-fired boilers. Other thermal processes such

  5. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  6. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  7. Pre-concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe and Co of water sea and analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy - DCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of separation and pre-concentration methods of chromium, manganese, iron and cobalt from seawater, that allow use control methods of 5 1 Cr, 5 4 Mn, 5 5 , 5 9 Fe, 5 8 , 5 9 Co with a better sensibility and the determination of this elements by atomic absorption spectroscopy or plasma emission spectroscopy are described. This methods of seawater analysis will use near the region of Angra I reactor. (author)

  8. Effectiveness of the use of emission data by fan beam collimator for TCT on TCT/ECT simultaneous acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Murase, Kenya

    2003-01-01

    On transmission CT (TCT)/emission CT (ECT) simultaneous acquisition in the three detector SPECT system (one fan beam collimator for TCT and two parallel-hole collimators for ECT), count loss of the ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT occurs, which may deteriorate image quality. We thought that it might be possible to retrieve the ECT counts and improve image quality, when ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT were added to ECT data of two other parallel-hole collimators. To prove our hypothesis, we performed a phantom and clinical studies. We compared the ECT images of the following protocols: ECT data of a fan beam collimator+ECT data of two parallel beam collimators with attenuation correction (protocol A), ECT data of two parallel beam collimators with attenuation correction (protocol B), ECT data of two parallel beam collimators without attenuation correction (protocol C). In the phantom study, pixel counts of protocol A were as 1.3 to 1.6 times as protocol B. Profile curve improved up to 7 to 10%. Clinical images also improved. In conclusion, ECT data of the fan beam collimator for TCT can be retrieved to increase ECT counts, which improved image quality. (author)

  9. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collamati, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Faccini, R., E-mail: riccardo.faccini@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ferrari, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lanza, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mancini-Terracciano, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ortega, P.G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Patera, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Piersanti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Russomando, A. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Sala, P.R. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  10. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, F.; Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Lanza, L.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P.G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Russomando, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported

  11. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, F.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum.This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is report...

  12. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N 2 , H 2 , CO 2 , O 2 , and CH 4 . Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location

  13. Reduction of organic solvent emission by industrial use of electron-beam curable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haering, E.

    1982-01-01

    Most industrial finishing processes operate by the use of liquid organic coating materials drying by solvent evaporation and subsequent chemical crosslinking reactions, in many cases also releasing cleavage products. These organic emissions contribute to air pollution and therefore many countries have issued restrictions in order to protect the environment. Complementary to other modern methods for reducing this problem, radiation chemistry enables an approach by radical chain polymerization which can be induced by exposure to electron radiation. This procedure is known as electron-beam curing of coatings or the EBC process. It utilizes well-developed accelerator equipment with voltages of 150 to 400kV at a minimum energy consumption. There is no necessity to use irradiation facilities based on the decay of radioisotopes. Free radical polymerization requires unsaturated resins as pain binders and polymerizable liquid compounds (monomers) as reactive diluents. Their crosslinking yields a high molecular network, the coating, without any emission of organic solvents or cleavage products. Moreover, the radiochemical formation of the paint film occurs extremely rapidly. The technical application of EBC coatings began by coating automotive plastic parts; a little later the finishing of wood products gained more industrial use as a non-polluting and energy-saving coating technology. Application methods in coating plastic foils in combination with vacuum metallizing and the production of decorative laminating papers for furniture followed. In 1981 new EBC pilot lines were installed for curing top coats on PVC foil and also for the coating of prefinished steel wheels for automobiles. In comparison with conventional solvent-based methods the industrial EBC process results in a nearly complete reduction of organic solvent emission avoiding air pollution and saving valuable petrochemical raw materials. This paper reviews the development of EBC during the last decade. (author)

  14. New approach to the nuclear in beam γ spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei at N=20 using projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Jimenez, M.J.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Achouri, L.; Daugas, J.M.; Belleguic, M.; Azaiez, F.; Bourgeois, C.; Angelique, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of nuclei far from stability around 32 Mg have been recently investigated by means of a novel method. In-beam γ-decay spectroscopy of a large number of exotic neutron-rich nuclei produced by projectile fragmentation of a 36 S projectile has been performed, using coincidences between the recoil fragments collected at the focal plane of SPEG spectrometer and γ-rays emitted at the target location. Preliminary results on both the population mechanism and the decay of excited states in nuclei around 32 Mg are presented. (author)

  15. Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ∼100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages

  16. [Desmoid fibromatosis in absorption infrared spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and roentgen diffraction recording].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zejkan, A; Bejcek, Z; Horejs, J; Vrbová, H; Bakosová, M; Macholda, F; Rykl, D

    1989-10-01

    The authors present results of serial quality and quantity microanalyses of bone patterns and dental tissue patterns in patient with desmoid fibromatosis. Methods of absorption spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with follow-up to x-ray examination are tested. The above mentioned methods function in a on-line system by means of specially adjusted monitor unit which is controlled centrally by the computer processor system. The whole process of measurement is fully automated and the data obtained are recorded processed in the unit data structure classified into index sequence blocks of data. Serial microanalyses offer exact data for the study of structural changes of dental and bone tissues which manifest themselves in order of crystal grid shifts. They prove the fact that microanalyses give new possibilities in detection and interpretation of chemical and structural changes of apatite cell.

  17. Method validation in plasma source optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) - From samples to results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilon, Fabien; Vielle, Karine; Birolleau, Jean-Claude; Vigneau, Olivier; Labet, Alexandre; Arnal, Nadege; Adam, Christelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Amiel, Jeanine; Granier, Guy; Faure, Joel; Arnaud, Regine; Beres, Andre; Blanchard, Jean-Marc; Boyer-Deslys, Valerie; Broudic, Veronique; Marques, Caroline; Augeray, Celine; Bellefleur, Alexandre; Bienvenu, Philippe; Delteil, Nicole; Boulet, Beatrice; Bourgarit, David; Brennetot, Rene; Fichet, Pascal; Celier, Magali; Chevillotte, Rene; Klelifa, Aline; Fuchs, Gilbert; Le Coq, Gilles; Mermet, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Even though ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy) is now a routine analysis technique, requirements for measuring processes impose a complete control and mastering of the operating process and of the associated quality management system. The aim of this (collective) book is to guide the analyst during all the measurement validation procedure and to help him to guarantee the mastering of its different steps: administrative and physical management of samples in the laboratory, preparation and treatment of the samples before measuring, qualification and monitoring of the apparatus, instrument setting and calibration strategy, exploitation of results in terms of accuracy, reliability, data covariance (with the practical determination of the accuracy profile). The most recent terminology is used in the book, and numerous examples and illustrations are given in order to a better understanding and to help the elaboration of method validation documents

  18. Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy of strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaccione, Giancarlo; Offi, Francesco; Sacchi, Maurizio; Torelli, Piero

    2008-06-01

    Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a new tool for the study of bulk electronic properties of solids using synchrotron radiation. We review recent achievements of HAXPES, with particular reference to the VOLPE project, showing that high energy resolution and bulk sensitivity can be obtained at kinetic energies of 6-8 keV. We present also the results of recent studies on strongly correlated materials, such as vanadium sesquioxide and bilayered manganites, revealing the presence of different screening properties in the bulk with respect to the surface. We discuss the relevant experimental features of the metal-insulator transition in these materials. To cite this article: G. Panaccione et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  19. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    1983-11-01

    The report, written under a research contract with the IAEA, contains a detailed presentation of the most difficult problem encountered in the trace element analysis by methods of the X-ray emission spectroscopy, namely the sample preparation techniques. The following items are covered. Sampling - with specific consideration of aerosols, water, soil, biological materials, petroleum and its products, storage of samples and their handling. Pretreatment of samples - preconcentration, ashing, solvent extraction, ion exchange and electrodeposition. Sample preparations for PIXE - analysis - backings, target uniformity and homogeneity, effects of irradiation, internal standards and specific examples of preparation (aqueous, biological, blood serum and solid samples). Sample preparations for radioactive sources or tube excitation - with specific examples (water, liquid and solid samples, soil, geological, plants and tissue samples). Finally, the problem of standards and reference materials, as well as that of interlaboratory comparisons, is discussed

  20. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-01-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  1. Experiments and FLUKA simulations of $^{12}C$ and $^{16}O$ beams for therapy monitoring by means of in-beam Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerer,; Ferrari, A

    2007-01-01

    Since 1997 at the experimental C-12 ion therapy facility at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany, more than 350 patients have been treated. The therapy is monitored with a dedicated positron emission tomograph, fully integrated into the treatment site. The measured beta+-activity arises from inelastic nuclear interactions between the beam particles an the nuclei of the patients tissue. Because the monitoring is done during the irradiation the method is called in-beam PET. The underlying principle of this monitoring is a comparison between the measured activity and a simulated one. The simulations are presently done by the PETSIM code which is dedicated to C-12 beams. In future ion therapy centers like the Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg, Germany, besides C-12 also proton, $^3$He and O-16 beams will be used for treatment and the therapy will be monitored by means of in-beam PET. Because PETSIM is not extendable to other ions in an easy way, a code capable ...

  2. CNS active target (CAT) for missing mass spectroscopy with intense beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, S.; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C.S.; Watanabe, Y.N.

    2015-01-01

    A new gaseous active target based on a time projection chamber, named CAT, is introduced. The remarkable feature is a dual gain THGEM to decrease the effective gain for the beam particles while keeping a high enough effective gain for the recoil particles. The measured effective gain of low gain region was a factor of one hundred smaller than that of high gain region. This technique provides a wide dynamic range in order to detect both the beam and recoil particles at the same time even with a very high intensity beam of more than 10 5 Hz. (author)

  3. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  4. Sub-microanalysis of solid samples with near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhisen; Meng, Yifan; Wang, Tongtong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2018-03-01

    A novel approach, which we have chosen to name it as near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy (NFE-AES), was proposed by introducing a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) system into a laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS). The near-field enhancement of a laser-illuminated tip was utilized to improve the lateral resolution tremendously. Using the hybrid arrangement, pure metal tablets were analyzed to verify the performance of NFE-AES both in atmosphere and in vacuum. Due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the incident electromagnetic field is enhanced and confined at the apex of tip, resulting in sub-micron scale ablation and elemental emission signal. We discovered that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the spectral resolution obtained in vacuum condition are better than those acquired in atmospheric condition. The quantitative capability of NFE-AES was demonstrated by analyzing Al and Pb in Cu matrix, respectively. Submicron-sized ablation craters were achieved by performing NFE-AES on a Si wafer with an Al film, and the spectroscopic information from a crater of 650 nm diameter was successfully obtained. Due to its advantage of high lateral resolution, NFE-AES imaging of micro-patterned Al lines on an integrated circuit of a SIM card was demonstrated with a sub-micron lateral resolution. These results reveal the potential of the NFE-AES technique in sub-microanalysis of solids, opening an opportunity to map chemical composition at sub-micron scale.

  5. Experimental study of radiative energy transport in dense plasmas by emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozieres, Maylis

    2016-01-01

    This PhD work is an experimental study, based on emission and absorption spectroscopy of hot and dense nanosecond laser-produced plasmas. Atomic physics in such plasmas is a complex subject and of great interest especially in the fields of astrophysics or inertial confinement fusion. On the atomic physics point of view, this means determining parameters such as the average ionization or opacity in plasmas at given electronic temperature and density. Atomic physics codes then need of experimental data to improve themselves and be validated so that they can be predictive for a wide range of plasmas. With this work we focus on plasmas whose electronic temperature varies from 10 eV to more than a hundred and whose density range goes from 10 -5 ato10 -2 g/cm 3 . In this thesis, there are two types of spectroscopic data presented which are both useful and necessary to the development of atomic physics codes because they are both characteristic of the state of the studied plasma: 1) some absorption spectra from Cu, Ni and Al plasmas close to local thermodynamic equilibrium; 2) some emission spectra from non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas of C, Al and Cu. This work highlights the different experimental techniques and various comparisons with atomic physics codes and hydrodynamics codes. (author) [fr

  6. A small electron beam ion trap/source facility for electron/neutral–ion collisional spectroscopy in astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gui-Yun; Wei, Hui-Gang; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wang, Fei-Lu; Peng, Ji-Min; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Schmidt, Mike; Zschornack, Günter; Ma, Xin-Wen; Zhao, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Spectra are fundamental observation data used for astronomical research, but understanding them strongly depends on theoretical models with many fundamental parameters from theoretical calculations. Different models give different insights for understanding a specific object. Hence, laboratory benchmarks for these theoretical models become necessary. An electron beam ion trap is an ideal facility for spectroscopic benchmarks due to its similar conditions of electron density and temperature compared to astrophysical plasmas in stellar coronae, supernova remnants and so on. In this paper, we will describe the performance of a small electron beam ion trap/source facility installed at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.We present some preliminary experimental results on X-ray emission, ion production, the ionization process of trapped ions as well as the effects of charge exchange on the ionization.

  7. Far-red to near infrared emission and scattering spectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang

    2001-06-01

    The thesis investigates the far-red and near infrared (NIR) spectral region from biomedical tissue samples for monitoring the state of tissues. The NIR emission wing intensity is weak in comparison to the emission in the visible spectral region. The wing emission from biomedical samples has revealed meaningful information about the state of the tissues. A model is presented to explain the shape of the spectral wing based on a continuum of energy levels. The wing can be used to classify different kinds of tissues; especially it can be used to differentiate cancer part from normal human breast tissues. The research work of the far-red emission from thermal damaged tissue samples shows that the emission intensity in this spectral region is proportional to the extent of the thermal damage of the tissue. Near infrared spectral absorption method is used to investigate blood hemodynamics (perfusion and oxygenation) in brain during sleep-wake transition. The result of the research demonstrates that the continuous wave (CW) type near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device can be used to investigate brain blood perfusion and oxygenation with a similar precision with frequency domain (FD) type device. The human subject sleep and wake transition, has been monitored by CW type NIRS instrument with traditional electroencephalograph (EEG) method. Parallel change in oxy-Hb and deoxy-Hb is a discrete event that occurs in the transition from both sleep to wakefulness and wakefulness to sleep. These hemodynamic switches are generally about few seconds delayed from the human decided transition point between sleep and wake on the polygraph EEG recording paper. The combination of NIRS and EEG methods monitor the brain activity, gives more information about the brain activity. The sleep apnea investigation was associated with recurrent apneas, insufficient nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and the different response of the peripheral and central compartments to breathing

  8. Neural network fatigue life prediction in steel i-beams using mathematically modeled acoustic emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadorai, Prathikshen N.

    The purpose of this research is to predict fatigue cracking in metal beams using mathematically modeled acoustic emission (AE) data. The AE data was collected from nine samples of steel Ibeam that were subjected to three-point bending caused by cyclic loading. The data gathered during these tests were filtered in order to remove long duration hits, multiple hit data, and obvious outliers. Based on the duration, energy, amplitude, and average frequency of the AE hits, the filtered data were classified into the various failure mechanisms of metals using NeuralWorksRTM Professional II/Plus software based self-organizing map (SOM) neural network. The parameters from mathematically modeled AE failure mechanism data were used to predict plastic deformation data. Amplitude data from classified plastic deformation data is mathematically modeled herein using bounded Johnson distributions and Weibull distribution. A backpropagation neural network (BPNN) is generated using MATLABRTM. This BPNN is able to predict the number of cycles that ultimately cause the steel I-beams to fail via five different models of plastic deformation data. These five models are data without any mathematical modeling and four which are mathematically modeled using three methods of bounded Johnson distribution (Slifker and Shapiro, Mage and Linearization) and Weibull distribution. Currently, the best method is the Linearization method that has prediction error not more than 17%. Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is also performed on the four sets of mathematically modeled plastic deformation data as named above using the bounded Johnson and Weibull shape parameters. The MLR gives the best prediction for the Linearized method which has a prediction error not more than 2%. The final conclusion made is that both BPNN and MLR are excellent tools for accurate fatigue life cycle prediction.

  9. A single-beam titration method for the quantification of open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Lung-Yu; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study introduced a quantitative method that can be used to measure the concentration of analytes directly from a single-beam spectrum of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR). The peak shapes of the analytes in a single-beam spectrum were gradually canceled (i.e., “titrated”) by dividing an aliquot of a standard transmittance spectrum with a known concentration, and the sum of the squared differential synthetic spectrum was calculated as an indicator for the end point of this titration. The quantity of a standard transmittance spectrum that is needed to reach the end point can be used to calculate the concentrations of the analytes. A NIST traceable gas standard containing six known compounds was used to compare the quantitative accuracy of both this titration method and that of a classic least square (CLS) using a closed-cell FTIR spectrum. The continuous FTIR analysis of industrial exhausting stack showed that concentration trends were consistent between the CLS and titration methods. The titration method allowed the quantification to be performed without the need of a clean single-beam background spectrum, which was beneficial for the field measurement of OP-FTIR. Persistent constituents of the atmosphere, such as NH 3 , CH 4 and CO, were successfully quantified using the single-beam titration method with OP-FTIR data that is normally inaccurate when using the CLS method due to the lack of a suitable background spectrum. Also, the synthetic spectrum at the titration end point contained virtually no peaks of analytes, but it did contain the remaining information needed to provide an alternative means of obtaining an ideal single-beam background for OP-FTIR. - Highlights: • Establish single beam titration quantification method for OP-FTIR. • Define the indicator for the end-point of spectrum titration. • An ideal background spectrum can be obtained using single beam titration. • Compare the quantification between titration

  10. Development of a pulsed laser with emission at 1053 nm for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a pulsed and Q-switched laser resonator was developed using the double-beam mode-controlling technique. A Nd:LiYF4 crystal with 0,8mol% of doping concentration was used to generate a giant pulse with duration of 5,5 ns (FWHM), 1,2 mJ of energy and 220 kW peak power for the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The CRDS technique is used to measure absorption spectra for gases, liquids and solids. With the CRDS technique it is possible to measure losses with high degree of accuracy, underscoring the sensitivity that is confirmed by the use of mirrors with high reflectivity. With this technique, the losses by reflection and scattering of transparent materials were evaluated. By calibrating the resonant cavity, it was possible to measure the losses in the samples with resolution of 0,045%, the maximum being reached by 0,18%. The calibration was possible because there was obtained to measure a decay time of approximately 20 μs with the empty cavity. Besides was obtained a method for determining the refractive index of transparent materials with accuracy of five decimals. (author)

  11. High temperature and high resolution uv photoelectron spectroscopy using supersonic molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng; Reutt-Robey, J.E.; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1989-07-01

    A high temperature molecular beam source with electron bombardment heating has been built for high resolution photoelectron spectroscopic studies of high temperature species and clusters. This source has the advantages of: producing an intense, continuous, seeded molecular beam, eliminating the interference of the heating mechanism from the photoelectron measurement. Coupling the source with our hemispherical electron energy analyzer, we can obtain very high resolution HeIα (584 angstrom) photoelectron spectra of high temperature species. Vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra of PbSe, As 2 , As 4 , and ZnCl 2 are shown to demonstrate the performance of the new source. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  13. Focussed ion beam thin sample microanalysis using a field emission gun electron probe microanalyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Field emission gun electron probe microanalysis (FEG-EPMA) in conjunction with wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry using a low acceleration voltage (V acc) allows elemental analysis with sub-micrometre lateral spatial resolution (SR). However, this degree of SR does not necessarily meet the requirements associated with increasingly miniaturised devices. Another challenge related to performing FEG-EPMA with a low V acc is that the accuracy of quantitative analyses is adversely affected, primarily because low energy X-ray lines such as the L- and M-lines must be employed and due to the potential of line interference. One promising means of obtaining high SR with FEG-EPMA is to use thin samples together with high V acc values. This mini-review covers the basic principles of thin-sample FEG-EPMA and describes an application of this technique to the analysis of optical fibres. Outstanding issues related to this technique that must be addressed are also discussed, which include the potential for electron beam damage during analysis of insulating materials and the development of methods to use thin samples for quantitative analysis.

  14. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  15. In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy in the vicinity of 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, in-beam x-ray experiments supplied a vast amount of data on high-spin states in nuclei in the vicinity of 100 Sn. The present contribution reviews spectroscopic information obtained recently for N ≥ 50 nuclei around 100 Sn, with emphasis on isomer studies, and discusses selected results in the frame of the shell model

  16. Study of Nuclear Moments and Mean Square Charge Radii by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The collinear fast-beam laser technique is used to measure atomic hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of unstable nuclides produced at ISOLDE. This gives access to basic nuclear ground-state and isomeric-state properties such as spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, and the variation of the nuclear mean square charge radius within a sequence of isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ Among the various techniques used for this purpose, the present approach is of greatest versatility, due to the direct use of the beams from the isotope separator. Their phase-space properties are exploited to achieve high sensitivity and resolution. The optical spectra of neutral atoms are made accessible by converting the ion beams into fast atomic beams. This is accomplished in the charge-exchange cell which is kept at variable potential ($\\pm$10~kV) for Doppler-tuning of the effective laser wavelength. The basic optical resolution of 10$^{-8}$ requires a 10$^{-5}$ stability of the 60~kV main acceleration voltage and low energy ...

  17. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  18. Optical emissions from an ionized channel produced by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the visible light generated by the Astron beam (5 MeV, 400 A) in passing through 500 torr air and nitrogen are reported. Experiments show that in the presence of the beam, the light is from .01 to 0.1 percent sun's brightness. After the beam, the light decays extremely rapidly. The size and position of the beam in the gas can be determined from observations of the channel light

  19. Terahertz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz DES) - ‘ALMA in the Lab’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile Auriacombe, Olivier Bruno Jacques; Fraser, Helen; Ellison, Brian; Ioppolo, Sergio; Rea, Simon

    2016-06-01

    ALMA is revolutionising our scope to identify and locate molecules that have been desorbed from ices, particularly complex organic molecules (COMS), which provide a vital link between interstellar and prebiotic chemistry. Explaining the existence of these molecules in star-forming regions relies on an empirical understanding of the chemistry that underpins their formation:- do COMS form predominantly in the solid-phase and then desorb to the gas phase, or do only “smaller” species, radials or ions desorb and then undergo gas-phase chemical reactions to generate larger COMS?-are the rotational state populations in COMS only attributable to equilibrium chemistry, or could their formation mechanisms and desorption processes affect the rotational state occupancy of these molecules, thereby directly tying certain species to solid-state origins?We have developed a novel laboratory method - THz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz-DES) that combines “traditional” laboratory astrophysics high-vacuum ice experiments with a sensitive high-spectral-resolution terahertz total-power heterodyne radiometer 1,2, partially mirroring the spectral range of ALMA band 7 (275- 373 GHz). Ices are grown in situ on a cold-plate, situated in a vacuum cell, then (thermally) desorbed. The sub-mm emission spectra of the resultant gas-phase molecules are detected as a function of time, temperature, or distance from the surface. Our first THz DES results will be shown for pure and binary ice systems including H2O, N2O and CH3OH. They show good correlation with established methods e.g. TPD, with the advantage of exploiting the molecular spectroscopy to unravel surface dynamics, state-occupancy, and unequivocal molecular identification, as well as concurrently measuring desorption barriers and molecular yields. We will extend our technique to a broader frequency range, enabling us to detect radical and ion desorption, to differentiate between A and E populations of CH3OH or ortho

  20. Consequences of trapped beam ions of the analysis of neutron emission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Hone, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Laundy, B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra have been measured during D o neutral beam heating of deuterium plasmas. The thermonuclear to beam-plasma neutron production ratios are deduced. For a non-radial spectrometer line-of-sight, the trapped beam-ion fraction must be considered. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  1. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Relativistic Radioactive Beams From RISING via PreSPEC towards HISPEC/DESPEC at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, D

    2010-01-01

    The study of atomic nuclei far from the line of β-stability by means of radioactive ion beams is undertaken at several large-scale facilities throughout the world. These proceedings summarize high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy investigations based on relativistic radioactive ion beams produced and prepared by the SIS/FRS facility of the GSI Helmholtz-Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and a brief outlook towards the next-generation experiments at both GSI and FAIR.

  2. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  3. High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy: An advanced tool for actinide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitova, T.; Brendebach, B.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Lebid, A.; Löble, M.; Rothe, J.; Batuk, O. N.; Hormes, J.; Liu, D.; Breher, F.; Geckeis, H.

    2010-03-01

    High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy (HRXES) is becoming increasingly important for our understanding of electronic and coordination structures. The combination of such information with development of quantum theoretical tools will advance our capability for predicting reactivity and physical behavior especially of 5f elements. HRXES can be used to remove lifetime broadening by registering the partial fluorescence yield emitted by the sample (i.e., recording a windowed signal from the energy dispersed fluorescence emission while varying incident photon energy), thereby yielding highly resolved X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Such spectra often display resonant features not observed in conventional XAFS. The spectrometer set-up can also be used for a wide range of other experiments, for example, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), where bulk electron configuration information in solids, liquids and gases is obtained. Valence-selective XAFS studies, where the local structure of a selected element's valence state present in a mixture of valence states can be obtained, as well as site-selective XAFS studies, where the coordination structure of a metal bound to selected elements can be differentiated from that of all the other ligating atoms. A HRXES spectrometer has been constructed and is presently being commissioned for use at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA at FZK. We present the spectrometer's compact, modular design, optimized for attaining a wide range of energies, and first test measurement results. Examples from HRXES studies of lanthanides, actinides counter parts, are also shown.

  4. A model for Hsub(α) and Hsub(β) emission from a high power hydrogen beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, G.; Ramette, J.

    1980-07-01

    Hsub(α) and Hsub(β) emission from an high power hydrogen beam has been simulated by means of a computer code in order to discuss the role of various parameters (acceleration energy, pressure, impact decay) on the measured intensities. A comparison has been performed with other simplified models and conversion factors are provided to transform the measured line intensity ratios into extracted species proportions

  5. Emission Spectroscopy of Atmospheric-Pressure Ball Plasmoids: Higher Energy Reveals a Rich Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Rose, Amber Nicole; Glumac, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2017-06-01

    Ball plasmoids (self-sustaining spherical plasmas) are a particularly unique example of a non-equilibrium air plasma. These plasmoids have lifetimes on the order of hundreds of milliseconds without an external power source, however, current models dictate that a ball plasmoid should recombine in a millisecond or less. Ball plasmoids are considered to be a laboratory analogue of natural ball lightning, a phenomenon that has eluded scientific explanation for centuries. We are searching for the underlying physicochemical mechanism(s) by which ball plasmoids and (by extension) ball lightning are stabilized using a variety of diagnostic techniques. This presentation will focus on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of ball plasmoid discharges between 190-850 nm. The previous generation of OES measurements of this system showed emission from only a few atomic and molecular species, however, the energy available for the discharges in these experiments was limited by the size of the capacitor banks and voltages to which the capacitor banks were charged. We are capable of generating plasmoids at much higher energies, and as a result we are the first to report a very rich chemistry previously not observed in ball plasmoids. We have identified signals from species including NO A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, OH A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, NH A^{3}Π→X^{3}Σ^{-}, AlO A^{2}Π→X^{2}Σ^{+}, NH^{+} B^{2}Δ→X^{2}Π, W I, Al I, Cu I, and H_{α}, all of which have not yet been reported for this system. Analysis of the emission spectra and fitting procedures will be discussed, rotational temperatures of constituent species will be reported, and theories of ball plasmoid stabilization based upon these new results will be presented. Versteegh, A.; Behringer, K.; Fantz, U.; Fussman, G.; Jüttner, B.; Noack, S. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2008, 17(2), 024014 Stephan, K. D.; Dumas, S.; Komala-Noor, L.; McMinn, J. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2013, 22(2), 025018

  6. Trace cobalt speciation in bacteria and at enzymic active sites using emission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, A.A.; Antonyuk, L.P.; Smirnova, V.E.; Serebrennikova, O.B. [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation); Kulikov, L.A.; Perfiliev, Yu.D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2002-02-01

    {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) allows the chemical state of cobalt, as influenced by its coordination environment, to be monitored in biological samples at its physiological (trace) concentrations. To draw attention to EMS as a valuable tool for speciation of cobalt in biocomplexes, the process of cobalt(II) metabolism in cells of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 was investigated using EMS of {sup 57}Co{sup II}-doped bacterial cells. EMS measurements also showed {sup 57}Co{sup II}-activated glutamine synthetase (GS, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, isolated from this bacterium) to have two different cobalt(II) forms at its active sites, in agreement with data available on other bacterial GSs. Chemical after-effects following electron capture by the nucleus of the parent {sup 57}Co{sup II} during the {sup 57}Co{yields}{sup 57}Fe transition, which contribute to the formation of a stabilised daughter {sup 57}Fe{sup III} component along with the nucleogenic {sup 57}Fe{sup II} forms, are also briefly considered. (orig.)

  7. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H- density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, J.; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-08-01

    "Prometheus I" is a volume H- negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma. The acquired VUV spectra are correlated with the negative ion densities, as measured by means of laser photodetachment, and the possible mechanisms of negative ion production are considered. The well-established H- formation process of dissociative attachment to vibrationally excited molecules is evaluated, while an additional production path (i.e. neutral resonant ionization) is tested due to the recently attracted interest. The obtained results indicate that for the source Prometheus I, the dominant formation process is dissociative attachment.

  8. Characterization of an atmospheric helium plasma jet by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qing; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; González, Manuel Á.; Leys, Christophe; Pei Lu, Xin

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of plasma temperatures (gas temperature and electron excitation temperature) and electron density in a pulsed-dc excited atmospheric helium plasma jet are studied by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy (OES). High-resolution OES is performed for the helium and hydrogen lines for the determination of electron density through the Stark broadening mechanism. A superposition fitting method composed of two component profiles corresponding to two different electron densities is developed to fit the investigated lines. Electron densities of the orders of magnitude of 1021 and 1020 m-3 are characterized for the center and edge regions in the jet discharge when the applied voltage is higher than 13.0 kV. The atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of helium demonstrates that the discharge deviates from the Boltzmann-Saha equilibrium state, especially for the helium lower levels, which are significantly overpopulated. Local electron excitation temperatures T13 and Tspec corresponding to the lower and upper parts of the helium ASDF are defined and found to range from 1.2 eV to 1.4 eV and 0.2 eV to 0.3 eV, respectively. A comparative analysis shows that the Saha balance is valid in the discharge for helium atoms at high excited states.

  9. Environmental samples analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Busuioc, G.; Dima, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Vlaicu, Gh.; Marian, R.

    2002-01-01

    Biological samples are interesting from many aspects of environmental monitoring. By analyzing tree leaves conclusions can be drown regarding the metal loading in the growth medium. So that, starting from assumption that the pollution factors from environmental medium can modify the normal concentration of elements, we decided to control the presence of toxic elements and the deviation from normal state of elements in leaves of different trees from areas situated at different distances of pollution source. The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) method and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method. Using AAS spectrophotometer SHIMADZU we identified and determined the concentration of: Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Fe, Se, Pb with an instrumental error less than 1% for most of the elements analyzed. The same samples were analyzed by ICP-OES spectrometer, BAIRD ICP2070-Sequential Plasma spectrometer. We identified and determined in leaves of different trees the concentration of Mg, Ca, and Sr with a precision less than 6%. (authors)

  10. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  11. Size dependent bandgap of molecular beam epitaxy grown InN quantum dots measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mahesh; Roul, Basanta; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Kalghatgi, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    InN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si (111) by epitaxial Stranski-Krastanow growth mode using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN QDs was verified by the x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to probe the structural aspects of QDs. A surface bandgap of InN QDs was estimated from scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) I-V curves and found that it is strongly dependent on the size of QDs. The observed size-dependent STS bandgap energy shifts with diameter and height were theoretical explained based on an effective mass approximation with finite-depth square-well potential model.

  12. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... Full Length Research Paper. Determination of lactic acid bacteria in Kaşar cheese and identification by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. İlkay Turhan1* and Zübeyde Öner2. 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetic, School of Health Sciences, T.C.Istanbul Arel University, 34537 Buyukcekmece /.

  13. [Enhancement effect of double-beam laser processed aqueous solution on ICP emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-zhong; Xu, Li-jing; Su, Hong-xin; Li, Xu; Wang, Shu-fang

    2015-01-01

    In order to change the physical properties of aqueous solution and improve the radiation intensity of the ICP emission spectrum, the effects of different laser power density and irradiation time on the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution were investigated by using near infrared laser at 976 nm and CO2 laser at 10. 6 µm to irradiate aqueous solution orthogonally, then the enhancement of ICP spectral intensity with processed solution was discussed. The results showed that the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution reduced by 42. 13% and 14. 03% compared with the untreated, and the atomization efficiency increased by 51.26% at the laser power density 0. 265 7 W . cm-2 of 976 nm and 0. 206 9 W . cm-2 of CO2 laser with 40 min irradiation time. With the optimized aqueous solution introduced into the ICP source, the spectral line intensity of sample elements As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb was enhanced by 46.29%, 94. 65%, 30. 76%, 33.07% and 94. 58% compared to the untreated aqueous solution, while the signal-to-background ratio increased by 43. 84%, 85. 35%, 28. 71%, 34. 37% and 90. 91%, respectively. Plasma temperature and electron density also increased by 5. 94% and 1. 18% respectively. It is obvious that the method of double-beam laser orthogonal irradiation on solution can reduce the surface tension and viscosity of aqueous solution significantly, and raise the radiationintensity of ICP source, and will provide a better condition for detecting the trace heavy metal elements in water samples.

  14. Time-resolved measurement of emission profiles in pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy: Investigation of the pre-peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, D. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Horvath, P. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Nelis, Th. [LAPLACE, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 rte de Narbonne, Bat3R2, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); CU Jean Francois Champollion, Place de Verdun 81012 Albi Cedex 9 (France); Pereiro, R. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Bordel, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Michler, J. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Sanz-Medel, A., E-mail: asm@uniovi.e [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radiofrequency glow discharge coupled to optical emission spectroscopy has been used in pulsed mode in order to perform a detailed study of the measured temporal emission profiles for a wide range of copper transitions. Special attention has been paid to the early emission peak (or so-called pre-peak), observed at the beginning of the emission pulse profile. The effects of the important pulse parameters such as frequency, duty cycle, pulse width and power-off time, have been studied upon the Cu pulse emission profiles. The influence of discharge parameters, such as pressure and power, was studied as well. Results have shown that the intensity observed in the pre-peak can be 10 times as large as the plateau value for resonant lines and up to 5 times in case of transitions to the metastable levels. Increasing pressure or power increased the pre-peak intensity while its appearance in time changed. The pre-peak decreased when the discharge off-time was shorter than 100 {mu}s. According to such results, the presence of the pre-peak could be probably due to the lack of self-absorption during the first 50 {mu}s, and not to the ignition of the plasma. Under the selected operation conditions, the use of the pre-peak emission as analytical signals increases the linearity of calibration curves for resonant lines subjected to self-absorption at high concentrations.

  15. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Cortázar, O D; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H +, H+2 , and H+3 ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  16. Assessment of high precision, high accuracy Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy to obtain concentration uncertainties less than 0.2% with variable matrix concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabb, Savelas A.; Olesik, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to obtain high precision, high accuracy measurements in samples with complex matrices using High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (HP-ICP-OES) was investigated. The Common Analyte Internal Standard (CAIS) procedure was incorporated into the High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy method to correct for matrix-induced changes in emission intensity ratios. Matrix matching and standard addition approaches to minimize matrix-induced errors when using High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy were also assessed. The High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy method was tested with synthetic solutions in a variety of matrices, alloy standard reference materials and geological reference materials

  17. Recent progress in the studies of atomic spectra and transition probabilities by beam-foil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, I.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of recent studies of atomic structure (in particular atomic spectra, energy levels and transition probabilities) using fast beams from ion accelerators. Thanks to improved spectral resolution detailed and quite accurate studies of energy levels are now possible, a number of such results will be discussed. The non-autoionizing, multiply excited levels in atoms and ions (including negative ions) are being vigorously investigated at present, some new results will be reported. The accuracy in lifetime determinations continues to improve, and several new ways for reduction of cascading effects have been developed. Some selected examples of recent progress in lifetime measurements are also included. (orig.)

  18. High-precision laser and rf spectroscopy of atomic, molecular, and slow ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, W.J.; Steimle, T.C.; Sen, A.; Azuma, Y.

    1988-01-01

    We have obtained extensive new structural information on the light diatomic radical ScO since the last report in this series. The new studies complete our systematic investigation of the fine and hyperfine structure (hfs) of the group IIIa monoxides LaO, YO, and ScO. The studies of the molecular X 2 Σ + electronic ground state were carried out using the molecular-beam laser-rf double-resonance method, and the excited electronic state information was obtained by complementing this data with Doppler-free laser fluorescence studies

  19. A comparison of current-voltage relationships of collectors in the Earth's ionosphere with and without electron beam emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, N.B.; Raitt, W.J.; Gilchrist, B.E.; Banks, P.M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P.R.; Sasaki, S.; Star Laboratory, Stanford University; Institute for Space and Astronautical Science, Tokyo)

    1989-01-01

    The CHARGE-2 sounding rocket flight was designed primarily to measure the vehicle potential of an electron-emitting payload in the mid-latitude ionosphere. The experiment was separated into two sections, the larger section carried a 1 keV electron gun and was referred to as the mother vehicle. The smaller section, referred to as the daughter, was connected to the mother by an insulated, conducting tether, and was deployed to a distance of up to 426 m across the geomagnetic field. In addition to performing electron beam experiments, the mother vehicle contained a high voltage power supply capable of applying up to 450 V and 28 mA to the daughter through the tether. Steady state potentials of up to 560 V were measured for the mother vehicle during beam emissions of up to 36 mA. The daughter collected currents up to 6.5 mA and attained potentials of up to 1000 V relative to the background ionosphere. The CHARGE-2 experiment was unique in that for the first time a comparison can be made of the current collection between an electron beam-emitting vehicle and a non-emitting vehicle at high potentials (400 V to 1000 V). The daughter current collection agreed well with the Parker-Murphy model, while the mother current collection always exceeded the Parker-Murphy limit and even exceeded the Langmuir-Blodgett predicted current below 240 km. The additional current collection of the mother is attributed to beam-plasma interactions. This additional source of collected current may be very important for successful electron beam emission at altitudes below 240 km. Copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  20. Spectroscopy of high lying resonances in {sup 9}Be produced with radioactive {sup 8}Li beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepini-Szily, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimaraes, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Scarduelli, V.; Rossi, E.; Zagatto, V.A.; Aguiar, V.A.P.; Duarte, J., E-mail: alinka@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Faria, P.N. de; Santos, H. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Descouvemont, P. [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels (Belgium); Barioni, A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pires, K.C.C. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Cornelio Procopio, PR (Brazil); Morcelle, V. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itabira, MG (Brazil); Moraes, M.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Britos, T.; Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil); Zamora, J.C. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, (Germany); Shorto, J.M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of the {sup 8}Li(p,α){sup 5}He and {sup 8}Li(p,p){sup 8}Li reactions measured at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) system. The experiment was realized in inverse kinematics using a thick [CH{sub 2}]{sub n} polyethylene target and an incident {sup 8}Li beam, produced by RIBRAS. Using the thick target method, the complete excitation function could be measured between E{sub cm} = 0.2 - 2.1 MeV, which includes the Gamow peak energy region. The excitation function of the {sup 8}Li(p,α){sup 5}He reaction, populating resonances between 16.888 and 19.0 MeV in {sup 9}Be, was obtained[1] and the resonances were fitted using R-matrix calculations. This study shed light on spins, parities, partial widths and isospin values of high lying resonances in {sup 9}Be. The measurement of the resonant elastic scattering {sup 8}Li(p,p){sup 8}Li populating resonances in the same energy region can constrain the resonance parameters. Preliminary results of the elastic scattering are also presented. (author)

  1. Spectroscopy of high lying resonances in 9Be produced with radioactive 8Li beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lépine-Szily A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the 8Li(p,α5He and 8Li(p,p8Li reactions measured at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil system. The experiment was realized in inverse kinematics using a thick [CH2]n polyethylene target and an incident 8Li beam, produced by RIBRAS. Using the thick target method, the complete excitation function could be measured between Ecm = 0.2 − 2.1 MeV, which includes the Gamow peak energy region. The excitation function of the 8Li(p,α5He reaction, populating resonances between 16.888 and 19.0 MeV in 9Be, was obtained[1] and the resonances were fitted using R-matrix calculations. This study shed light on spins, parities, partial widths and isospin values of high lying resonances in 9Be. The measurement of the resonant elastic scattering 8Li(p,p8Li populating resonances in the same energy region can constrain the resonance parameters. Preliminary results of the elastic scattering are also presented.

  2. Neutron in-beam Moessbauer spectroscopy of iron disulfide at 298 and 78 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y., E-mail: kyoshio@riken.jp [RIKEN (Japan); Yamada, Y. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Tsuruoka, Y.; Kubo, M. K. [International Christian University (Japan); Shoji, H. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Saint-Gobain K. K., Crystal Division (Japan); Takayama, T.; Sakai, Y. [Daido Institute of Technology (Japan); Sato, W.; Shinohara, A. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Segawa, M.; Matsue, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Emission Moessbauer spectra of {sup 57}Fe arising from the {sup 56}Fe(n, {gamma}){sup 57}Fe reaction in two crystal forms of iron disulfide were measured at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. Both forms exhibited two doublets assignable to the parent material and the new species produced by the nuclear reaction. At low temperature three doublets explained the spectra obtained. Production of thermally unstable species after the neutron capture reaction was suggested.

  3. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Swetz, D. S.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Reintsema, C. D.; Bennett, D. A.; Vale, L. R.; Mandal, U.; O' Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Joe, Y. I.; El Nahhas, A.; Fullagar, W.; Parnefjord Gustafsson, F.; Sundström, V.; Kurunthu, D.; Hilton, G. C.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-04-21

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies.

  4. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustsson, Andreas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  5. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium battery materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustsson, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  6. Characterization of a direct dc-excited discharge in water by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Leys, Christophe; Schram, Daan; Gonzalez, Manuel A; Rego, Robby; Kong, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Dc-excited discharges generated in water at the tip of a tungsten wire which is located at the orifice of a quartz capillary are investigated by time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy. Two distinctive discharge modes are observed. For small conductivities of the liquid the discharge is a streamer-like discharge in the liquid itself (liquid mode). For conductivities above typically 45 μS cm -1 a large vapour bubble is formed and a streamer discharge in this vapour bubble is observed (bubble mode). Plasma temperatures and electron densities are investigated for both modes. The gas temperature is estimated from the rotational temperature of N 2 (C-B) and is 1600 ± 200 K for the bubble mode and 1900 ± 200 K for the liquid mode. The rotational temperature of OH(A-X) is up to 2 times larger and cannot be used as an estimate for the gas temperature. The rotational population distribution of OH(A), ν = 0 is also non-Boltzmann with a large overpopulation of high rotational states. This discrepancy in rotational temperatures is discussed in detail. Electron densities are obtained from the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The electron densities in the liquid mode are of the order of 10 21 m -3 . In the bubble mode electron densities are significantly smaller: (3-4) x 10 20 m -3 . These values are compared with the Stark broadening of the hydrogen alpha and gamma lines and with electron densities obtained from current density measurements. The chemical reactivities of the bubble and liquid modes are compared by means of the hydrogen peroxide production rate.

  7. Effectiveness of revascularization surgery evaluated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masaaki; Ueda, Shin; Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo; Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were used to evaluate chronic ischemic regions in 26 stroke patients before and 1, 3, and 6 months after revascularization surgery. The volume of interest for proton MRS was placed in an area including part of the frontal and temporal opercula, insular cortex, and basal ganglia. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls for proton MRS. Patients were divided into three groups according to the preoperative proton MRS. Group A (n=12) had significantly lower N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios on the operative side compared to those on the contralateral side, and also lower than those in normal subjects. In seven patients in Group A, postoperative serial proton MRS demonstrated no recovery of these ratios on the operative side. However, proton MRS of the other five patients indicated gradual improvement in these ratios on the operative side at 3 to 6 months after surgery, and SPECT indicated an increase in cerebral blood flow on the operative side in four of these five patients. In Group B (n=9), proton MRS and SPECT showed no laterality before revascularization and no remarkable change during the postoperative course. In Group C (n=5), NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr decreased on the contralateral side preoperatively. Two patients showed fluctuating values of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr during the postoperative period. Serial proton MRS and SPECT Studies may be useful for the evaluation of revascularization surgery on ischemic regions. The efficacy of revascularization surgery on the metabolism may appear gradually within 3-6 months. (author)

  8. Characterization of a direct dc-excited discharge in water by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Leys, Christophe [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Schram, Daan [Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gonzalez, Manuel A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Rego, Robby [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, VITO Materials, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Kong, Michael G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.bruggeman@ugent.be

    2009-05-01

    Dc-excited discharges generated in water at the tip of a tungsten wire which is located at the orifice of a quartz capillary are investigated by time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy. Two distinctive discharge modes are observed. For small conductivities of the liquid the discharge is a streamer-like discharge in the liquid itself (liquid mode). For conductivities above typically 45 {mu}S cm{sup -1} a large vapour bubble is formed and a streamer discharge in this vapour bubble is observed (bubble mode). Plasma temperatures and electron densities are investigated for both modes. The gas temperature is estimated from the rotational temperature of N{sub 2}(C-B) and is 1600 {+-} 200 K for the bubble mode and 1900 {+-} 200 K for the liquid mode. The rotational temperature of OH(A-X) is up to 2 times larger and cannot be used as an estimate for the gas temperature. The rotational population distribution of OH(A), {nu} = 0 is also non-Boltzmann with a large overpopulation of high rotational states. This discrepancy in rotational temperatures is discussed in detail. Electron densities are obtained from the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The electron densities in the liquid mode are of the order of 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. In the bubble mode electron densities are significantly smaller: (3-4) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. These values are compared with the Stark broadening of the hydrogen alpha and gamma lines and with electron densities obtained from current density measurements. The chemical reactivities of the bubble and liquid modes are compared by means of the hydrogen peroxide production rate.

  9. Copper Determination in Gunshot Residue by Cyclic Voltammetric and Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hashim Nurul’Afiqah Hashimah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gunshot residue (GSR is a crucial evidences for a forensic analyst in the fastest way. GSR analysis insists a suitable method provides a relatively simple, rapid and precise information on the spot at the crime scene. Therefore, the analysis of Cu(II in GSR using cyclic voltammetry (CV on screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE is a better choice compared to previous alternative methods such as Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES those required a long time for analysis. SPCE is specially designed to handle with microvolumes of sample such as GSR sample. It gives advantages for identification of copper in GSR on-site preliminary test to prevent the sample loss on the process to be analyzed in the laboratory. SPCE was swabbed directly on the shooter’s arm immediately after firing and acetate buffer was dropped on SPCE before CV analysis. For ICP-OES analysis, cotton that had been soaked in 0.5 M nitric acid was swabbed on the shooter’s arm immediately after firing and kept in a tightly closed sampling tube. Gold coated SPCE that had been through nanoparticles modification exhibits excellent performance on voltammograms. The calibration was linear from 1 to 50 ppm of copper, the limit of detection for copper was 0.3 ppm and a relative standard deviation was 6.1 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of copper in GSR. The Cu determination on SPCE was compared and validated by ICP-OES method with 94 % accuracy.

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission CT in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Naomi

    1998-01-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) and single photon emission CT (SPECT), the cerebellum of patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and of age-matched control subjects was studied. A spectrum was collected from a 27 cm 3 (3 x 3 x 3 cm) voxel in the cerebellum containing white and gray matters in order to measure the distribution and relative signal intensities of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre) and choline (Cho). In the cerebellum of the patients with OPCA, mean NAA/Cre ratios for OPCA patients were significantly decreased compared with normal control subjects (OPCA, 1.01±0.247; controls, 1.526±0.144: p<0.001). Mean NAA/Cho ratios for OPCA patients were slightly decreased (OPCA, 1.285±0.228; controls 1.702±0.469: p<0.06). Cho/Cre ratios valued in the cerebellum of OPCA patients were not significantly different from those in normal controls (OPCA, 0.793±0.186; controls, 0.946±0.219). The ratio of RI count in the cerebellum to that in the occipital lobe was significantly decreased in OPCA patients (OPCA, 0.947±0.096; controls, 1.06±0.063: p<0.01). Cerebellar signs were assessed including gait ataxia, limb ataxia, dysarthria, saccadic pursuit, and nystagmus separately or in combination. In patients with more severe ataxic gait and dysarthria, MRS revealed slightly lowered NAA/Cre ratio. There was no significant correlation between NAA/Cre ratio and severity of other clinical signs. The MRS and SPECT findings give a confirmative evidence of hypofunction in cerebellum of patients with OPCA. (author)

  11. Localised proton spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in cerebral gliomas, with comparison to positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, K.G.; Kamman, R.L.; Mooyaart, E.L.; Heesters, M.A.A.M.; Pruim, J.; Vaalburg, W.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    In 32 patients with gliomas, one- and two-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) has been conducted, the latter allowing reconstruction of spectroscopic data into a spectroscopic image (MRSI), showing the distribution of the various metabolite concentrations over the cross-sectional plane. For lack of absolute concentrations, the measured concentrations of phosphocholine (CHOL), N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), and lactate (LAC) were conventionally expressed in ratios relative to that of creatine (CREAT). Compared to normal brain tissue, an increased CHOL/CREAT ratio was found in all groups of tumours, in glioblastomas, high-, middle- and low-grade astrocytomas both at the margin and the core of the tumours, but in oligodendrogliomas only at the margin. This is consistent with an increased phosphocholine turnover in relation to membrane biosynthesis by the proliferating cells. The NAA/CREAT ratio was decreased in all groups of tumours, both in the centre and at the margin, reflecting replacement of functioning neurons by neoplastic cells. The LAC/CREAT ratio was elevated in the core of malignant gliomas, which may be the result of a prevailing glycolysis, characteristic of tumours, possibly in conjunction with hypoxia/ischaemia. In the perifocal oedema, there was neither elevation of the CHOL/CREAT ratio nor decrease of the NAA/CREAT ratio; an increased LAC/CREAT ratio therefore rather reflected ischaemia/hypoxia probably due to locally elevated pressure and compromised regional perfusion. In the normal brain, the metabolite ratios of grey matter did not differ from those of white matter. The frontal lobe and basal ganglia showed lower NAA/CREAT ratios than the other cerebral areas. In 7 patients positron emission tomography was also performed with [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) or L-[1- 11 C]-tyrosine ( 11 C-TYR); the latter demonstrated a pattern of 11 C-TYR uptake similar to that of CHOL elevation in the MRSI. (orig.)

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sismanoglu, B.N., E-mail: bogos@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Amorim, J., E-mail: jayr.amorim@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Souza-Correa, J.A., E-mail: jorge.correa@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C., E-mail: carlosf@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Gomes, M.P., E-mail: gomesmp@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is about the use of optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to determine the gas discharge parameters of a direct current (98% Ar-2% H{sub 2}) non-thermal microplasma jet, operated at atmospheric pressure. The electrical and optical behaviors were studied to characterize this glow discharge. The microplasma jet was investigated in the normal and abnormal glow regimes, for current ranging from 10 to 130 mA, at approx 220 V of applied voltage for copper cathode. OH (A {sup 2}SIGMA{sup +}, nu = 0 -> X {sup 2}PI, nu' = 0) rotational bands at 306.357 nm and also the 603.213 nm Ar I line, which is sensitive to van der Waals broadening, were used to determine the gas temperature, which ranges from 550 to 800 K. The electron number densities, ranging from 6.0 x 10{sup 14} to 1.4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, were determined through a careful analysis of the main broadening mechanisms of the H{sub beta} line. From both 603.213 nm and 565.070 nm Ar I line broadenings, it was possible to obtain simultaneously electron number density and temperature (approx 8000 K). Excitation temperatures were also measured from two methods: from two Cu I lines and from Boltzmann-plot of 4p-4s and 5p-4s Ar I transitions. By employing H{sub alpha} line, the hydrogen atoms' H temperature was estimated (approx 18,000 K) and found to be surprisingly hotter than the excitation temperature.

  13. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission CT in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Naomi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) and single photon emission CT (SPECT), the cerebellum of patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and of age-matched control subjects was studied. A spectrum was collected from a 27 cm{sup 3} (3 x 3 x 3 cm) voxel in the cerebellum containing white and gray matters in order to measure the distribution and relative signal intensities of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre) and choline (Cho). In the cerebellum of the patients with OPCA, mean NAA/Cre ratios for OPCA patients were significantly decreased compared with normal control subjects (OPCA, 1.01{+-}0.247; controls, 1.526{+-}0.144: p<0.001). Mean NAA/Cho ratios for OPCA patients were slightly decreased (OPCA, 1.285{+-}0.228; controls 1.702{+-}0.469: p<0.06). Cho/Cre ratios valued in the cerebellum of OPCA patients were not significantly different from those in normal controls (OPCA, 0.793{+-}0.186; controls, 0.946{+-}0.219). The ratio of RI count in the cerebellum to that in the occipital lobe was significantly decreased in OPCA patients (OPCA, 0.947{+-}0.096; controls, 1.06{+-}0.063: p<0.01). Cerebellar signs were assessed including gait ataxia, limb ataxia, dysarthria, saccadic pursuit, and nystagmus separately or in combination. In patients with more severe ataxic gait and dysarthria, MRS revealed slightly lowered NAA/Cre ratio. There was no significant correlation between NAA/Cre ratio and severity of other clinical signs. The MRS and SPECT findings give a confirmative evidence of hypofunction in cerebellum of patients with OPCA. (author)

  14. Study of the light emission from hydrogen atoms excited by the beam-foil technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broll, Norbert.

    1976-01-01

    Zero-field and Stark-induced quantum beat measurements have been performed for beam foil excited hydrogen (H + and H 2 + beam). Experimental evidence of coherent excitation of S and P states of Lyman α line has been demonstrated [fr

  15. Provenance studies of Central European Neolithic obsidians using external beam milli-PIXE spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, B.; Cristea-Stan, D. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering “Horia Hulubei”, Str. Reactorului No.3, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kovács, I. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Konkoly-Thege Miklós út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z., E-mail: szokefalvi-nagy@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Konkoly-Thege Miklós út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-01-01

    External beam milli-PIXE technique was used for the determination of the elemental concentration ratios in some Prehistoric obsidian tools found in Transylvania, in the Iron Gates region near Danube, as well as on a few relevant geological obsidian samples from Slovak Tokaj Mountains, Lipari, Armenia. As provenance “fingerprints” the Ti to Mn and Rb to Zr ratios were used. The results confirm that the Transylvanian Neolithic samples have a Slovak Tokaj Mountains provenance. For Iron Gates samples, there are at least two different geological sources: for Late Neolithic tools, the origin is also the Slovak Tokaj Mountains but for Late Mesolithic–Early Neolithic samples, the sources are clearly different, possibly of the Hungarian Tokaj Mountains or the Balkan–Aegean origin.

  16. Provenance studies of Central European Neolithic obsidians using external beam milli-PIXE spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Cristea-Stan, D.; Kovács, I.; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    External beam milli-PIXE technique was used for the determination of the elemental concentration ratios in some Prehistoric obsidian tools found in Transylvania, in the Iron Gates region near Danube, as well as on a few relevant geological obsidian samples from Slovak Tokaj Mountains, Lipari, Armenia. As provenance “fingerprints” the Ti to Mn and Rb to Zr ratios were used. The results confirm that the Transylvanian Neolithic samples have a Slovak Tokaj Mountains provenance. For Iron Gates samples, there are at least two different geological sources: for Late Neolithic tools, the origin is also the Slovak Tokaj Mountains but for Late Mesolithic–Early Neolithic samples, the sources are clearly different, possibly of the Hungarian Tokaj Mountains or the Balkan–Aegean origin

  17. First prompt in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of a superheavy element: the 256Rf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubert, J; Dorvaux, O; Gall, B J P; Asfari, Z; Piot, J; Greenlees, P T; Grahn, T; Herzan, A; Jakobsson, U; Jones, P; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Andersson, L L; Cox, D M; Herzberg, R-D; Asai, M; Dechery, F; Hauschild, K; Henning, G; Heßberger, F P

    2013-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art γ-ray spectroscopic techniques, the first rotational band of a superheavy element, extending up to a spin of 20 h, was discovered in the nucleus 256 Rf. To perform such an experiment at the limits of the present instrumentation, several developments were needed. The most important of these developments was of an intense isotopically enriched 50 Ti beam using the MIVOC method. The experimental set-up and subsequent analysis allowed the 256 Rf ground-state band to be revealed. The rotational properties of the band are discussed and compared with neighboring transfermium nuclei through the study of their moments of inertia. These data suggest that there is no evidence of a significant deformed shell gap at Z = 104.

  18. A new X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for extraterrestrial materials using a muon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, K; Ninomiya, K; Osawa, T; Tachibana, S; Miyake, Y; Kubo, M K; Kawamura, N; Higemoto, W; Tsuchiyama, A; Ebihara, M; Uesugi, M

    2014-05-27

    The recent development of the intense pulsed muon source at J-PARC MUSE, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex/MUon Science Establishment (10(6) s(-1) for a momentum of 60 MeV/c), enabled us to pioneer a new frontier in analytical sciences. Here, we report a non-destructive elemental analysis using µ(-) capture. Controlling muon momentum from 32.5 to 57.5 MeV/c, we successfully demonstrate a depth-profile analysis of light elements (B, C, N, and O) from several mm-thick layered materials and non-destructive bulk analyses of meteorites containing organic materials. Muon beam analysis, enabling a bulk analysis of light to heavy elements without severe radioactivation, is a unique analytical method complementary to other non-destructive analyses. Furthermore, this technology can be used as a powerful tool to identify the content and distribution of organic components in future asteroidal return samples.

  19. Charmonium Spectroscopy at the ISR using an Antiproton Beam and a Hydrogen Jet Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies the formation of charmonium states not directly accessible in e|+e|- annihilation. The good momentum definition of the cooled @* beam allows a precise measurement of the width of these states. A hydrogen gas jet has been used, yielding a luminosity of 3.10|3|0 cm|-|2sec|-|1 with 10|1|1~@*. Three types of exclusive events are selected: e|+e|-~(J/@Y) for calibration of the energy of the machine, e|+e|-@g~(@c states) and @g@g~(@h^c, @h'^c). The experiment uses MWPC, scintillator hodoscopes, Freon Cerenkov counters for the e|+e|- determination and electromagnetic calorimeters (@g detection and energies of the electrons).

  20. Supersonic molecular beam electric resonance spectroscopy and van der Waals molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luftman, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    A supersonic molecular beam electric resonance (MBER) spectrometer was built to study the radiofrequency spectra of weakly bound gas phase van der Waals molecules. The instrument and its operating characteristics are described in detail. Sample mass spectra of Ar-ClF gas mixtures are also presented as an illustration of the synthesis of van der Waals molecules. The Stark focusing process for linear polar molecules is discussed and computer-simulated using both second order perturbation and variational methods. Experimental refocusing spectra of OCS and ClF are studied and compared with these trajectory calculations. Though quantitative fitting is poor, there are strong qualitative indicators that the central part of a supersonic beam consists of molecules with a significantly greater population in the lowest energy rotational states than generally assumed. Flop in as opposed to flop out resonance signals for OCS are also numerically predicted and observed. The theoretical properties of the MBER spectrum for linear molecules are elaborated upon with special emphasis on line shape considerations. MBER spectra of OCS and ClF under a variety of conditions are presented and discussed in context to these predictions. There is some uncertainty expressed both in our own modeling and in the manner complex MBER spectra have been analyzed in the past. Finally, an electrostatic potential model is used to quantitatively describe the class of van der Waals molecules Ar-MX, where MX is an alkali halide. Energetics and equilibrium geometries are calculated. The validity of using an electrostatic model to predict van der Waals bond properties is critically discussed

  1. Determination of Metals Present in Textile Dyes Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Cross-Validation Using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was used for the quantitative analysis of elements present in textile dyes at ambient pressure via the fundamental mode (1064 nm of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Three samples were collected for this purpose. Spectra of textile dyes were acquired using an HR spectrometer (LIBS2000+, Ocean Optics, Inc. having an optical resolution of 0.06 nm in the spectral range of 200 to 720 nm. Toxic metals like Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn along with other elements like Al, Mg, Ca, and Na were revealed to exist in the samples. The %-age concentrations of the detected elements were measured by means of standard calibration curve method, intensities of every emission from every species, and calibration-free (CF LIBS approach. Only Sample 3 was found to contain heavy metals like Cr, Cu, and Ni above the prescribed limit. The results using LIBS were found to be in good agreement when compared to outcomes of inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES.

  2. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-01-01

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni 63 Al 37 , Au 50.5 Cd 49.5 , and Fe 68.8 Pd single 31.2 , and the polycrystalline sample Fe 68.8 Pd poly 31.2 . Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni 52 Mn 23 Ga 25 single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni 52 Mn 23 Ga 25 sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni 63 Al 37 , the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of intrinsic disorder leads to a lower acoustic activity and weaker signals under

  3. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  4. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy of some 3d and 4f oxides exposed to Ar+ beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sasaki, T.A.; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hoonnivathana, E.; Sasase, Masato; Takano, Ichiro; Isobe, Shoji.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the ion bombardment on the surface electronic structures and electrical properties of transition-metal oxides and lanthanide oxides have been investigated by a photoelectron spectroscopy and measurement of surface electric conductivity. Many of the oxides (TiO 2 , CeO 2 , etc.) are reduced to the oxides in lower valence states by the 8-keV Ar + -ion bombardment, but there exist some oxides (Sc 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , etc.) which are stable against the bombardment. For TiO 2 , the bombardment-induced reduction brings about Ti3d-derived new band at the Fermi level, together with the increase of the surface electric conductivity. The mechanism leading to bombardment-induced surface electric conductivity is discussed in relation to the surface electronic structures. (author)

  6. Application of ultraviolet fluorometry and excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) to fingerprint oil and chemically dispersed oil in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugden, J B C; Yeung, C W; Kepkay, P E; Lee, K

    2008-04-01

    Excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) was used to characterize the ultra violet fluorescence fingerprints of eight crude oils (with a 14,470-fold range of dynamic viscosity) in seawater. When the chemical dispersant Corexit 9500 was mixed with the oils prior to their dispersion in seawater, the fingerprints of each oil changed primarily as an increase in fluorescence over an emission band centered on 445 nm. In order to simplify the wealth of information available in the excitation-emission matrix spectra (EEMs), two ratios were calculated. A 66-90% decrease in the slope ratio was observed with the addition of Corexit. When the slope ratios were reduced in complexity to intensity ratios, similar trends were apparent. As a result either of the ratios could be used as a simple and rapid means of identifying and monitoring chemically dispersed oil in the open ocean.

  7. Space-resolved characterization of high frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma in nitrogen, applying optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Ruhrmann, Cornelia; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Averaged plasma parameters such as electron distribution function and electron density are determined by characterization of high frequency (2.4 GHz) nitrogen plasma using both experimental methods, namely optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and microphotography, and numerical simulation. Both direct and step-wise electron-impact excitation of nitrogen emissions are considered. The determination of space-resolved electron distribution function, electron density, rate constant for electron-impact dissociation of nitrogen molecule and the production of nitrogen atoms, applying the same methods, is discussed. Spatial distribution of intensities of neutral nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecular ion from the microplasma is imaged by a CCD camera. The CCD images are calibrated using the corresponding emissions measured by absolutely calibrated OES, and are then subjected to inverse Abel transformation to determine space-resolved intensities and other parameters. The space-resolved parameters are compared, respectively, with the averaged parameters, and an agreement between them is established. (paper)

  8. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed; and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  9. Characterization of dissolved organic matter/nitrogen by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for watershed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Bin; Yang, John; Liu, Fengjing; Zhu, Guocheng; Deng, Baolin; Mao, Jingdong

    2018-06-01

    Characterization of dissolved organic matter/nitrogen (DOM/DON) is critical in water quality assessment and nutrient management in watershed or ecosystem. This study was to investigate the link between DOM/DON and its source using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Water samples were collected from various aquatic systems in a watershed located in central Missouri, including rural watershed with various land use and land cover (LULC), landfill, and constructed wetland. PARAFAC results based on EEM spectroscopy revealed four DOM components: two humic/fulvic acid-like components, one xenobioic-like component, and one protein-like component (f4). The f4 score was found highly correlated to LULC, indicating its distinctive EEM structure in relation to source. It is believed that the f4 score could be used as a surrogate for DOM/DON source-tracking in complex ecosystems. The nitrogen 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the solid DOM showed a close relationship between N oxidation state and its origin. The classification of the sample origins by the N oxidation state confirmed the grouping by the f4 score of EEM/PARAFAC. This study demonstrated that EEM/PARAFAC could be used as a tool for DOM/DON source tracking, point or non-point source pollution control, and understanding of DOM/DON fate and transport in complex aquatic ecosystems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  11. Emission Line Astronomy - Coronagraphic Tunable Narrow Band Imaging and Integral Field Spectroscopy. Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to continue our program of emission line astronomy featuring three areas of emphasis: 1) The distribution and nature of high redshift emission line...

  12. Development of a PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis device using an extracted proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental device described allows the extention of the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method to the analysis, by means of proton beams, of solid or liquid samples, which can not be analyzed under vacuum conditions. The homogeneity of the surfaces to be analysed and elements (in the atmosphere) which absorb X-rays must be taken into account. Liquid samples do not need special care. The results show that: at high energies, the extracted beam sensibility is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained under vacuum; at low energies, the performance under vacuum conditions is better. The particles energy losses, at the exit membrane and in the outer atmosphere, decrease the X-rays production efficiency [fr

  13. High-throughput screening of plant cell-wall composition using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Robert; Yung, Matthew; Novaes, Evandro; Kirst, Matias; Peter, Gary; Davis, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We describe a high-throughput method for estimating cell-wall chemistry traits using analytical pyrolysis. The instrument used to perform the high-throughput cell-wall chemistry analysis consists of a commercially available pyrolysis unit and autosampler coupled to a custom-built molecular beam mass spectrometer. The system is capable of analyzing approximately 42 biomass samples per hour. Lignin content and syringyl to guaiacol (S/G) ratios can be estimated directly from the spectra and differences in cell wall chemistry in large groups of samples can easily be identified using multivariate statistical data analysis methods. The utility of the system is demonstrated on a set of 800 greenhouse-grown poplar trees grown under two contrasting nitrogen treatments. High-throughput analytical pyrolysis was able to determine that the lignin content varied between 13 and 28% and the S/G ratio ranged from 0.5 to 1.5. There was more cell-wall chemistry variation in the plants grown under high nitrogen conditions than trees grown under nitrogen-deficiency conditions. Analytical pyrolysis allows the user to rapidly screen large numbers of samples at low cost, using very little sample material while producing reliable and reproducible results.

  14. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  15. In-beam alpha, electron, and gamma-ray spectroscopy of 215Fr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decman, D.J.; Grawe, H.; Kluge, H.; Maier, K.H.; Maj, A.; Menningen, M.; Roy, N.; Wiegner, W.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleus 215 Fr was studied using the 208 Pb( 11 B, 4n) and 204 Hg( 15 N, 4n) reactions. The measurements included α-γ, γ-γ, and e-e coincidence experiments as well as γ-ray and α-particle DPAD studies. The decay scheme gives levels up to a 3068 keV 39/2 - isomer with tsub(1/2)=(33 +- 5) ns as well as 3 shorter-lived isomers (tsub(1/2) approx.= 4 ns); g-factors have been measured for these isomers. The alpha-particle spectroscopy showed the existence of 4 longrange alphas which could be assigned to excited states in 215 Fr. tsub(1/2)( 215 Frsup(gs)) = (86+-5) ns has been remeasured. The negative parity states up to 1680 keV seem to be members of the π(h9/2) 5 9/2sup(ν)(g9/2) 2 configuration; a strong hindrance of M1 transitions is found. The higher lying states are compared with the DIPM model. (orig.)

  16. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viezzer, E., E-mail: eleonora.viezzer@ipp.mpg.de, E-mail: eviezzer@us.es [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes, 41012 Seville (Spain); Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line D{sub α}. The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  17. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzer, E; Dux, R; Dunne, M G

    2016-11-01

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line D α . The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy glovebox assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ''cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  19. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation

  20. Water vapor concentration measurement in singlet oxygen generator by using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weili; Wang, Zengqiang; Fang, Benjie; Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2005-12-01

    By using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm, partial water pressure at the exit of a square pipe-array jet-type singlet oxygen generator (SPJSOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was measured. The water vapor fraction was calculated from the partial water pressure in the diagnostic cell when we assumed the water vapor fraction in the diagnostic cell is the same as that in the generator. The results from the two methods showed that the water vapor concentration is less than 0.08 in this SPJSOG during normal operation. The water vapor fraction decreases with the increasing of the pressure in the generator and rises with the increasing of buffer gas flow rate and the basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) temperature in the case of constant chlorine flow rate. Measurements showed that the change of water vapor fraction due to BHP temperature could be ignored during normal operation. It is indicated that the gas flow velocity is the main reason that affects on the water vapor fraction in COIL. It is proved that the emission spectroscopy method is one of the simple and convenient ways to measure the water vapor concentration in singlet oxygen generator (SOG), especially in real time measurements. But absorption spectroscopy method, as a direct measurement, can give the more factual results of the water concentration.

  1. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 109 (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 106 (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 1012 (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min-1; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower

  2. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  3. To the application of the emission Mössbauer and positron annihilation spectroscopies for detection of carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, A. V.; Byakov, V. M.; Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D.; Stepanov, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    Being the main cause of cancer, almost all chemical carcinogens are strong electrophiles, that is, they have a high affinity for the electron. We have shown that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is able to detect chemical carcinogens by their inhibition of positronium (Ps) formation in liquid media. Electrophilic carcinogens intercept thermalized track electrons, which are precursors of Ps, and as a result, when they are present Ps atom does not practically form. Available biophysical data seemingly indicate that frozen solutions model better an intracellular medium than the liquid ones. So it is reasonable to use emission Mössbauer spectroscopy (EMS) to detect chemical carcinogens, measuring the yield of 57Fe2+ions formed in reactions of Auger electrons and other secondary electrons they produced with 57Fe3+. These reactions are similar to the Ps formation process in the terminal part the positron track: e++ e- =>Ps. So EMS and PALS are complementary methods for detection of carcinogenic compounds.

  4. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in water | Boudjemai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sparks were generated in water by the focused beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser Na and Cu aqueous solutions exhibited fluorescence signal on the decaying edge of plasma emission at their respective characteristic resonance lines. Potential of the laser plasma spectroscopy for in-situ pollution monitoring in natural ...

  5. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation

  6. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  7. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  8. Femtosecond X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on zno nanoparticles in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, Thomas J.; Szlachetko, Jakub; Gawelda, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band.......We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band....

  9. Evaluation of self-absorption coefficients of aluminum emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sherbini, A.M.; El Sherbini, Th.M.; Hegazy, H.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In quantitative Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements it is essential to account for the effect of self-absorption on the emission lines intensity. In order to quantify this effect, in this paper we propose a simple method for evaluating the ratio between the actual measured line intensity and the intensity expected in absence of self-absorption and, if necessary, correcting the effect of self-absorption on line intensity. The method, based on a homogeneous plasma model, is applicable when the plasma electron density is known and in particular to lines whose Stark broadening parameter is available

  10. Least squares autoregressive (maximum entropy) spectral estimation for Fourier spectroscopy and its application to the electron cyclotron emission from plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwama, N.; Inoue, A.; Tsukishima, T.; Sato, M.; Kawahata, K.

    1981-07-01

    A new procedure for the maximum entropy spectral estimation is studied for the purpose of data processing in Fourier transform spectroscopy. The autoregressive model fitting is examined under a least squares criterion based on the Yule-Walker equations. An AIC-like criterion is suggested for selecting the model order. The principal advantage of the new procedure lies in the enhanced frequency resolution particularly for small values of the maximum optical path-difference of the interferogram. The usefulness of the procedure is ascertained by some numerical simulations and further by experiments with respect to a highly coherent submillimeter wave and the electron cyclotron emission from a stellarator plasma. (author)

  11. A theoretical study on the selective oxygen K-edge soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Naohiro; Kanai, Seiji; Tokushima, Takashi; Horikawa, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    We have performed theoretical calculations to reproduce the site-selective X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) spectra of liquid acetic acid at the oxygen K-edge (OCdbnd O,1s and OOH,1s). Structure sampling of an acetic acid cluster model was performed from the ab initio molecular dynamics trajectory. Relative XES intensities for the core-hole excited state dynamics simulations were calculated using density functional theory. We found that the theoretical XES spectra reproduced well the experimental spectra and that these calculations gave us electronic and molecular structure information about liquid acetic acid.

  12. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  13. Study of the trace tritium content in deuterium plasmas of the JET tokamak based on neutron emission spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringmar, David

    2001-02-01

    This thesis describes a study of the evolution of the trace tritium content in the JET tokamak. The study is based on measurements of the neutron emission, which were performed with the magnetic proton recoil (MPR) spectrometer. Data analysis procedures used to extract the results are described in some detail. The thesis also describes a simplified theoretical model to calculate the absolute tritium concentration with a comparison to the experimental results. The present study covers the time period 1996-2000 and the evolution of neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) results are compared with information from related diagnostic sources, and used to discuss the important issue of how tritium is retained in the JET tokamak.

  14. Characterization of He/CH{sub 4} Dc glow discharge plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and actinometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal, E. de la; Tafalla, D.; Tabares, F. L.

    1993-07-01

    The gas-phase kinetics responsible for the formation of some electronically excited radicals (CH) and atoms (H, He; Ar) in glow discharge plasmas of He- methane admixtures has been investigated under several conditions of gas composition and discharge current at a total initial pressure of 0.01 torr. Actinometry has been used to characterize the microscopic plasma parameters and, in combination with mass spectrometry and optical emission spectroscopy, to establish the formation mechanism of excited species. Very good correlation between CH emission intensity and carbon deposition rate has been found under all conditions. The effective cracking Kinetic constant for methane molecules depends on plasma conditions, its value ranging from = 1 to 5x10 cm3 s{sup 1} as plasma current is increased, in good agreement with the expected value according to the actinometric results. A simplified kinetic mode, accounting for all the observations reported in this work, is proposed. (Author) 28 refs.

  15. Characterization of He/CH4 DC glow discharge plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cal, E.; Tafalla, D.; Tabares, F.L.

    1993-01-01

    The gas-phase kinetics responsible for the formation of some electronically excited radicals (CH) and atoms (H,He;Ar) in glow discharge plasmas of He-methane admixtures has been investigated under several conditions of gas composition and discharge current at a total initial pressure of 0.01 torr. Actinometry has been used to characterize the microscopic plasma parameters and, in combination with mass spectrometry and optical emission spectroscopy, to establish the formation mechanism of excited species. Very good correlation between CH emission intensity and carbon deposition rate has been found under all conditions. The effective cracking Kinetic constant for methane molecular depends on plasma conditions, its value ranging from ∼ 1 to 5x10''-10 cm''3 s''-1 as plasma current is increased, in good agreement with the expected value according to the actinometric results. (Author)

  16. Characterization of He/CH4 Dc glow discharge plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cal, E. de la; Tafalla, D.; Tabares, F. L.

    1993-01-01

    The gas-phase kinetics responsible for the formation of some electronically excited radicals (CH) and atoms (H, He; Ar) in glow discharge plasmas of He- methane admixtures has been investigated under several conditions of gas composition and discharge current at a total initial pressure of 0.01 torr. Actinometry has been used to characterize the microscopic plasma parameters and, in combination with mass spectrometry and optical emission spectroscopy, to establish the formation mechanism of excited species. Very good correlation between CH emission intensity and carbon deposition rate has been found under all conditions. The effective cracking Kinetic constant for methane molecules depends on plasma conditions, its value ranging from = 1 to 5x10 cm3 s 1 as plasma current is increased, in good agreement with the expected value according to the actinometric results. A simplified kinetic mode, accounting for all the observations reported in this work, is proposed. (Author) 28 refs

  17. Feedback control of laser welding based on frequency analysis of light emissions and adaptive beam shaping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, NOV (2012), s. 784-791 ISSN 1875-3892. [LANE 2012. Laser Assisted Net Shape Engineering /7./ International Conference on Photonic Technologies. Fürth, 12.11.2012-15.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser weld ing * feedback control * frequency analysis * adaptive beam shaping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  18. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO(4) scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm(2) using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  19. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P.C.; Campbell, C.M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M.P.; Crawford, H.L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.

    2017-01-01

    The γ-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The γ-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the γ-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. The results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  20. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisshaar, D., E-mail: weisshaar@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bender, P.C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Campbell, C.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Recchia, F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bader, V.; Baugher, T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belarge, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Carpenter, M.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Crawford, H.L.; Cromaz, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Elman, B. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Fallon, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Forney, A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Gade, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2017-03-01

    The γ-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The γ-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the γ-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. The results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  1. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C +5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I p = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z eff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n e , compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I p and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I p and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Flash Spectroscopy: Emission Lines From the Ionized Circumstellar Material Around 10-Day-Old Type II Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazov, D.; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Cao, Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (spectroscopy"), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. Searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger than 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as "blue/featureless" (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude M(sub R) = -18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above M(sub R) = -17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.

  3. Inelastic electron scattering spectroscopy: a comparison of absorption and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnatterly, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    The operation of a high energy inelastic scattering spectrometer is briefly described. Measured absorption and emission spectra are fit to parameters in recently described models for insulators. Implications for model validity are discussed

  4. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Goeroge P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2001-01-01

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the absorbed signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time

  5. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  6. Analysis of acoustic emission cumulative signal strength of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hakeem, Z.; Noorsuhada, M. N.; Azmi, I.; Noor Syafeekha, M. S.; Soffian Noor, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated using acoustic emission (AE) technique. Three beams with dimension of 150 mm width, 200 mm depth and 1500 mm length were fabricated. The results generated from AE parameters were analysed as well as signal strength and cumulative signal strength. Three relationships were produced namely load versus deflection, signal strength versus time and cumulative signal strength with respect to time. Each relationship indicates significant physical behaviour as the crack propagated in the beams. It is found that an addition of steel fibre in the concrete mix and strengthening of CFRP increase the ultimate load of the beam and the activity of signal strength. Moreover, the highest signal strength generated can be identified. From the study, the occurrence of crack in the beam can be predicted using AE signal strength.

  7. Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy (FSCS) for probes with highly overlapping emission spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, A.; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin; Gaus, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2014), s. 2973-2988 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400904; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * fluorescence and luminiscence * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  8. Probing of InAs/AlSb double barrier heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Walachová, Jarmila; Zelinka, Jiří; Vaniš, Jan; Chow, D. H.; Schulman, J. N.; Karamazov, Simeon; Cukr, Miroslav; Zich, P.; Král, J.; McGill, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 26 (1997), s. 3588-3590 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/94/1056 Keywords : spectroscopy * semiconductor heterojunctions * semiconductor devices Impact factor: 3.033, year: 1997

  9. Injectable silver nanosensors: in vivo dosimetry for external beam radiotherapy using positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Rydhög, J. S.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki

    2016-01-01

    , which enables post treatment verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography imaging. The silver-nanosensor was investigated in a tissue equivalent thorax phantom using clinical settings and workflow for both standard fractionated radiotherapy (2 Gy) and stereotactic radiotherapy...

  10. InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru-Chevallier, C; El Akra, A; Pelloux-Gervais, D; Dumont, H; Canut, B; Chauvin, N; Regreny, P; Gendry, M; Patriarche, G; Jancu, J M; Even, J; Noe, P; Calvo, V; Salem, B

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve homogeneous, high density and dislocation free InGaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy for light emission on silicon substrates. This work is part of a project which aims at overcoming the severe limitation suffered by silicon regarding its optoelectronic applications, especially efficient light emission device. For this study, one of the key points is to overcome the expected type II InGaAs/Si interface by inserting the InGaAs quantum dots inside a thin silicon quantum well in SiO2 fabricated on a SOI substrate. Confinement effects of the Si/SiO2 quantum well are expected to heighten the indirect silicon bandgap and then give rise to a type I interface with the InGaAs quantum dots. Band structure and optical properties are modeled within the tight binding approximation: direct energy bandgap is demonstrated in SiO2/Si/InAs/Si/SiO2 heterostructures for very thin Si layers and absorption coefficient is calculated. Thinned SOI substrates are successfully prepared using successive etching process resulting in a 2 nm-thick Si layer on top of silica. Another key point to get light emission from InGaAs quantum dots is to avoid any dislocations or defects in the quantum dots. We investigate the quantum dot size distribution, density and structural quality at different V/III beam equivalent pressure ratios, different growth temperatures and as a function of the amount of deposited material. This study was performed for InGaAs quantum dots grown on Si(001) substrates. The capping of InGaAs quantum dots by a silicon epilayer is performed in order to get efficient photoluminescence emission from quantum dots. Scanning transmission electronic microscopy images are used to study the structural quality of the quantum dots. Dislocation free In50Ga50As QDs are successfully obtained on a (001) silicon substrate. The analysis of QDs capped with silicon by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in a channeling geometry is also presented.

  11. Comparison of electron spin resonance spectroscopy and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy for biodistribution analysis of iron-oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; Cole, Adam J; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-04-05

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) have been widely studied for use in targeted drug delivery. Analysis of MNP biodistribution is essential to evaluating the success of targeting strategies and the potential for off-target toxicity. This work compared the applicability of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in assessing MNP biodistribution. Biodistribution was evaluated in 9L-glioma bearing rats administered with MNP (12-25 mg Fe/kg) under magnetic targeting. Ex vivo analysis of MNP in animal tissues was performed with both ICP-OES and ESR. A cryogenic method was developed to overcome the technical hurdle of loading tissue samples into ESR tubes. Comparison of results from the ICP-OES and ESR measurements revealed two distinct relationships for organs accumulating high or low levels of MNP. In organs with high MNP accumulation such as the liver and spleen, data were strongly correlated (r = 0.97, 0.94 for the liver and spleen, respectively), thus validating the equivalency of the two methods in this high concentration range (>1000 nmol Fe/g tissue). The two sets of measurements, however, differed significantly in organs with lower levels of MNP accumulation such as the brain, kidney, and the tumor. Whereas ESR resolved MNP to 10-55 nmol Fe/g tissue, ICP-OES failed to detect MNP because of masking by endogenous iron. These findings suggest that ESR coupled to cryogenic sample handling is more robust than ICP-OES, attaining better sensitivity in analyses. Such advantages render ESR the method of choice for accurate profiling of MNP biodistribution across tissues with high variability in nanoparticle accumulation.

  12. The primary photophysics of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain observed with time-resolved emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Gauden, Magdalena; Crosson, Sean; van Grondelle, Rienk; Moffat, Keith; Kennis, John T M

    2011-01-01

    The phototropins are blue-light receptors that base their light-dependent action on the reversible formation of a covalent bond between a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor and a conserved cysteine in light, oxygen or voltage (LOV) domains. The primary reactions of the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 domain were investigated by means of time-resolved and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchroscan streak camera experiments revealed a fluorescence lifetime of 2.2 ns in LOV2. A weak long-lived component with emission intensity from 600 to 650 nm was assigned to phosphorescence from the reactive FMN triplet state. This observation allowed determination of the LOV2 triplet state energy level at physiological temperature at 16600 cm(-1). FMN dissolved in aqueous solution showed pH-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of 2.7 ns at pH 2 and 3.9-4.1 ns at pH 3-8. Here, too, a weak phosphorescence band was observed. The fluorescence quantum yield of LOV2 increased from 0.13 to 0.41 upon cooling the sample from 293 to 77 K. A pronounced phosphorescence emission around 600 nm was observed in the LOV2 domain between 77 and 120 K in the steady-state emission. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  14. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  15. Secondary ion emission from cleaned surfaces bombarded by 100 MeV accelerator beams at the GSI Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wien, K.; Becker, O.; Guthier, W.; Knippelberg, W.; Koczon, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1.4 MeV/n beam facility for the UNILAC/GSI has been used to study secondary ion emission from surfaces cleaned under UHV conditions by ion etching or cleaving of crystals. The desorption phenomena observed by means of TOF mass spectrometry can be classified as follows: (1) Clean metal surfaces emit metal ions being ejected by atomic collisions cascades. Electronic excitation of surface states seems to support ionization. (2) The desorption of contaminants adsorbed at the metal surface is strongly correlated with the electronic energy loss of the projectiles - even, if the content of impurities is very low. (3) Ion formation at the epitaxial surface of fluoride crystals as CaF 2 , MgF 2 and NaF is initiated by the electronic excitation of the crystal. At high beam energies the mass spectrum is dominated by a series of cluster ions. These cluster ions disappear below a certain energy deposit threshold, whereas small atomic ions are observed over the whole energy range

  16. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy of advanced materials for opto- and nano-electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    Olafsson, S; Weyer, G O P; Masenda, H; Dlamini, W B

    Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) is a versatile solid state method giving information about probe atom interactions with its nearest neighbours. Simultaneously, information on the probe valence state, site symmetry, and electric and magnetic hyperfine interactions is obtained. MS can be applied in many different contexts in material science and solid state physics. MS using radioactive isotopes, applied for decades at the ISOLDE facilities, has the particular merit of very high sensitivity. This opens up many new possibilities compared to traditional (absorption) Mössbauer spectroscopy. Among them is the possibility of working with very low concentrations (10$^{-4}$ at. ~\\%), where the probe atoms are true dilute impurities. Here we propose four main themes in our Mössbauer investigations for the coming years: \\\\(1) Para-magnetic relaxations in compound semiconductors. \\\\(2) Vacancy diffusion in group IV semiconductors. \\\\(3) Doping of Si-nano-particles. \\\\(4) Investigation of phase change mechanisms in chalcog...

  17. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  18. MEASURING ORGANIC MOLECULAR EMISSION IN DISKS WITH LOW-RESOLUTION SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Henning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We explore the extent to which Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra taken at low spectral resolution can be used in quantitative studies of organic molecular emission from disks surrounding low-mass young stars. We use Spitzer IRS spectra taken in both the high- and low-resolution modules for the same sources to investigate whether it is possible to define line indices that can measure trends in the strength of the molecular features in low-resolution data. We find that trends in the HCN emission strength seen in the high-resolution data can be recovered in low-resolution data. In examining the factors that influence the HCN emission strength, we find that the low-resolution HCN flux is modestly correlated with stellar accretion rate and X-ray luminosity. Correlations of this kind are perhaps expected based on recent observational and theoretical studies of inner disk atmospheres. Our results demonstrate the potential of using the large number of low-resolution disk spectra that reside in the Spitzer archive to study the factors that influence the strength of molecular emission from disks. Such studies would complement results for the much smaller number of circumstellar disks that have been observed at high resolution with IRS.

  19. Infrared Emission Spectrum of the Hydroxyl Radical: A Novel Experiment in Molecular Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Giles; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which parameters from an "ab-initio" potential are used to calculate vibrational-rotational energy levels and construct a "stick spectrum" for the overtone emission of the hydroxyl radical. Provides background information on ab-initio spectrum, experimental procedures, and analysis of data. (Author/JN)

  20. Measurements of urea and glucose in aqueous solutions with dual-beam near-infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P.S.; Bak, J.

    2002-01-01

    -beam measurements that must be taken into account when quantifying trace components from single-beam spectra. The data obtained with the dual-beam technique resulted in more stable calibration models based on principal component regression. These calibration models need fewer factors and yield lower prediction...... of these two modes of operation. The concentrations of aqueous solutions of urea and glucose in the ranges 0-40 mg/dL and 0-250 mg/dL, respectively, were determined by principal component regression using both modes. The dual-beam technique eliminated instrumental variations present in the single...

  1. Multicomponent remote sensing of vehicle exhaust emissions by dispersive IR and UV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Marc M.; Kiyomiya, Eileen S.; Kumar, Sasi; Lappas, Anastasios M.; Lord, Harry C., III

    2000-12-01

    Direct remote sensing of vehicle exhaust emissions under real-world driving conditions is desirable for a number of reasons, including: identifying high emitters, investigating the chemical composition of the exhaust, and probing fast reactions in the plume. A remote sensor, incorporating IR and UV spectrometers, was developed. The IR spectrometer consists of a grating system mounted on a synchronous motor, optically interfaced to a room temperature PbSe detector. UV-vis measurements are made with a CCD array spectrometer. Eight optical passes through the exhaust plume allow rapid and sensitive monitoring of the exhaust stream emitted by moving vehicles on a car-by-car basis. The combination of these two techniques resulted in unprecedented, direct measurement capability of over 25 pollutants in the exhaust plume. Emissions from a fleet of vehicles powered by a range of fuels (gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and methanol) were tested. The exhaust from hot gasoline- and methanol-powered cars contained high levels of NH3, up to 1500 ppm. These emissions were up to 14 times higher than the corresponding NOx emissions. Unlike most previous work, NOx was measured as the sum of NO and NO2; N2O was also measured. Field testing at a southern California freeway on-ramp was conducted over a one week period, totaling >4,500 measurements. It was found that 66.4% of the emitted NH3 was produced by 10% of the fleet, following the (gamma) - distribution that has been reported for criteria pollutants. Mean NH3 emission rates were calculated at 138 mg km-1, nearly twice as high was previous estimates.

  2. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800–900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  3. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin A.; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800-900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  4. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  5. Spectroscopic analysis of high protein nigella seeds (Kalonji) using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Imran; Khan, M. Zubair; Ali, Irfan; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, Sabiha; Shah, Sher

    2018-03-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of high protein nigella seeds (also called Kalonji) was performed using pulsed nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 532 nm. The emission spectrum of Kalonji recorded with an LIBS spectrometer exposed the presence of various elements like Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cr, K, P, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, S, Si, Cu, Fe, Ti, Sn, Sr, and Zn. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron density) were estimated using Ca-I spectral lines and their behavior were studied against laser irradiance. The electron temperature and electron density was observed to show an increasing trend in the range of 5802-7849 K, and (1.2-3.9) × 1017 cm- 3, respectively, in the studied irradiance range of (1.2-12.6) × 109 W/cm2. Furthermore, the effect of varying laser energy on the integrated signal intensities was also studied. The quantitative analysis of the detected elements was performed via the calibration curves drawn for all the observed elements through typical samples made in the known concentration in the Kalonji matrix, and by setting the concentration of P as the calibration. The validity of our LIBS findings was verified via comparison of the results with the concentration of every element find in Kalonji using the standard analytical tool like ICP/OES. The results acquired using LIBS and ICP/OES were found in fine harmony. Moreover, limit of detection was measured for toxic metals only.

  6. Pulsed electron-beam-sustained discharge in oxygen-containing gas mixtures: electrical characteristics, spectroscopy,and singlet oxygen yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, Nikolai P; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kotkov, A A; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Frolov, M P; Yuryshev, Nikolai N; Kochetov, Igor' V; Napartovich, A P; Hager, G D

    2004-01-01

    The electrical and spectroscopic characteristics of electron-beam-sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen-containing gas mixtures are studied experimentally under gas pressures up to 100 Torr in a large excitation volume (∼18 L). It is shown that the EBSD in pure oxygen and its mixtures with inert gases is unstable and is characterised by a small specific energy contribution. The addition of small amounts (∼1%-10%) of carbon monoxide or hydrogen to oxygen or its mixtures with inert gases considerably improves the stability of the discharge, while the specific energy contribution W increases by more then an order of magnitude, achieving ∼6.5 kJ L -1 atm -1 per molecular component of the gas mixture. A part of the energy supplied to the EBSD is spent to excite vibrational levels of molecular additives. This was demonstrated experimentally by the initiation of a CO laser based on the O 2 : Ar : CO = 1 : 1 : 0.1 mixture. Experimental results on spectroscopy of the excited electronic states O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ), of oxygen formed in the EBSD are presented. A technique was worked out for measuring the concentration of singlet oxygen in the O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) state in the afterglow of the pulsed EBSD by comparing with the radiation intensity of singlet oxygen of a given concentration produced in a chemical generator. Preliminary measurements of the singlet-oxygen yield in the EBSD show that its value ∼3% for W ∼ 1.0 kJ L -1 atm -1 is in agreement with the theoretical estimate. Theoretical calculations performed for W ∼ 6.5 kJ L -1 atm -1 at a fixed temperature show that the singlet-oxygen yield may be ∼20%, which is higher than the value required to achieve the lasing threshold in an oxygen-iodine laser at room temperature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Investigation of InP etching mechanisms in a Cl2/H2 inductively coupled plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatilova, L.; Bouchoule, S.; Guilet, S.; Chabert, P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used in order to investigate the InP etching mechanisms in a Cl 2 -H 2 inductively coupled plasma. The authors have previously shown that anisotropic etching of InP could be achieved for a H 2 percentage in the 35%-45% range where the InP etch rate also presents a local maximum [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 24, 2381 (2006)], and that anisotropic etching was due to an enhanced passivation of the etched sidewalls by a silicon oxide layer [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 666 (2008)]. In this work, it is shown that this etching behavior is related to a maximum in the H atom concentration in the plasma. The possible enhancement of the sidewall passivation process in the presence of H is investigated by comparing OES measurements and etching results obtained for Cl 2 -H 2 and Cl 2 -Ar gas mixtures

  8. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Tohru; Higuchi, T.; Liu, Y.-S.; Yao, P.; Glans, P.-A.; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, C.; Wu, Z.; Sakamoto, W.; Itoh, N.; Shimura, T.; Yogo, T.; Hattori, T.

    2008-07-11

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} has been studied using soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O 2p state hybridized with Fe 3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O 2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe 3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft-X-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to charge transfer transition from O 2p valence band to Fe 3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  9. The detection of discrete cyclotron emission features in phase-resolved optical spectroscopy of V1500 Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Ryan K.

    2018-02-01

    We have obtained phase-resolved optical spectroscopy of the old nova and asynchronous polar V1500 Cyg. These new data reveal discrete cyclotron humps from two different strength magnetic fields. One region has B = 72 MG, while the other has B ≃ 105 MG. With the detection of these features, we revisit the optical/near-infrared light curves presented in Harrison & Campbell, and find that the large photometric excesses observed in those data are fully reconcilable with cyclotron emission. These results, when combined with the X-ray observations that appeared to have maxima that repeated on the orbital period, imply that V1500 Cyg has reverted back to a synchronous polar. Using existing theory, we show that the strong field strengths found here can explain the rapid spin-down time.

  10. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  11. Electronic anisotropies revealed by detwinned angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy measurements of FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew D.; Haghighirad, Amir A.; Rhodes, Luke C.; Hoesch, Moritz; Kim, Timur K.

    2017-10-01

    We report high resolution angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements of detwinned FeSe single crystals. The application of a mechanical strain is used to promote the volume fraction of one of the orthorhombic domains in the sample, which we estimate to be 80 % detwinned. While the full structure of the electron pockets consisting of two crossed ellipses may be observed in the tetragonal phase at temperatures above 90 K, we find that remarkably, only one peanut-shaped electron pocket oriented along the longer a axis contributes to the ARPES measurement at low temperatures in the nematic phase, with the expected pocket along b being not observed. Thus the low temperature Fermi surface of FeSe as experimentally determined by ARPES consists of one elliptical hole pocket and one orthogonally-oriented peanut-shaped electron pocket. Our measurements clarify the long-standing controversies over the interpretation of ARPES measurements of FeSe.

  12. Plasma emission spectroscopy (DCP) for rare earths determination in waters from Morro do Ferro (MG) Brazil, after chromatographic preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, A.M.R. de.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth determinations in surface and well waters from Morro do Ferro was studied using chemical preconcentration methods of the group and plasma emission spectroscopy excited by direct current are - DCP. A method that combines retention in alumina is HF medium with ion exchange for the preconcentration of the group was developed in semi micro scale. DCP determination, in the sequencial mode by using mixed standards containing, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Ga, Tb, Dy, Er, Yb and Al, principal concentrate componentes was studied by analysis of the profile of each spectral line. Principal cations, anions, ph and Eh were determined. Semi-micro techniques were developed for anions preconcentration and for determination of sulphate, phosphate and carbonate. (M.J.C.) [pt

  13. Standard test method for determining elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the specimen. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and nonnuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable to process control within waste treatment facilities. This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels which do not require special personnel or environmental protection. A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is included

  14. Secondary-electron-emission spectroscopy of tungsten: Angular dependence and phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Roy F.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    1978-01-01

    Angle-resolved energy-distribution measurements of secondary-electron emission (SEE) from metals reveal spectral fine structure that relates directly to the density distribution of the one-electron states throughout E-K→ space located above the vacuum level Ev. The angular dependence of the SEE...... of basically two contributions JSEEtotal=∫0πdΩ∫0EmaxjSEE (E, Ω)dE=JSEEbulk+JSEEsurface. The bulk contribution represents emission due to Bloch waves propagating out of states in the semi-infinite crystal; the surface contribution represents that part of the current due to evanescent waves at the metal-vacuum...... interface. In addition, transmission-induced spectral features are observed (transmission resonances), which are not related to the density-of-states fine structure, but are due to a quantum-mechanical enhancement in the escape probability arising from wave-function matching at the emitter-vacuum interface...

  15. Spin-noise spectroscopy of randomly moving spins in the model of light scattering: Two-beam arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, G. G.; Ryzhov, I. I.; Zapasskii, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    A strict analytical solution of the problem of spin-noise signal formation in a volume medium with randomly moving spin carriers is presented. The treatment is carried out in the model of light scattering in a medium with fluctuating inhomogeneity. Along with conventional single-beam geometry, we consider the two-beam arrangement, with the scattering field of the auxiliary (tilted) beam heterodyned on the photodetector illuminated by the main beam. It is shown that the spin-noise signal detected in the two-beam arrangement is highly sensitive to motion (diffusion) of the spin carriers within the illuminated volume and thus can provide additional information about the spin dynamics and spatial correlations of spin polarization in the volume media. Our quantitative estimates show that, under real experimental conditions, spin diffusion may strongly suppress the spin-noise signal in the two-beam geometry. The mechanism of this suppression is similar to that of the time-of-flight broadening with the critical distance determined by the period of two-beam spatial interference rather than by the beam diameter.

  16. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  17. Gas temperature measurement in CH4/CO2 dielectric-barrier discharges by optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Jorge; Kraus, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Haffner, Ken; Kogelschatz, Ulrich; Eliasson, Baldur

    2003-04-01

    The gas temperatures were determined by optical emission in a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. The feed gases were either pure CH4 to yield higher hydrocarbons or CH4/CO2 mixtures to yield synthesis gas (H2/CO). The monitored emission was from the CH radical A 2Δ-X 2Π electronic system and the gas temperature range characterized was from 300 to 600 K. The technique described in this article enables the measurement of the neutral gas temperature in the discharge that is not accessible via conventional methodology using thermocouples. A bimodal rotational population distribution in the CH A 2Δ v'=0 state was determined in the investigated gas mixtures of CO2/CH4 and in pure methane. Most of the rotational population was at temperatures from 300 to 600 K depending on experimental conditions, which are only slightly higher than the set temperature of the reactor. A small fraction of the emitting species was found to have a much higher rotational temperature of ˜4000 K for the pure methane gas and the mixture of CO2 and CH4. The low temperature rotational distribution correlated with changes in the ambient conditions and is used as a thermometer, while the high rotational temperature component and the vibrational temperature reflect the excess of energy during the CH radical formation by electron impact dissociative excitation of methane, and the extent of collisional relaxation before emission takes place.

  18. Direct Detection of Oxygen Ligation to the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkar, Yulia; Long, Xi; Glatzel, Pieter; Brudvig, Gary W.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Collins, Terrence J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-06-16

    Ligands play critical roles during the catalytic reactions in metalloproteins through bond formation/breaking, protonation/deprotonation, and electron/spin delocalization. While there are well-defined element-specific spectroscopic handles, such as X-ray spectroscopy and EPR, to follow the chemistry of metal catalytic sites in a large protein matrix, directly probing particular ligand atoms like C, N, and O is challenging due to their abundance in the protein. FTIR/Raman and ligand-sensitive EPR techniques such as ENDOR and ESEEM have been applied to study metal-ligand interactions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can also indirectly probe the ligand environment; its element-specificity allows us to focus only on the catalytic metal site, and EXAFS and XANES provide metal-ligand distances, coordination numbers, and symmetry of ligand environments. However, the information is limited, since one cannot distinguish among ligand elements with similar atomic number (i.e. C, N. and O). As an alternative and a more direct method to probe the specific metal-ligand chemistry in the protein matrix, we investigated the application of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Using this technique we have identified the oxo-bridging ligands of the Mn{sub 4}Ca complex of photosystem II (PS II), a multisubunit membrane protein, that catalyzes the water oxidizing reaction. The catalytic mechanism has been studied intensively by Mn XAS. The fundamental question of this reaction, however, is how the water molecules are ligated to the Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster and how the O-O bond formation occurs before the evolution of O{sub 2}. This implies that it is necessary to follow the chemistry of the oxygen ligands in order to understand the mechanism.

  19. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  20. Correlation between average frequency and RA value (rise time/amplitude) for crack classification of reinforced concrete beam using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorsuhada, M. N.; Abdul Hakeem, Z.; Soffian Noor, M. S.; Noor Syafeekha, M. S.; Azmi, I.

    2017-12-01

    Health monitoring of structures during their service life become a vital thing as it provides crucial information regarding the performance and condition of the structures. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the non-destructive techniques (NDTs) that could be used to monitor the performance of the structures. Reinforced concrete (RC) beam associated with AE monitoring was monotonically loaded to failure under three-point loading. Correlation between average frequency and RA value (rise time / amplitude) was computed. The relationship was established to classify the crack types that propagated in the RC beam. The crack was classified as tensile crack and shear crack. It was found that the relationship is well matched with the actual crack pattern that appeared on the beam surface. Hence, this relationship is useful for prediction of the crack occurrence in the beam and its performance can be determined.

  1. Modeling of neutron emission spectroscopy in JET discharges with fast tritons from (T)D ion cyclotron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Andersson Sunden, E.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Kaellne, J.; Ronchi, E.; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Johnson, T.; Lamalle, P. U.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of fast ion populations is one of the diagnostic capabilities provided by neutron emission spectroscopy (NES). NES measurements were carried out during JET trace tritium campaign with the magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer. A favorable plasma scenario is (T)D where the resulting 14 MeV neutron yield is dominated by suprathermal emission from energetic tritons accelerated by radio frequency at their fundamental cyclotron frequency. Information on the triton distribution function has been derived from NES data with a simple model based on two components referred to as bulk (B) and high energy (HE). The HE component is based on strongly anisotropic tritium distribution that can be used for routine best-fit analysis to provide tail temperature values (T HE ). This article addresses to what extent the T HE values are model dependent by comparing the model above with a two-temperature (bi-) Maxwellian model featuring parallel and perpendicular temperatures. The bi-Maxwellian model is strongly anisotropic and frequently used for radio frequency theory

  2. In-situ virtual metrology for the silicon-dioxide etch rate by using optical emission spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Boomsoo; Hong, Sangjeen

    2014-01-01

    As a useful tool for process control in a high volume semiconductor manufacturing environment, virtual metrology for the etch rate in a plasma etch process is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) data. Virtual metrology is a surrogate measurement taken from the process instead of from direct measurement, and it can provide in-situ metrology of a wafer's geometry from a predictive model. A statistical regression model that correlates the selected wavelengths of the optical emission spectra to the etch rate is established using the OES data collected over 20 experimental runs. In addition, an argon actinometry study is employed to quantify the OES data, and it provides valuable insight into the analysis of the OES data. The established virtual metrology model is further verified with an additional 20 runs of data. As a result, the virtual metrology model with both process recipe tool data and in-situ data shows higher prediction accuracy by as much as 56% compared with either the process recipe tool data or the in-situ data alone.

  3. Extended wavelength anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) measurements: better filters, validation standards, and Rayleigh scatter removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Ryder, Alan G.

    2017-09-01

    Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) provides valuable insights into multi-fluorophore proteins (Groza et al 2015 Anal. Chim. Acta 886 133-42). Fluorescence anisotropy adds to the multidimensional fluorescence dataset information about the physical size of the fluorophores and/or the rigidity of the surrounding micro-environment. The first ARMES studies used standard thin film polarizers (TFP) that had negligible transmission between 250 and 290 nm, preventing accurate measurement of intrinsic protein fluorescence from tyrosine and tryptophan. Replacing TFP with pairs of broadband wire grid polarizers enabled standard fluorescence spectrometers to accurately measure anisotropies between 250 and 300 nm, which was validated with solutions of perylene in the UV and Erythrosin B and Phloxine B in the visible. In all cases, anisotropies were accurate to better than ±1% when compared to literature measurements made with Glan Thompson or TFP polarizers. Better dual wire grid polarizer UV transmittance and the use of excitation-emission matrix measurements for ARMES required complete Rayleigh scatter elimination. This was achieved by chemometric modelling rather than classical interpolation, which enabled the acquisition of pure anisotropy patterns over wider spectral ranges. In combination, these three improvements permit the accurate implementation of ARMES for studying intrinsic protein fluorescence.

  4. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Estado de México (Mexico); Villalobos, S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  5. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  6. IR Bismuth active centers in optical fibers: Combined excitation-emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Firstov, S. V.; Khopin, V. F.; Bufetov, I. A.; Firstova, E. G.; Guryanov, A. N.; Dianov, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    3D excitation-emission luminescence spectra of Bi-doped optical fibers of various compositions were measured in a wide wavelength range 450-1700 nm. Such luminescence spectra were obtained for Bi-doped pure silica and germania fibers, and for Bi-doped Al- or P-codoped silica fibers (at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures). The energy level schemes of IR bismuth active centers in pure silica and germania core fibers were derived from spectra obtained. The energy level schemes similarity of b...

  7. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  8. Ultrafast Core-Hole-Induced Dynamics in Water Probed by X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odelius, Michael; Nordlund, Dennis; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, Lothar; Maier, Florian; Umbach, Eberhard; Heske, Clemens; Zubavichus, Yan; Grunze, Michael; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Nilsson, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The isotope effect and excitation-energy dependence have been measured in the oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectrum (XES). The use of XES to monitor core decay processes provides information about molecular dynamics (MD) on an ultrafast time scale through the O1s lifetime of a few femtoseconds. Different nuclear masses give rise to differences in the dynamics and the observed isotope effect in XES is direct evidence of the importance of such processes. MD simulations show that even the excitation-energy dependence in the XES is mainly related to differences in core-excited-state dynamics

  9. Doppler spectroscopy and D-alpha emission diagnostics for the C-2 FRC plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Paganini, E.; Bonelli, L.; Deng, B. H.; Gornostaeva, O.; Hayashi, R.; Knapp, K.; McKenzie, M.; Pousa-Hijos, R.; Primavera, S.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Balvis, A.; Giammanco, F.; Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Two Doppler spectroscopy diagnostics with complementary capabilities are developed to measure the ion temperatures and velocities of FRC plasmas in the C-2 device. First, the multichord ion doppler diagnostic can simultaneously measure 15 chords of the plasma using an image intensified camera. Second, a single-chord fast-response ion Doppler diagnostic provides much higher faster time response by using a 16-channel photo-multiplier tube array. To study the neutral density of deuterium under different wall and plasma conditions, a highly sensitive eight-channel D-alpha diagnostic has been developed and calibrated for absolute radiance measurements. These spectroscopic diagnostics capabilities, combined with other plasma diagnostics, are helping to understand and improve the field reversed configuration plasmas in the C-2 device.

  10. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3–TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alnama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma plume of Al2O3–TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettry, J; Fantz, U; Kronberger, M; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Mahner, E; Schmitzer, C; Sanchez, J; Scrivens, R; Midttun, O; Myllyperkiö, P; O'Neil, M; Pereira, H; Paoluzzi, M; Tarvainen, O; Wünderlich, D

    2012-02-01

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H(-) ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H(α), H(β), and H(γ) Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  12. Atomic data of Ti II from laser produced Ti plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaie, A.I.; Farrag, A.A.; El Sharkawy, H.; El Sherbini, T.M.

    2005-06-01

    In the present study, the emission spectrum of titanium produced from laser induced plasma has been measured at different distances from the target. The Titanium target is irradiated by using the high power Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=1064 nm) that generates energy 750 mJ/pulse of duration rate 6 ns and repetition rate 10 Hz in vacuum and at different distances. The variation of the distance from the target affects the measured plasma parameters, i.e. the electron density, the ion temperature and the velocity distribution. The electron density increases with the increase of the distance from the target. At a distance 0.6 mm from the target it decreases to 2.28·10 16 cm -3 . The temperature increases with the distance from the get until a distance of 1 mm, after that it decreases. It is found that the plasma velocity increases with the distance then it decreases again. Then, Energy levels and transition probabilities for 3d 2 4p →(3d 2 4s + 3d 3 ) lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from an optically thin laser produced plasma of Ti II in vacuum. Calculations with intermediate coupling using Hartree-Fock wave functions have been carried out in order to place the experimental data on an absolute scale and also to evaluate the lifetimes. The plasma parameters in different regions of the plasma plume have been measured and used to obtain further transition probabilities. (author)

  13. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus

    2011-12-01

    In the last years, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) gained more and more acceptance in the analysis of functional coatings. GDOES thereby represents an interesting alternative to common depth profiling techniques like AES and SIMS, based on its unique combination of high erosion rates and erosion depths, sensitivity, analysis of nonconductive layers and easy quantification even for light elements such as C, N, O and H. Starting with the fundamentals of GDOES, a short overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings and thin films. Results illustrating the high depth resolution, confirmation of stoichiometry, the detection of light elements in coatings as well as contamination on the surface or interfaces will be demonstrated by measurements of: a multilayer system Cr/Ti on silicon, interface contamination on silicon during deposition of aluminum, Al2O3-nanoparticle containing conversion coatings on zinc for corrosion resistance, Ti3SiC2 MAX-phase coatings by pulsed laser deposition and hydrogen detection in a V/Fe multilayer system. The selected examples illustrate that GDOES can be successfully adopted as an analytical tool in the development of new materials and coatings. A discussion of the results as well as of the limitations of GDOES is presented. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Investigation of PTFE transfer films by infrared emission spectroscopy and phase-locked ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, James L.; Bunting, Bruce G.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    When a PTFE sheet was rubbed unidirectionally over a smooth surface of stainless steel an essentially monomolecular transfer film was formed. by ellipsometric and emission infrared spectroscopic techniques it was shown that the film was 10 to 15 A thick and birefringent. From the intensity differences of infrared bands obtained with a polarizer passing radiation polarized in mutually perpendicular planes, it was possible to deduce transfer film orientation with the direction of rubbing. After standing in air for several weeks the transfer films apparently increased in thickness by as much as threefold. At the same time both the index of refraction and the absorption index decreased. Examination of the surfaces by optical and electron microscopies showed that the films had become porous and flaky. These observations were consistent with previous tribological measurements. The coefficients of friction decreased with the formation of the transfer film but increased again as the film developed breaks. The applicability of the ellipsometric and polarized infrared emission techniques to the identification of monomolecular tribological transfer films of polymers such as PTFE has been demonstrated.

  15. Local emission spectroscopy of surface micrograins in A{sup III}B{sup V} semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, N. D., E-mail: ndzhukov@rambler.ru; Gluhovskoy, E. G.; Mosiyash, D. S. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The density-of-states spectra and the parameters of levels of electron states in locally chosen surface micrograins of indium antimonide and arsenide and gallium arsenide are studied with a tunneling electron microscope in the field-emission mode of measurements. By correlating the current–voltage characteristics with the formula for the probability of emission via levels, the activation energies of the levels (ψ) and the lifetimes of electrons at the levels (τ) are determined. Two types of levels for electron localization are identified. These are levels in the micrograin bulk (ψ ≈ 0.75, 1.15, and 1.59 eV for n-InSb, n-InAs, and n-GaAs, respectively; τ ~ 10{sup –8}–10{sup –7} s) and in the surface region of an i-InSb micrograin (ψ ~ 0.73, 1.33, 1.85, 2.15, 5.1 eV; τ ≈ 5 × 10{sup –8}–3 × 10{sup –7} s). A physical model involving the Coulomb-interaction-induced localization of light electrons and their size quantization determined by the electron effective mass, energy, and concentration and by the surface curvature of the micrograin is proposed.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of nitrogen species and plasma plume induced by laser ablation combined with pulse modulated radio-frequency discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Lančok, Ján; Tomov, R.; Zelinger, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2002), s. 1513-1521 ISSN 1386-1425 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : optical emission spectroscopy * laser ablation * carbon nitride films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  17. Time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy of Cu in the 1800-3800 cm(-1) region: transitions involving f and g states and oscillator strengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Matulková, Irena; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Kubelík, Petr; Kawaguchi, K.; Chernov, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2011), 025002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR KAN100500652 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metal poor stars * atomic data * FTIR emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.875, year: 2011

  18. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β + -activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  19. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-07-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β{sup +}-activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  20. SLIM (secondary emission monitor for low interception monitoring) an innovative non-destructive beam monitor for the extraction lines of a hadrontherapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, P.N.; Holzwarth, U.; Abbas, K.

    2005-01-01

    Real time monitoring of hadron therapy beam intensity and profile is a critical issue for the optimisation of dose delivery to carcinogenic tissue, patient safety and operation of the accelerator complex. For this purpose an innovative beam monitor, SLIM (Secondary electron emission for Low Interception Monitoring) is being developed in the framework of the EC-funded SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra-fast Cameras for electrons and gamma sources In Medical Application) project. The detector system is based on the secondary emission of electrons by a non-perturbative, sub-micron thick Al foil placed directly in the extracted beam path. The secondary electrons, accelerated by an electrostatic focusing system, are detected by a monolithic silicon position-sensitive sensor, which provides the beam intensity and its position with a precision of 1 mm at 10 kHz frame rate. The results of the laboratory tests of the first system prototype with thermoionic electrons emitted from a hot Tungsten wire are presented together with the measurements performed on a low intensity hadron beam at the Cyclotron of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra. (author)

  1. Secondary-electron-emission spectroscopy of tungsten: Angular dependence and phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, R.F.; Christensen, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    Angle-resolved energy-distribution measurements of secondary-electron emission (SEE) from metals reveal spectral fine structure that relates directly to the density distribution of the one-electron states throughout E-K space located above the vacuum level E/sub v/. The angular dependence of the SEE spectra from (100), (110), and (111) tungsten surfaces has been studied as a function of polar angle 0 0 0 along azimuthal directions phi such that the energy- and angle-resolved SEE current j/sub SEE/ (E, Ω) effectively scans states throughout the 1/48th irreducible body-centered-cubic zone. Calculations have been carried out in both ''reduced'' and ''extended'' K space in order to assess the relative contribution of elastic umklapp scattering to the density distribution of contributing states profiles. The results indicate that the overall secondary-electron yield may be represented as the sum of basically two contributions J/sup total//sub SEE/ = ∫/sup π/ 0 dΩ ∫/sup E//sup max/ 0 j/sub SEE/ (E,Ω)2dE = J/sup bulk//sub SEE/ + J/sup surface/ /sub SEE/. The bulk contribution represents emission due to Bloch waves propagating out of states in the semi-infinite crystal; the surface contribution represents that part of the current due to evanescent waves at the metal-vacuum interface. Transmission-induced spectral features are observed (transmission resonances), which are not related to the density-of-states fine structure, but are due to a quantum-mechanical enhancement in the escape probability arising from wave-function matching at the emitter-vacuum interface. Bulk and surface band-structure effects are concurrently manifest in the SEE spectra via the wave-matching conditions imposed at the solid-vacuum interface. Results are discussed within the general conceptual framework provided by ''the (time-reversed) incoming final-state wave-function'' approach to electron emission phenomenology of metal surfaces

  2. Spatial distribution of Bose condensate in high-temperature superconductors, determined by emission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seregin, N.P.; Nasredinov, F.S.; Ali, H.M.; Gordeev, O.A.; Saidov, Ch.S.; Seregin, P.P. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: nasredinov@tuexph.stu.neva.ru

    2002-08-12

    It has been shown that temperature dependences of the gravity centres of {sup 67}Cu({sup 67}Zn) and{sup 67}Ga({sup 67}Zn) emission Moessbauer spectra of Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}, La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4} and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 8} superconductors are described by the second-order Doppler shift in the temperature range T{>=}T{sub c}, and Bose condensation of Cooper pairs should be taken into account at T{<=}T{sub c} (T{sub c} is the superconducting transition temperature). The spatial nonuniformity of the electron density created by the Bose condensate has been observed in La{sub 1.85}Sr{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}. (author)

  3. Emission Spectroscopy of OH Radical in Water-Argon Arc Plasma Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Mašláni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emission spectra of OH radical are studied in the plasma jet generated by a plasma torch with hybrid water-argon stabilization. Plasma jet is located in a chamber with pressures 4 kPa and 10 kPa. In spite of high temperatures of produced plasma, OH spectra are observed in a large area of the jet. OH spectra are used to obtain rotational temperatures from the Boltzmann plots of resolved rotational lines. Due to line-of-sight integration of radiation, interpretation of the temperatures is not straightforward. It seems that excited OH molecules can be formed by various mechanisms, mainly in the outer parts of the jet, where thermal processes are not as dominant as in the hot central region.

  4. Study of dynamic emission spectra from lubricant films in an elastohydrodynamic contact using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra were obtained through a diamond window from lubricating fluids in an operating sliding elastohydrodynamic contact and analyzed by comparison with static absorption spectra under similar pressures. Different loads, shear rates and temperatures were used. Most of the spectra exhibited polarization characteristics, indicating directional alignment of the lubricant in the EHD contact. Among the fluids studied were a "traction" fluid, an advanced ester, and their mixtures, a synthetic paraffin, a naphthenic reference fluid (N-1), both neat and containing 1 percent of p-tricresyl phosphate as an anti-wear additive, and a C-ether. Traction properties were found to be nearly proportional to mixture composition for traction fluid and ester mixtures. The anti-wear additive reduced traction and fluid temperature under low loads but increased them under higher loads, giving rise to formation of a friction polymer.

  5. WHT spectroscopy of emission-line gas around two separate quasars at z = 0.87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.C.; Crawford, C.S.; Johnstone, R.M.; Hewett, P.C.; Allington-Smith, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A report is given of observations made with the Faint Object Spectrograph on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT), in which the line emission of the fuzz around two separate quasars, which coincidentally both have redshifts z = 0.87, is detected and measured. These represent the most distant quasars for which the spectrum of the fuzz has been obtained. The oxygen line ratios we observe are similar to those of the lower-z quasar 3C48 (to which the present quasars show a strong similarity) and again imply a high gas density. If confined by surrounding hot gas, the pressure is so high that an intracluster medium is required. This suggests that the quasars lie in clusters or groups of galaxies. (author)

  6. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  7. Determination of the electron energy distribution function of a low temperature plasma from optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodt, Dirk Hilar

    2009-01-01

    The experimental determination of the electron energy distribution of a low pressure glow discharge in neon from emission spectroscopic data has been demonstrated. The spectral data were obtained with a simple overview spectrometer and analyzed using a strict probabilistic, Bayesian data analysis. It is this Integrated Data Analysis (IDA) approach, which allows the significant extraction of non-thermal properties of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The results bear potential as a non-invasive alternative to probe measurements. This allows the investigation of spatially inhomogeneous plasmas (gradient length smaller than typical probe sheath dimensions) and plasmas with reactive constituents. The diagnostic of reactive plasmas is an important practical application, needed e.g. for the monitoring and control of process plasmas. Moreover, the experimental validation of probe theories for magnetized plasmas as a long-standing topic in plasma diagnostics could be addressed by the spectroscopic method. (orig.)

  8. High-harmonic spectroscopy of oriented OCS molecules: emission of even and odd harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, P M; Rupenyan, A; Wörner, H J

    2012-12-07

    We study the emission of even and odd high-harmonic orders from oriented OCS molecules. We use an intense, nonresonant femtosecond laser pulse superimposed with its phase-controlled second harmonic field to impulsively align and orient a dense sample of molecules from which we subsequently generate high-order harmonics. The even harmonics appear around the full revivals of the rotational dynamics. We demonstrate perfect coherent control over their intensity through the subcycle delay of the two-color fields. The odd harmonics are insensitive to the degree of orientation, but modulate with the degree of axis alignment, in agreement with calculated photorecombination dipole moments. We further compare the shape of the even and odd harmonic spectra with our calculations and determine the degree of orientation.

  9. Determination of the electron energy distribution function of a low temperature plasma from optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodt, Dirk Hilar

    2009-01-05

    The experimental determination of the electron energy distribution of a low pressure glow discharge in neon from emission spectroscopic data has been demonstrated. The spectral data were obtained with a simple overview spectrometer and analyzed using a strict probabilistic, Bayesian data analysis. It is this Integrated Data Analysis (IDA) approach, which allows the significant extraction of non-thermal properties of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The results bear potential as a non-invasive alternative to probe measurements. This allows the investigation of spatially inhomogeneous plasmas (gradient length smaller than typical probe sheath dimensions) and plasmas with reactive constituents. The diagnostic of reactive plasmas is an important practical application, needed e.g. for the monitoring and control of process plasmas. Moreover, the experimental validation of probe theories for magnetized plasmas as a long-standing topic in plasma diagnostics could be addressed by the spectroscopic method. (orig.)

  10. Flame structure, spectroscopy and emissions quantification of rapeseed biodiesel under model gas turbine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Hochgreb, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Rapeseed biodiesel shows extended flame reaction zone with no soot formation. • RME spray flame shows higher droplet number density and volume flux than diesel. • RME droplet size and velocity distribution are similar to diesel. • Blending 50% RME with diesel reduces soot formation non-linearly. • RME shows lower NO x and higher CO emissions level compared to diesel. - Abstract: The spray combustion characteristics of rapeseed biodiesel/methyl esters (RME) and 50% RME/diesel blend were investigated and compared with conventional diesel fuel, using a model swirl flame burner. The detailed database with well-characterised boundary conditions can be used as validation targets for flame modelling. An airblast, swirl-atomized liquid fuel spray was surrounded by air preheated to 350 °C at atmospheric pressure. The reacting droplet distribution within the flame was determined using phase Doppler particle anemometry. For both diesel and RME, peak droplet concentrations are found on the outside of the flame region, with large droplets migrating to the outside via swirl, and smaller droplets located around the centreline region. However, droplet concentrations and sizes are larger for RME, indicating a longer droplet evaporation timescale. This delayed droplet vaporisation leads to a different reaction zone relative to diesel, with an extended core reaction. In spite of the longer reaction zone, RME flames displayed no sign of visible soot radiation, unlike the case of diesel spray flame. Blending 50% RME with diesel results in significant reduction in soot radiation. Finally, RME emits 22% on average lower NO x emissions compared to diesel under lean burning conditions.

  11. Atomic physics measurements in an electron beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M. H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J. R.; Knapp, D. A.; Osterheld, S.; Schneider, M. B.; Scofield, J. H.; Levine, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q≥70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized.

  12. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  13. Rabi oscillations and rapid-passage effects in the molecular-beam CO2-laser Stark spectroscopy of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.G.; Gough, T.E.; Isenor, N.R.; Scoles, G.

    1985-01-01

    sub-Doppler molecular-beam laser Stark spectroscopy has been employed to produce high-contrast Rabi oscillations in the ν 3 band of CH 3 F. By varying the intensity of the cw CO 2 laser, up to five complete oscillations were observed before the phenomenon was washed out by rapid-passage effects and damping mechanisms. Besides being useful in clarifying key features of coherent ir molecular-beam spectroscopy, the observation of Rabi oscillations provides one of the most accurate means of directly measuring transition dipole moments. Analysis of the present data on three rovibrational transitions, Q(1,1) -1reverse arrow0, P(1,0) 0reverse arrow0, and R(1,1) 0reverse arrow1, has yielded a rotationless transition dipole moment of 0.21 +- 0.01 D for the ν 3 = 1reverse arrow0 vibration. This result is in agreement with values estimated from both band-intensity and absorption-coefficient data in the literature

  14. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  15. Optimal emission enhancement in orthogonal double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanginés, R.; Contreras, V.; Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthogonal double-pulse (DP) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was performed using reheating and pre-ablative configurations. The ablation pulse power density was varied by two orders of magnitude and the DP experiments were carried out for a wide range of interpulse delays. For both DP-LIBS schemes, the signal enhancement was evaluated with respect to the corresponding single-pulse (SP) LIBS as a function of the interpulse delay. The reheating scheme shows a sharp maximum signal enhancement of up to 200-fold for low ablative power densities (0.4 GW cm −2 ); however, for power densities larger than 10 GW cm −2 this configuration did not improve the SP outcome. On the other hand, a more uniform signal enhancement of about 4–6 was obtained for the pre-ablative scheme nearly independently of the used ablative power density. In terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) the pre-ablative scheme shows a monotonic increment with the ablative power density. Whereas the reheating configuration reaches a maximum at 2.2 GW cm −2 , its enhancement effect collapses markedly for fluencies above 10 GW cm −2 . - Highlights: • Comparison of reheating and pre-ablative double-pulse LIBS was done using a wide range of ablation power densities. • Experimental parameters that could achieve optimal signal-to-noise ratio were investigated. • A reheating scheme is better for low-ablation power densities. • A pre-ablative configuration is better for high-ablation power densities

  16. Microwave Emission Spectroscopy of Short Pulse Laser-Produced Plasma in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesbe, Alexander; Elle, Jennifer; Reid, Remington; Lucero, Adrian; Pohle, Hugh; Kalmykov, Serge; Domonkos, Matthew; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Krushelnick, Karl

    2017-10-01

    Measuring the radiated power spectral density of microwaves from plasmas has long been used to infer details about plasma behavior. We apply this technique to plasma generated via ultra-short pulse laser ionization. The impulsive interaction of the laser with the plasma drives current, which couples to radiated fields and is a source of broadband terahertz and microwave radiation. We measure the radiated spectrum and angular distribution in the far field over a frequency range of 1-40 GHz. The spectrum of the microwaves is sampled using calibrated, tunable heterodyne receivers. We show that neutral gas pressure significantly alters the amplitude of microwave emissions from the plasma. The spectrum as a function of background neutral density is used to infer information about the free electron density of the plasma. Experimental results are compared to a moving dipole model, with good agreement over a limited parameter range. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-16RDCOR325.

  17. LSDCat: Detection and cataloguing of emission-line sources in integral-field spectroscopy datacubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2017-06-01

    We present a robust, efficient, and user-friendly algorithm for detecting faint emission-line sources in large integral-field spectroscopic datacubes together with the public release of the software package Line Source Detection and Cataloguing (LSDCat). LSDCat uses a three-dimensional matched filter approach, combined with thresholding in signal-to-noise, to build a catalogue of individual line detections. In a second pass, the detected lines are grouped into distinct objects, and positions, spatial extents, and fluxes of the detected lines are determined. LSDCat requires only a small number of input parameters, and we provide guidelines for choosing appropriate values. The software is coded in Python and capable of processing very large datacubes in a short time. We verify the implementation with a source insertion and recovery experiment utilising a real datacube taken with the MUSE instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. The LSDCat software is available for download at http://muse-vlt.eu/science/tools and via the Astrophysics Source Code Library at http://ascl.net/1612.002

  18. Atomic emission and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in the direct current plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Current Plasma (DCP) was investigated as a source for Atomic Emission (AE) and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (AFS). The DCP was optimized for AE analyses using simplex optimization and Box-Behnken partial factorial experimental design, varying argon flows, and plasma position. Results were compared with a univariate search carried out in the region of the simplex optimum. Canonical analysis demonstrated that no true optimum exists for sensitivity, precision, or drift. A stationary ridge, where combinations of conditions gave comparable instrumental responses, was found. The DCP as an excitation source for AFS in a flame was used for diagnostic studies of the DCP. Moving the aerosol introduction tube behind the DCP with respect to the flame improved the characteristics of the DCP as a narrow line source, although self-absorption was observed at high concentrations of metal salt solutions in the DCP. Detection limits for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, and Ni were in the low ng/mL region. Theoretical expressions for scatter correction with a two-line technique were derived, although no correction was necessary to achieve accurate results for standard reference materials

  19. Development of the double-pulse technique to improve the analytical performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on solids: Nuclear and geological applications; Developpement de la technique de la double impulsion laser pour ameliorer les performances analytiques de l'Ablation Laser couplee a la Spectrometrie d'Emission Optique (AL/SEO) sur solides: Applications nucleaires et geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.

    2005-10-15

    The double-pulse technique has been developed to improve the analytical performance of Laser Ablation coupled to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA/OES). This approach relies on the addition of a second time-resolved laser pulse to the classical LA/OES system. It has been studied on aluminium alloys according to different geometries of the two laser beams (orthogonal and collinear geometries) before being applied to different materials (synthetic glass, rock, steel, sodium chloride). The increase in emission intensity depends on the temporal parameters, on the excitation energy level of the emission line, on the concentration of the studied element and on the analyzed matrix. The double-pulse LA/OES technique can be particularly interesting to improve the sensitivity towards vitreous matrices containing elements emitting lines with high excitation energy levels. (author)

  20. Electron emission of cathode holder of vacuum diode of an intense electron-beam accelerator and its effect on the output voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Bing Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum diode which is used to generate relativistic electron beams is one of the most important parts of a pulsed-power modulator. In this paper, the electron emission of cathode holder of a vacuum diode and its effect on the output voltage is investigated by experiments on an intense electron-beam accelerator with 180 ns full width at half maximum and 200–500 kV output voltage. First, the field emission is analyzed and the electric field of the vacuum chamber is calculated. Then, the flatness of the output voltage is discussed before and after adding an insulation plate when a water load is used. It is found that the electron emission at the edges of the cathode holder is the main reason to cause the change of the flatness. Last, a piece of polyester film is used as a target to further show the electron emission of the cathode holder. This analysis shows that decreasing the electron emission of the cathode holder in such a pulse power modulator could be a good way to improve the quality of the output voltage.

  1. LASER EMISSIONS FROM CO2 VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS IN A LOW TEMPERATURE SUPERSONIC FLOW EXCITED BY A PULSED ELECTRON BEAM STABILIZED DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, B.; Forestier, B.; Gross, P.; Koudriavtsev, E.

    1980-01-01

    High power long pulse infrared laser emission has been achieved on CO2 molecule with the high density and very low temperature supersonic flow-electron beam-stabilized discharge excitation device developped at I.M.F.M. ([MATH] [MATH] 2 amagats, T [MATH] 70 - 150 K). Laser emission at [MATH] = 10.6 µ has been achieved for a resonant cavity set at the discharge location and also 3 cm downstream of the discharge location. With Ar/CO2, Ar/CO2/H2, He/CO2, and He/CO2/N2 mixtures, lasing energy and ...

  2. Measurement of spatially resolved gas-phase plasma temperatures by optical emission and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.P.; Gottscho, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distributions of particles in glow discharges is crucial to the understanding and modeling of plasma reactors used in microelectronic manufacturing. Reaction rates, available product channels, and transport phenomena all depend upon the partitioning of energy in the discharge. Because of the nonequilibrium nature of glow discharges, however, the distribution of energy among different species and among different degrees of freedom cannot be characterized simply by one temperature. The extent to which different temperatures are needed for each degree of freedom and for each species is not known completely. How plasma operating conditions affect these energy distributions is also an unanswered question. We have investigated the temperatures of radicals, ions, and neutrals in CCl 4 , CCl 4 /N 2 (2%), and N 2 discharges. In the CCl 4 systems, we probed the CCl rotational and vibrational energy distributions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The rotational distribution always appeared to be thermal but under identical operating conditions was found to be roughly-equal400 K colder than the vibrational distribution. The rotational temperature at any point in the discharge was strongly dependent upon both applied power and surface temperature. Thermal gradients as large as 10 2 K mm -1 were observed near electrode surfaces but the bulk plasmas were isothermal. When 2% N 2 was added to a CCl 4 discharge, N 2 second positive emission was observed and used to estimate the N 2 rotational temperature. The results suggest that emission from molecular actinometers can be used to measure plasma temperatures, providing such measurements are not made in close proximity to surfaces

  3. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Study Ligand Valence Orbitals in Mn Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V; Messinger, Johannes; Merz, Kathrin; Weyhermuller, Thomas; Bergmann, Uwe; Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-03-02

    We discuss a spectroscopic method to determine the character of chemical bonding and for the identification of metal ligands in coordination and bioinorganic chemistry. It is based on the analysis of satellite lines in X-ray emission spectra that arise from transitions between valence orbitals and the metal ion 1s level (valence-to-core XES). The spectra, in connection with calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), provide information that is complementary to other spectroscopic techniques, in particular X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS). The spectral shape is sensitive to protonation of ligands and allows ligands, which differ only slightly in atomic number (e.g., C, N, O...), to be distinguished. A theoretical discussion of the main spectral features is presented in terms of molecular orbitals for a series of Mn model systems: [Mn(H2O)6]2+, [Mn(H2O)5OH]+, [Mn(H2O)5NH2]+, and [Mn(H2O)5NH3]2+. An application of the method, with comparison between theory and experiment, is presented for the solvated Mn2+ ion in water and three Mn coordination complexes, namely [LMn(acac)N3]BPh4, [LMn(B2O3Ph2)(ClO4)], and [LMn(acac)N]BPh4, where L represents 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, acac stands for the 2,4-pentanedionate anion, and B2O3Ph2 represents the 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-dibora-2-oxapropane-1,3-diolato dianion.

  4. Measurement of the parallel velocity distribution function of the electron beam in a quasi-optical gyrotron by electron cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soumagne, G.; Alberti, S.; Hogge, J.P.; Pedrozzi, M.; Siegrist, M.R.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The parallel velocity distribution function of the weakly relativistic electron beam of a quasi-optical gyrotron (QOG) has been determined by measuring the Doppler-shifted Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) at an angle θ=15 o with respect to the external magnetic DC-field. Due to the Doppler shift, the frequency of the spontaneous cyclotron emission at the fundamental (ν 0 =100 GHz) is upshifted to 140 GHz. A broadening of the spectrum up to 10 GHz (Full Width at Half Maximum FWHM) was measured. The measured mean frequency agrees well with the theoretical predictions, but the observed line-width, and hence the parallel velocity distribution function, is 2-3 times larger than expected. Considerations on ECE-measurements of the electron beam energy spread, performed at larger angles θ, are also discussed. (author) 12 figs., 18 refs

  5. High-frequency emissions during the propagation of an electron beam in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalita and Tripathi, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic annular electron beam passing through a high-density plasma excites Langmuir waves via Cerenkov interaction. The Langmuir waves are backscattered off ions via nonlinear ion Landau damping. At moderately high amplitudes these waves are parametrically up-converted by the beam into high-frequency electromagnetic radiation, as observed in some recent experiments. A nonlocal theory of this process is developed in a cylindrical geometry. It is seen that the growth rate of the Langmuir wave scales as one-third power of beam density. The growth rate of parametric instability scales as one-fourth power of beam density and the square root of beam thickness

  6. Composite Fillers and their Influence on Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Milan; Kalenda, Petr; Honner, Milan; Vacíková, Petra

    The research work presented in this paper shows influence of filler composition in inorganic composite on its emissivity. Development of system which will provide a very high emissivity (0.90 - 0.99) within a short wavelength range is the intention of our project. Active ingredients (Chromium Oxide, Iron powder, Kaolin, Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Boron Nitride and Aluminum Nitride) were built in matrix of the composite. Furrier Transform Infra- Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy method was applied for measurement of spectral emissivity. Block hot plate was used for heating samples in relative emissivity measurement and laser beam in absolute emissivity measurement. These tests demonstrated that filler composition is able to influence emissive properties in range of short IR wavelength (1.5-4.0 μm) within 0.7 - 1.5 times (against the reference). Also influence of content of active ingredient in ceramic matrix on emissivity was measured. Content of active ingredients had no significant effect on emissivity.

  7. Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides andrelated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    In today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one ''spintronic'' device that exploits both charge and ''spin'' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; and (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 μm thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (< 4 at.%) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm

  8. Investigation of spectral interference effects on determination of uranium concentration in phosphate ore by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachari, Ayoob H.; Jalali, Fatemeh; Alahyarizadeh, Ghasem [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Engineering Dept.

    2017-04-01

    Effects of spectral interferences on determination of the uranium concentration in phosphate ore were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Eleven high intensity emission lines including four lines recommended by ICP-OES apparatus were chosen to determine the uranium concentration. The ore samples were collected from phosphate acid producing industry in the south of Iran. Three different acid combinations [(HNO{sub 3}:HCl:HF-2:6:2), (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:HF-3:3:3), (HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:HF-4:2:2)] used in microwave digestion method to explore the spectral interference effects in different solvent environments. The results showed that the trusty uranium concentration, obtained in the 367.007 nm, 386.592 nm, 389.036 nm and 409.014 nm by second acid digestion method which were 0.665 ppm, 0.972 ppm, 0.670 ppm and 0.801 ppm, respectively. Although the line of 409.014 nm was reported as the best line for determining of the uranium concentration in several literatures, the results showed that this line has a significant spectral interference with vanadium in some ores which should be considered in determining of the uranium concentration. Spectral interference effects of some elements which have high concentrations in the phosphate ore including Ca, Fe, Mg, Pb, V, Mn, and Ti on the line intensities were also investigated. Results indicated that the chosen elements affect emission intensities of all of 11 lines. They also indicated that the line of 409.014 nm provides a trusty precision in the determination of the uranium concentration in the ore sample with low vanadium concentration (at least, U/V ratio of 1:5). Results show that the line of 409.014 nm provides acceptable precision with some corrections in comparison with other selected lines. For instance in high concentrations of other elements including Fe and Ti in the ore samples, strong influences on the line intensities of the 367.007 nm (by Fe

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of OH lines in N2 and Ar plasma during the treatments of cotton fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoro, Nikola; Puac, Nevena; Spasic, Kosta; Malovic, Gordana; Gorjanc, Marija; Petrovic, Zoran Lj

    2016-09-01

    Low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas are proven to be irreplaceable tool in material processing. Among other fields their applications in treatments of textiles are still diversifying, but the main role of plasma is activation of the surface of treated sample. After, or during, the treatments these surfaces can be covered with different materials or species (such as microcapsules) that enhance properties of the fabric. In order to investigate mechanisms how active species from plasma interact with the cotton surface, we studied both plasma and surface properties. Bleached cotton samples were treated in low-pressure nitrogen and argon plasma in a chamber with parallel-plate electrodes. The effect of the plasma treatment on the cotton samples was investigated with the colorimetric measurements on dyes absorption by a spectrophotometer. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed by using spectrometer with a sensitive CCD camera. We have recorded the evolution of the maximum of the intensity of OH and N2 second positive band lines. Measurement were done with and without samples in the chamber and comparison between the lines intensity was made. The parameters for optimal plasma treatment conditions were determined. Research supported by the MESTD, projects III41011 and ON171037.

  10. Diagnostic of capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma from electrical discharge characteristics: comparison with optical emission spectroscopy and fluid model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, HE; Chong, LIU; Yachun, ZHANG; Jianping, CHEN; Yudong, CHEN; Xiaojun, ZENG; Bingyan, CHEN; Jiaxin, PANG; Yibing, WANG

    2018-02-01

    The capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) plasma has been widely used in various fields. In some cases, it requires us to estimate the range of key plasma parameters simpler and quicker in order to understand the behavior in plasma. In this paper, a glass vacuum chamber and a pair of plate electrodes were designed and fabricated, using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge technology to ionize the working gas of Ar. This discharge was mathematically described with equivalent circuit model. The discharge voltage and current of the plasma were measured at different pressures and different powers. Based on the capacitively coupled homogeneous discharge model, the equivalent circuit and the analytical formula were established. The plasma density and temperature were calculated by using the equivalent impedance principle and energy balance equation. The experimental results show that when RF discharge power is 50–300 W and pressure is 25–250 Pa, the average electron temperature is about 1.7–2.1 eV and the average electron density is about 0.5 × 1017–3.6 × 1017 m‑3. Agreement was found when the results were compared to those given by optical emission spectroscopy and COMSOL simulation.

  11. Insufficiency of Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the Diagnosis of Intravascular Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kawai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL is a rare type of extranodal lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course characterized by the proliferation of lymphoma cells within the lumen of small vessels. Diagnosis is often difficult because of marked variability in clinical presentation and nonspecific laboratory and radiological findings, especially when central nervous system (CNS symptoms are the only manifestation. Modern metabolic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS have been reported to be useful in the diagnosis of conventional primary CNS lymphoma. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a progressive leukoencephalopathic syndrome. The patient was examined by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-methionine PET and MRS, but none of these examinations were able to show the presence of a tumor in the lesions or to clarify the tumor characteristics. Brain biopsy was the only way to obtain a definite diagnosis of IVL. The patient was treated intensively with standard immunochemotherapy but died 6 months after the diagnosis. Here, we discuss the insufficiency of modern metabolic imaging techniques, including PET and MRS, and recommend a rapid decision of brain biopsy in the diagnosis of IVL only involving the CNS.

  12. Analysis of resonant fast ion distributions during combined ICRF and NBI heating with transients using neutron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Mantsinen, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Kiptily, V. G.; Nabais, F.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    ICRF heating at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of a hydrogen minority ion species also gives rise to a partial power absorption by deuterium ions at their second harmonic resonance. This paper studies the deuterium distributions resulting from such 2nd harmonic heating at JET using neutron emission spectroscopy data from the time of flight spectrometer TOFOR. The fast deuterium distributions are obtained over the energy range 100 keV to 2 MeV. Specifically, we study how the fast deuterium distributions vary as ICRF heating is used alone as well as in combination with NBI heating. When comparing the different heating scenarios, we observed both a difference in the shapes of the distributions as well as in their absolute level. The differences are most pronounced below 0.5 MeV. Comparisons are made with corresponding distributions calculated with the code PION. We find a good agreement between the measured distributions and those calculated with PION, both in terms of their shapes as well as their amplitudes. However, we also identified a period with signs of an inverted fast ion distribution, which showed large disagreements between the modeled and measured results. Resonant interactions with tornado modes, i.e. core localized toroidal alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), are put forward as a possible explanation for the inverted distribution.

  13. Use of emission spectroscopy as a tool for optimization of plasma hearth operation for hazardous waste thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monts, D.L.; Bauman, L.E.; Lengel, R.K.; Wang, W.; Lin, J.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal processing of mixed wastes by plasma hearth vitrification requires optimization of and continuous monitoring of plasma hearth operation. A series of investigations utilizing emission spectroscopy has been initiated to characterize the plasma of a 96 kW plasma hearth in order to determine optimum conditions for monitoring and hence controlling plasma hearth performance. The plasma hearth test stand is based upon a 96 kW, transferred arc plasma torch. The torch is mounted in a vacuum vessel through an electrically operated XYZ Gimbal mount. The peak operating power depends on the gas used for the plasma. The operational limits for DC voltage are 180 V to 550 V; and the current is operated at a constant value, selectable in the range from 72 to 200 amps. The plasma arc length can be varied from 2.5 cm to 25 cm, and is dependent on the supply voltage and the process gas used. The arc current and voltage, gas pressure, cooling water flow, and cooling water temperature are monitored and stored by a PC-based data acquisition system. Five optical ports are available for making optical diagnostic measurements

  14. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masenda, H., E-mail: hilary.masenda@wits.ac.za [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Geburt, S. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Naidoo, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K. [PH Dept, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR (Italy); Mølholt, T. E. [PH Dept, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Ncube, M. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Shayestehaminzadeh, S. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Materials Chemistry (Germany); Gislason, H. P. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Langouche, G. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Ólafsson, S. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Ronning, C. [University of Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLDE Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope {sup 57}Mn{sup +} (T{sub 1/2}= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of {sup 57}Fe atoms produced in the {sup 57}Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with {sup 56}Fe to fluences of 2×10{sup 13}, 5×10 {sup 13} and 8 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe{sup 3+} on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe{sup 3+} at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  15. Sensitivity of {sup 57}Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to Ar and C induced defects in ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharuth-Ram, K., E-mail: kbr@tlabs.ac.za [Durban University of Technology, School of Physics (South Africa); Mølholt, T. E. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Langouche, G. [KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica (Belgium); Geburt, S.; Ronning, C. [Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Institute for Solid State Physics (Germany); Doyle, T. B. [iThemba LABS (South Africa); Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN (Switzerland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR (Italy); Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Ncube, M. [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics (South Africa); Gislason, H.; Ólafsson, S. [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland); Weyer, G. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark)

    2016-12-15

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (eMS) measurements, following low fluence (<10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) implantation of {sup 57}Mn (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystals pre-implanted with Ar and C ions, has been utilized to test the sensitivity of the {sup 57}Fe eMS technique to the different types of defects generated by the different ion species. The dominant feature of the Mössbauer spectrum of the Ar implanted ZnO sample was a magnetic hyperfine field distribution component, attributed to paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+}, while that of the C implanted sample was a doublet attributed to substitutional Fe{sup 2+} forming a complex with the C dopant ions in the 2{sup −} state at O vacancies. Magnetization measurements on the two samples, on the other hand, yield practically identical m(H) curves. The distinctly different eMS spectra of the two samples display the sensitivity of the probe nucleus to the defects produced by the different ion species.

  16. Nanometric resolution in glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry depth profiling of metal (Cr, Al) nitride multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; Gago, R.; Fornies, E.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Climent Font, A.; Albella, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we address the capability of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) for fast and accurate depth profiling of multilayer nitride coatings down to the nanometer range. This is shown by resolving the particular case of CrN/AlN structures with individual thickness ranging from hundreds to few nanometers. In order to discriminate and identify artefacts in the GDOES depth profile due to the sputtering process, the layered structures were verified by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfaces in the GDOES profiles for CrN/AlN structures are sharper than the ones measured for similar metal multilayers due to the lower sputtering rate of the nitrides. However, as a consequence of the crater shape, there is a linear degradation of the depth resolution with depth (approximately 40 nm/μm), saturating at a value of approximately half the thickness of the thinner layer. This limit is imposed by the simultaneous sputtering of consecutive layers. The ultimate GDOES depth resolution at the near surface region was estimated to be of 4-6 nm

  17. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, X; Cawley, J.; Rainforth, W.M.; Chen, L.

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 μm). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 μm), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). GDOES proved to be an excellent tool for the quantification of oxidation and element distribution as a function of depth, particularly when combined with SEM and TEM to identify oxide type and morphology

  18. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  19. Dual-array valence emission spectrometer (DAVES): A new approach for hard x-ray photon-in photon-out spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, K. D., E-mail: kdf1@cornell.edu; Lyndaker, A.; Krawcyk, T.; Conrad, J. [CHESS Wilson Lab, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Pollock, C. J. [Dept. of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    CHESS has developed and successfully deployed a novel Dual Array Valence Emission Spectrometer (DAVES) for high energy resolution, hard x-ray spectroscopy. DAVES employs the simplest method for scanning multiple spherical crystals along a Rowland Circle. The new design achieves unique 2-color collection capability and is built to take special advantage of pixel array detectors. Our initial results show why these detectors greatly improve data quality. The presentation emphasizes flexibility of experimental design offered by DAVES. Prospects and benefits of 2-color spectroscopy are illustrated and discussed.

  20. Dual-array valence emission spectrometer (DAVES): A new approach for hard x-ray photon-in photon-out spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Lyndaker, A.; Krawcyk, T.; Conrad, J.; Pollock, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    CHESS has developed and successfully deployed a novel Dual Array Valence Emission Spectrometer (DAVES) for high energy resolution, hard x-ray spectroscopy. DAVES employs the simplest method for scanning multiple spherical crystals along a Rowland Circle. The new design achieves unique 2-color collection capability and is built to take special advantage of pixel array detectors. Our initial results show why these detectors greatly improve data quality. The presentation emphasizes flexibility of experimental design offered by DAVES. Prospects and benefits of 2-color spectroscopy are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Beam foil spectroscopy of N = 3 to N = 2 transitions in highly stripped heavy ions. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Chandler, G.A.; Egan, P.O.; Ziock, K.P.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The spectroscopy of very highly ionized atoms provides an important testing ground for multi-electron atomic theory. We report preliminary experimental results on the n = 3 → 2 spectra of Bi +73 and A +69 obtained at the GSI UNILAC accelerator. 19 refs., 4 figs

  2. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the JET Li-BES system

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y. -c.; Contributors, JET

    2015-01-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are mode...

  3. γ-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A˜130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stézowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rossé, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R.; Dimmock, M.; Gros, S.; McGuirck, B.; Paul, E. S.; Petri, M.; Scraggs, H.; Turk, G.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Porquet, M. G.; Prévost, A.; Juhasz, K.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G.

    2008-11-01

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM γ-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new γ-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A γ-ray belonging to the 130Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  4. Dual-beam, second-derivative tunable diode-laser infrared spectroscopy applied to trace-gas measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallant, D.R.; Jungst, R.G.

    1981-04-01

    A dual beam diode laser spectrometer has been constructed using off-axis reflective optics. The spectrometer can be amplitude modulated for direct absorption measurements or frequency modulated to obtain derivative spectra. The spectrometer has high throughput, is easy to operate and align, provides good dual beam compensation, and has no evidence of the interference effects that have been observed in diode laser spectrometers using refractive optics. Unpurged, using second derivative techniques, the instrument has measured 108 parts-per-million CO (10 cm absorption cell, atmospheric pressure-broadened) with good signal/noise. With the replacement of marginal instrumental components, the signal/noise should be substantially increased. This instrument was developed to monitor the evolution of decomposition gases in sealed containers of small volume at atmospheric pressure

  5. Electron beam produced in a transient hollow cathode discharge: beam electron distribution function, X-ray emission and solid target ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, Magdalena

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of phenomena occurring during transient hollow cathode discharges. The author first recalls the characteristics of such a discharge which make it different from conventional pseudo-spark discharges. The objective is to characterise the electron beam produced within the discharge, and the phenomena associated with its interaction with a solid or gaseous target, leading to the production of an X ray or visible radiation. Thus, the author reports the measurement (by magnetic deflection) of the whole time-averaged electronic distribution function. Such a knowledge is essential for a better use of the electron beam in applications such as X-ray source or material ablation. As high repetition frequency pulse X ray sources are very interesting tools, he reports the development and characterisation of Bremsstrahlung X rays during a beam-target interaction. He finally addresses the implementation of a spectroscopic diagnosis for the filamentary plasma and the ablation of a solid target by the beam [fr

  6. The Search for Radio Emission from Exoplanets Using LOFAR Low-Frequency Beam-Formed Observations: Preliminary Results on the 55 CNC System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jake; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Zarka, Philippe; Vasylieva, Iana

    2017-05-01

    Detection of radio emission from exoplanets can provide information on the star-planet system that is very difficult or impossible to study otherwise, such as the planet's magnetic field, magnetosphere, rotation period, orbit inclination, and star-planet interactions. Such a detection in the radio domain would open up a whole new field in the study of exoplanets, however, currently there are no confirmed detections of an exoplanet at radio frequencies. In this study, we search for non-thermal radio emission from 55 Cnc, an exoplanetary system with 5 planets. 55 Cnc is among the best targets for this search according to theoretical predictions. We observed for 18 hours with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) in the frequency range 26-73 MHz with full-polarization and and covered 85% of the orbital phase of the innermost planet. During the observations four beams were recorded simultaneously on 55 Cnc, a patch of nearby “empty” sky, the nearby pulsar B0823+26, and a bright radio source in the field. The extra beams make this setup unique since they can be used for control of the telescope gain and to verify that a detection in the exoplanet beam is not a false-positive detection (e.g. ionospheric fluctuations). An automatic pipeline was created to automatically find Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and to search for emission in the exoplanet beam. Conclusions reached at the time of the meeting, about detection of or upper limit to the planetary signal, will be presented. In the near future, we will apply this observational technique and pipeline to some moreplanetary targets, which were selected on the basis of theoretical predictions.

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy for quantification of ultraviolet radiations and biocide active species in microwave argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattieaux, G., E-mail: gaetan.wattieaux@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.

    2013-11-01

    case. - Highlights: • Absorption and emission spectroscopy diagnostic of a microwave plasma jet • Cheap and simple absolute calibration in the UV range without UV calibration source • Determination of the gas temperature uncertainty from OH(A-X) spectrum • Anticipation of the biocide effect of the plasma jet from spectroscopic analysis • Safety requirements in terms of microwave and ozone exposure.

  8. Characterization of biochar-derived dissolved organic matter using UV-visible absorption and excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Tyler; Sager, Eric; Guéguen, Céline

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, biochar has become of considerable interest for a variety of environmental applications. However, the feasibility of its application is entirely dependent on its physical and chemical properties, including the characteristics of biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). The goal of this study was to assess the use of optical analysis for the purpose of characterizing biochar-derived DOM. Three different biochars (slow pyrolysis birch and maple; fast pyrolysis maple) were produced and leached in distilled water over 17d. Samples were taken on days 3, 10, 13 and 17, filtered, and analyzed for DOC content. Samples were also subjected to optical analysis using UV-visible absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopies. EEM fluorescence data were further analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Absorbance and fluorescence results were combined and examined using principal component analysis (PCA). Significant differences in the water soluble organic carbon content were observed for all biochar types. The estimated aromaticity (SUVA254) and mean molecular weight (S275-295) of biochar-derived DOM were also found to differ based on biochar type. PARAFAC analysis identified three humic-like components and one protein-like component. Distinct DOM signatures were observed for each biochar type. Transformations in biochar DOM characteristics over time were also observed. The PCA showed a clear delineation in biochar types based on their optical properties. The results of this study indicate that optical analysis may provide valuable information regarding the characteristics of biochar-derived DOM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Point defects in MnSi and YBCO studied by Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy using a positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, Markus

    2015-10-28

    The positron beam NEPOMUC was used in order to investigate MnSi and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ} (YBCO) single crystals. The Doppler broadening of the annihilation radiation of electron-positron pairs was analyzed. Thus, the concentration of Mn vacancies in MnSi crystals was determined. In thin YBCO films, the Doppler broadening is correlated with the oxygen deficiency δ. Its spatial distribution and its high-temperature behavior were studied using positrons.

  10. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, tunable cw sources, and Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy. Discusses saturation spectroscopy; continuous wave saturation spectroscopy in the ultraviolet; and two-photon spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen 1S-2S. Focuses on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of gaseous samples. Explains that in saturation spectroscopy, a monochromatic laser beam ''labels'' a group of atoms within a narrow range of axial velocities through excitation or optical pumping, and a Doppler-free spectrum of these selected atoms is observed with a second, counterpropagating beam. Notes that in two-photon spectroscopy it is possible to record Doppler-free spectra without any need for velocity selection by excitation with two counterpropagating laser beams whose first order Doppler shifts cancel

  11. Admittance spectroscopy of Mg-doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy using RF nitrogen sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D J; Kim, K H; Bojarczuk, N A; Karasinski, J; Guha, S; Lee, H G

    1999-01-01

    Thermal activation energies of Mg in GaN grown using RF nitrogen source with varying Mg flux were examined using an admittance spectroscopy technique. There was no noticeable difference or trend in the activation energy with varying Mg flux. The thermal activation energy for GaN:Mg was approx 115 meV under the investigated Mg flux range. Negligible persistent photo-conductivity and yellow luminescence peak in PL observed in the samples suggest possible reduction of the thermal activation energies compared to the values in the literature.

  12. Range extension in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using femtosecond-nanosecond dual-beam laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Li, Ziting; Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2017-06-01

    We extend the detection range of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with high-energy nanosecond CO2 laser pulses. The femtosecond laser pulses ionize the molecules and generate filament in air. The free electrons generated in the self-confined plasma channel by the femtosecond laser serve as the seed electrons which cause efficient avalanche ionization in the nanosecond CO2 laser field. We show that the detection distance has been extended by three times with the assistance of femtosecond laser filamentation.

  13. Annihilation detector for an in-beam spectroscopy apparatus to measure the ground state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerzopf, Clemens, E-mail: clemens.sauerzopf@oeaw.ac.at [Stefan Meyer Institute for subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Capon, Aaron A.; Diermaier, Martin; Fleck, Markus; Kolbinger, Bernadette [Stefan Meyer Institute for subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Malbrunot, Chloé [Stefan Meyer Institute for subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Organisation Européenne pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Massiczek, Oswald; Simon, Martin C.; Vamosi, Stefan; Zmeskal, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard [Stefan Meyer Institute for subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2017-02-11

    The matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe today still lacks a quantitative explanation. One possible mechanism that could contribute to the observed imbalance is a violation of the combined Charge-, Parity- and Time symmetries (CPT). A test of CPT symmetry using anti-atoms is being carried out by the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator using a low temperature beam of antihydrogen—the most simple atomic system built only of antiparticles. While hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, antihydrogen is produced in very small quantities in a laboratory framework. A detector for in-beam measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure of antihydrogen has to be able to detect very low signal rates within high background. To fulfil this challenging task, a two layer barrel hodoscope detector was developed. It is built of plastic scintillators with double sided readout via Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The SiPM readout is done using novel, compact and cost efficient electronics that incorporate power supply, amplifier and discriminator on a single board. This contribution will evaluate the performance of the new hodoscope detector. - Highlights: • A novel detector for Antihydrogen was successfully commissioned. • A time of flight resolution of better than 1 ns was achieved. • Rudimentary 3D tracking is possible without bar segmentation.

  14. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  15. Density functional theory calculations of the non-resonant and resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of carbon fullerenes and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; George, Michael W.; Besley, Nicholas A.

    2018-03-01

    The non-resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes is studied with density functional theory in conjunction with short-range corrected functionals. For C60 and C70 the X-ray emission spectra are insensitive to modest structural changes, and absorption onto the fullerene cage has the greatest effect with a broader less structured band observed with the high energy π band reduced in intensity. For carbon nanotubes the X-ray emission spectra are shown to be weakly dependent on the length and chirality of the nanotube. However, some variation with the diameter of the tube is observed in both resonant and non-resonant spectra.

  16. Study of electronic states for V thin films deposited on 6H-SiC substrates by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, M., E-mail: hirai@science.okayama-u.ac.jp [Division of Frontier and Fundamental Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Faculty of Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Okazaki, H.; Yoshida, R.; Tajima, M.; Saeki, K. [Mathematics and Physics, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Muraoka, Y.; Yokoya, T. [Division of Frontier and Fundamental Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Faculty of Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a candidate material for electronic devices to operate upon crucial environment. Electronic states of silicides and/or carbide/graphite formed in metal/SiC contact system is fundamentally important from the view point of device performance. We study interface electronic structure of vanadium (V) thin-film deposited on 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) Si-face by using a soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES). For specimens of V(38 nm)/6H-SiC (substrate) contact systems annealed at 850 deg. C, the Si L{sub 2,3} emission spectra indicate different shapes and peak energies from the substrate. The product of materials such as silicides and/or ternary materials is suggested. Similarly, the C K{alpha} emission spectra show the shape and peak energy characteristic of vanadium carbide including substrate 6H-SiC signal.

  17. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag.

  18. Measurement of position dependence of spectral distribution in primary X-ray beam of CT system using compton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masao; Maeda, Koji; Maeda, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose is to acquire the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system easily under clinical conditions by Compton scatter spectroscopy using a high resolution Schottky CdTe detector recently developed and to estimate the quality and quantity of these spectra compared the relative exposure measured using an ionization chamber with curves measured by the reconstructed spectra. Although the spectral broadening and the fluctuation were slightly shown, the errors of the relative exposure were under 10%. Though the experimental arrangement of this method is so easy and reconstructed algorithm is simple, these results suggested that this method is little influenced by the variation of dose rates or property of the incident x rays. We therefore propose that the Compton scatter spectroscopy with the newly developed Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system under the clinical conditions and useful for quality assurance and quality control of the clinical x-ray CT system. (author)

  19. Volcanic SO2 and SiF4 visualization using 2-D thermal emission spectroscopy – Part 1: Slant-columns and their ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grutter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition and emission rates of volcanic gas plumes provide insight of the geologic internal activity, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol formation and radiative processes around it. Observations are necessary for public security and the aviation industry. Ground-based thermal emission infrared spectroscopy, which uses the radiation of the volcanic gas itself, allows for continuously monitoring during day and night from a safe distance. We present measurements on Popocatépetl volcano based on thermal emission spectroscopy during different campaigns between 2006–2009 using a Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS. The experimental set-up, measurement geometries and analytical algorithms are described. The equipment was operated from a safe distance of 12 km from the volcano at two different spectral resolutions: 0.5 and 4 cm−1. The 2-dimensional scanning capability of the instrument allows for an on-line visualization of the volcanic SO2 plume and its animation. SiF4 was also identified in the infrared spectra recorded at both resolutions. The SiF4/SO2 molecular ratio can be calculated from each image and used as a highly useful parameter to follow changes in volcanic activity. A small Vulcanian eruption was monitored during the night of 16 to 17 November 2008 and strong ash emission together with a pronounced SO2 cloud was registered around 01:00 a.m. LST (Local Standard Time. Enhanced SiF4/SO2 ratios were observed before and after the eruption. A validation of the results from thermal emission measurements with those from absorption spectra of the moon taken at the same time, as well as an error analysis, are presented. The inferred propagation speed from sequential images is used in a subsequent paper (Part 2 to calculate the emission rates at different distances from the crater.

  20. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe–Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T. [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Castro, V. de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@uc3m.es [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C. [FRM II and Physics Department, Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Pareja, R. [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe–Cr–(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe–Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  1. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  3. A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the uncracked and cracked condition of concrete beams using impulse excitation, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic pulse velocity techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, S.; Iliopoulos, A.; Pyl, L.; Sol, H.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The Impulse Excitation Technique (IET) is a useful tool for characterizing the structural condition of concrete. Processing the obtained dynamic parameters (damping ratio, response frequency) as a function of response amplitude, clear and systematic differences appear between intact and cracked specimens, while factors like age and sustained load are also influential. Simultaneously, Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) techniques are used during the three point bending test of the beams in order to supply additional information on the level of damage accumulation which resulted in the specific dynamic behavior revealed by the IET test.

  4. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  5. Electron Beam Damage in Poly(Vinyl Chloride) and Poly(Acrylonitrile) as Observed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    AES spectra of spun-cast films of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) were collected over a period of time to determine specimen damage during exposure to a 10kV electron beam. For the PVC, loss of chlorine was observed over a period of 203 minutes to the extent that the final chlorine concentration was only 20% of its original value. PAN exhibited a loss in nitrogen content over a period of 120 minutes, but the rate of damage to the polymer was significantly less than PVC. Figure 1 shows the atomic concentration in the PVC film as a function of dose (time). It takes a dose of approximately 7.0x10-5 Ccm-5 for the chlorine concentration to fall from its original value by 10% (one definition of critical dose). Figure 2 shows a similar drop in nitrogen concentration in the PAN film as a function of dose. For this polymer, it takes a dose of 1.3x10-3 Ccm-2 for the nitrogen concentration to fall by 10%

  6. Trace gas emissions from the production and use of domestic biofuels in Zambia measured by open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschi, Isaac T.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Ward, Darold E.; Christian, Ted J.; Hao, Wei Min

    2003-07-01

    Domestic biomass fuels (biofuels) were recently estimated to be the second largest source of carbon emissions from global biomass burning. Wood and charcoal provide approximately 90% and 10% of domestic energy in tropical Africa. In September 2000, we used open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to quantify 18 of the most abundant trace gases emitted by wood and charcoal cooking fires and an earthen charcoal-making kiln in Zambia. These are the first in situ measurements of an extensive suite of trace gases emitted by tropical biofuel burning. We report emission ratios (ER) and emission factors (EF) for (in order of abundance) carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), acetic acid (CH3COOH), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (HCHO), ethene (C2H4), ammonia (NH3), acetylene (C2H2), nitric oxide (NO), ethane (C2H6), phenol (C6H5OH), propene (C3H6), formic acid (HCOOH), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydroxyacetaldehyde (HOCH2CHO), and furan (C4H4O). Compared to previous work, our emissions of organic acids and NH3 are 3-6.5 times larger. Another significant finding is that reactive oxygenated organic compounds account for 70-80% of the total nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC). For most compounds, the combined emissions from charcoal production and charcoal burning are larger than the emissions from wood fires by factors of 3-10 per unit mass of fuel burned and ˜2 per unit energy released. We estimate that Zambian savanna fires produce more annual CO2, HCOOH, and NOx than Zambian biofuel use by factors of 2.5, 1.7, and 5, respectively. However, biofuels contribute larger annual emissions of CH4, CH3OH, C2H2, CH3COOH, HCHO, and NH3 by factors of 5.1, 3.9, 2.7, 2.4, 2.2, and 2.0, respectively. Annual CO and C2H4 emissions are approximately equal from both sources. Coupling our data with recent estimates of global biofuel consumption implies that global biomass burning emissions for several compounds are significantly larger than previously

  7. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  8. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  9. On the excess photon noise in single-beam measurements with photo-emissive and photo-conductive cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.

    In this paper the so-called excess photon noise is theoretically considered with regard to noise power measurements with a single, illumined photo-emissive or photo-conductive cell. Starting from a modification of Mandel's stochastic association of the emission of photo-electrons with wave

  10. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy used for the characterization of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepijko, S.A., E-mail: nepijko@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Chernenkaya, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Medjanik, K.; Chernov, S.V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Klimenkov, M. [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Vlasenko, O.V. [Sumy State University, Rimsky-Korsakov str. 2, 40007 Sumy (Ukraine); Petrovskaya, S.S. [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Krzhizhanovsky str. 3, 03142 Kiev (Ukraine); Odnodvorets, L.V. [Sumy State University, Rimsky-Korsakov str. 2, 40007 Sumy (Ukraine); Zaulichnyy, Ya.V. [National Technical University of Ukraine (KPI), Pobedy Av. 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Schönhense, G. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-02-27

    We present the results of a soft X-ray emission spectroscopy study of a-C and CN{sub x} films on a Si(100) substrate. Also for the characterization of the homogeneity in depth of these films electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements with localization better than 4 nm were carried out. In case of CN{sub x} films the highest diamond-like modification occurs in the region close to the Si(100) substrate. The film density decreases with increasing distance from the substrate and becomes almost constant in range of thicknesses more than ~ 2 nm. - Highlights: • CN{sub x} and a-C film densities decrease with the increase of thickness. • Density increases with the decrease of Si(100) substrate temperature at preparation. • Highest concentration of the diamond-like structure is in the substrate vicinity. • It reduces further from the substrate and stabilizes at thickness ≥ 2 nm.

  11. Excited-level lifetimes and hyperfine-structure measurements on ions using collinear laser--ion-beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, J.; Church, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mean lifetimes τ of the Ca II 4p 2 P 1/2 and 4p 2 P 3/2 levels, and the 35 Cl II 4p' 1 F 3 level, have been measured by a variant of the collinear laser--ion-beam lifetime technique applied previously to the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 o level [Jian Jin and D. A. Church, Phys. Rev. A 47, 132 (1993)]. The present results are τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 1/2 )=7.098(0.020) ns, τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 3/2 )=6.924(0.019) ns, and τ(Cl II, 4p' 1 F 3 ) =11.17(0.06) ns. The experimental lifetimes of these, plus the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 level, are compared with available recent many-electron calculations. Typically 1%--3% differences between measurement and ab initio theory are found, while certain semiempirical calculations are in better agreement with experiment. Data for other precise lifetime measurements on alkali-metal systems are compared with recent ab initio and semiempirical calculations to provide perspective on the Ca II results. The hyperfine structure of the 35 Cl II 3d' 1 G 4 --4p' 1 F 3 transition was also measured and analyzed in the course of the measurements, with the resulting hyperfine-structure constants: A( 1 F 3 )=301.9(0.5) MHz, B( 1 F 3 )=-6.7(0.8) MHz, A( 1 G 4 )=205.1(0.5) MHz, and B( 1 G 4 )=-3.9(2.4) MHz

  12. A contribution to the characterisation of natural and industrial crystalline emissions using electron beam and X-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    In this work the composition of dusts of different origin is studied based on the assumption that natural and industrial emissions sources may possibly be differentiated by the emission of characteristic minerals and compounds. Only if some of these compounds or certain groups of compounds can be associated with a distinct emission source, such compounds may be considered as guiding compounds or guiding minerals. In this case the emission sources should be identified unambiguously even over large distances. In the air pollution studies performed in the past, the emphasis has been laid mainly on gases like SO 2 , CO, CO 2 , NOsub(x), and HF, without paying much attention to the crystalline and amorphous components, which are present simultaneously. This study is restricted to the dust-like component of natural and industrial emission sources to get more information on its composition. In part these emissions are less dangerous in the compound state, as for example fluorine in the mica type mineral muskovite (KAl 2 [(OH,F) 2 AlSi 3 O 10 ]. As a working hypothesis it has been assumed that based on a series of investigations these compounds can be identified using electron miscroscopy and electron diffraction. In the presence of larger quantities of emission materials also X-ray techniques as Debye-Scherrer- or gonio methods can be applied. Reliable results can only be obtained by an investigation covering a broad area of industrial production. (orig./RW) [de

  13. Emission characterization of a single CdSe-ZnS nanocrystal with high temporal and spectral resolution by photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, L; Brokmann, X; Spinicelli, P; Hermier, J-P

    2008-01-18

    We report a spectroscopic study of single colloidal CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals at low temperature. We use photon-correlation Fourier spectroscopy, a technique based on measuring the correlations of the intensities detected at the outputs of a Michelson interferometer. Spectral diffusion over a few microeV is evidenced, on a typical time scale of 200 micros. A time resolution as high as 20 micros is obtained, and an upper limit of 6.5 microeV emission linewidth is measured, corresponding to a coherence time of at least 200 ps, similar to the values for epitaxial quantum dots.

  14. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy of astronomical and laboratory sources at 8.5 micron. [absorption line profiles of nitrogen oxide and black body emission from Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, M.; Kostiuk, T.; Cohen, S.; Buhl, D.; Vonthuna, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The first infrared heterodyne spectrometer using tuneable semiconductor (PbSe) diode lasers has been constructed and was used near 8.5 micron to measure absorption line profiles of N2O in the laboratory and black body emission from the Moon and from Mars. Spectral information was recorded over a 200 MHz bandwidth using an 8-channel filter bank. The resolution was 25 MHz and the minimum detectable (black body) power was 1 x 10 to the minus 16th power watts for 8 minutes of integration. The results demonstrate the usefulness of heterodyne spectroscopy for the study of remote and local sources in the infrared.

  15. Goldtraces on wedge-shaped artefacts from late neolithic of south Scandinavia analysed by proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlberg, M.; Akselsson, R.; Forkman, B.; Rausing, G.

    1975-01-01

    Visible coloured traces on the surface of two selected wedge-shaped artefacts (pendants) of slate from the late Neolithic of South Scandinavia was analysed by means of proton-induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). PIXE is shown to be a feasible tool in investigating surface layers of archeological significance. Three different gold-silver alloys was found on the two pendants. The results indicate that we shall have to reconsider the general accepted theories on the economic basis of the early Bronze Age in the area. (author)

  16. Selective solid phase extraction of copper using a new Cu(II)-imprinted polymer and determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES)

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri; Hazer, Orhan; Yilmaz, Hayriye

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the preparation of a novel Cu(II)-ion imprinted polymer using 2-thiozylmethacrylamide (TMA) for on-line preconcentration of Cu(II) prior to its determination by inductively coupled optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Cu(II)-TMA monomer (complex) was synthesized and copolymerized via bulk polymerization method in the presence of ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate cross-linker. The resulting polymer was washed with 5% (v/v) HNO3 to remove Cu(II) ions and then with water until a...

  17. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  18. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  19. A Consortium to Develop the Medical Uses of NMR Imaging, NMR Spectroscopy, and Positron Emission Tomography. Final report, 6/1/92 - 5/31/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    During years one, two and three, this project concentrated on quantifying skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism for assessment of ischemia. The ultimate goal is to provide a non-invasive method of measuring viability of skeletal muscle following traumatic vascular compromise. The technique involves the use of both dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with compartmental model analysis of the resulting time activity relationships and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS). PET scanning is ideally suited for this project because of the capability to utilize labeled organic compounds. Blood flow was measured with N-13 ammonia. Metabolism was assessed with F-18 deoxyglucose (FDG)

  20. Photon emission statistics and photon tracking in single-molecule spectroscopy of molecular aggregates : Dimers and trimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemsma, E. A.; Knoester, J.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the generating function formalism, we investigate broadband photon statistics of emission for single dimers and trimers driven by a continuous monochromatic laser field. In particular, we study the first and second moments of the emission statistics, which are the fluorescence excitation