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Sample records for beam drift compression

  1. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  2. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.E.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-08-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a {approx} 10 cm long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter {approx} 5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8T field. Measured plasma density of {ge} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} meets the challenge of n{sub p}/Zn{sub b} > 1, where n{sub p} and n{sub b} are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the plasma ions.

  3. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  4. Short-Pulse, Compressed Ion Beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, Peter A; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P; Grote, David; Ji, Qing; Kaganovich, I D; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynam...

  5. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  6. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  7. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  8. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Hoon, M.J.L.

    2001-05-01

    Longitudinal compression of space-charge dominated beams can be achieved by imposing a head-to-tail velocity tilt on the beam. This tilt has to be carefully tailored, such that it is removed by the longitudinal space-charge repulsion by the time the beam reaches the end of the drift compression section. The transverse focusing lattice should be designed such that all parts of the beam stay approximately matched, while the beam smoothly expands transversely to the larger beam radius needed in the final focus system following drift compression. In this thesis, several drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression. The occurrence of mismatches due to a rapidly increasing current was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of drift compression to errors in the initial velocity tilt and current profile was studied. These calculations were done using a new computer code that accurately calculates the longitudinal electric field in the space-charge dominated regime.

  9. Longitudinal compression of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the longitudinal compression of ion beams which is necessary in some designs of drivers intended to realize inertial thermonuclear fusion by heavy ions. Taking space-charge forces in the beams into account, two compression schemes are investigated: the first preserves the longitudinal phase-space area of the beams, and the second allows an increase of the phase-space area. The compression-system parameters are optimized for an example of a driver for inertial thermonuclear fusion by heavy ions with an energy of 10 MJ and with a pulse length of 25 ns on the target

  10. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  11. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  12. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  13. PROGRESS IN BEAM FOCUSING AND COMPRESSION FOR WARM-DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K+ ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ∼50-fold current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available volt seconds; (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be >1013 cm-3

  14. The Single Pass RF Driver: Final beam compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Robert, E-mail: rjburke@fusionpowercorporation.com

    2014-01-01

    The Single Pass RF Driver (SPRFD) compacts the beam from the linac without storage rings by manipulations that take advantage of the multiplicity of isotopes (16), the preserved µbunch structure, and increased total linac current. Magnetic switches on a first set of delay lines rearrange the internal structure of the various isotopic beams. A second set of delay lines sets the relative timing of the 16 isotopic beam sections so they will telescope at the pellet, in one of multiple fusion chambers, e.g. 10. Shortening each isotopic beam section uses preservation of the µbunch structure up to the final ∼2 km drift before final focus. Just before the final drift, differential acceleration of the µbunches in each isotopic beam section (128 total) launches an axial collapse, referred to as the “Slick”. The µbunches interpenetrate as their centers of mass move toward each other and individual µbunches lengthen due to their momentum spread. In longitudinal phase space they slide over one another as they lengthen in time and slim down in instantaneous energy spread. The permissible amount of µbunch lengthening is set by the design pulse shape at the pellet, which varies for different groups of isotopes. In narrow bands of ranges according to the role for each isotope group in the pellet, the ranges extend from 1 to 10 g/cm{sup 2} to drive the cylinder barrel and thin hemispherical end caps, to heat the ∼0.5 g/cm{sup 2}ρR fast ignition zone, and to improve the quasi-sphericity of the compression of the fast ignition zones at the pellet's ends. Because the µbunch–µbunch momentum differences are correlated, time-ramped beamline transport elements close after the differential accelerator are used to correct the associated shifts of focal point. Beam neutralization is needed after the differential acceleration until adjacent bunches begin to overlap. Concurrent collapse of each isotope and telescoping of the 16 isotopes cause the current in each beamline

  15. Design of general apochromatic drift-quadrupole beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, C. A.; Adli, E.

    2016-07-01

    Chromatic errors are normally corrected using sextupoles in regions of large dispersion. In low emittance linear accelerators, use of sextupoles can be challenging. Apochromatic focusing is a lesser-known alternative approach, whereby chromatic errors of Twiss parameters are corrected without the use of sextupoles, and has consequently been subject to renewed interest in advanced linear accelerator research. Proof of principle designs were first established by Montague and Ruggiero and developed more recently by Balandin et al. We describe a general method for designing drift-quadrupole beam lines of arbitrary order in apochromatic correction, including analytic expressions for emittance growth and other merit functions. Worked examples are shown for plasma wakefield accelerator staging optics and for a simple final focus system.

  16. Drift distance survey in direct plasma injection scheme for high current beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between a laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme, which uses a laser ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration such as several tens of milliamperes, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C6+ beam was accelerated. We confirmed that matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  17. Determination of reversed plasma current profile from the experiments of magnetic compression of a microsecond relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring technique for distribution of reversed plasma current in relativistic electron beam crosssection which is based on velocity measurement of azimutj rotation of the beam spreading within the external magnetic field is realized experimentally. Measurements of reversed current profile are carried out during the experiments on magnetic compression of powerful microsecond relativistic electron beam (1 MV, 75 kA, 4μs, 100kj, 5 kA/cm2). Data on the level of beam charged neutralization at gas lowpressure in drift chamber are obtained

  18. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  19. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  20. Soft beams: When capillarity induces axial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, S.; Antkowiak, A.; Marigo, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition to the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet, we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfies the classical Young-Dupré relation.

  1. Beam divergence due to convective drift instabilities in an applied-B ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-frequency instability is identified, which is convected through an applied-B ion diode by the ion beam, is driven by the cross-field flow of electrons relative to drifting ions, and produces a spread in beam velocity. The consequences of this convective instability are explored in detail, and many of the aspects needed for application to ion beam physics are calculated and combined into a single unified theory. Many aspects of this instability agree with the frequency range, growth properties, spatial structure, saturation level, and beam spread seen in experiments and computer simulations

  2. Beam dynamics design for uranium drift tube linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; He, Yuan; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-07-01

    KONUS beam dynamics design of uranium DTL with LORASR code is presented. The 238U34+ beam, whose current is 5.0 emA, is accelerated from injection energy of 0.35 MeV/u to output energy of 1.30 MeV/u by IH-DTL operated at 81.25 MHz in HIAF project at IMP of CAS. It achieves a transmission efficiency of 94.95% with a cavity length of 267.8 cm. The optimization aims are the reduction of emittance growth, beam loss and project costs. Because of the requirements of CW mode operation, the designed average acceleration gradient is about 2.48 MV/m. The maximum axial field is 10.2 MV/m, meanwhile the Kilpatrick breakdown field is 10.56 MV/m at 81.25 MHz.

  3. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF, pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  4. Double beam near-infrared spectrometer for compensation of background water absorption and instrumental drift in intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Min; PENG Dan; XU Ke-xin

    2007-01-01

    A double beam near-infrared spectrometer is developed to compensate the water absorption and instrumental drift in intensity. The spectrometer maybe used for both single and double beam measurements, and the two operation modes are compared. The results show that the double beam technique eliminates instrumental drift in the single beam measurement and therefore the stability of the system increases by more than 20%. The compensation of the double beam system on water absorption is verified by the measurement of fat content in milk. The results show that the spectrum data based on double beam mode get better calibration model and lower prediction error than traditional single beam mode.

  5. Six beam spherical compression of plasma focus guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary experiment with a one beam plasma focus is carried out to confirm plasma formation with the lowest input energy of 0.2 kJ for six beam spherical compression of plasma focus guns. The plasma front of this cableless gun can be used for compression and for the coupling of six guns situated along three rectangular axes, providing a good plasma focus pinch instantaneously or many plasma focus pinches continuously. The whole device with the energy bank is mounted on a sphere, and the minimum requirement for the plasma chamber of this sphere is a diameter of ∼ 22 cm. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs

  6. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  7. Electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a high current drift tube linac for LEHIPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, R.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2014-06-01

    We have performed detailed electromagnetic and beam dynamics studies of a 352.21 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) that will accelerate a 30 mA CW proton beam from 3 to 20 MeV. At such high currents space charge effects are important, and therefore the effect of linear as well as non-linear space charge has been studied (corresponding to uniform and Gaussian initial beam distributions), in order to avoid space charge instabilities. To validate the electromagnetic simulations, a 1.2 m long prototype of the DTL was fabricated. RF measurements performed on the prototype were in good agreement with the simulations. A detailed simulation study of beam halos was also performed, which showed that beyond a current of 10 mA, significant longitudinal beam halos are excited even for a perfectly matched beam, whereas for a mis-matched beam transverse beam halos are also excited. However, these do not lead to any beam loss within the DTL.

  8. Drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hongli, E-mail: kaixinguoan@163.com [College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Yuen, Manwai, E-mail: nevetsyuen@hotmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Information Technology, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, 10 Po Ling Road, Tai Po, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the analytical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with dependent-density viscosity. By using the characteristic method, we successfully obtain a class of drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the Navier-Stokes model wherein the velocity components are governed by a generalized Emden dynamical system. In particular, when the viscosity variables are taken the same as Yuen [M. W. Yuen, “Analytical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations,” J. Math. Phys. 49, 113102 (2008)], our solutions constitute a generalization of that obtained by Yuen. Interestingly, numerical simulations show that the analytical solutions can be used to explain the drifting phenomena of the propagation wave like Tsunamis in oceans.

  9. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  10. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs

  11. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  12. Evaluation of a wavelet-based compression algorithm applied to the silicon drift detectors data of the ALICE experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Falchieri, Davide; Masotti, Matteo

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performances of a wavelet-based compression algorithm applied to the data produced by the silicon drift detectors of the ALICE experiment at CERN. This compression algorithm is a general purpose lossy technique, in other words, its application could prove useful even on a wide range of other data reduction's problems. In particular the design targets relevant for our wavelet- based compression algorithm are the following ones: a high- compression coefficient, a reconstruction error as small as possible and a very limited execution time. Interestingly, the results obtained are quite close to the ones achieved by the algorithm implemented in the first prototype of the chip CARLOS, the chip that will be used in the silicon drift detectors readout chain.

  13. Compensation of errors due to incident beam drift in a 3 DOF measurement system for linear guide motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Mao, Shuai; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-11-01

    A measurement system with three degrees of freedom (3 DOF) that compensates for errors caused by incident beam drift is proposed. The system's measurement model (i.e. its mathematical foundation) is analyzed, and a measurement module (i.e. the designed orientation measurement unit) is developed and adopted to measure simultaneously straightness errors and the incident beam direction; thus, the errors due to incident beam drift can be compensated. The experimental results show that the proposed system has a deviation of 1 μm in the range of 200 mm for distance measurements, and a deviation of 1.3 μm in the range of 2 mm for straightness error measurements.

  14. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  16. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  17. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J. [Fermilab; Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, China; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois University; Fermilab; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois University; Prokop, C. R. [Northern Illinois University

    2014-08-01

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ~37 MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25 μm (emittance ratio is ~400), 0.13 μm, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41 μm, 0.20 μm, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2-nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  18. Datapath system for multiple electron beam lithography systems using image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeehong; Savari, Serap A.; Harris, H. Rusty

    2013-07-01

    The datapath throughput of electron beam lithography systems can be improved by applying lossless image compression to the layout images and using an electron beam writer that contains a decoding circuit packed in single silicon to decode the compressed image on-the-fly. In our past research, we had introduced Corner2, a lossless layout image compression algorithm that achieved significantly better performance in compression ratio, encoding/decoding speed, and decoder memory requirement than Block C4. However, it assumed a somewhat different writing strategy from those currently suggested by multiple electron beam (MEB) system designers. The Corner2 algorithm is modified so that it can support the writing strategy of an MEB system.

  19. Method of controlling coherent synchroton radiation-driven degradation of beam quality during bunch length compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2012-07-10

    A method of avoiding CSR induced beam quality defects in free electron laser operation by a) controlling the rate of compression and b) using a novel means of integrating the compression with the remainder of the transport system: both are accomplished by means of dispersion modulation. A large dispersion is created in the penultimate dipole magnet of the compression region leading to rapid compression; this large dispersion is demagnified and dispersion suppression performed in a final small dipole. As a result, the bunch is short for only a small angular extent of the transport, and the resulting CSR excitation is small.

  20. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  1. Note: Autocollimation with ultra-high resolution and stability using telephoto objective together with optical enlargement and beam drift compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Tan, Xinran; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    An autocollimation (AC) setup with ultra-high resolution and stability for micro-angle measurement is presented. The telephoto objective, which is characterized in long focal length at a compact structure size, and the optical enlargement unit, which can magnify the image displacement to improve its measurement resolution and accuracy, are used to obtain an ultra-high measurement resolution of the AC. The common-path beam drift compensation is used to suppress the drift of measurement results, which is evident in the high-resolution AC, thus to obtain a high measurement stability. Experimental results indicate that an effective resolution of better than 0.0005 arc sec (2.42 nrad) over a measurement range of ±30 arc sec and a 2-h stability of 0.0061 arc sec (29.57 nrad) can be achieved. PMID:27587181

  2. The effect of the conductivity of drift chamber walls on the dynamics of a relativistic electron beam with a virtual cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarin, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of conductivity of walls of a drift chamber of the axial vircator on the behavior of a relativistic electron beam with a supercritical current was investigated. The dynamics of a relativistic electron beam is shown to be characterized by the formation of a virtual cathode of complex structure with two or three potential minima in the azimuthal direction, which rotate around the drift space axis. It is established that variation in the conductivity of drift chamber walls leads to stepwise switching of the generation frequency and a sharp change in the output power. Dependences of the output radiation power of the investigated vircator system on the conductivity of drift chamber walls for two characteristic regimes of the dynamics of a relativistic electron beam were obtained.

  3. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  4. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  5. PROPOSED PREDICTIVE EQUATION FOR DIAGONAL COMPRESSIVE CAPACITY OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantipidok, Patarapol; Kobayashi, Chikaharu; Matsumoto, Koji; Watanabe, Ken; Niwa, Junichiro

    The current standard specifications of JSCE fo r the diagonal compressive capacity of RC beams only consider the effect of the compressive strength of conc rete and are not applicable to high strength concrete. This research aims to investigate the effect of vari ous parameters on the diagonal compressive capacity and propose a predictive equation. Twenty five I-beams were tested by three-point bending. The verification of the effects of concrete strength, stirrup ratio and spacing, shear span to effective depth ratio, flange width to web width ratio and effective depth was performed. The diagonal compressive capacity had a linear relationship to stirrup spacing regardless of its diameter. The effect of spacing became more significant with higher concrete strength. Thus, the effect of concrete strength and stirrup spacing was interrelated. On the other hand, there were slight effects of the other parameters on the diagonal compressive capacity. Finally, a simple empirical equation for predicting the diagonal compressive capacity of RC beams was proposed. The proposed equation had an adequate simplicity and can provide an accurate estimation of the diagonal compressive capacity than the existing equations.

  6. DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF AL-ALLOY FOAM BEAM DAMAGED BY COMPRESSIVE FATIGUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Gaun Kim; Ilhyun Kim; Amkee Kim; Seung-Joon Kim; Junhong Park

    2008-01-01

    The permanent residual strain in aluminum (Al) alloy foams induced by compressive fatigue gradually increases with the increasing number of loading cycles.Consequently,the progressive shortening of Al-alloy foam degrades the dynamic material performance by the failure and ratcheting of multi-cells in the foam.In this paper,the dynamic properties of Al-alloy foams damaged by compressive fatigue were studied.The beam specimens with various residual strains were made by cyclic compression-compression stress.The dynamic bending modulus and loss factor were evaluated by using a beam transfer function method.As a result,the dynamic bending stiffness of Al-alloy foam turned out to be decreased due to damage while the loss factor was improved because of the increasing energy dissipation of such factors as cracked cell walls formed during the shortening process of the foam.The loss factor shows a manifest dependence on the fatigue residual strain.

  7. An evaluation of the sandwich beam compression test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sandwich beam in a four-point bending compressive test method for advanced composites is evaluated. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were obtained for graphite/polyimide beam specimens tested at 117 K, room temperature, and 589 K. Tensile elastic properties obtained from the specimens were assumed to be equal to the compressive elastic properties and were used in the analysis. Strain gages were used to record strain data. A three-dimensional finite-element model was used to examine the effects of the honeycomb core on measured composite mechanical properties. Results of the analysis led to the following conclusions: (1) a near uniaxial compressive stress state existed in the top cover and essentially all the compressive load was carried by the top cover; (2) laminate orientation, test temperature, and type of honeycomb core material were shown to affect the type of beam failure; and (3) the test method can be used to obtain compressive elastic constants over the temperature range 117 to 589 K.

  8. Performance of composite I-beams under axial compression and bending load modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Y.A.; Ali, F.A.; Sahari, B.B.; Saad, E.M.A

    2005-04-15

    An experimental and finite-element analyses for glass/epoxy composite I-beams have been carried out. Four, six, eight and 10 layers of woven fabric glass/epoxy composite I-beams were fabricated by a hand lay-up (molding) process. Quasi-static axial crushing and bending loading modes were used for this investigation. The load-displacement response was obtained and the energy absorption values were calculated for all the composite I-beams. Three tests were done for each composite I-beams type and each loading case for the results conformation. The second part of this study includes the elastic behavior of composite I-beams of the same dimensions and materials using finite-element analysis. The woven fabric glass/epoxy composite I-beams mechanical properties have been obtained from tensile tests. Results from this investigation show that the load required and the specific energy absorption for composite I-beams under axial compression load were higher than those for three and four point bending. On the other hand, the loads required for composite I-beams under four point bending were higher than those for three point bending, while the specific energy absorption for composite I-beams under three point bending were higher than those for four point bending. The first crushing loads difference between the experimental and finite-element results fell in the 3.6-10.92% range for axial compression tests, while fell in the 1.44-12.99% and 4.94-22.0% range for three and four point bending, respectively.

  9. Combined Compression and Shear Structural Evaluation of Stiffened Panels Fabricated Using Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Erik Walter

    2008-01-01

    Unitized aircraft structures have the potential to be more efficient than current aircraft structures. The Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) process can be used to manufacture unitized aircraft structures. The structural efficiency of blade stiffened panels made with EBF3 was compared to panels made by integrally machining from thick plate. The panels were tested under two load cases in a combined compression-shear load test fixture. One load case tested the panels' responses to a...

  10. Longitudinal motion in bunch compression and in the external beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy ion fusion simulation experiments on the SNS synchrotron in the fields of; momentum spread increase during debunching, storage ring bunch compression experiments at 70.44 MeV, and, briefly, longitudinal motion in external beam line, were evaluated qualitatively. Certain features that need attention were noted but overall it was concluded that the proposed experiments on the SNS would yield considerable insight into HIF drivers. (U.K.)

  11. Pseudo-beam method for compressive buckling characteristics analysis of space inflatable load-carrying structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changguo Wang; Huifeng Tan; Xingwen Du

    2009-01-01

    This paper extends Le van's work to the case of nonlinear problem and the complicated configuration. The wrinkling stress distribution and the pressure effects are also included in our analysis. Pseudo-beam method is presented based on the inflatable beam theory to model the inflatable structures as a set of inflatable beam elements with a pre-stressed state. In this method, the discretized nonlinear equations are given based upon the virtual work principle with a 3-node Timoshenko's beam model. Finite element simulation is performed by using a 3-node BEAM189 element incorporating ANSYS nonlinear program. The pressure effect is equivalent included in our method by modifying beam element cross-section parameters related to pressure. A benchmark example, the bending case of an inflatable cantilever beam, is performed to verify the accuracy of our pro-posed method. The comparisons reveal that the numerical results obtained with our method are close to open published analytical and membrane finite element results. The method is then used to evaluate the whole buckling and the load-carrying characteristics of an inflatable support frame subjected to a compression force. The wrinkling stress and region characteristics are also shown in the end. This method gives better convergence characteristics, and requires much less computation time. It is very effective to deal with the whole load-carrying ability analytical problems for large scale inflatable structures with complex configuration.

  12. Exact matched-beam envelopes for undepressed transport in a quadrupole lattice with unequal drift lengths and arbitrary field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958, Courant and Snyder analyzed the problem of alternating-gradient beam transport and treated a model without focusing gaps or space charge. Recently we revisited their work and found the exactsolution for matched-beam envelopes in a linear quadrupole lattice [O.A. Anderson and L.L. LoDestro, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 2009]. We extend that work here to include the effect of gaps. We derive the exact envelopes and show results for various field strengths, occupancies eta,and gap-length ratios. We find the peak envelope excursion. It has a broad minimum as a function of the phase advance sigma (typically around 34o) over which it varies less than +-1percent. The phase-advance numbers also change little over the full range of gap ratios. However, the required field strengths vary appreciably. In the second stable band, the higher field strength necessitated by the lower occupancy accentuates the remarkable compression effect predicted for the FD (gapless) model.

  13. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  14. 校正激光光束指向漂移的算法研究%Research of algorithm to correct direction drifts of laser beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽霞; 林妩媚; 廖志杰; 王瑞林

    2012-01-01

    In order to obtain stable laser beam, random deviations of light beams should be corrected. Taking the progress of adjusting direction drifts of pulse laser beam with fast steering mirrors in the beam delivery system as an example, an algorithm based on moving average ( MA) correction mechanism was used to simulate the correction outcomes with or without ground jitters. MA and moving standard deviation (MSD) are used to evaluate the correction effects. The results indicate that this algorithm can control the position excursions on the plane of beam delivery system caused by the direction drifts of laser beam effectively, and the MA corrected has a big jump between n ~1n pulses, for example, the optimal MA can be reduced to r-1/2 times (n is, pulse numbers in a window). At the same time, there is a sudden decline in MSD between n- ~2n pulses, and soon afterwards, MSD is going to be sticking. Meanwhile, the drifts can be restrained while loading the ground jitters, and the dropping amplitude is bigger than without the ground jitters. The results show thai the key of applications lies in construction of the appropriate corrections. What is more, this algorithm which is practical can achieve real-time control of direction drifts.%为了获得稳定的激光光束,需要对其随机漂移进行校正.以光束传递系统中快速反射镜校正脉冲激光器自身指向漂移的过程为例,采用一种基于移动平均值校正原理的算法,对加载地面抖动前后的校正效果进行了仿真模拟.仿真结果显示,该算法可以使指向漂移经过长距离传输后引入的位置偏移显著降低;校正后的移动平均值相对于校正前的有较大降幅,最优处约降至原来的n -1/2(n为一个窗口内的脉冲数);校正后的移动标准偏差值也明显下降.结果表明,该算法的关键在于提出合适的补偿量,具有实用性,可以实现对激光光束指向漂移的闭环实时校正.

  15. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  16. An evaluation of the sandwich beam in four-point bending as a compressive test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental phase of the study included compressive tests on HTS/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide, 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, and 5052 aluminum honeycomb at room temperature, and tensile tests on graphite/polyimide at room temperature, -157 C, and 316 C. Elastic properties and strength data are presented for three laminates. The room temperature elastic properties were generally found to differ in tension and compression with Young's modulus values differing by as much as twenty-six percent. The effect of temperature on modulus and strength was shown to be laminate dependent. A three-dimensional finite element analysis predicted an essentially uniform, uniaxial compressive stress state in the top flange test section of the sandwich beam. In conclusion, the sandwich beam can be used to obtain accurate, reliable Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio data for advanced composites; however, the ultimate compressive stress for some laminates may be influenced by the specimen geometry.

  17. Lateral-torsional buckling of compressed and highly variable cross section beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Ida; Pasquino, Mario

    2016-06-01

    In the critical state of a beam under central compression a flexural-torsional equilibrium shape becomes possible in addition to the fundamental straight equilibrium shape and the Euler bending. Particularly, torsional configuration takes place in all cases where the line of shear centres does not correspond with the line of centres of mass. This condition is obtained here about a z-axis highly variable section beam; with the assumptions that shear centres are aligned and line of centres is bound to not deform. For the purpose, let us evaluate an open thin wall C-cross section with flanges width and web height linearly variables along z-axis in order to have shear centres axis approximately aligned with gravity centres axis. Thus, differential equations that govern the problem are obtained. Because of the section variability, the numerical integration of differential equations that gives the true critical load is complex and lengthy. For this reason, it is given an energetic formulation of the problem by the theorem of minimum total potential energy (Ritz-Rayleigh method). It is expected an experimental validation that proposes the model studied.

  18. An experimental study of the strength of composite-reinforced beams and bars in transverse bending and axial compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhankhotov, S.O.; Panfilov, B.V.; Spichkova, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the strength and fracture characteristics of composite-reinforced beams and short and long bars of aluminum alloys in transverse bending and axial compression. The reinforcement materials include carbon and boron composites with a polymer matrix as well as boron/aluminum. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using structures reinforced by unidirectional composites. In aerospace applications, the use of composite reinforcements can significantly reduce the weight of structures. 6 refs.

  19. Improved compressed sensing-based cone-beam CT reconstruction using adaptive prior image constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Xing, Lei; Davidi, Ran; Li, Ruijiang; Qian, Jianguo; Lee, Rena

    2012-04-01

    Volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) images are acquired repeatedly during a course of radiation therapy and a natural question to ask is whether CBCT images obtained earlier in the process can be utilized as prior knowledge to reduce patient imaging dose in subsequent scans. The purpose of this work is to develop an adaptive prior image constrained compressed sensing (APICCS) method to solve this problem. Reconstructed images using full projections are taken on the first day of radiation therapy treatment and are used as prior images. The subsequent scans are acquired using a protocol of sparse projections. In the proposed APICCS algorithm, the prior images are utilized as an initial guess and are incorporated into the objective function in the compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction process. Furthermore, the prior information is employed to detect any possible mismatched regions between the prior and current images for improved reconstruction. For this purpose, the prior images and the reconstructed images are classified into three anatomical regions: air, soft tissue and bone. Mismatched regions are identified by local differences of the corresponding groups in the two classified sets of images. A distance transformation is then introduced to convert the information into an adaptive voxel-dependent relaxation map. In constructing the relaxation map, the matched regions (unchanged anatomy) between the prior and current images are assigned with smaller weight values, which are translated into less influence on the CS iterative reconstruction process. On the other hand, the mismatched regions (changed anatomy) are associated with larger values and the regions are updated more by the new projection data, thus avoiding any possible adverse effects of prior images. The APICCS approach was systematically assessed by using patient data acquired under standard and low-dose protocols for qualitative and quantitative comparisons. The APICCS method provides an

  20. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions’ charge states, and therefore, the ions’ energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 ÷ 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 ÷ 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  1. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, A; Beebe, E N; Raparia, D

    2013-03-01

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 ÷ 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 ÷ 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  2. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  3. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF; Validacion en el Test Beam del CERN/GIF de la electronica de Lectura de las Camaras de Muones del Experimento CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M. c.; Marin, J.; Oller, J. C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L. J.

    2002-07-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  4. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high power fast laser beam transportation and pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M.; Dutin, C. F.; Bradley, T. D.; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on recent design and fabrication of Kagome type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for the purpose of high power fast laser beam transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all Kagome fibers) of 40dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single modedness, low dispersion and relatively low banding loss makes it an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74μJ, 850fs and 40kHz repetition rate ultra-short pulse at 1550nm has been faithfully delivered with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105μJ laser pulse from 850fs to 300fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  5. On the correct interpretation of compression experiments of micropillars produced by a focused ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Avraam A.; Michos, Konstantinos; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-08-01

    The modest goal of this short note is to shed some light on the correct interpretation of micro/nanopillar compression experiments. We propose a modification of the way the stress-strain response in such experiments is calculated, aiming at answering open questions pertaining to discrepancies between the elastic moduli values calculated through micropillar compression experiments with those of the bulk materials, as well as the brittle-to-ductile transition in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) when the size of the pillars is reduced below a certain threshold value.

  6. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    1999-07-08

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches.

  7. Ion detection device and method with compressing ion-beam shutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2009-05-26

    An ion detection device, method and computer readable medium storing instructions for applying voltages to shutter elements of the detection device to compress ions in a volume defined by the shutter elements and to output the compressed ions to a collector. The ion detection device has a chamber having an inlet and receives ions through the inlet, a shutter provided in the chamber opposite the inlet and configured to allow or prevent the ions to pass the shutter, the shutter having first and second shutter elements, a collector provided in the chamber opposite the shutter and configured to collect ions passed through the shutter, and a processing unit electrically connected to the first and second shutter elements. The processing unit applies, during a first predetermined time interval, a first voltage to the first shutter element and a second voltage to the second shutter element, the second voltage being lower than the first voltage such that ions from the inlet enter a volume defined by the first and second shutter elements, and during a second predetermined time interval, a third voltage to the first shutter element, higher than the first voltage, and a fourth voltage to the second shutter element, the third voltage being higher than the fourth voltage such that ions that entered the volume are compressed as the ions exit the volume and new ions coming from the inlet are prevented from entering the volume. The processing unit is electrically connected to the collector and configured to detect the compressed ions based at least on a current received from the collector and produced by the ions collected by the collector.

  8. Digital Beam Forming and Compressive Sensing Based DOA Estimation in MIMO Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents different processing schemes that have been investigated in order to evaluate the direction of arrival (DOA) with a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. Conventional digital beam forming (DBF) and super resolution algorithm (MUSIC) have been applied. The results provided b

  9. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2008-06-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally-applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage ({approx} 8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO{sub 3} source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios {approx} 120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high energy density physics applications.

  10. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Emaury, Florian; Fourcade Dutin, Coralie; Saraceno, Clara J.; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Olivier H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output powe...

  11. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 μm over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is ±1 mm. (orig.)

  12. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  13. Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for beam delivery and pulse compression of high-power ultrafast lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, C. J.; Emaury, F.; Diebold, A.; Schriber, C.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Südmeyer, T.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2015-02-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the last years in the field of ultrafast high-power sources. Among the different laser technologies driving this progress, thin-disk lasers (TDLs) have gained significant ground, both from amplifiers and modelocked oscillators. Modelocked TDLs are particularly attractive, as they allow for unprecedented high energy and average powers directly from an oscillator. The exponential progress in the performance of these sources drives growing needs for efficient means of beam delivery and pulse compression at high average power ( 10 MW). This remains a challenging regime for standard fiber solutions: microstructured large-mode-area silica photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are good candidates, but peak powers are limited to ≈4-6 MW by self-focusing. Hollow-core (HC) capillaries are adapted for higher peak powers, but exhibit high losses and are not suitable for compact beam delivery. In parallel to the progress achieved in the performance of ultrafast laser systems, recent progress in novel hollow-core PCF designs are currently emerging as an excellent solution for these challenges. In particular, Inhibited-coupling Kagome-type HC-PCFs are particularly promising: their intrinsic guiding properties allow for extremely high damage thresholds, low losses over wide transmission windows and ultra-low dispersion. In our most recent results, we achieve pulse compression in the hundred-watt average power regime using Kagome-type HC-PCFs. We launch 127-W, 18-μJ, 740-fs pulses from our modelocked TDL into an Ar-filled fiber (13 bar), reaching 93% transmission. The resulting spectral broadening allows us to compress the pulses to 88 fs at 112 W of average power, reaching 105 MW of peak power, at 88% compression efficiency. These results demonstrate the outstanding suitability of Kagome HC-PCFs for compression and beam delivery of state-of-the-art kilowatt-class ultrafast systems.

  14. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  15. The CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B. [and others

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  16. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows: application to baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations and to drift-flux model; Methodes de correction de pression pour les ecoulements compressibles: application aux equations de Navier-Stokes barotropes et au modele de derive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldo, L

    2007-11-15

    We develop in this PhD thesis a simulation tool for bubbly flows encountered in some late phases of a core-melt accident in pressurized water reactors, when the flow of molten core and vessel structures comes to chemically interact with the concrete of the containment floor. The physical modelling is based on the so-called drift-flux model, consisting of mass balance and momentum balance equations for the mixture (Navier-Stokes equations) and a mass balance equation for the gaseous phase. First, we propose a pressure correction scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations based on mixed non-conforming finite elements. An ad hoc discretization of the advection operator, by a finite volume technique based on a dual mesh, ensures the stability of the velocity prediction step. A priori estimates for the velocity and the pressure yields the existence of the solution. We prove that this scheme is stable, in the sense that the discrete entropy is decreasing. For the conservation equation of the gaseous phase, we build a finite volume discretization which satisfies a discrete maximum principle. From this last property, we deduce the existence and the uniqueness of the discrete solution. Finally, on the basis of these works, a conservative and monotone scheme which is stable in the low Mach number limit, is build for the drift-flux model. This scheme enjoys, moreover, the following property: the algorithm preserves a constant pressure and velocity through moving interfaces between phases (i.e. contact discontinuities of the underlying hyperbolic system). In order to satisfy this property at the discrete level, we build an original pressure correction step which couples the mass balance equation with the transport terms of the gas mass balance equation, the remaining terms of the gas mass balance being taken into account with a splitting method. We prove the existence of a discrete solution for the pressure correction step. Numerical results are presented; they

  17. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  18. 基于DMTD多普勒补偿的互补码脉冲压缩%Implementation of Complementary Codes Pulse Compression Based on DMTD for Compensating Doppler Drift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田黎育; 刘斌

    2013-01-01

    为解决相位编码脉冲压缩信号的旁瓣导致大目标信号的旁瓣覆盖小目标,降低雷达对小目标的检测能力,提出一种基于数字动目标检测(DMTD)的交替发射互补码的方法,对正码和补码回波分别做MTD,然后分两步进行相位补偿,并分别脉压和叠加(去旁瓣).该方法能有效地补偿多普勒频移和分时发射导致的相位差,保持了脉压后正码和补码回波信号旁瓣的互补性.由于是交替发射正码和补码,能有效降低目标RCS的角闪烁导致的回波能量起伏带来的影响.以四相互补码为例进行了仿真,结果表明,该方法补偿了由于分时发射造成的互补码之间的初始相位差,脉冲压缩后对互补码进行叠加,得到了低旁瓣的脉冲压缩结果.%The range sidelobe of phase-coded compression signals could induce the problem that the sidelobe of a large target might mask the presence of nearby smaller target, which reduce the ability of radar to detect the small target. Complementary codes in theory can solute this problem well, but, in practice, complementary codes have Doppler sensitivity problem: as the increase of Doppler frequency drift, complementarity of range sidelobe between the pair of complementary codes would reduce rapidly, which leads to the rise of sidelobe. To attack the problem above, a method of alternative transmit the complementary codes based on Digital Moving Target Detect (DMTD) is presented in this research. In processing, firstly, it should separately do MTD to positive code echo matrix and complementary code echo matrix. Then the phase difference would be compensated. At last, the pulse compression and superposition would be carried out to remove sidelobe. The presented method can effectively compensate the Doppler frequency shift and phase difference between the pair of complementary codes due to time division transmission, and maintain the complementarity of range sidelobe between the positive and

  19. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are consider...

  20. Transimssion and compression of an intense relativistic electron beam produced by a converging annular diode with return current feedback through the cathode. Part II. The experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.G.; Schuch, R.L.

    1976-02-01

    The complete results of the experiments with the converging annular diode within return current feedback through the cathode (Triax) are reported herein. The diode was designed to focus a relativistic high-current electron beam to a small focus. It did confirm the Triaxial theory detailed in Part I, and it did achieve a factor of 10 areal compression with 50% efficiency (which was below expectations). There were two principal reasons for this shortfall. First, the rapid diode plasma motion of 10 cm/..mu..sec that was discovered necessitated the use of larger A-K gaps than expected and led to thicker beam sheets than are needed for good focusing. Second, the intrinsic angular spread of the electrons, even from the best cathode surfaces, introduced excessive angular momentum into the beam so that only a minor portion of the electrons could reach the axis. However, the yield of useful information about diode physics in general and about the influence of prepulse, the role of diode plasmas, the motion of energetic beams within conducting boundaries, diode emission properties, and diode diagnostic techniques in particle has had a significant and useful impact on the electron beam program at Sandia.

  1. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  2. Evolution with Drifting Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kanade, Varun; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2010-01-01

    We consider the question of the stability of evolutionary algorithms to gradual changes, or drift, in the target concept. We define an algorithm to be resistant to drift if, for some inverse polynomial drift rate in the target function, it converges to accuracy 1 -- \\epsilon , with polynomial resources, and then stays within that accuracy indefinitely, except with probability \\epsilon , at any one time. We show that every evolution algorithm, in the sense of Valiant (2007; 2009), can be converted using the Correlational Query technique of Feldman (2008), into such a drift resistant algorithm. For certain evolutionary algorithms, such as for Boolean conjunctions, we give bounds on the rates of drift that they can resist. We develop some new evolution algorithms that are resistant to significant drift. In particular, we give an algorithm for evolving linear separators over the spherically symmetric distribution that is resistant to a drift rate of O(\\epsilon /n), and another algorithm over the more general prod...

  3. The influence of cell morphology on the compressive fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V meshes fabricated by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S; Li, S J; Hou, W T; Hao, Y L; Yang, R; Misra, R D K

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufacturing technique is a promising approach for fabricating cellular bone substitutes such as trabecular and cortical bones because of the ability to adjust process parameters to fabricate different shapes and inner structures. Considering the long term safe application in human body, the metallic cellular implants are expected to exhibit superior fatigue property. The objective of the study was to study the influence of cell shape on the compressive fatigue behavior of Ti-6Al-4V mesh arrays fabricated by electron beam melting. The results indicated that the underlying fatigue mechanism for the three kinds of meshes (cubic, G7 and rhombic dodecahedron) is the interaction of cyclic ratcheting and fatigue crack growth on the struts, which is closely related to cumulative effect of buckling and bending deformation of the strut. By increasing the buckling deformation on the struts through cell shape design, the cyclic ratcheting rate of the meshes during cyclic deformation was decreased and accordingly, the compressive fatigue strength was increased. With increasing bending deformation of struts, fatigue crack growth in struts contributed more to the fatigue damage of meshes. Rough surface and pores contained in the struts significantly deteriorated the compressive fatigue strength of the struts. By optimizing the buckling and bending deformation through cell shape design, Ti-6Al-4V alloy cellular solids with high fatigue strength and low modulus can be fabricated by the EBM technique. PMID:26878293

  4. Preliminary calculations of ballistic bunch compression with thermionic cathode rf guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary calculations using the computer code PARMELA indicate that it is possible to achieve peak currents on the order of 1 kA using a thermionic-cathode rf gun and ballistic bunch compression. In contrast to traditional magnetic bunching schemes, ballistic bunch compression uses a series of rf cavities to modify the energy profile of the beam and properly chosen drifts to allow the bunching to occur naturally. The method, suitably modified, should also be directly applicable to photoinjector rf guns. Present work is focusing on simultaneously compressing the bunch while reducing the emittance of the electron beam. At present, the calculated normalized rms emittance is in the neighborhood of 6.8 π mm mrad with a peak current of 0.88 kA, and a peak bunch charge of 0.28 nC from a thermionic-cathode gun

  5. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  6. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  7. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  8. A silicon drift photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avset, B.S.; Evensen, L.; Ellison, J.A.; Hall, G.; Roe, S.; Wheadon, R.; Hansen, T.E.

    1989-02-01

    A low capacitance photodiode based on the principle of the solid state drift chamber has been constructed and tested. The device is based on a cellular design with an anode at the centre of each of five cells allowing electrons liberated by ionisation to drift up to 1mm to the read out strip. Results on the performance of the detector, including leakage current, capacitance and drift properties, are presented and compared with simulations.

  9. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based 3D image reconstruction in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for low-dose, high-quality dental X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Park, Y. O.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    The most popular reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is based on the computationally-inexpensive filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, that method usually requires dense projections over the Nyquist samplings, which imposes severe restrictions on the imaging doses. Moreover, the algorithm tends to produce cone-beam artifacts as the cone angle is increased. Several variants of the FBP-based algorithm have been developed to overcome these difficulties, but problems with the cone-beam reconstruction still remain. In this study, we considered a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm for low-dose, high-quality dental CBCT images that exploited the sparsity of images with substantially high accuracy. We implemented the algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. CBCT images of high quality were successfully reconstructed by using the built-in CS-based algorithm, and the image qualities were evaluated quantitatively in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI) and the slice-profile quality index (SPQI).We expect the reconstruction algorithm developed in the work to be applicable to current dental CBCT systems, to reduce imaging doses, and to improve the image quality further.

  10. 合理考虑梁受压钢筋的配筋设计方案%Beam Reinforcement Design Method with Reasonable Consideration about Compression Bar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡理; 粱博; 汤学宏

    2011-01-01

    根据正负弯矩进行梁的正截面配筋设计时,由于不知道可能存在的可用于受压钢筋的配筋面积,梁的顶部和底部纵筋的计算一般由正负弯矩的最不利效应决定,不考虑由于构造或计算可能存在的受压钢筋的影响。根据本文的分析,在配筋率较大的情况下,如果不考虑受压钢筋的有利影响,将会造成材料浪费。本文提出了一种在不能确定受压钢筋面积时,通过简单的内力比较后,合理地考虑梁的受压钢筋的配筋设计方案。由本文的分析可以得出结论.这种配筋设计方案的设计结果确实可以达到节省材料的目的.%When reinforcing bars for concrete beam according to positive and negative moments, generally, the top and bottom longitudinal reinforcement are determined only by the most adverse effects of the positive and negative moments and the influence of compressive reinforcement is ignored in this calculation, because of not knowing the area of reinforcement which may be used as compressive bar. According to the analysis of this paper, when the reinforcement ratio is high, if not considering the beneficial effects of compressive reinforcement, the waste of materials will be caused. This paper presents a reinforcement design method which can reasonably consider the influence of compressive bar by simple comparison of moments, when not knowing the area of compressive reinforcement. This analysis can concluded that the results by the method in the paper can really achieve the purpose of saving material.

  11. Thermal stability and relaxation mechanisms in compressively strained Ge0.94Sn0.06 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, C.; Lieten, R. R.; Hermann, P.; Hönicke, P.; Beckhoff, B.; Seidel, F.; Richard, O.; Bender, H.; Shimura, Y.; Zaima, S.; Uchida, N.; Temst, K.; Vandervorst, W.; Vantomme, A.

    2016-08-01

    Strained Ge1-xSnx thin films have recently attracted a lot of attention as promising high mobility or light emitting materials for future micro- and optoelectronic devices. While they can be grown nowadays with high crystal quality, the mechanism by which strain energy is relieved upon thermal treatments remains speculative. To this end, we investigated the evolution (and the interplay) of composition, strain, and morphology of strained Ge0.94Sn0.06 films with temperature. We observed a diffusion-driven formation of Sn-enriched islands (and their self-organization) as well as surface depressions (pits), resulting in phase separation and (local) reduction in strain energy, respectively. Remarkably, these compositional and morphological instabilities were found to be the dominating mechanisms to relieve energy, implying that the relaxation via misfit generation and propagation is not intrinsic to compressively strained Ge0.94Sn0.06 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

  12. Energy deposition of ions in materials, and numerical simulations of compression, ignition, and burn of ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article various aspects of ion beam inertial confinement fusion are discussed. In particular a very thorough discussion of aspects of energy deposition of ions in hot plasmas and cold materials is given. Using energy deposition profiles given by these calculations, computer simulations of the compression, ignition and burn phases have been carried out for a single shell, pusher-tamper-DT fuel, multi-layered spherical pellet, suitable for use in a fusion reactor. The gain of this pellet was calculated to be 97 for an input energy of 7.38 MJ and an output energy of 715 MJ. This pellet has several other attractive features, including being environmentally attractive because of minimal radioactivity production and being insensitive to pusher-fuel instabilities. (orig.)

  13. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  14. Shear behaviour of steel fibre reinforced self-consolidating concrete beams based on the modified compression field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Yining; Zhang Fasheng; Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Zhang Yulin

    2012-01-01

    A series of steel fibre reinforced self-consolidating concrete (SFRSCC) beams have been tested to investigate the influence of steel fibres and the combined effect of fibres and stirrups on the deflection and cracking, ultimate loads and failure pattern. The experiment indicates that the shear strength increases clearly with the increasing of fibre content. The combination of steel fibres and stirrups demonstrates a positive composite effect on the ultimate load, ductility and fai...

  15. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  16. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.;

    2015-01-01

    graphical models, that explicitly represents concept drift using latent variables. To ensure efficient inference and learning, we re- sort to a variational Bayes inference scheme. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate and analyze the proposed framework using synthetic data sets as well as a real financial......An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic...

  17. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. Tν(x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  18. A Statistical Study of Beam Centroid Oscillations in a Solenoid Transport Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, S; Wootton, C; Coleman, J; Lidia, S; Seidl, P

    2009-05-07

    A recent theory of transverse centroid oscillations in solenoidally focused beam transport lattices presented in Ref. [1] is applied to statistically analyze properties of the centroid orbit in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contributions to the amplitude of the centroid oscillations from mechanical misalignments and initial centroid errors exiting the injector are analyzed. Measured values of the centroid appear consistent with expected alignment tolerances. Correction of these errors is discussed.

  19. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    Polar orbiting satellites equipped with random access data collection and position fixing systems have made long-term remote oceanographic/meteorological observations possible by means of instrumented drifting buoys fitted with ARGOS telementry...

  20. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  1. Analytical Solutions for Continuous Beams with Different Modulus in Tension and Compression%不同拉压模量连续梁的解析解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚文娟; 叶志明

    2011-01-01

    Materials with different modulus in tension and compression have a wide application in engineering practice, especially the composite materials developed in recent years, which have properties of different tension-compression modulus. The determinant theorem of neutral axis for continuous beam with different modulusunder complex stress was suggests,and the formulae of neutral axis as well as the analytical solution of stress for structures with different modulus by segmental integral method were deduced.Some examples were calculated by the different modulus and the single modulus in classic mechanics, respectively, and stress difference of two methods was elicited. In the end, the reasonable suggestion on calculation of this type of structure, and the method of structure optimization by using different modulus were proposed.%拉压不同模量的材料在工程中应用很广,特别是近几年发展起来的复合材料都具有明显的拉压不同模量性质.本文对复杂应力状态下不同模量连续梁提出了中性轴判断定理,并用分段积分方法推导出不同模量结构的中性层计算表达式及应力的解析解.通过对实例的计算及分析,得出不同模量与经典力相同模量两种方法在结构应力计算上的差异,最后提出对该类结构计算的合理建议以及利用不同模量优化结构的方法.

  2. Design of a Cavity of Drift Tube Linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiu-long; LV; Wei-xing; LI; Jin-hai; HUANG; Jun; WU; Qing-feng

    2013-01-01

    The drift tube Linac(DTL)is used as accelerating of low energy proton beam with high intensity.Its operating frequency is 325 MHz with handling power of 2.5 kW.The cavity of DTL consists of circularwaveguide,drift tube,post coupler and tuner.First,the beam parameters of the cavity of DTL is calculated by using beam dynamic codes,and then the electromagnetic field distribution and RF parameters of the cavity of DTL is calculated by using

  3. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  4. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  5. The 'Diogene' detector, 4π drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Diogene' is a detector with a solid angle near the steradian 4π, mainly comprising a drift chamber and capable of detecting in coincidence several tens of charged particles. Built by several laboratories (Dph-N/Saclay, CRN/Strasbourg and LPC/Clermont-Ferrand) it should be ready round about June 1980 to use the heavy ion beams of Saturne II for studying the multiple production of pions and protons in central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

  6. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360 .deg. ) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200 .deg. with a fixed angle step of 1.2 .deg. and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  7. Experimental study on the application of a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm to dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) for accurate, low-dose image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jieun; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Hyojeong; Hong, Daeki; Park, Yeonok; Lee, Seonhwa; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2013-03-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient data. In computed tomography (CT); for example, image reconstruction from few views would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction method based on a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for accurate, low-dose dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction. We applied the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system (Expert7™, Vatech Co., Korea) and performed experimental works to demonstrate the algorithm for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images from several undersampled data and evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI). Experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction algorithm appear to show that it can be applied to current dental CBCT systems for reducing imaging doses and improving the image quality.

  8. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  9. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  10. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  11. BaBar Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V

    2002-01-01

    As PEP-II is exceeding the original design luminosity, BaBar is currently upgrading its Level 1 Drift Chamber Trigger (DCT) to reduce the rate of background Level 1 triggers by more than 50% while preserving the high Level 1 trigger physics efficiency. New Z-Pt-Discriminator VME boards (ZPD) utilizing the stereo hit information from the drift chamber are being built to extract the track z coordinate at the beam line with a resolution of a few centimeters.

  12. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  13. Recent Experiments At Ndcx-II: Irradiation Of Materials Using Short, Intense Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, P A; Persaud, A; Feinberg, E; Ludewigt, B; Silverman, M; Sulyman, A; Waldron, W L; Schenkel, T; Barnard, J J; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I D; Stepanov, A; Treffert, F; Zimmer, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the performance of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) accelerator at Berkeley Lab, and summarize recent studies of material properties created with nanosecond and millimeter-scale ion beam pulses. The scientific topics being explored include the dynamics of ion induced damage in materials, materials synthesis far from equilibrium, warm dense matter and intense beam-plasma physics. We summarize the improved accelerator performance, diagnostics and results of beam-induced irradiation of thin samples of, e.g., tin and silicon. Bunches with over 3x10^10 ions, 1- mm radius, and 2-30 ns FWHM duration have been created. To achieve these short pulse durations and mm-scale focal spot radii, the 1.2 MeV He+ ion beam is neutralized in a drift compression section which removes the space charge defocusing effect during final compression and focusing. Quantitative comparison of detailed particle-in-cell simulations with the experiment play an important role in optimizing acc...

  14. The Electron Drift Instrument on Cluster: overview of first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Paschmann

    Full Text Available EDI measures the drift velocity of artificially injected electron beams. From this drift velocity, the perpendicular electric field and the local magnetic field gradients can be deduced when employing different electron energies. The technique requires the injection of two electron beams at right angles to the magnetic field and the search for those directions within the plane that return the beams to their associated detectors after one or more gyrations. The drift velocity is then derived from the directions of the two beams and/or from the difference in their times-of-flight, measured via amplitude-modulation and coding of the emitted electron beams and correlation with the signal from the returning electrons. After careful adjustment of the control parameters, the beam recognition algorithms, and the onboard magnetometer calibrations during the commissioning phase, EDI is providing excellent data over a wide range of conditions. In this paper, we present first results in a variety of regions ranging from the polar cap, across the magnetopause, and well into the magnetosheath.

    Key words. Electron drift velocity (electric fields; plasma convection; instruments and techniques

  15. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  16. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Cumming; G. Fleming; A. Schwienbacher

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  17. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  18. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage (∼ 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K+ ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments

  19. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  20. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  1. Emplacement Drift System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Emplacement Drift System is part of the Engineered Barrier System and provides the interface between the various waste package (WP) systems and the Ground Control System. In conjunction with the various WPs, the Emplacement Drift System limits the release and transport of radionuclides from the WP to the Natural Barrier following waste emplacement. Collectively, the Emplacement Drift System consists of the structural support hardware (emplacement drift invert and WP emplacement pallet) and any performance-enhancing barriers (drip shields and invert ballast) installed or placed in the emplacement drifts. The Emplacement Drift System is entirely located within the emplacement drifts in the subsurface portion of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR); specifically, it is physically bounded by the Subsurface Facility System, the Ground Support System, and the Natural Barrier. The Emplacement Drift System supports the key MGR functions of limiting radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier, minimizing the likelihood of a criticality external to the WPs, limiting natural and induced environmental effects, and providing WP support. The Emplacement Drift System limits radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier by controlling the movement of radionuclides within the emplacement drift and to the Natural Barrier, and by limiting water contact with the WPs. The Emplacement Drift System provides physical support and barriers for emplaced WPs that reduce water contact. The Emplacement Drift WP spacing supports the thermal loading performance by complimenting drift layout and orientation as described in the system description document for the Subsurface Facility System. The Emplacement Drift System supports the WP and also provides an environment that aids in enhancing WP confinement performance. As part of the Engineered Barrier System, the Emplacement Drift System interfaces with the WP systems. The Emplacement Drift System also interfaces with the Natural Barrier

  2. Thermal design of drift tubes for high-gradient linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-intensity drift tube linacs were designed at Los Alamos using copper drift tubes capable of very high duty-factor operation, limited only by beam-loss heating in the bore. The drift-tube bodies are cooled by a peripheral, full-length cooling jacket that effectively clamps the drift tube at the average coolant temperature and shields the samarium-cobalt quadrupole from excessive heating caused by rf dissipation. The bore tube is thick-walled copper that is split to provide a gap for thermal-expansion, beam-diagnostic instrumentation, and vacuum relief of the drift-tube body. The magnet pole pieces are isolated from the bore tube by a 0.2-mm thermal gap that is very effective in preventing beam-loss heating from degrading the magnetic properties of the quadrupoles. The authors discuss thermal studies that explore the capabilities of this design concept. The design features of the quadrupoles include a technique for precision shimming using captive screws and guide slots. Results of tests on prototype quadrupole assemblies are presented

  3. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  4. Fingermark ridge drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  5. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  6. The DRIFT Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Daw, E; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Ghag, C; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Gold, M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Landers, J M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Pushkin, K; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D; Warner, D

    2011-01-01

    The current status of the DRIFT (Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks) experiment at Boulby Mine is presented, including the latest limits on the WIMP spin-dependent cross-section from 1.5 kg days of running with a mixture of CS2 and CF4. Planned upgrades to DRIFT IId are detailed, along with ongoing work towards DRIFT III, which aims to be the world's first 10 m3-scale directional Dark Matter detector.

  7. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  8. Correction of Dopant Concentration Fluctuation Effects in Silicon Drift Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P G; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nilsen, B S; Piemonte, C; Rachevsky, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R

    2001-01-01

    Dopant fluctuations in silicon wafers are responsible for systematic errors in the determination of the particle crossing point in silicon drift detectors. In this paper, we report on the first large scale measurement of this effect by means of a particle beam. A significant improvement of the anodic resolution has been obtained by correcting for these systematic deviations.

  9. Analysis of the SPS Long Term Orbit Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velotti, Francesco [CERN; Bracco, Chiara [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Fraser, Matthew [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN

    2016-06-01

    The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is the last accelerator in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) injector chain, and has to deliver the two high-intensity 450 GeV proton beams to the LHC. The transport from SPS to LHC is done through the two Transfer Lines (TL), TI2 and TI8, for Beam 1 (B1) and Beam 2 (B2) respectively. During the first LHC operation period Run 1, a long term drift of the SPS orbit was observed, causing changes in the LHC injection due to the resulting changes in the TL trajectories. This translated into longer LHC turnaround because of the necessity to periodically correct the TL trajectories in order to preserve the beam quality at injection into the LHC. Different sources for the SPS orbit drifts have been investigated: each of them can account only partially for the total orbit drift observed. In this paper, the possible sources of such drift are described, together with the simulated and measured effect they cause. Possible solutions and countermeasures are also discussed.

  10. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachiv, Ivo, E-mail: stachiv@fzu.cz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  11. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions

  12. DRIFT EFFECTS IN HGCDTE DETECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. PAVAN KUMAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of temporal drift in spectral responsivity of HgCdTe photodetectors is investigated and found to have an origin different from what has been reported in literature. Traditionally, the literature attributes the cause of drift due to the deposition of thin film of ice water on the active area of the cold detector. The source of drift as proposed in this paper is more critical owing to the difficulties in acquisition of infrared temperature measurements. A model explaining the drift phenomenon in HgCdTe detectors is described by considering the deep trapping of charge carriers and generation of radiation induced deep trap centers which are meta-stable in nature. A theoretical model is fitted to the experimental data. A comparison of the model with the experimental data shows that the radiation induced deep trap centers and charge trapping effects are mainly responsible for the drift phenomenon observed in HgCdTe detectors.

  13. Installation and cosmic ray test of the high voltage system of the BESⅢdrift chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    After examination of the designed high voltage power supply system of the BESⅢ drift chamber in the beam test of the full length prototype of drift chamber,a full system covering all the channels of high voltage was installed.The system's training and the high voltage value adjustment were carried out in the cosmic ray test of the BESⅢ drift chamber.The cosmic ray test for the full system and its final installation on the BESⅢ drift chamber were reported.The full system of high voltage power supply works stably and reliably.

  14. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  15. Assembly of Drift Tubes (DT) Chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid)

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    The construction of muon drift tube chambers (DT) has been carried out in four different european institutes: Aachen (Germany), CIEMAT-Madrid (Spain), Legnaro and Turin (Italy), all of them following similar procedures and quality tests. Each chamber is composed by three or two independent units called superlayers, with four layers of staggered drift cells each. The assembly of a superlayer is a succesive glueing of aluminium plates and I-beams with electrodes previously attached, forming a rectangular and gas-tight volume. These pictures illustrate the various processes of material preparation, construction, equipment and assembly of full chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid).

  16. ATA probe beam experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The philosophy of these tests is to measure the motion of a low current, small diameter electron beam in the accelerator before running high current. By using low current, we can study particle motion in the applied fields without any extra complications associated with the self-forces of high currents. With the steering magnets off, we have measured the transverse drift of the probe beam. Also, we have used the probe beam to optimize the current in the steering magnets to compensate for the drift. There have been concurrent efforts to locate the source of the error field which is presumed to cause the drift. So far, the source has not been established but the search is continuing

  17. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; McAllister, Liam [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Silverstein, Eva [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); Westphal, Alexander [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  18. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  19. Corrections to sodar Doppler winds due to wind drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Bradley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Refraction of the acoustic beam from a sodar, or translation of the beam due to the wind (known as wind drift, both affect the scattering angle and hence the Doppler shift of the return signal. Wind drift has been the subject of a number of previous studies, which have shown that errors increase with wind speed, giving about 6 % error in the estimated wind speed when the actual wind speed is 7 ms−1. Since previous studies have not treated the general case of finite angular beam width, a new analytic treatment is given here for monostatic sodars. Surprisingly, it is found that the Doppler error contributed by the transmitted beam is exactly compensated by the Doppler error contributed by the received beam, if the two beam widths are the same. If the transmitter beam width is not equal to the receiver beam width, then either over-estimation or under-estimation of wind speed results, depending on which beam is wider. This has implications for bi-static sodars, in which it is not possible to match beam widths. Contrary to this new theory, examples of field comparisons with mast instrumentation show a non-linear relationship between wind speeds measured by a sodar and wind speeds measured by mast-mounted instruments. It is proposed that this is due to the acoustic baffle clipping the received beam and changing its width, since the received beam must return at lower elevations from scattering downwind. This is shown to be feasible for a Metek sodar. The sign and magnitude of the observed non-linear dependence of estimated wind speed on actual wind speed are consistent with this proposed mechanism.

  20. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. PMID:27386298

  1. Performances of Glued-laminated Timber in the Compressive Zone of Prestressed Glulam Beams%预应力胶合木梁受压区层板胶合木受压性能试验1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左宏亮; 王东岳; 何东坡; 王永兵

    2014-01-01

    In order to choose the layer board glulam for applying to the compression zone of the new type prestressed glulam beams, we studied the tree species, tree combination, the thicknesses of laminates, and assemble pattern to show the effect on the compression performance of layer board glulam by choosing the SPF, Poplar, North-East Larix, and Eucalyp-tus.Based on the compression tests along the grain on the 4 batches with 17 groups prism glulam specimens, a total of 102 by using a new type of holder type displacement sensor, we studied the elastic modulus, compression strength parallel to grain, mechanics characteristic and failure mode of the layer board glulam.The elastic modulus and the compression strength parallel to grain of Poplar, North-East Larix and Eucalyptus are both higher than those of SPF, especially the com-pression performance of Poplar and North-East Larix is much better than that of others.The elastic modulus and the com-pression strength parallel to grain from different tree species combination are similar with the feasibility of different species. Though the elastic modulus and the compression strength parallel to grain have a certain increasing trend with the decrea-sing thicknesses of laminates, the thicknesses of laminates and assemble pattern have little effect on compressive behavior.%为了选择适用于新型预应力胶合木梁受压区的层板胶合木,选取SPF(云杉-松-冷杉)、杨木、东北落叶松和桉木等木制材料,研究树种类别、树种组合、层板厚度和组坯方式等因素对层板胶合木受压性能的影响。采用自行提出的棱柱体胶合木试块,利用自行研制的对夹式引伸计,通过4批次17组102个层板胶合木试块的顺纹受压试验,研究了层板胶合木的弹性模量、顺纹抗压强度、受力特征及破坏形态。结果表明:杨木、东北落叶松和桉木的弹性模量及顺纹抗压强度均高于进口木材SPF,尤其是杨木和东北落

  2. Compressed Teleportation

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur; Wozniakowski, Alex

    2016-01-01

    In a previous paper we introduced holographic software for quantum networks, inspired by work on planar para algebras. This software suggests the definition of a compressed transformation. Here we utilize the software to find a CT protocol to teleport compressed transformations. This protocol serves multiple parties with multiple persons.

  3. D. phi. vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D{O} experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO{sub 2}(95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with (9.74+8.68( E -1.25)) {mu}m/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < E z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 {mu}m or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 {mu}m. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Imaging riometer observations of drifting absorption patches in the morning sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevitch

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by a 7x7-beam imaging riometer in Kilpisjärvi, Finland (~66° MLAT of the drifting cosmic noise absorption (CNA structures in the morning sector near the zonal drift reversals are presented. The examination of the absorption intensity images revealed several regions with enhanced CNA (absorption patches slowly drifting through the riometer field of view (FoV. The absorption patches were found to vary in shape, orientation (for elongated arc-like patches, and drift direction. The latter was calculated from the regression lines to positions of the absorption maxima in the FoV images and compared with the direction of electrojet plasma flow from horizontal magnetic perturbations and (for one event tristatic ion drift velocities in the F-region. A reasonable agreement was found between these directions both in point-by-point comparisons and in terms of direction reversal timings. The absorption patches of lower intensity appear to have smaller drift velocities and to be associated with weaker magnetic perturbations. These results are consistent with the notion that relatively slow motions of the auroral absorption near the zonal drift reversals are associated with the drift of the entire magnetic flux tube as opposed to the gradient-curvature drift of energetic electrons injected into the ionosphere at the substorm onset. The absorption drift velocity magnitude, on the other hand, was found to be substantially lower than that of the plasma flow based on the results of limited comparison with tristatic ion drift measurements. A comparison of the drift directions with those of the patch elongation showed that a considerable number of patches had these directions close to each other. Using this observation, we demonstrate a satisfactory agreement between the patch drift velocities (both in direction and magnitude as determined from the absorption images and keograms under the assumption that some patches were propagating in a direction

  5. Frequency Control Loop for Drift Tube Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the preparation of the frequency tracking of the RCCS by connecting the RCCS to low level RF (LLRF) system is described. KOMAC 100-MeV proton accelerator is under operation and supply beam to users. We are developing frequency control function in the LLRF system to control the RCCS in frequency control mode. After the test in the test bench, the system will be applied to the 100-MeV DTL RCCS in order to supply better quality beam to users. A 100-MeV proton accelerator has been developed and the operation and beam service started at Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) in June 2013. The accelerator consists of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and 100-MeV drift tube linac (DTL). The resonance frequency of the DTL tanks are controlled by using the resonance frequency control cooling system (RCCS), which are installed at every each tank. Until now, the RCCS has been operating in constant temperature mode which means that the frequency was measured with respect to the RCCS supply temperature before the RF operation, and then the RCCS operates with that temperature throughout the whole operation. The constant temperature operation is simple but the RF stability is not good because many perturbations such as RCCS supply temperature error can cause a frequency change. To stabilize the system better, it is necessary to operate the RCCS in frequency tracking mode.

  6. Daytime zonal drifts in the ionospheric E and 150 km regions estimated using EAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    The Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), located at Kototabang (0.2o S, 100.32o E, mag. lat. 10.36o S), Indonesia, is capable of detecting both E region and 150 km echoes during daytime. We have conducted multi-beam observations using the EAR during daytime covering all seasons to study seasonal variations of these echoes and their dynamics. Given the facts that drifts at the 150 km region are governed primarily by electric field, drifts at the E region are governed by both electric field and neutral wind, simultaneous observations of drifts in both E and 150 km regions would help understand their variations. In this paper we present local time and seasonal variations of zonal drifts in the E and 150 km regions estimated using multi-beam observations. Zonal drifts (positive eastward) in the E and 150 km regions are found to be in the range of -10 to -60 m/s and -40 to 80 m/s, respectively. In the E region, zonal drifts show height reversal and temporal variations having tidal signature and noticeable seasonal variations. Zonal drifts in the 150 km region also show noticeable height and seasonal variations. These results are compared with model drifts and evaluated in terms of electric field and neutral wind.

  7. Analytic Solution of the Envelope Equations for an Undepressed Matched Beam in a Quadrupole Doublet Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1958, Courant and Snyder analyzed the problem of alternating-gradient beam transport and treated a model without focusing gaps or space charge. Recently we revisited their work and found the exact solution for matched beam envelopes in a linear quadrupole lattice [O.A. Anderson and L.L. LoDestro, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 2009]. We extend that work here to include the effect of asymmetric drift spaces. We derive the solution and show exact envelopes for the first two solution bands and the peak envelope excursions as a function of the phase advance sigma up to 360o. In the second stable band, decreased occupancy requires higher focus field-strength and accentuates the remarkable compression effect predicted for the FD (gapless) model.

  8. Irradiation response of straw drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Dünnweber, W; Neumayr, J; Platzer, K

    2003-01-01

    Drift tubes filled with Ar/CF//4/CO//2 (74:20:6) were exposed to 26 MeV proton beams from the Munich Tandem accelerator to study the radiation effects and operation characteristics expected for the COMPASS experiment at CERN. Stable operation with no significant loss of gain and no significant Malter current was observed up to charge accumulations of 1.1 C/cm. For comparison, with Ar/CH//4 (90:10) the same detectors show a 23% loss of gain and large Malter currents under the same irradiation condition. For Ar/CF//4/CO//2 a thin ( less than 0.1 mum) surface layer is observed by means of SEM on the anode wire in the irradiated detector section. As revealed by an ERDA study, the prominent components of this layer are C, O and Si.

  9. The Absence of Stokes Drift in Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Stokes drift has been as central to the history of wave theory as it has been distressingly absent from experiment. Neither wave tanks nor experiments in open bodies detect this without nearly canceling "eulerian flows." Acoustic waves have an analogous problem that is particularly problematic in the vorticity production at the edges of beams. Here we demonstrate that the explanation for this arises from subtle end-of-packet and wavetrain gradient effects such as microbreaking events and wave-flow decomposition subtleties required to conserve mass and momentum and avoid fictitious external forces. These losses occur at both ends of packets and can produce a significant nonviscous energy loss for translating and spreading surface wave packets and wavetrains. In contrast, monochromatic sound wave packets will be shown to asymmetrically distort to conserve momentum. This provides an interesting analogy to how such internal forces arise for gradients of electromagnetic wavetrains in media. Such examples show that...

  10. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  11. Nozzle Classification for Drift Reduction in Orchard Spraying: Identification of Drift Reduction Class Threshold Nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zande, van de J.C.; Holterman, H.J.; Wenneker, M.

    2008-01-01

    In fruit growing high values of spray drift are found compared to arable field applications. In arable spraying drift reducing nozzles are certified for use as drift reducing measures. The nozzles which may potentially reduce drift in fruit growing are not jet classified as drift reducing nozzles, a

  12. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  13. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  14. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  15. Hadron shower energy and direction measurements using drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnel, T.S.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.O.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; Barbaro, P. de; Sakumoto, W.K. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1994-03-08

    We report energy and angle resolutions for hadron showers produced in the CCFR iron target-calorimeter. The measurements were made using drift chambers instrumented with FADC readout; showers were produced using a momentum-analyzed hadron test beam from the Fermilab Tevatron at energies of 40, 70, 100, 150, and 200 GeV. Shower energy measurements are compared to measurements using scintillation counters in the same target. (orig.)

  16. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates and in Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Legger, F; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Richter, R; Valderanis, Ch; Rauscher, F; Staude, A

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses drift-tube chambers for precision tracking. The performance of these chambers in the presence of magnetic field and high radiation fluxes is studied in this article using test-beam data recorded in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The measurements are compared to detailed predictions provided by the Garfield drift-chamber simulation programme.

  17. drift tube for linear accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    A drift tube from the Linac 1. This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  18. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  19. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  20. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially-local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport are investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight $\\delta f$ Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas $\\rm \\textbf{1}$, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transpo...

  1. Pulsar bi-drifting: implications for polar cap geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    For many years it has been considered puzzling how pulsar radio emission, supposedly created by a circulating carousel of sub-beams, can produce the driftbands demonstrated by PSR J0815+09, and more recently PSR B1839-04, which simultaneously drift in opposing directions. Here we suggest that the carousels of these pulsars, and hence their beams, are not circular but elliptical with axes tilted with respect to the fiducial plane. We show that certain relatively unusual lines of sight can cause bi-drifting to be observed, and a simulation of the two known exemplars is presented. Although bi-drifting is rare, non-circular beams may be common among pulsars and reveal themselves by having profile centroids displaced from the fiducial plane identified by polarisation position angle swings. They may also result in profiles with asymmetric and frequency-dependent component evolution. It is further suggested that the carousels may change their tilt by specific amounts and later reverse them. This may occur suddenly, ...

  2. Predicting public sector accountability : From agency drift to forum drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas; Busuioc, Madalina

    2015-01-01

    Principal-agent theory has been the dominant theory at the heart of public sector accountability research. The notion of the potentially drifting agent-such as independent public agencies, opaque transnational institutions, or recalcitrant street-level bureaucrats-has been the guiding paradigm in em

  3. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. Tv(x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  4. A front-end stage with signal compression capability for XFEL detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, B.; Fiorini, C.; Grande, A.; Erdinger, F.; Fischer, P.; Porro, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a front-end stage with signal compression capability to be used in detectors for the new European XFEL in Hamburg. This front-end is an alternative solution under study for the DEPFET Sensor with Signal Compression (DSSC) detection system for the European XFEL. The DEPFET sensor of the DSSC project has a high dynamic range and very good noise performance. The high gain for small collected charge and the compression for large signals will provide both desired features of single photon detection capability and wide dynamic range. However, manufacturing of the DEPFET sensor requires a sophisticated processing technology with a relatively long time fabrication process. Accordingly, an alternative solution, namely Day-0 solution, was introduced as an approach characterized not by the best performance of the DEPFET, but available in a shorter time to allow first beam tests and experiments. The alternative sensor is made of mini Silicon Drift Detector (mini-SDD) and the compression behavior is obtained from the front-end on the readout ASIC and not by the transistor integrated in the silicon sensor, as in the DEPFET. The first version of corresponding front-end of the Day-0 solution has been realized based on an input PMOSFET transistor placed on the readout chip. This simple front-end proved the working principle of the proposed compression technique and the desired noise performance. In this paper, an improved version of the Day-0 front-end is presented. In the new prototype, the current gain of the front-end stage has been increased by factor of 1.8, the total input capacitance (SDD+PMOSFET) has been reduced by factor of 2 with respect to the previous prototype and consequently the noise performance has been improved. Moreover, by introducing selectable extra branches in parallel with the main one, the compression behavior of the front-end can be tuned based on desired dynamic range.

  5. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Maassen van den Brink; W.J.N. Groot

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  6. Drift, Violence, and the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank P.

    This paper begins by discussing David Matza's concept of "Drift" as a causal factor in violence and delinquent behavior. Matza's theory of delinquency contends that youth are prone to feelings of injustice, neutralization, preparation, and desperation. According to Matza, no one characteristic of the potential delinquent is sufficient, although…

  7. Drift in LED based Photometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Kasper

    1999-01-01

    During the development of a low cost industrial optical sensor an unexpected drift phenomenon has shown to be critical to performance. The sensor is based on LED's as light sources and the main source of error could be tracked to the instability of the spatial radiation pattern of the LED...

  8. Calibration of cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdnikov, V. V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, L.; Somov, A.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for calibrating cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment is described. The accuracy of the technique is estimated based on Monte Carlo generated data with known gain coefficients in the strip signal channels. One of the four detector sections has been calibrated using cosmic rays. Results of drift chamber calibration on the accelerator beam upon inclusion in the GlueX experimental setup are presented.

  9. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  10. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  11. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200° with a fixed angle step of 1.2° and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  12. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  13. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  14. 3d and r,z particle simulation of beams for heavy ion fusion: The WARP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WARP is an electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code that is optimized for studies of space-charge-dominated beams. The authors use the code to understand a number of issues in HIF accelerators and transport systems, including: drift-compression in the presence of misalignments, axial confinement, longitudinal stability, transport around bends, and thermal equilibration processes. In this paper they describe the code architecture and numerical techniques employed to enhance efficiency. They then describe the new simple algorithm for following a beam around a bend, and recent results on bent-beam dynamics and transverse emittance evolution. Finally, they describe the code's most recent feature, a general-lattice capability structured to preserve the efficiency of the particle advance, and present initial results using it

  15. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M

    2015-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas, is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occuring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  16. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Bartosik, Hannes [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Papaphilippou, Yannis [CERN; Wenninger, Jorg [CERN

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  17. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Gianfelice Wendt, E; Cornelis, K; Norderhaug Drosdal, L; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Papaphilippou, Y; Wenninger, J

    2014-01-01

    Beside producing beams for fixed target operation, the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerates beams for injection into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During the 2012-2013 run drifts of the extracted beam horizontal trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. The feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, has been therefore investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed. As the observed drift is mainly horizontal, the horizontal plane only will be considered.

  18. Intense electron beam propagation into vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have performed experimental and theoretical studies of the propagation of an intense electron beam (1 MeV, 27 kA, 30 ns) into a long evacuated drift cube. In one case the beam propagates because an applied axial magnetic field immerses the entire system. In the second case a localized source of ions for charge neutralization enables the beam is propagate. In the case of a magnetically confined beam, experimental results for current propagation as a function of uniform applied magnetic field (0-1.2 Tesla) are presented for various drift tube diameters, cathode geometries, and anode aperture sizes. An analytic model of laminar beam flow is presented which predicts the space charge limited current of a solid intense relativistic electron beam (IREB) propagating in a grounded drift tube as a function of tube and diode sizes and applied magnetic field. Comparisons between the experimental and theoretical results are discussed

  19. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  20. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    with halved radius, which also provide better high rate capability. The single tube resolution of these 15 mm drift tubes was determined to be 95 {mu}m at the H8 test facility at CERN using a muon beam with an energy of 140 GeV. (orig.)

  1. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  2. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  3. The HERMES Back Drift Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    al, S. Bernreuther et

    1998-01-01

    The tracking system of the HERMES spectrometer behind the bending magnet consists of two pairs of large planar 6-plane drift chambers. The design and performance of these chambers is described. This description comprises details on the mechanical and electronical design, information about the gas mixture used and its properties, results on alignment, calibration, resolution, and efficiencies, and a discussion of the experience gained through the first three years of operation.

  4. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  5. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  6. Dispersal of invasive species by drifting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.C. VAN RIEL; G. VAN DER VELDE; A. BIJ DE VAATE

    2011-01-01

    Drifting can be an effective way for aquatic organisms to disperse and colonise new areas.Increasing connectivity between European large rivers facilitates invasion by drifting aquatic macroinvertebrates.The present study shows that high abundances of invasive species drift in the headstream of the river Rhine.Dikerogammarus villosus and Chelicorophium curvispinum represented up to 90% of the total of drifting macroinvertebrates.Drift activity shows seasonal and diel patterns.Most species started drifting in spring and were most abundant in the water column during the summer period.Drift activity was very low during the winter period.Diel patterns were apparent; most species,including D.villosus,drifted during the night.Drifting macroinvertebrates colonised stony substrate directly from the water column.D.villosus generally colonised the substrate at night,while higher numbers of C.curvispinum colonised the substrate during the day.It is very likely that drifting functions as a dispersal mechanism for crustacean invaders.Once waterways are connected,these species are no longer necessarily dependent on dispersal vectors other than drift for extending their distribution range [Current Zoology 57 (6):818-827,2011].

  7. Carrier-envelope Phase Drift Detection of Picosecond Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A bandwidth-independent, linear and scalable method for carrier-envelope phase drift measurement demonstrated. Our experiments reveal that carrier-envelope phase drift of a picosecond pulse train can be directly obtained from the spectrally resolved interference pattern of a length-stabilized multiple-beam interferometer. The retrieved phase from the pattern correlates well with the strongly CEP-sensitive coupling signal between the frequency combs of the picosecond oscillator and an ultra-high finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer. Our results can lead to the generation of a robust CEP-stabilized seed pulse train for high resolution comb spectroscopy as well as to compact Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

  8. Cursory seismic drift assessment for buildings in moderate seismicity regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yong; R.K.L. Su; Zhou Fulin

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to assess the seismic drift of reinforced concrete buildings with limited structural and geotechnical information. Based on the latest and the most advanced research on predicting potential near-field and far field earthquakes affecting Hong Kong, the engineering response spectra for both rock and soil sites are derived. A new step-by-step procedure for displacement-based seismic hazard assessment of building structures is proposed to determine the maximum inter-storey drift demand for reinforced concrete buildings. The primary information required for this assessment is only the depth of the soft soil above bedrock and the height of the building. This procedure is further extended to assess the maximum chord rotation angle demand for the coupling beam of coupled shear wall or frame wall structures, which may be very critical when subjected to earthquake forces. An example is provided to illustrate calibration of the assessment procedure by using actual engineering structural models.

  9. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Woo, T. H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  10. Three-dimensional particle simulation of heavy-ion fusion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beams in a heavy-ion-beam-driven inertial fusion (HIF) accelerator are collisionless, nonneutral plasmas, confined by applied magnetic and electric fields. These space-charge-dominated beams must be focused onto small (few mm) spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of a small emittance is crucial. The nonlinear beam self-fields can lead to emittance growth, and so a self-consistent field description is needed. To this end, a multidimensional particle simulation code, WARP [Friedman et al., Part. Accel. 37-38, 131 (1992)], has been developed and is being used to study the transport of HIF beams. The code's three-dimensional (3-D) package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation. Novel techniques allow it to follow beams through many accelerator elements over long distances and around bends. This paper first outlines the algorithms employed in WARP. A number of applications and corresponding results are then presented. These applications include studies of: beam drift-compression in a misaligned lattice of quadrupole focusing magnets; beam equilibria, and the approach to equilibrium; and the MBE-4 experiment [AIP Conference Proceedings 152 (AIP, New York, 1986), p. 145] recently concluded at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Finally, 3-D simulations of bent-beam dynamics relevant to the planned Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE) [Fessenden, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Plasma Res. A 278, 13 (1989)] at LBL are described. Axially cold beams are observed to exhibit little or no root-mean-square emittance growth at midpulse in transiting a (sharp) bend. Axially hot beams, in contrast, do exhibit some emittance growth

  11. Data delivery system for MAPPER using image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeehong; Savari, Serap A.

    2013-03-01

    The data delivery throughput of electron beam lithography systems can be improved by applying lossless image compression to the layout image and using an electron beam writer that can decode the compressed image on-the-fly. In earlier research we introduced the lossless layout image compression algorithm Corner2, which assumes a somewhat idealized writing strategy, namely row-by-row with a raster order. The MAPPER system has electron beam writers positioned in a lattice formation and each electron beam writer writes a designated block in a zig-zag order. We introduce Corner2-MEB, which redesigns Corner2 for MAPPER systems.

  12. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  13. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  14. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  15. Tensile and compressive test results for metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results of the mechanical behavior of two metal matrix composite systems at room temperature are presented. Ultimate stress, ultimate strain, Poisson's ratio, and initial Young's Modulus are documented for BORSIC/Aluminum in uniaxial tension and Boron/Aluminum in uniaxial tension and compression. Poisson's ratio is used for nonlinear stress-strain behavior. A comparison of compression results for B/Al as obtained from sandwich beam compression specimens and IITRI coupon compression specimens is presented.

  16. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    , two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation is...... proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence in...

  17. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  18. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  19. Precision alignment of permanent magnet drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) technique of drift-tube alignment has been resurrected at Los Alamos for the precision alignment of 1-cm-core drift tubes that carry high gradient rare-earth-cobalt quadrupoles. Because the quadrupoles cannot be switched off, this technique is not applicable to a drift-tube assembly, but tests indicate that individual magnetic centers can be detected with a precision of +/-0.003 mm. Methods of transferring this information to machined alignment flats on the sides of the drift-tube body are discussed. With measurements of drift tubes designed for a 100-mA, 425-MHz drift-tube linac, offsets between the geometric and magnetic axes of up to +/-0.05 mm were detected following final assembly and welding. This degree of offset is serious if not accommodated, because it represents the entire alignment tolerance for the 40-cell tank. The measurement equipment and technique are described

  20. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  1. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  2. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, K; Arroyo, C; Bachman, M; Connor, D; Eckhause, M; Ecklund, K M; Graessle, S C; Hamela, M; Hamilton, S; Hancock, A D; Hartman, K; Hebert, M; Hoff, C H; Hoffmann, G W; Irwin, G M; Kane, J R; Kanematsu, N; Kuang, Y; Lee, R; Marcin, M; Martin, R D; McDonough, J; Milder, A J; Molzon, W R; Ouimette, D A; Pommot-Maia, M C; Proga, M; Riley, P J; Ritchie, J L; Rubin, P D; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Ware, B; Welsh, R E; Wojcicki, S G; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5 mm diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds.

  3. Fluffy dust forms icy planetesimals by static compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Context: In planetesimal formation theory, several barriers have been proposed, which are bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift problems. To understand the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in the planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they become fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals. Aims: We aim to reveal the pathway of the dust structure evolution from dust grains to compact planetesimals. Methods: Using the compressive strength formula, we analytically investigate how fluffy dust aggregates are compressed by static compression due to ram pressure of the disk gas and self gravity of the aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Results: We reveal the pathway of the porosity evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to form planetesimals, circumventing the barriers in planetesimal formation. The aggregates are compressed by the disk gas to the density of 10^{-3...

  4. RF Breakdown in Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, J; Lown, R

    2009-01-01

    The highest RF electric field in drift-tube linacs (DTLs) often occurs on the face of the first drift tube. Typically this drift tube contains a quadrupole focusing magnet whose fringing fields penetrate the face of the drift tube parallel to the RF electric fields in the accelerating gap. It has been shown that the threshold for RF breakdown in RF cavities may be reduced in the presence of a static magnetic field. This note offers a “rule of thumb” for picking the maximum “safe” surface electric field in DTLs based on these measurements.

  5. Design of a 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift tube Linac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nita S Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    A conventional 10 MeV drift tube Linac is designed as a part of the - front end accelerator system for the future Indian Spallation Neutron Source. The front end Linac consists of a 50 keV H- ion source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and a 10 MeV drift tube Linac (DTL), which will be operated at 1.25% duty factor. Cell geometry of the DTL is optimized to house quadrupole magnets and to get maximum effective shunt impedance. Transmission efficiency and various other output parameters depend on the input design parameters. Beam dynamic studies are done to maximize the transmission efficiency with minimum emittance growth. Errors in the alignment of the quadrupoles inside the drift tubes or the DTL tank alignment with respect to transport line will degrade the beam quality and may reduce the transmission efficiency. Error study is performed to assess the acceptable tolerances on various parameters. This paper describes the 2D and 3D electromagnetic and beam dynamics simulations of the 352.2 MHz, 10 MeV drift tube Linac. Details of the DTL design are reported in this paper.

  6. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  7. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  8. Supersensitive avalanche silicon drift photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical principles of performance and main characteristics of a novel avalanche photodetector developed on the basis of MOS (metal-oxide-silicon) technology are presented. The photodetector contains a semitransparent gate electrode and a drain contact to provide a drift of multiplied charge carriers along the semiconductor surface. A high gain (more than 104) of the photocurrent was achieved due to the local negative feedback effect realized on the Si -- SiO2 boundary. Special attention is paid to the possibilities of the development of a supersensitive avalanche CCD (charge-coupled device) for the detection of individual photons in visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. The experimental results obtained with a two-element CCD prototype are discussed. (author)

  9. Implementering af drift i byggeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Torben; Erichsen, Pia Bruun

    På trods af, at der løbende er udgivet materiale der argumenterer for at tænke drift ind i byggeprocesser, er der problemer med, at det faktisk sker. Undersøgelser viser, at forskellige barrierer kan være årsag til problemerne. Disse barrierer kan opstilles inden for følgende kategorier: Projekt...... med i byggeriet. Som følge af dette skal der løbende skabes nye relationer mellem parterne, og der skal arbejdes sammen på nye måder. De forskellige barrierer syntes at være mest fremtrædende ved offentlige byggerier, men også private innovative byggerier er præget af barriererne. Der er flere...

  10. Drift effects in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion equation is an approximation to the transport equation which relies on the validity of Fick's law. Since this law is not explicitly integrated in the transport equation it can only be derived approximately using homogenization theories. However, such homogenization theories state that when the cell is not symmetric Fick's law breaks down due to the presence of an additional term to the neutron current, called the drift term. In fact, this term can be interpreted as a transport correction to Fick's law which tends to increase the neutron current in a direction opposite to that specified by the flux gradient. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of asymmetric liquid zone controllers will modify the flux distribution inside a CANDU core. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  12. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  13. Local Trigger Electronics for the CMS Drift Tubes Muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglini, R

    2003-01-01

    In the CMS detector in preparation for the CERN LHC collider, the Drift Tubes Muon Chambers are equipped with mini-crates hosting custom electronics for fast data processing and local trigger generation. In particular the Trigger Server of a DTC consists of Track Sorter Slave ASICs and a Track Sorter Master system. The trigger electronics boards are in production, to be ready for the muon detector installation in the CMS barrel starting at the end of 2003.In this work, the performance of the Trigger Server will be discussed, on the basis both of high-statistics tests with predefined patterns and of test beam data collected at CERN, where a DTC was exposed to a muon beam having an LHC-like bunch structure. Finally, some system performance expectations, concerning radiation tolerance and signal transmission issues during LHC running, will be also discussed.

  14. Static compression of porous dust aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-07-01

    To understand the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in the planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they become fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals (Okuzumi et al. 2012, ApJ, 752, 106). Thus, some other compression mechanisms are required to form planetesimals. We investigate the static compression of highly porous aggregates. First, we derive the compressive strength by numerical N-body simulations (Kataoka et al. 2013, A&A, 554, 4). Then, we apply the strength to protoplanetary disks, supposing that the highly porous aggregates can be quiasi-statically compressed by ram pressure of the disk gas and the self gravity. As a result, we find the pathway of the dust structure evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to compact planetesimals. Moreover, we find that the fluffy aggregates overcome the barriers in planetesimal formation, which are radial drift, fragmentation, and bouncing barriers. (The paper is now available on arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.7984 )

  15. A Robust H.264/AVC Video Watermarking Scheme with Drift Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghao Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme for copyright protection with self-adaptive drift compensation is proposed. In our scheme, motion vector residuals of macroblocks with the smallest partition size are selected to hide copyright information in order to hold visual impact and distortion drift to a minimum. Drift compensation is also implemented to reduce the influence of watermark to the most extent. Besides, discrete cosine transform (DCT with energy compact property is applied to the motion vector residual group, which can ensure robustness against intentional attacks. According to the experimental results, this scheme gains excellent imperceptibility and low bit-rate increase. Malicious attacks with different quantization parameters (QPs or motion estimation algorithms can be resisted efficiently, with 80% accuracy on average after lossy compression.

  16. A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme with drift compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinghao; Sun, Tanfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Wan; Shi, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme for copyright protection with self-adaptive drift compensation is proposed. In our scheme, motion vector residuals of macroblocks with the smallest partition size are selected to hide copyright information in order to hold visual impact and distortion drift to a minimum. Drift compensation is also implemented to reduce the influence of watermark to the most extent. Besides, discrete cosine transform (DCT) with energy compact property is applied to the motion vector residual group, which can ensure robustness against intentional attacks. According to the experimental results, this scheme gains excellent imperceptibility and low bit-rate increase. Malicious attacks with different quantization parameters (QPs) or motion estimation algorithms can be resisted efficiently, with 80% accuracy on average after lossy compression.

  17. Design and Fabrication of the Lithium Beam Ion Injector for NDCX-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 130 keV injector is developed for the NDCX-II facility. It consists of a 10.9 cm diameter lithium doped alumina-silicate ion source heated to ∼1300 C and 3 electrodes. Other components include a segmented Rogowski coil for current and beam position monitoring, a gate valve, pumping ports, a focusing solenoid, a steering coil and space for inspection and maintenance access. Significant design challenges including managing the 3-4 kW of power dissipation from the source heater, temperature uniformity across the emitter surface, quick access for frequent ion source replacement, mechanical alignment with tight tolerance, and structural stabilization of the cantilevered 27-inch OD graded HV ceramic column. The injector fabrication is scheduled to complete by May 2011, and assembly and installation is scheduled to complete by the beginning of July. The Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) is for the study of high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research utilizing a lithium ion (Li+) beam with a current of 93 mA and a pulse length of 500 ns (compressed to 1 ns at the target). The injector is one of the most complicated sections of the NDCX-II accelerator demanding significant design and fabrication resources. It needs to accommodate a relatively large ion source (10.9 cm), a high heat load (3-4 kW) and specific beam optics developed from the physics model. Some specific design challenges are noted in this paper.

  18. Fractal image compression

    OpenAIRE

    Žemlo, Gražina

    2004-01-01

    One of the images compression methods – fractal image compression is analyzed in the work. After work carried out, it is possible to state, that selecting parameters of method of fractal compression depends on user’s demands.

  19. 40 CFR 1065.672 - Drift correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drift correction. 1065.672 Section 1065.672 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.672 Drift correction. (a) Scope...

  20. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arct

  1. Biology Undergraduates' Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct…

  2. TBV 361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization

  3. Effect of unsteady wind on drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierco, F.-X.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Naaim, M.

    2003-04-01

    Wind is not always a steady flow. It can oscillate producing blasts. However most of the current numerical models of drifting snow are constrained by one major assumption : forcing winds are steady and uniform. Experiments done in the CSTB climatic wind tunnel (with a data acquisition frequency of 1 Hz both for wind and drifting snow) showed that drifting snow is in a state of permanent disequilibrium in the presence of fluctuating airflows : mass flux and velocity were poorly matched. However, the study of wind and drifting snow gust factors done at Col du Lac Blanc (parameters recorded every 15 min with a scan rate of 1 s) shown that the largest drifting snow episodes appear during periods of roughly constant strong wind whereas a short but strong blast does not produce significant drifting snow. In order to better understand the effect of unsteady wind on drifting snow processes, these first investigations have been completed during winter 2003 by increasing the acquisition frequency during snow storms at Col du Lac Blanc using an ultrasonic anemometer and a profile of six drifting snow acoustic sensors set up side by side.

  4. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  5. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw;

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  6. Satellite data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bormin

    2011-01-01

    Satellite Data Compression covers recent progress in compression techniques for multispectral, hyperspectral and ultra spectral data. A survey of recent advances in the fields of satellite communications, remote sensing and geographical information systems is included. Satellite Data Compression, contributed by leaders in this field, is the first book available on satellite data compression. It covers onboard compression methodology and hardware developments in several space agencies. Case studies are presented on recent advances in satellite data compression techniques via various prediction-

  7. Multiple-beam Propagation in an Anderson Localized Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Karbasi, Salman; Mafi, Arash

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the simultaneous propagation of multiple beams in a disordered Anderson localized optical fiber. The profiles of each beam fall off exponentially, enabling multiple channels at high-density. We examine the influence of fiber bends on the movement of the beam positions, which we refer to as drift. We investigate the extent of the drift of localized beams induced by macro-bending and show that it is possible to design Anderson localized optical fibers which can be used for practical beam-multiplexing applications.

  8. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  9. Runaway electron drift orbits in magnetostatic perturbed fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, G.; Drevlak, M.; Fülöp, T.; Helander, P.

    2011-04-01

    Disruptions in large tokamaks can lead to the generation of a relativistic runaway electron beam that may cause serious damage to the first wall. To mitigate the disruption and suppress the runaway beam the application of resonant magnetic perturbations has been suggested. In this work we investigate the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on the confinement of runaway electrons by simulating their drift orbits in magnetostatic perturbed fields and calculating the orbit losses for various initial energies and magnetic perturbation magnitudes. In the simulations we use a TEXTOR-like configuration and solve the relativistic, gyro-averaged drift equations for the runaway electrons including synchrotron radiation and collisions. The results indicate that runaway electrons are well confined in the core of the device, but the onset time of runaway losses closer to the edge is dependent on the magnetic perturbation level and thereby can affect the maximum runaway current. However, the runaway current damping rate is not sensitive to the magnetic perturbation level, in agreement with experimental observations.

  10. Measurements Verifying the Optics of the Electron Drift Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Vanessa; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott; Sigsbee, Kristine M.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the process of breaking and reconnecting of opposing magnetic field lines, and is often associated with tremendous energy transfer. The energy transferred by reconnection directly affects people through its influence on geospace weather and technological systems - such as telecommunication networks, GPS, and power grids. However, the mechanisms that cause magnetic reconnection are not well understood. The Magnetospheric Multi-Scale Mission (MMS) will use four spacecraft in a pyramid formation to make three-dimensional measurements of the structures in magnetic reconnection occurring in the Earth's magnetosphere.The spacecraft will repeatedly sample these regions for a prolonged period of time to gather data in more detail than has been previously possible. MMS is scheduled to be launched in March of 2015. The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) will be used on MMS to measure the electric fields associated with magnetic reconnection. The EDI is a device used on spacecraft to measure electric fields by emitting an electron beam and measuring the E x B drift of the returning electrons after one gyration. This paper concentrates on measurements of the EDI’s optics system. The testing process includes measuring the optics response to a uni-directional electron beam. These measurements are used to verify the response of the EDI's optics and to allow for the optimization of the desired optics state. The measurements agree well with simulations and we are confident in the performance of the EDI instrument.

  11. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  12. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  13. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  14. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  15. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c)

  16. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238U72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  17. A microwave radiation generator with a virtual cathode and a spherical drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper we present results of an experimental investigation of a vircator with a spherical drift chamber. The vircator was powered from a generator of high-voltage pulses, making it possible to form electrons beam with energy up to 170 keV and length up to 35 ns on a half height. Significant influence of the electron beam parameters on the vircator efficiency coefficient is shown. A critical current of the electron beam, on reaching of which generation of the microwave radiation starts, is determined

  18. Study of Radiation Damage of Silicon Drift Detectors Induced by Fast Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kugler, A; CERN. Geneva; Hanzal, V

    1995-01-01

    We report results of radiation hardness tests of linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Non-biased SDDs wre irradiated using flux of fast neutrons with fluency up to 3.5 x 1013 neutrons/cm2. Neutrons were generated due to the stopping of 20 MeV deuteron beam in thick Be target. We have found that electron drift is still possible. However substantional increase in the leakage current of SDDs was observed. Hence, radiation damage will result in corresponding increase of heat generation, which has to be taken into account designing the cooling system of ALICE ITS.

  19. Solving the drift control problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ormeci Matoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem. We formulate a structured linear program that models a practical discretization of the problem and exploit a strong relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a functional lower bound for the continuous problem from a dual solution to the discrete problem. Refining the discretization proves a functional strong duality for the continuous problem. The linear programming formulation is so badly scaled, however, that solving it is beyond the capabilities of standard solvers. By demonstrating the equivalence between strongly feasible bases and deterministic unichain policies, we combinatorialize the pivoting process and by exploiting the relationship between dual solutions and relative value functions, develop a mechanism for solving the LP without ever computing its coefficients. Finally, we exploit the relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a scheme analogous to column generation for refining the discretization so as to drive the gap between the discrete approximation and the continuous problem to zero quickly while keeping the LP small. Computational studies show our scheme is much faster than simply solving a regular discretization of the problem both in terms of finding a policy with a low average cost and in terms of providing a lower bound on the optimal average cost.

  20. Genetic drift of HIV populations in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegor Voronin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 undergo a surprisingly large amount of genetic drift in infected patients despite very large population sizes, which are predicted to be mostly deterministic. Several models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but all of them implicitly assume that the process of virus replication itself does not contribute to genetic drift. We developed an assay to measure the amount of genetic drift for HIV populations replicating in cell culture. The assay relies on creation of HIV populations of known size and measurements of variation in frequency of a neutral allele. Using this assay, we show that HIV undergoes approximately ten times more genetic drift than would be expected from its population size, which we defined as the number of infected cells in the culture. We showed that a large portion of the increase in genetic drift is due to non-synchronous infection of target cells. When infections are synchronized, genetic drift for the virus is only 3-fold higher than expected from its population size. Thus, the stochastic nature of biological processes involved in viral replication contributes to increased genetic drift in HIV populations. We propose that appreciation of these effects will allow better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on HIV in infected patients.

  1. Do Arctic waders use adaptive wind drift?

    OpenAIRE

    Green, M.; Alerstam, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Hedenstrom, A; Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.; Hedenström, Anders

    2004-01-01

    We analysed five data sets of night directions of migrating arctic waders ill relation to,winds, recorded by tracking radar and optical range finder, in order to find out if these birds compensate for wind drift, or allow themselves to be drifted by winds. Our purpose was to investigate whether arctic waders use adaptive wind drift strategies or not. The data sets were collected in Siberia (two sets) and Canada during post-breeding (autumn) migration, and in Mauritania and South Sweden during...

  2. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  3. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, R. S.; Szezech, J. D.; Batista, A. M.; de Souza, S. L. T.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  4. Current-driven electron drift solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali, E-mail: aliahmad79@hotmail.com [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-09

    The soliton formation by the current-driven drift-like wave is investigated for heavier ion (such as barium) plasma experiments planned to be performed in future. It is pointed out that the sheared flow of electrons can give rise to short scale solitary structures in the presence of stationary heavier ions. The nonlinearity appears due to convective term in the parallel equation of motion and not because of temperature gradient unlike the case of low frequency usual drift wave soliton. This higher frequency drift-like wave requires sheared flow of electrons and not the density gradient to exist.

  5. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2010-03-25

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)] .

  6. Discussion of Balanced Relative Compression Height ξb (ρb)in Strengthened Beam with Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Polymer Sheets%碳纤维加固钢筋混凝土梁的界限相对受压区高度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江世永; 飞渭; 李迎涛; 彭飞飞; 杜文龙; 王跃文

    2002-01-01

    根据材料的本构关系及平截面假定,结合预应力加固的概念推导出了碳纤维加固钢筋混凝土梁时的三种不同的界限受压区高度,并给出了界限状态下钢筋、混凝土、碳纤维片材的相应应力.%Based on the stress - strain relationship and principle of co - deformation,this paper analyses the balanced relative compression height ξb (ρb) of strengthened beam with Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Polymer(CFRP) sheets, and presents the concept of balanced section. Based on this concept, the method of deciding balanced relative compression height is proposed.

  7. An analytical model of iceberg drift

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Till J W; Eisenman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Iceberg drift and decay and the associated freshwater release are increasingly seen as important processes in Earth's climate system, yet a detailed understanding of their dynamics has remained elusive. Here, an idealized model of iceberg drift is presented. The model is designed to include the most salient physical processes that determine iceberg motion while remaining sufficiently simple to facilitate physical insight into iceberg drift dynamics. We derive an analytical solution of the model, which helps build understanding and also enables the rapid computation of large numbers of iceberg trajectories. The long-standing empirical rule of thumb that icebergs drift at 2% of the wind velocity, relative to the ocean current, is derived here from physical first principles, and it is shown that this relation only holds in the limit of strong winds or small icebergs, which approximately applies for typical icebergs in the Arctic. It is demonstrated that the opposite limit of weak winds or large icebergs approxim...

  8. Anomalous bootstrap current due to drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anomalous parallel current driven by radial flux in tokamak is discussed. Drift waves, which cause an anomalous cross field diffusion, can generate a parallel current in a sheared magnetic field, if the fluctuation level has radial dependence. (author)

  9. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  10. Intense DC beam nonlinear transport-analysis & simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-Qin; ZHAO Xiao-Song

    2009-01-01

    The intense dc beam nonlinear transport was analyzed with the Lie algebraic method,and the particle trajectories of the second order approximation were obtained.Based on the theoretical analysis a computer code was designed.To get self-consistent solutions,iteration procedures were used in the code.As an example,we calculated a beam line(drift-electrostatic quadrupole doublet-drift).The results agree to the results calculated by using the PIC method.

  11. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  12. On the electron drift velocity in plasma devices with E × B drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapurin, O.; Smolyakov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure and various components of the electron drift velocity are discussed in application to plasma discharges with the E × B drift. In high density plasmas, the contribution of the diamagnetic drift can be of the same order magnitude as the E × B drift. It is pointed out that curvature and gradient drifts associated with magnetic field inhomogeneities manifest themselves via the electron pressure anisotropy. Estimates show that the components of the diamagnetic drift related to the electron pressure anisotropy and magnetic field gradients can be important for the parameters of modern magnetrons and Hall thrusters. Similar additional terms appear in the momentum balance as mirror forces which may affect the distribution of the electrostatic potential in Hall devices.

  13. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed

  14. Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in Waveguide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun

    -energy, high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers with the beam finely confined by the waveguide structure. Therefore, nano-joule, mega-hertz fiber laser pulses with ~100 fs durations can be compressed to few-cycle. We investigate quadratic waveguides with both small and large refractive index (RI) changes. Robust...

  15. The Bipolar Quantum Drift-diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Qing CHEN; Li CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A fourth order parabolic system, the bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation, with physically motivated Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition is studied in this paper. By semidiscretization in time and compactness argument, the global existence and semiclassical limit are obtained, in which semiclassical limit describes the relation between quantum and classical drift-diffusion models. Furthermore, in the case of constant doping, we prove the weak solution exponentially approaches its constant steady state as time increases to infinity.

  16. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  17. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  18. Single-hit resolution measurement with MEG II drift chamber prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Baldini, A M; Cavoto, G; Cascella, M; Cei, F; Chiappini, M; Chiarello, G; Chiri, C; Dussoni, S; Galli, L; Grancagnolo, F; Grassi, M; Martinelli, V; Nicolò, D; Panareo, M; Pepino, A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Ripiccini, E; Signorelli, G; Tassielli, G F; Tenchini, F; Venturini, M; Voena, C

    2016-01-01

    Drift chambers operated with helium-based gas mixtures represent a common solution for tracking charged particles keeping the material budget in the sensitive volume to a minimum. The drawback of this solution is the worsening of the spatial resolution due to primary ionisation fluctuations, which is a limiting factor for high granularity drift chambers like the MEG II tracker. We report on the measurements performed on three different prototypes of the MEG II drift chamber aimed at determining the achievable single-hit resolution. The prototypes were operated with helium/isobutane gas mixtures and exposed to cosmic rays, electron beams and radioactive sources. Direct measurements of the single hit resolution performed with an external tracker returned a value of 110 $\\mu$m, consistent with the values obtained with indirect measurements performed with the other prototypes.

  19. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  20. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; 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Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  1. Determination of the physical parameters of a drift chamber by application of an UV laser as track producing source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For simple drift cells with a rotational-symmetric electric field the simulation of particle tracks by UV laser-radiation allows the exact determination of the position-drift time relation and the drift velocity in dependence on the drift path. For this the laser ionization density must be fitted to the ionization density for particles. Then the results are comparable with those reached at DESY. In the medium drift region spatial resolutions of 40 μm to 50 μm can be reached. An increase of the pressure to 2 bar absolute improves the spatial resolution especially for short drift paths (≅ 30 μm). A double-track simulation is possible by relatively simple means. The values reached with electrons however are not reached completely. With a more sophisticated beam optic and a smaller beam aperture particle tracks can be simulated more accurately. Also the evaluation procedures for the FADC data can be optimized in so far that the time resolution of the FADC's is comparable with that of the TDC's. The spatial resolutions calculated by this procedure agree with those determined from TDC data. (orig.)

  2. Fluffy dust forms icy planetesimals by static compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Context. Several barriers have been proposed in planetesimal formation theory: bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift problems. Understanding the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they are fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals. Aims: We aim to reveal the pathway of dust structure evolution from dust grains to compact planetesimals. Methods: Using the compressive strength formula, we analytically investigate how fluffy dust aggregates are compressed by static compression due to ram pressure of the disk gas and self-gravity of the aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Results: We reveal the pathway of the porosity evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to form planetesimals, circumventing the barriers in planetesimal formation. The aggregates are compressed by the disk gas to a density of 10-3 g/cm3 in coagulation, which is more compact than is the case with collisional compression. Then, they are compressed more by self-gravity to 10-1 g/cm3 when the radius is 10 km. Although the gas compression decelerates the growth, the aggregates grow rapidly enough to avoid the radial drift barrier when the orbital radius is ≲6 AU in a typical disk. Conclusions: We propose a fluffy dust growth scenario from grains to planetesimals. It enables icy planetesimal formation in a wide range beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. This result proposes a concrete initial condition of planetesimals for the later stages of the planet formation.

  3. Drift wave solitons in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shears of electron diamagnetic drift velocity and ExB drift velocity are theoretically verified to give nonlinearities and establish a soliton of drift wave. Experimentally, a drift wave soliton is observed. Both of the propagation velocity of the soliton and the inverse of the soliton width get large with an increase in amplitude. (author)

  4. MUON DETECTOR: BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT) AND ALIGNMENT

    CERN Document Server

    Marco Dallavalle

    After months of cosmics data taking the drift tube (DT) detector is in good shape, ready for LHC beams. Several hundreds of millions of cosmics events have been recorded; out of those, more than 90% were triggered by the DT system. Data integrity analyses have shown a very reliable read-out system, also during high rate tests. With a 98% of the detector operational, only awaiting the arrival of some low voltage modules and for the completion of the DT Track Finder system, data taking is starting to become routine job. These continuous running exercises have been very useful to study performance and reliability of the detector in a medium term period, allowing understanding and fixing failures that have occurred with low frequency. Drift tubes have become a very stable system, becoming a service of muon triggering for the tracker after its final installation. During the last months, major efforts have taken place in synchronization tasks, within the DT system (250 chambers) and also with the rest of the CMS su...

  5. Magnetically Guided Fast Electrons in Cylindrically Compressed Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast electrons produced by a 10 ps, 160 J laser pulse through laser-compressed plastic cylinders are studied experimentally and numerically in the context of fast ignition. Kα-emission images reveal a collimated or scattered electron beam depending on the initial density and the compression timing. A numerical transport model shows that implosion-driven electrical resistivity gradients induce strong magnetic fields able to guide the electrons. The good agreement with measured beam sizes provides the first experimental evidence for fast-electron magnetic collimation in laser-compressed matter.

  6. The Physics of E × B -Drifting Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wolfgang Kundt; Gopal Krishna

    2004-09-01

    $\\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B}$-drifting jets have been generally ignored for the past 25 years even though they may well describe all the astrophysical jet sources, both on galactic and stellar scales. Here we present closed-form solutions for their joint field-and-particle distribution, argue that the observed jets are near equipartition, with extremely relativistic, monoenergetic ±-pairs of bulk Lorentz factor ≲ 104, and are first-order stable. We describe plausible mechanisms for the jets’ (i) formation, (ii) propagation, and (iii) termination. Wherever a beam meets with resistance, its frozen-in Poynting flux transforms the delta-shaped energy distribution of the pairs into an almost white power law, 2 ∼ with ≳ 0, via single-step falls through the huge convected potential.

  7. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  8. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL) in conjunction with the B ampersand W Fuel Co. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic temperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-to-end in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock temperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160 degrees C, but rock temperatures exceed the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results have been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes

  9. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  10. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  11. Compressed gas manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  12. Development and characterisation of new high-rate muon drift tube detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, Bernhard

    2012-07-25

    With the increase of the LHC luminosity above the design value and the higher background counting rates, detectors in the ATLAS muon spectrometer have to be replaced because the limits of the radiation tolerance will be exceeded. Therefore drift tube chambers with 15 mm tube diameter were developed. The required construction accuracy was verified and the limits of the resolution and efficiency were determined in a muon beam and under gamma irradiation and compared to model expectations.

  13. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  14. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies.

  15. Epigenetic drift, epigenetic clocks and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shijie C; Widschwendter, Martin; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    It is well-established that the DNA methylation landscape of normal cells undergoes a gradual modification with age, termed as 'epigenetic drift'. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of epigenetic drift and its potential role in cancer etiology. We propose a new terminology to help distinguish the different components of epigenetic drift, with the aim of clarifying the role of the epigenetic clock, mitotic clocks and active changes, which accumulate in response to environmental disease risk factors. We further highlight the growing evidence that epigenetic changes associated with cancer risk factors may play an important causal role in cancer development, and that monitoring these molecular changes in normal cells may offer novel risk prediction and disease prevention strategies. PMID:27104983

  16. Operational beams for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y; Rumolo, G; Manglunki, D

    2014-01-01

    The variety of beams, needed to set-up in the injectors as requested in the LHC, are reviewed, in terms of priority but also performance expectations and reach during 2015. This includes the single bunch beams for machine commissioning and measurements (probe, Indiv) but also the standard physics beams with 50 ns and 25 ns bunch spacing and their high brightness variants using the Bunch Compression Merging and Splitting (BCMS) scheme. The required parameters and target performance of special beams like the doublet for electron cloud enhancement and the more exotic 8b$\\oplus$4e beam, compatible with some post-scrubbing scenarios are also described. The progress and plans for the LHC ion production beams during 2014-2015 are detailed. Highlights on the current progress of the setting up of the various beams are finally presented with special emphasis on potential performance issues across the proton and ion injector chain.

  17. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  18. Realtime vision-based lateral drift correction

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, T; Pajarola, R.

    2009-01-01

    A major drawback in many robotics projects is the dependance on a specific environment and the otherwise uncertain behavior of the hardware. Simple navigation tasks like driving in a straight line can lead to a strong lateral drift over time in an unknown environment. In this paper we propose a fast and simple solution for the lateral drift problem for vision guided robots by real-time scene analysis. Without an environment-specific calibration of the robot’s drive system, we balance the ...

  19. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  20. Development of a low-energy, high-brightness $\\mu^+$ beam line

    CERN Document Server

    Eggenberger, A; Wichmann, G

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a beam line which compresses the phase space of a standard surface $\\mu^+$ beam by 10 orders of magnitude with an efficiency of $10^{-3}$. Phase space compression occurs in a He gas target and consists of three consecutive stages: Transverse (perpendicular to the beam axis) compression, longitudinal compression and re-extraction into vacuum. Transverse compression was observed for the first time and longitudinal compression has been measured to occur within 2.5 $\\mu$s with high efficiency.

  1. LASER BEAM PROPAGATION THROUGH FOG

    OpenAIRE

    Duchet, M; Flocon, B.; Sap, J

    1980-01-01

    The atmosphere is characterized by its molecular absorption coefficient and the fog by the initial radius of droplets which can be drifted by the wind. Absorption and scattering coefficients of droplets are calculated by the MIE's theory from their radius and complex index. In the laser beam, droplets are partially vaporized (we neglect thermal conductivity). Propagation equations are solved by numerical means giving steady state in a first slice of atmosphere and by incremental process in th...

  2. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, H; Fox, W; Yamada, M; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell; Fox, William; Yamada, Masaaki

    2005-01-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) waves in the moving electron frame and the forward propagating sound (slow) waves in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of large wavenumber characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz forc...

  3. Stability analysis of abandoned drift for alternative utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo-Hyun; Yoo, In-Kol; Kim, Moon-Seob; Kim, Ryang-Hee [Korea Resources Corp., Seoul(Korea); Yang, Hyung-Sik [Chonnam National University, Kwangju(Korea); Lee, Hi-Keun [Seoul National University, Seoul(Korea); Kim, Jae-Dong [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon(Korea)

    2000-04-30

    This study was performed to find the way that is alternative utilization of the drift that had been abandoned by coal industry promotion. To determine whether abandoned drift would be maintained without supports or not, the safety inspection that consists of drift survey, laboratory tests, rock mass classification and numerical analysis was performed. According to the result, there were discontinuity sets those had unfavorable orientation to the drift and rock mass around the drift had generally poor condition. So, it would be much difficult that abandoned drift is maintained without supports. (author). 15 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. Perturbational blowup solutions to the compressible 1-dimensional Euler equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, Manwai, E-mail: nevetsyuen@hotmail.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-24

    We construct non-radially symmetry solutions for the compressible 1-dimensional adiabatic Euler equations in this Letter. In detail, we perturb the linear velocity with a drifting term: (1)u=c(t)x+b(t), to seek new solutions. Then, we transform the problem into the analysis of ordinary differential equations. By investigating the corresponding ordinary differential equations, a new class of blowup or global solutions can be given. Here, our constructed solutions can provide the mathematical explanations for the drifting phenomena of some propagation wave like Tsunamis. And when we adopt the Galilean-like transformation to a drifting frame, the constructed solutions are self-similar. -- Highlights: → We construct non-radially symmetry solutions for the 1-dimensional Euler equations. → We perturb the linear velocity with a drifting term to seek new solutions. → We transform the Euler system into the ordinary differential equations analysis. → The solutions model the drifting phenomena of some propagation wave like Tsunamis. → Under the Galilean-like transformation, the constructed solutions are self-similar.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...

  6. Visualizing CMS muon drift tubes’ currents

    CERN Document Server

    Hamarik, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    This report documents my work as a summer student in the CMS DT group at CERN in July and August of 2015. During that time, I have participated in relocating DT monitoring experiment to GIF++ site and creating software to analyze drift tubes’ wires current dependence on luminosity and radioactivity.

  7. Low-drift micro flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The emerging fields of micro total-analysis systems (micro-TAS), micro-reactors and bio-MEMS drives the need for further miniaturisation of sensors measuring quantities such as pressure, temperature and flow. The research described in this thesis concerns the development of low-drift micro flow sens

  8. Stable discrete representation of relativistically drifting plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchen, Manuel; Godfrey, Brendan B; Dornmair, Irene; Jalas, Soeren; Peters, Kevin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Maier, Andreas R

    2016-01-01

    Representing the electrodynamics of relativistically drifting particle ensembles in discrete, co-propagating Galilean coordinates enables the derivation of a Particle-in-Cell algorithm that is intrinsically free of the Numerical Cherenkov Instability, for plasmas flowing at a uniform velocity. Application of the method is shown by modeling plasma accelerators in a Lorentz-transformed optimal frame of reference.

  9. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  10. Development of 2D particle-in-cell code to simulate high current, low energy beam in a beam transport system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C L Srivastava; S V L S Rao; P Singh

    2007-10-01

    A code for 2D space-charge dominated beam dynamics study in beam transport lines is developed. The code is used for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of -uniform beam in a channel containing solenoids and drift space. It can also simulate a transport line where quadrupoles are used for focusing the beam. Numerical techniques as well as the results of beam dynamics studies are presented in the paper.

  11. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  12. Coupling fluxes in the presence of cross L Drifts: A comparison of whistler mode and radio beacon results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of plasmasphere column content models, Davies et al [1979] deduced the existence of ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling fluxes of order 1 x 1013 el m-2 s-1 per hemisphere, driven by compressed tubes of plasma in the course of an E x B drift. Such large fluxes should be easily detectable on a VLF whistler mode experiment but have not been seen. Data from that experiment are presented that show inward drifts at L=2.3 accompanied at times by small upward fluxes. This is contrary to some theoretical predictions but is in agreement with recent measurements regarding the dynamics of the ionosphere at latitudes approaching the plasmapause. Calculations show column content measurements may be insensitive to compression effects even in the absence of fluxes

  13. Research on Drift Tube Linac Model Cavity for CPHS

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, S X; Wei, J; Zhang, H Y; Billen, J H; Young, L M; He, Y; Li, J; Zhang, D S; Li, J H; Stovall, J; Zhao, Y L

    2010-01-01

    The CPHS pro­ject in Ts­inghua Uni­ver­si­ty plans to con­struct a 13 MeV lin­ear ac­cel­er­a­tor to de­liv­er a pulsed pro­ton beam hav­ing an av­er­age beam cur­rent of 2.5 mA. A Drift Tube Linac (DTL), fol­low­ing a Radio Fre­quen­cy Quadrupole ac­cel­er­a­tor(RFQ), will ac­cel­er­ate pro­tons from 3 to 13MeV. The ac­cel­er­at­ing field and phase will be ramped to match the lon­gi­tu­di­nal restor­ing forces at the end of the RFQ. Like­wise, the trans­verse fo­cus­ing forces, pro­vid­ed by per­ma­nent-mag­net quadrupole lens­es (PMQs) will be pro­grammed to match the trans­verse restor­ing forces at the end of the RFQ to avoid miss­match and avoid para­met­ric res­o­nances. We will pre­sent the main physics de­sign pa­ram­e­ters of CPHS DTL and de­scribe the prop­er­ties of the res­o­nant cav­i­ty. We plan to apply elec­tron beam weld­ing tech­nol­o­gy ex­clu­sive­ly in the fab­ri­ca­tion of the drift tubes and will pre­sent t...

  14. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose

  15. Compressed Sensing in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, J; Ottensamer, R

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in signal processing have focused on the use of sparse representations in various applications. A new field of interest based on sparsity has recently emerged: compressed sensing. This theory is a new sampling framework that provides an alternative to the well-known Shannon sampling theory. In this paper we investigate how compressed sensing (CS) can provide new insights into astronomical data compression and more generally how it paves the way for new conceptions in astronomical remote sensing. We first give a brief overview of the compressed sensing theory which provides very simple coding process with low computational cost, thus favoring its use for real-time applications often found on board space mission. We introduce a practical and effective recovery algorithm for decoding compressed data. In astronomy, physical prior information is often crucial for devising effective signal processing methods. We particularly point out that a CS-based compression scheme is flexible enough to account ...

  16. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  17. Design of 7 MeV drift tube linac as injector of proton accelerator for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 324 MHz drift-tube linac(DTL) is designed for proton cancer therapy. The design demands low power dissipation and short tank. The DTL accelerates beam from 2.5 MeV to 7 MeV, with RF power of 265 kW and total length of 1.9 m. The DTL uses permanent-quadrupole magnet(PQM) inside the drift tubes arranged in an FODO lattice. A new matching method is designed. In stead of the traditional beam transport line, the first four cells in DTL are designed as matching section. It causes the beam ellipse from radio-frequency quadrupole linac(RFQ) to satisfy conditions specified by the DTL periodic structure. The dynamics simulation was performed with PARMILA, and almost no emittance growth has been found. (authors)

  18. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  19. Strategies for Dealing with Drift during Implementation of ERP Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van Baalen (Peter); P.C. van Fenema (Paul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractResearch on the relationship between Information Technology (IT) and organizations emphasizes the complexity of adaptation processes and the potential of drifting. Drifting means that an organization encounters unexpected circumstances that show the incompleteness and possible failure of

  20. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  1. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  2. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  3. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  4. Wavelet image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pearlman, William A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the stages necessary to create a wavelet compression system for images and describes state-of-the-art systems used in image compression standards and current research. It starts with a high level discussion of the properties of the wavelet transform, especially the decomposition into multi-resolution subbands. It continues with an exposition of the null-zone, uniform quantization used in most subband coding systems and the optimal allocation of bitrate to the different subbands. Then the image compression systems of the FBI Fingerprint Compression Standard and the JPEG2000 S

  5. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  6. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P., E-mail: eplee@lbl.gov

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design. After a summary of dynamical considerations, two major topics are addressed here: transportable current limits, which determine the choice of focal system for the linac, and longitudinal control of the beams, which are potentially destabilized by their interaction with the pulsed power system.

  7. Seasonal and longitudinal dependence of equatorialdisturbance vertical plasma drifts

    OpenAIRE

    Fejer, Bela G.; Jensen, J. W.; Su, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    [1] We used equatorial measurements from the ROCSAT-1 satellite to determine the seasonal and longitudinal dependent equatorial F region disturbance vertical plasma drifts. Following sudden increases in geomagnetic activity, the prompt penetration vertical drifts are upward during the day and downward at night, and have strong local time dependence at all seasons. The largest prompt penetration drifts near dusk and dawn occur during June solstice. The daytime disturbance dynamo drifts are sma...

  8. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices......A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  9. Performance of Drift Chambers for E906/SeaQuest Drell-Yan Experiment at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kei; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Naively, the parton distribution of the anti-u and anti-d quark were considered flavor symmetric. However, previous experiments showed that u and d are asymmetric. The E906/SeaQuest Collaboration at Fermilab is precisely measuring the x dependence of the flavor asymmetry in the nucleon at large x (0 . 1 γ* -->l+l- , is suited for this measurement, because the process always involves an antiquark. Thus SeaQuest measures the momenta of Drell-Yan muon pairs with a magnetic spectrometer. SeaQuest began a two-year data taking run in the 120 GeV proton beam in November 2013. There are four drift chambers in the SeaQuest spectrometer for tracking of muons. We have checked the performance of the drift chambers using the data. The single-plane efficiency, position resolution and rate tolerance of the drift chambers have been evaluated. The requirements of one of the drift chambers are > 95 % of efficiency, < 400 μ m of position resolution, and 1 kHz/wire/1 mm of rate tolerance. I will report on the results of the chamber performance investigations.

  10. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  11. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  12. Simplified Drift Analysis for Proving Lower Bounds in Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Drift analysis is a powerful tool used to bound the optimization time of evolutionary algorithms (EAs). Various previous works apply a drift theorem going back to Hajek in order to show exponential lower bounds on the optimization time of EAs. However, this drift theorem is tedious to read and to...

  13. Effectiveness of spray adjuvants on reduction of spray drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  14. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch

  15. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  16. Drift mode accelerometry for spaceborne gravity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Conklin, John W

    2014-01-01

    A drift mode accelerometer is a precision device that overcomes the much of the acceleration noise and readout dynamic range limitations of traditional electrostatic accelerometers. It has the potential of achieving acceleration noise performance of drag-free systems over a restricted frequency band without the need for external drag-free control or spacecraft propulsion. Like traditional accelerometers, the drift mode accelerometer contains a high-density test mass surrounded by an electrode housing, which can control and sense all six degrees of freedom of the test mass. Unlike traditional accelerometers, the suspension system is operated with a low duty cycle so that the limiting suspension force noise only acts over brief, known time intervals, which can be neglected in the data analysis. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of even the best voltage references typically used to determine the inertial acceleration of electrostatic accelerome...

  17. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik;

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that current-driven macroalge transport in shallow lagoons and estuaries may negatively impact eelgrass through increased turbidity and physical stress. Increased turbidity and lower light availability for eelgrass may result when drifting macroalgae erode surface sediment...... and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...... at increasing current velocity. In flume experiments with macroalgae, sediment erosion always started at lower current velocities (2-4 cm s-1) than in control experiments without macroalgae (18-27 cm s-1). When macroalgae started to move, the turbidity increased immediately from a background concentration of 7...

  18. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  19. Toroidal electron temperature gradient drive drift modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron temperature gradient in tokamak geometry is shown to drive a short wavelength lower hybrid drift wave turbulence due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature on the outside of the torus. Ballooning mode theory is used to determine the stability regimes and the complex eigenfrequencies. At wavelengths of order the electron gyroradius the polarization is electrostatic and the growth rate is greater than the electron transit time aroud the torus. At longer wavelengths of order the collisionless skin depth the polarization is electromagnetic with electromagnetic vortices producing the dominant transport. The small scale electrostatic component of the turbulence produces a small by (m/sub e/m/sub i/)/sup 1/2/ drift wave anomalous transport of both the trapped and passing electrons while the c/ω/sub pe/ scale turbulene produces a neo-Alcator type transport from the stochastic diffusion of the trapped electrons. 15 refs., 5 figs

  20. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  1. Beam Dynamics and Pulse Duration Control During Final Beam Bunching in Driver System for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Katayama, Takeshi; Kawata, Shigeo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Someya, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    Beam dynamics is investigated by multi-particle simulations during a final beam bunching in a driver system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). The longitudinal bunch compression causes the beam instability induced by the strong space charge effect. The multi-particle simulation can indicate the emittance growth due to the longitudinal bunch compression. Dependence in the beam pulse duration is also investigated for effective pellet implosion in HIF. Not only the spatial nonuniformity of the beam illumination, but also the errors of the beam pulse duration cause changes of implosion dynamics. The allowable regime of the beam pulse duration for the effective fusion output becomes narrow with decreasing the input beam energy. The voltage accuracy requirement at the beam velocity modulator is also estimated for the final beam bunching. It is estimated that the integrated voltage error is allowable as a few percent.

  2. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Walking-In-Place interaction techniques seem particularly useful in relation to immersive virtual environments where the user's movement is greatly constrained by a limited physical space. However, current techniques may not be particularly useful in combination with head-mounted displays since...... many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  3. Review of cooling tower drift deposition models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.C.J.

    1977-05-04

    The behavior, basic assumptions, and limitations of ten different models for calculating the drift deposition rate from wet cooling towers are reviewed and then their predicted results for such deposition with a common set of input parameters are compared. The predicted maximum deposition differs among the models by two orders of magnitude with a wide range in peak location. Comments and suggestions to improve the models are included.

  4. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMPLACEMENT DRIFT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emplacement drift system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2000).

  5. Average Drift Analysis and Population Scalability

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jun; Yao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study how the population size affects the computation time of evolutionary algorithms in a rigorous way. The computation time of an evolutionary algorithm can be measured by either the expected number of generations (hitting time) or the expected number of fitness evaluations (running time) to find an optimal solution. Population scalability is the ratio of the expected hitting time between a benchmark algorithm and an algorithm using a larger population size. Average drift...

  6. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF; FOUAD KERROUR; SALAH KEMOUCHE

    2016-01-01

    The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FE...

  7. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    OpenAIRE

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Xin ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of $2\\lesssim z\\lesssim5$, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holograp...

  8. On plasma density blobs in drift turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2016-01-01

    By keeping nonlinear Boltzmann factor in electron density dependence on electrostatic potential it is demonstrated that large plasma density blobs, often seen in experiment inside separatrix, can exist within the framework of drift wave dynamics. The estimates show that plasma density in a blob can be ~3 times higher that average plasma density, but hardly exceeds this limit, which in a ball park is in agreement with experimental observations.

  9. Inertial Orientation Trackers with Drift Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxlin, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    A class of inertial-sensor systems with drift compensation has been invented for use in measuring the orientations of human heads (and perhaps other, similarly sized objects). These systems can be designed to overcome some of the limitations of prior orientation-measuring systems that are based, variously, on magnetic, optical, mechanical-linkage, and acoustical principles. The orientation signals generated by the systems of this invention could be used for diverse purposes, including controlling head-orientation-dependent virtual reality visual displays or enabling persons whose limbs are paralyzed to control machinery by means of head motions. The inventive concept admits to variations too numerous to describe here, making it necessary to limit this description to a typical system, the selected aspects of which are illustrated in the figure. A set of sensors is mounted on a bracket on a band or a cap that gently but firmly grips the wearer s head to be tracked. Among the sensors are three drift-sensitive rotationrate sensors (e.g., integrated-circuit angular- rate-measuring gyroscopes), which put out DC voltages nominally proportional to the rates of rotation about their sensory axes. These sensors are mounted in mutually orthogonal orientations for measuring rates of rotation about the roll, pitch, and yaw axes of the wearer s head. The outputs of these rate sensors are conditioned and digitized, and the resulting data are fed to an integrator module implemented in software in a digital computer. In the integrator module, the angular-rate signals are jointly integrated by any of several established methods to obtain a set of angles that represent approximately the orientation of the head in an external, inertial coordinate system. Because some drift is always present as a component of an angular position computed by integrating the outputs of angular-rate sensors, the orientation signal is processed further in a drift-compensator software module.

  10. Submarine landslides in contourite drifts along the Pianosa Ridge (Northern Tyrrhenian Sea): A geotechnical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontes Garcia, Elda; Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sebastien; Jouet, Gwenael; Cauquil, Eric; Cattaneo, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The Pianosa Ridge is a tectonic structure in the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea that forms the eastern flank of the Corsica trough (between Corsica and the Tuscan shelf). It is characterised by the presence of submarine landslides within the Pianosa Contourite Depositional System. Multibeam bathymetry, High-Resolution-72 channel (50-250 Hz) and CHIRP (3200-5200 Hz) seismic reflection profiles, collected during cruises PRISME2 and PRISME3 in 2013, revealed that bottom currents created a heterogeneous sedimentation pattern, resulting in zones of preferential deposition (drifts) and zones of erosion and/or non-deposition (moat and abraded surfaces). The sector where the largest submarine landslides took place is characterised by the presence of a plastered drift, a sediment body with a maximum thickness in the mid-low continental slope and a moat at the toe of the slope. Calypso piston cores and piezocone CPTu data acquired during the PRISME3 cruise in 2013 also provide valuable information about the lithology, geomechanical properties and stress history of contourite drifts and of the shallowest submarine landslide, named Pianosa Slump. Contourites in this area are mostly muddy, with coarser layers deposited during sea level falls. During sea level low-stands sedimentation rates (up to 115 cm•kyr-1 in the plastered drift) are higher than during sea level high-stands (20 cm•kyr-1 in the plastered drift). The plastered drift is underconsolidated with Overconsolidation Ratios (OCR) that range between 0.5 and 0.8. The Pianosa Slump formed in the plastered drift at 43-50 kyr BP has a volume of 2.62 km3, and it is covered by 17-20 m of sediment. The basal shear surface of the Pianosa Slump, at 30-56 m below the present-day seafloor, is correlated with a sediment layer characterised by the presence of zeolite minerals (up to 4% of sediment volume), high water content, low density, high compressibility, high permeability, high undrained shear strength and a post-peak strain

  11. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  12. Arabic Short Text Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Omer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Text compression permits representing a document by using less space. This is useful not only to save disk space, but more importantly, to save disk transfer and network transmission time. With the continues increase in the number of Arabic short text messages sent by mobile phones, the use of a suitable compression scheme would allow users to use more characters than the default value specified by the provider. The development of an efficient compression scheme to compress short Arabic texts is not a straight forward task. Approach: This study combined the benefits of pre-processing, entropy reduction through splitting files and hybrid dynamic coding: A new technique proposed in this study that uses the fact that Arabic texts have single case letters. Experimental tests had been performed on short Arabic texts and a comparison with the well known plain Huffman compression was made to measure the performance of the proposed schema for Arabic short text. Results: The proposed schema can achieve a compression ratio around 4.6 bits byte-1 for very short Arabic text sequences of 15 bytes and around 4 bits byte-1 for 50 bytes text sequences, using only 8 Kbytes overhead of memory. Conclusion: Furthermore, a reasonable compression ratio can be achieved using less than 0.4 KB of memory overhead. We recommended the use of proposed schema to compress small Arabic text with recourses limited.

  13. A Bunch Compression Method for Free Electron Lasers that Avoids Parasitic Compressions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Stephen V. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Douglas, David R. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Tennant, Christopher D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wilson, Frederick G. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Nguyen, Dinh [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY

    2015-09-01

    Virtually all existing high energy (>few MeV) linac-driven FELs compress the electron bunch length though the use of off-crest acceleration on the rising side of the RF waveform followed by transport through a magnetic chicane. This approach has at least three flaws: 1) it is difficult to correct aberrations--particularly RF curvature, 2) rising side acceleration exacerbates space charge-induced distortion of the longitudinal phase space, and 3) all achromatic "negative compaction" compressors create parasitic compression during the final compression process, increasing the CSR-induced emittance growth. One can avoid these deficiencies by using acceleration on the falling side of the RF waveform and a compressor with M56>0. This approach offers multiple advantages: 1) It is readily achieved in beam lines supporting simple schemes for aberration compensation, 2) Longitudinal space charge (LSC)-induced phase space distortion tends, on the falling side of the RF waveform, to enhance the chirp, and 3) Compressors with M56>0 can be configured to avoid spurious over-compression. We will discuss this bunch compression scheme in detail and give results of a successful beam test in April 2012 using the JLab UV Demo FEL

  14. Sunrise enhancement of equatorial vertical plasma drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Libo; Zhang, Ruilong; Le, Huijun

    2016-04-01

    Sunrise enhancement in vertical plasma drift over equatorial regions is not discernible in the statistical picture compared with the significant enhancement during dusk hours. In this report, it is the first time to investigate the occurrence of the dawn enhancement in the equatorial ionospheric vertical plasma drift from ROCSAT-1 observations during geomagnetic quiet times. The dawn enhancements occur most frequently in June solstice and least frequently in December solstice. The statistical survey shows that the occurrence depends on the magnetic declination. The enhancement has the strongest amplitude in regions near 320° longitude and peaks during June solstice. The dawn enhancement reaches its peak after the sunrise in conjugated E regions. Furthermore, it is found that the dawn enhancement is closely related to the difference between the sunrise times in the conjugated E regions (sunrise time lag). The dawn enhancement occurs easily in regions with a large sunrise time lag. Moreover, we will report the effects of the sunrise enhancement of vertical plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere as indicated from the observations and model simulations. We thanks National Central University of Taiwan providing the ROCSAT-1 data. The Ap and F107 indices are obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (http://spidr.ngdc.noaa.gov/spidr/). This research is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41231065), the Chinese Academy of Sciences project (KZZD-EW-01-3), National Key Basic Research Program of China (2012CB825604) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (41321003).

  15. Ambipolar Drift Heating in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo

    1999-01-01

    Although thermal pressure is unimportant dynamically in most molecular gas, the temperature is an important diagnostic of dynamical processes and physical conditions. This is the first of two papers on thermal equilibrium in molecular clouds. We present calculations of frictional heating by ion-neutral (or ambipolar) drift in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent, magnetized molecular clouds. We show that ambipolar drift heating is a strong function of position in a turbulent cloud, and its average value can be significantly larger than the average cosmic ray heating rate. The volume averaged heating rate per unit volume due to ambipolar drift, H_AD ~ |JxB|^2 ~ B^4/L_B^2, is found to depend on the rms Alfvenic Mach number, M_A, and on the average field strength, as H_AD ~ M_A^2^4. This implies that the typical scale of variation of the magnetic field, L_B, is inversely proportional to M_A, which we also demonstrate.

  16. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  17. THERMAL DRIFT CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPACITIVE PRESSURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The capacitive pressure sensors based on silicon are characterized by their very high sensitivities and their low power consumption. Nevertheless, their thermal behavior remains more or less unpredictable because they can indicate very high thermal coefficients. The study of the thermal behavior of these sensors is essential to define the parameters that cause the output characteristics drift. In this study, we modeled the thermal behavior of this sensors, using Finite Element Analysis (FEA made in COMSOL. The model solved by COMSOL environment takes into account the entire sensor and thermal effects due to the temperature considering the materials’ properties, the geometric shape and also the heat transfer mechanisms. By COMSOL we determine how the temperature affects the sensor during the manufacturing process. For that end, we calculated the thermal drift of capacitance at rest, the thermal coefficients and we compared them with experimental results to validate our model. Further, we studied the thermal drift of sensor characteristics both at rest and under constant and uniform pressure. Further, our study put emphasis on the geometric influence parameters on these characteristics to optimize the sensor performance. Finally, this study allows us to predict the sensor behavior against temperature and to minimize this effect by optimizing the geometrical parameters.

  18. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  19. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2000-01-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M&O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used.

  20. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  1. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  2. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  3. Giving cosmic redshift drift a whirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alex G.; Linder, Eric V.; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2015-03-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of 10-9 require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 h exposure on a 10-m telescope (1000 h of exposure on a 40-m telescope) potentially capable of measuring the redshift of a galaxy to a precision of 10-8 (few ×10-10). Low-redshift redshift drift also has very strong complementarity with cosmic microwave background measurements, with the combination achieving a dark energy figure of merit of nearly 300 (1400) for 5% (1%) precision on drift.

  4. Comparison of drift velocities of nighttime equatorial plasma depletions with ambient plasma drifts and thermospheric neutral winds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; England, S.L.; Frey, H.U.; Immel, T.J.; Lin, C.S.; Pacheco, E.E.; Häusler, K.; Doornbos, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to compare plasma depletion drifts with the ambient plasma drifts and neutral winds in the post sunset equatorial ionosphere using global-scale satellite observations. The local time and latitude variations of the drift velocities of O+ plasma depletions at 350–400 km altitud

  5. Compression and Progressive Retrieval of Multi-Dimensional Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, P.; Brinkhoff, T.

    2016-06-01

    Since the emergence of sensor data streams, increasing amounts of observations have to be transmitted, stored and retrieved. Performing these tasks at the granularity of single points would mean an inappropriate waste of resources. Thus, we propose a concept that performs a partitioning of observations by spatial, temporal or other criteria (or a combination of them) into data segments. We exploit the resulting proximity (according to the partitioning dimension(s)) within each data segment for compression and efficient data retrieval. While in principle allowing lossless compression, it can also be used for progressive transmission with increasing accuracy wherever incremental data transfer is reasonable. In a first feasibility study, we apply the proposed method to a dataset of ARGO drifting buoys covering large spatio-temporal regions of the world's oceans and compare the achieved compression ratio to other formats.

  6. COMPRESSION AND PROGRESSIVE RETRIEVAL OF MULTI-DIMENSIONAL SENSOR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lorkowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of sensor data streams, increasing amounts of observations have to be transmitted, stored and retrieved. Performing these tasks at the granularity of single points would mean an inappropriate waste of resources. Thus, we propose a concept that performs a partitioning of observations by spatial, temporal or other criteria (or a combination of them into data segments. We exploit the resulting proximity (according to the partitioning dimension(s within each data segment for compression and efficient data retrieval. While in principle allowing lossless compression, it can also be used for progressive transmission with increasing accuracy wherever incremental data transfer is reasonable. In a first feasibility study, we apply the proposed method to a dataset of ARGO drifting buoys covering large spatio-temporal regions of the world´s oceans and compare the achieved compression ratio to other formats.

  7. Fractal image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Sloan, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    Fractals are geometric or data structures which do not simplify under magnification. Fractal Image Compression is a technique which associates a fractal to an image. On the one hand, the fractal can be described in terms of a few succinct rules, while on the other, the fractal contains much or all of the image information. Since the rules are described with less bits of data than the image, compression results. Data compression with fractals is an approach to reach high compression ratios for large data streams related to images. The high compression ratios are attained at a cost of large amounts of computation. Both lossless and lossy modes are supported by the technique. The technique is stable in that small errors in codes lead to small errors in image data. Applications to the NASA mission are discussed.

  8. Spectral Animation Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wang; Yang Liu; Xiaohu Guo; Zichun Zhong; Binh Le; Zhigang Deng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a spectral approach to compress dynamic animation consisting of a sequence of homeomor-phic manifold meshes. Our new approach directly compresses the field of deformation gradient defined on the surface mesh, by decomposing it into rigid-body motion (rotation) and non-rigid-body deformation (stretching) through polar decompo-sition. It is known that the rotation group has the algebraic topology of 3D ring, which is different from other operations like stretching. Thus we compress these two groups separately, by using Manifold Harmonics Transform to drop out their high-frequency details. Our experimental result shows that the proposed method achieves a good balance between the reconstruction quality and the compression ratio. We compare our results quantitatively with other existing approaches on animation compression, using standard measurement criteria.

  9. The Diagonal Compression Field Method using Circular Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new design method, which is a modification of the diagonal compression field method, the modification consisting of the introduction of circular fan stress fields. The traditional method does not allow changes of the concrete compression direction throughout a given beam...... if the -value for a given beam could be set to a low value in regions with high shear stresses and thereafter increased in regions with low shear stresses. Thus the shear reinforcement would be reduced and the concrete strength would be utilized in a better way. In the paper it is shown how circular fan stress...... fields may be used whenever changes in the concrete compression direction are desired. To illustrate the new design method, a specific example of a prestressed concrete beam is calculated....

  10. Concept of a solid-state drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a solid state drift chamber is described, and its use in a high rate, high multiplicity environment is discussed. The Solid State Drift Chamber (SSDCH) is a thin wafer of a high purity n-type silicon (few cm2 x a few hundreds μm thick) with a single small-area, small-capacitance anode readout. The drift voltage is supplied to an array of drift electrodes on both sides of the wafer to produce a uniform drift field parallel to the surface of the wafer and to ensure the complete depletion of the wafer

  11. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  12. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  13. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M andO 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  14. Acceptance scan technique for the drift tube linac of the spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, D. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: jeond@ornl.gov; Stovall, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Takeda, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Nath, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Billen, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Young, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kisselev, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Troitsk, Russia (Russian Federation); Shishlo, A. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Aleksandrov, A. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Assadi, S. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chu, C.M. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Cousineau, S. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Danilov, V. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Galambos, J. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Henderson, S. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, S. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kravchuk, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Troitsk, Russia (Russian Federation); Tanke, E. [SNS Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For high intensity proton accelerators, it is vital to reduce the machine activation by minimizing the beam loss from many sources. One of such sources is longitudinal mismatch. To minimize a potential mismatch, it is important to set accurately the rf set-point (rf field amplitude and phase) of a high-intensity linac such as the drift tube linac (DTL) of the spallation neutron source. A widely used technique called the acceptance scan was studied extensively and applied successfully to tune the DTL tanks since the initial commissioning. From the acceptance scan one can obtain the longitudinal beam profile at the entrance of each DTL tank. But except tank 1, acceptance scan alone cannot determine the incoming beam energy deviation, leading to small uncertainties in the rf set point.

  15. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  16. Improved Particle Identification Using Cluster Counting in a Full-Length Drift Chamber Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, Jean-François; Lu, Philip; So, Rocky; Cheaib, Racha; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Faszer, Wayne; Beaulieu, Alexandre; de Jong, Samuel; Roney, Michael; de Sangro, Riccardo; Felici, Giulietto; Finocchiaro, Giuseppe; Piccolo, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell prototype drift chambers were built at TRIUMF and tested with a $\\sim\\unit[210]{MeV/c}$ beam of positrons, muons, and pions. A cluster-counting technique is implemented which improves the ability to distinguish muons and pions when combined with a traditional truncated-mean charge measurement. Several cluster-counting algorithms and equipment variations are tested, all showing significant improvement when combined with the traditional method. The results show that cluster counting is a feasible option for any particle physics experiment using drift chambers for particle identification. The technique does not require electronics with an overly high sampling rate. Optimal results are found with a signal smoothing time of $\\sim\\unit[5]{ns}$ corresponding to a $\\sim\\unit[100]{MHz}$ Nyquist frequency.

  17. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented

  18. Bessel Beams

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kirk T

    2000-01-01

    Scalar Bessel beams are derived both via the wave equation and via diffraction theory. While such beams have a group velocity that exceeds the speed of light, this is a manifestation of the "scissors paradox" of special relativty. The signal velocity of a modulated Bessel beam is less than the speed of light. Forms of Bessel beams that satisfy Maxwell's equations are also given.

  19. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Vertical plasma drift data measured at a mid-latitude ionospheric station Pruhonice (50.0 ° N, 14.6 ° E) were collected and analysed for the year 2006, a year of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Hence these data provide insight into the drift behaviour during quiet conditions. The following typical diurnal trend is evident: a significant decay to negative values (downward peak) at dawn; generally less pronounced downward peak at dusk hours. Magnitude of the downward drift varies during the year. Typically it reaches values about 20 ms-1 at dawn hours and 10 ms-1 at dusk hours. Maximum dawn magnitude of about 40 ms-1 has been detected in August. During daytime the vertical drifts increases from the initial small downward drifts to zero drift around noon and to small upward drifts in the afternoon. Night-time drift values display large variability around a near zero vertical drift average. There is a significant trend to larger downward drift values near dawn and a less pronounced decrease of the afternoon upward vertical drifts near sunset. Two regular downward peaks of the drift associated with the dawn and dusk are general characteristics of the analysed data throughout the year 2006. Their seasonal course corresponds to the seasonal course of the sunrise and sunset. The duration of prevailing negative drift velocities forming these peaks and thus the influence of the dawn/dusk on the drift velocity is mostly 1.5-3 h. The dawn effect on vertical drift tends to be larger than the effect of the dusk. The observed magnitude of the sunrise and sunset peaks show significant annual course. The highest variability of the magnitude is seen during winter. High variability is detected till March equinox and again after September equinox. Around solstice, both peaks reaches lowest values. After that, the magnitudes of the drift velocity increase smoothly till maxima in summer (August). The vertical drift velocity course is smooth between June solstice and September

  20. Simulations of ion beams for NDCX-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, D.P., E-mail: dpgrote@lbl.gov [LBNL MS47-112, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Bekerley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Friedman, A., E-mail: afriedman@lbl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Sharp, W.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    NDCX-II, the second neutralized drift compression experiment, is a moderate energy, high current accelerator designed to drive targets for warm dense matter and IFE-relevant energy coupling studies, and to serve as a testbed for high current accelerator physics. As part of the design process, studies were carried out to assess the sensitivities of the accelerator to errors, and to further optimize the design in concert with the evolving pulsed power engineering. The Warp code was used to carry out detailed simulations in both axisymmetric and full 3-D geometry. Ensembles of simulations were carried out to characterize the effects of errors, such as timing jitter and noise on the accelerator waveforms, noise on the source waveform, and solenoid and source offsets. In some cases, the ensemble studies resulted in better designs, revealing operating points with improved performance and showing possible means for further improvement. These studies also revealed a new non-paraxial effect of the final focus solenoid on the beam, which must be taken into account in designing an optimal final focusing system.

  1. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-06-22

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths of all species. This peak compression occurs with a modest reduction of resolution, but which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. In addition, approaches for peak compression in traveling wave IMS are also discussed. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  2. New interpretation of laser gyro drifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Discuss and develop some contents which are relevant to the IEEE Std 647TM-2006 in this paper. The IEEE Std only involves Allan variance, and decomposes it into five primary noise terms, in which, however, the noise nature of the so called "rate random walk noise" and the "rate ramp" is doubted by the IEEE Std editors. Here we use a mathematical identity to entirely affirm the first query and partially the second query as mentioned above. Besides, we argue that only the classical variance can be used in navigation, not the Allan variance. In order to seek the true nature of all drift terms in the variance, we adopt our original work that represents the noises as damped oscillations, to obtain the power spectral density (PSD) of the noises which is then transformed back into time domain. When the damped time constant is much longer than the sampling interval, the re-sulting slow variation term may be expanded into three terms: ordinary bias instability, rate random walk, and rate ramp. Therefore, these "noise terms" are not independent, and they are more of deterministic errors than random noises, and can be explained quantitatively. The resulting fast variation drift may be expanded into two terms. The first term is the same as angle random noise, while the second term adds to the true quantization noise term to form a new combined term called "quantiza-tion noise term". As the result of our research, not only the IEEE Std editors’ suspicions above are answered completely, but a new theory to analyze the laser gyro drifts is also presented, with several supporting examples to explain and verify the theory.

  3. Daytime plasma drifts in the equatorial lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Debrup; Fejer, Bela G.

    2015-11-01

    We have used extensive radar measurements from the Jicamarca Observatory during low solar flux periods to study the quiet time variability and altitudinal dependence of equatorial daytime vertical and zonal plasma drifts. The daytime vertical drifts are upward and have largest values during September-October. The day-to-day variability of these drifts does not change with height between 150 and 600 km, but the bimonthly variability is much larger in the F region than below about 200 km. These drifts vary linearly with height generally increasing in the morning and decreasing in the afternoon. The zonal drifts are westward during the day and have largest values during July-October. The 150 km region zonal drifts have much larger day-to-day, but much smaller bimonthly variability than the F region drifts. The daytime zonal drifts strongly increase with height up to about 300 km from March through October, and more weakly at higher altitudes. The December solstice zonal drifts have generally weaker altitudinal dependence, except perhaps below 200 km. Current theoretical and general circulation models do not reproduce the observed altitudinal variation of the daytime equatorial zonal drifts.

  4. Focus on Compression Stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy may be recommended as part of a treatment plan. There are several situations when compression may be helpful, including: tired legs, varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), lymphedema, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). This brochure focuses ...

  5. LZW Data Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheemanth H N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lempel–Ziv–Welch (LZW is a universal lossless data compression algorithm created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch. LZW compression is one of the Adaptive Dictionary techniques. The dictionary is created while the data are being encoded. So encoding can be done on the fly. The dictionary need not be transmitted. Dictionary can be built up at receiving end on the fly. If the dictionary overflows then we have to reinitialize the dictionary and add a bit to each one of the code words. Choosing a large dictionary size avoids overflow, but spoils compressions. A codebook or dictionary containing the source symbols is constructed. For 8-bit monochrome images, the first 256 words of the dictionary are assigned to the gray levels 0-255. Remaining part of the dictionary is filled with sequences of the gray levels.LZW compression works best when applied on monochrome images and text files that contain repetitive text/patterns.

  6. Shocklets in compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁湘江; 男俊武; 沈清; 李筠

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of shocklets is studied theoretically and numerically for the stationary fluid, uniform compressible flow, and boundary layer flow. The conditions that trigger shock waves for sound wave, weak discontinuity, and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave in compressible flows are investigated. The relations between the three types of waves and shocklets are further analyzed and discussed. Different stages of the shocklet formation process are simulated. The results show that the three waves in compressible flows will transfer to shocklets only when the initial disturbance amplitudes are greater than the certain threshold values. In compressible boundary layers, the shocklets evolved from T-S wave exist only in a finite region near the surface instead of the whole wavefront.

  7. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  8. Demersally drifting invertebrates from Kongsfjorden, Svalbård (Arctic Ocean)-a comparison of catches from drift-pump and drift-nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Joo, Hyoung-Min; Lee, Jae Hyung; Yun, Mi Sun; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2015-12-01

    Demersally drifting organisms were collected at Ny Ålesund (Svalbård-Arctic Ocean) to study the taxon composition and relative abundances in the Arctic summer. Catch potentials of two collection devices for demersal drift were compared. A lowvolume submersible drift-pump and a drift-net unit were employed for the collection of demersally drifting biota, particularly for shallow aquatic habitats. With the exception of Appendicularia, Chaetognatha, Coelenterata, and Ctenophora, which were damaged at times, the pump catches were in good condition and sufficient for identification and quantification of less mobile fauna. A comparison of the two devices revealed that the drift-pump collected more specimens than the drift-net. However, the drift-net may have caused an underestimation of the abundances of invertebrates. No differences in identified taxon number and indices of richness, evenness and diversity were found. However, the proportion of invertebrate animals in the two devices was different for the three groups: zooplankton, macrofauna and meiofauna. At Svalbård, zooplankton, larvae of macrofauna, and meiofauna were successfully collected by the two collecting devices. However, the catchibility of the two devices in collecting various invertebrate taxa was different and, therefore, a sound `Device Effect' was revealed.

  9. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  10. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  11. Drift-induced Benjamin-Feir instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.; Carletti, T.

    2016-06-01

    A modified version of the Ginzburg-Landau equation is introduced which accounts for asymmetric couplings between neighbors sites on a one-dimensional lattice, with periodic boundary conditions. The drift term which reflects the imposed microscopic asymmetry seeds a generalized class of instabilities, reminiscent of the Benjamin-Feir type. The uniformly synchronized solution is spontaneously destabilized outside the region of parameters classically associated to the Benjamin-Feir instability, upon injection of a nonhomogeneous perturbation. The ensuing patterns can be of the traveling wave type or display a patchy, colorful mosaic for the modulus of the complex oscillators amplitude.

  12. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  13. A drift formulation of Gresham's Law

    OpenAIRE

    Reginald D. Smith

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyze Gresham's Law, in particular, how the rate of inflow or outflow of currencies is affected by the demand elasticity of arbitrage and the difference in face value ratios inside and outside of a country under a bimetallic system. We find that these equations are very similar to those used to describe drift in systems of free charged particles. In addition, we look at how Gresham's Law would play out with multiple currencies and multiple countries under a variety of conne...

  14. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  15. DRIFT study of pitches and separated mesophase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machnikowski, J.; Krzton, A.; Weber, J.V.; Zimny, T.; Petryniak, J.; Wiecek, I. [Technical University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland). Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Petroleum and Coal

    1995-12-31

    Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) was used to assess the structural changes associated with an early stage of carbonization in pitches of different origin, including coal tar, coal hydrogenation product and petroleum pitch. It was shown that an increase in aromaticity was rather slight in the case of coal tar pitch. It was confirmed that the chemical structure of the mesophase produced at an early stage of carbonization was controlled mostly by the nature of the parent pitch. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Multiwire-drift-chambers for the HADES spectrometer at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New multiwire-drift-chambers for plane 1 (MDC1) for implementation in the HADES Spectrometer are under construction. This new detectors will replace the innermost six MDC1, which are ten years old detectors and are mounted closest to the target in forward direction. The aim of the new detectors is to guarantee high spatial track resolution of about 0.1 mm for charged particles with a counting efficiency close to 100 % in heavy ion collisions at beam energy of 8 AGeV as will be delivered at SIS 100 within FAIR. To measure rare reactions the rate capability of the new MDC1 must be sufficient for the envisaged high luminosity. The design of the new MDC1 differs conceptually from the former detector: - individual self supporting glass-fiber epoxy frames; - homogeneous gas distribution system; - impedance controlled stiff-flexible connectors and - Cu/Be cathode and field wires. The design improvements as well as the manufacturing process are reported

  17. Fingerprint Image Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Mansi Kambli,; Shalini Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Modified Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Tree with Run Length Encoding is a new framework proposed for fingerprint image compression. The Proposed method is better because more number of images related to the fingerprint image are retrieved. Experiments on an image database of grayscale bitmap images show that the proposed technique performs well in compression and decompression. We use Peak Signal to noise ratio [3] and Mean Square Error [3] to compute the picture quality of fingerprint ima...

  18. Study of the performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube chambers in magntic fields and at high irradiation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos

    2012-07-26

    The performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers has been studied in detail using high-energy muon beams. The measurements of the drift tube properties in magnetic fields showed that inelastic collisions of the drifting electrons with the CO{sub 2} molecules in the Ar:CO{sub 2} (93:7) gas mixture of the MDT chambers have to be taken into account in the simulation of the drift properties. Such inelastic collisions are now correctly treated by the Garfield simulation programme from version 9 providing an accurate description of the behaviour of the ATLAS muon drift tubes, in particular in the magnetic field. Measurements at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN were performed to study the performance of the MDT chambers in the presence of high {gamma} ray background fluences. The chambers have a spatial resolution better than 40 {mu}m at the nominal background rates expected at the Large Hadron Collider design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a resolution better than 50 {mu}m for up to five times higher background rates. Efficient muon detection up to background counting rates of 500 kHz per tube corresponding to 35% occupancy was demonstrated.

  19. EQUAL OPTICAL PATH BEAM SPLITTERS BY USE OF AMPLITUDE-SPLITTING AND WAVEFRONT-SPLITTING METHODS FOR PENCIL BEAM INTERFEROMETER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    QIAN,S.TAKACS,P.

    2003-08-03

    A beam splitter to create two separated parallel beams is a critical unit of a pencil beam interferometer, for example the long trace profiler (LTP). The operating principle of the beam splitter can be based upon either amplitude-splitting (AS) or wavefront-splitting (WS). For precision measurements with the LTP, an equal optical path system with two parallel beams is desired. Frequency drift of the light source in a non-equal optical path system will cause the interference fringes to drift. An equal optical path prism beam splitter with an amplitude-splitting (AS-EBS) beam splitter and a phase shift beam splitter with a wavefront-splitting (WS-PSBS) are introduced. These beam splitters are well suited to the stability requirement for a pencil beam interferometer due to the characteristics of monolithic structure and equal optical path. Several techniques to produce WS-PSBS by hand are presented. In addition, the WS-PSBS using double thin plates, made from microscope cover plates, has great advantages of economy, convenience, availability and ease of adjustment over other beam splitting methods. Comparison of stability measurements made with the AS-EBS, WS-PSBS, and other beam splitters is presented.

  20. Field experiment on spray drift: Deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, A.; Linnemann, V.; Zande, van de J.C.; Vereecken, H.

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done accord

  1. The OML-SprayDrift model for predicting pesticide drift and deposition from ground boom sprayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfstrøm, Per; Bruus, Marianne; Andersen, Helle Vibeke;

    2013-01-01

    . The Gaussian tilting plume principle was applied inside the stayed track. The model was developed on one set of field experiments using a flat-fan nozzle and validated against another set of field experiments using an air-induction nozzle. The vertical spray-drift profile was measured using hair curlers...

  2. Formation and transport of slow positron beam in magnetic field with {sup 22}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Fujita, Hirohumi; Yamada, Masaki; Nunogaki, Masanobu; Honda, Yoshihide; Isoyama, Goro [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research

    1996-03-01

    The {beta}{sup +} particles emitted from {sup 22}Na have been formed to a slow positron beam by moderating them at the surface of a W-foil and then transported in a curved magnetic field to separate the beam from the {gamma}-rays. The curvature drift has been compensated by the E x B drift due to the auxidially electrodes inserted in that region. More than 1.1 x 10{sup 4} positrons/sec have been confirmed to be transported through the curved field without the drift motion. (author).

  3. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  4. Interdigital H -mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, M.; Mibe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Hayashizaki, N.; Iwashita, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kitamura, R.; Saito, N.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an interdigital H-mode (IH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The IH-DTL accelerates muons from β =v /c =0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The output beam emittances are calculated as 0.315 π and 0.195 π mm mrad in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which satisfies the experimental requirement.

  5. Performance of a prototype drift chamber with 100 MHz FADC readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectangular drift chamber cells have been constructed and tested using an electron test beam facility at DESY. A systematic study of the time, space, energy and double track resolution with a 100 MHz FADC readout is presented. The spatial resolution is 100 μm to 120 μm and the double track resolution is 2.5 mm with an Ar:C2H6 (50:50) gas mixture at atmospheric pressure. The dE/dx resolution obtained corresponds to 6% resolution for a 72-layer chamber. (author)

  6. Metabolic drift in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H Paul; Epstein, Adrian A; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E; Fox, Howard S; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energymetabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication. PMID:27182841

  7. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Tang

    2004-02-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis.

  8. Weak drifts of infinitely divisible distributions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Ken-iti

    2012-01-01

    Weak drift of an infinitely divisible distribution $\\mu$ on $\\mathbb{R}^d$ is defined by analogy with weak mean; properties and applications of weak drift are given. When $\\mu$ has no Gaussian part, the weak drift of $\\mu$ equals the minus of the weak mean of the inversion $\\mu'$ of $\\mu$. Applying the concepts of having weak drift 0 and of having weak drift 0 absolutely, the ranges, the absolute ranges, and the limit of the ranges of iterations are described for some stochastic integral mappings. For L\\'{e}vy processes the concepts of weak mean and weak drift are helpful in giving necessary and sufficient conditions for the weak law of large numbers and for the weak version of Shtatland's theorem on the behavior near $t=0$; those conditions are obtained from each other through inversion.

  9. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  10. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  11. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO3-SO4-Br-CO3-SiO2-CO2-O2-H2O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO3-, CO32-, OH-, H+, HSO4-, Ca2+, Mg2+, CaHCO3+, MgHCO3+, HSiO3-, and MgOH+); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral precipitation resulting from the evaporation of

  12. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3

  13. Electron beam characteristics in the hollow beam diode and cusped magnetic field of the Maryland ERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maryland electron ring accelerator (ERA) concept calls for the formation of an electron ring current by transmission of a hollow relativistic electron beam through a static, azimuthally symmetric, cusped magnetic field. Electron motion is approximately paraxial in the diode and pre-cusp drift region and is axis-encircling in the post-cusp region. Experiments show the electron flow in the diode to be approximately pressureless. The radial thickness of the drifting Brillouin hollow beam is derived from a radial force balance equation. Time-resolved measurements of the beam current and energy are made by measuring the extrapolated range of the beam in aluminum targets. These measurements are analyzed with a model of the diode as a terminating impedance driven by a transmission line. Beam motion in the cusped field region is analyzed. Beam dynamics in the post-cusp region are studied by examining the interaction of a hollow rotating beam with its self-induced potentials in a cylindrical box with conducting walls and ends. The energy of the self-induced electric and magnetic potentials is much less than the kinetic energy of the beam electrons for cases approximating experimental conditions

  14. Climatology of F region zonalplasma drifts over Jicamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Fejer, Bela G.; J. R. Souza; Santos, A. S.; Costa Pereira, A. E.

    2005-01-01

    [1] We use extensive incoherent scatter radar observations made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory between 1970 and 2003 to study and model empirically the equatorial zonal plasma drifts near the F region peak using Bernstein polynomials as base functions. Our quiet-time model results confirm that the daytime drifts are westward and are nearly season and solar cycle independent. The nighttime drifts are eastward, have larger magnitudes, and increase strongly with solar flux, particularly near...

  15. Anomalous drift of spiral waves in heterogeneous excitable media

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2009-01-01

    We study the drift of spiral waves in a simple model of heterogeneous excitable medium, having gradients in local excitability or cellular coupling. For the first time, we report the anomalous drift of spiral waves towards regions having higher excitability, in contrast to all earlier observations in reaction-diffusion models of excitable media. Such anomalous drift can promote the onset of complex spatio-temporal patterns, e.g., those responsible for life-threatening arrhythmias in the heart.

  16. Evidence that whales (Balaenoptera borealis) visit drifting fish aggregating devices : do their presence affect the processes underlying fish aggregation ?

    OpenAIRE

    Brehmer, Patrice; Josse, Erwan; Nottestad, L. (Leif)

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of a group of sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis) detected around drifting fish aggregating devices (FADs) was provided by omnidirectional multi-beam sonar during a survey off the Seychelles (Indian Ocean). The short visit by the sei whales produced a significant change in the behaviour of the fish assemblage associated with the FAD. There was first a significant increase in fish density when the whales approached the FAD, then a marked decrease after the whales had mo...

  17. Behavior of reinforcement SCC beams under elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Hamoon; Farhang, Kianoosh

    2015-09-01

    This experimental study focuses on the behavior of heated reinforced concrete beams. Four types of concrete mixtures were used for the tested self-compacting concrete beams. A total of 72 reinforced concrete beams and 72 standard cylindrical specimens were tested. The compressive strength under uniaxial loading at 23 °C ranged from 30 to 45 MPa. The specimens were exposed to different temperatures. The test parameters of interest were the compressive strength and the temperature of the specimens. The effect of changes in the parameters was examined so as to control the behavior of the tested concrete and that of the reinforced concrete beam. The results indicated that flexibility and compressive strength of the reinforced concrete beams decreased at higher temperatures. Furthermore, heating beyond 400 °C produced greater variations in the structural behavior of the materials in both the cylindrical samples and the reinforced concrete beams.

  18. THERMAL TEST ALCOVE HEATED DRIFT GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bonabian

    1996-10-03

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to analyze the stability of the Thermal Test Facility Heated Drift and to design a ground support system. The stability of the Heated Drift is analyzed considering in situ, seismic, and thermal loading conditions. A ground support system is recommended to provide a stable opening for the Heated Drift. This report summarizes the results of the analyses and provides the details of the recommended ground support system for the Heated Drift. The details of the ground support system are then incorporated into the design output documents for implementation in the field.

  19. Beam dynamics with new booster dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New bending magnets are being designed for the booster synchrotron at RRCAT, Indore with the same effective length and field which will be installed in the existing ring with the same configuration of drifts and quadrupole magnets. Presently sector type dipoles are in use. It is easier to fabricate parallel edge (rectangular type) dipoles but the beam optics gets modified due to edges which provide additional focusing. The effect on tune point can be corrected using two quadrupole families. Studies indicate that the beam emittance is lower in the optics with rectangular type dipoles but the beam injection and extraction are more difficult. In this paper, the beam optics, beam emittance, injection and extraction with two configurations of the dipole magnets are compared. (author)

  20. Laser driver beam combination for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the estimated parameters of fast ignition,the requirements for laser-beam power intensity and energy are used to analyze the possibility of realizing fast ignition by coherent combination and non-coherent combination. The practical distorted wavefront is considered to analyze the far-field focal spot. Non-coherent combination needs more beams for energy requirement and to limit angle drifting in ±2 μrad through improving laser driver's stability. Coherent combination is beneficial for achieving smaller focal spot and higher power intensity, simultaneously reducing the requirement of energy, but single beam wavefront correction can not improve the power intensity in this method, which leads to combined wavefront correction of the total clear aperture with complex monitoring and control methods. Based on the requirement of parameters and wavefront correction capability, non-coherent beam combination is easier to achieve for fast ignition, however, coherent beam combination has the potential for extensive application. (authors)

  1. Negative linear compressibility in common materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.; Evans, K. E.; Marmier, A., E-mail: A.S.H.Marmier@exeter.ac.uk [College of Engineering Mathematics and Physical Science, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-08

    Negative linear compressibility (NLC) is still considered an exotic property, only observed in a few obscure crystals. The vast majority of materials compress axially in all directions when loaded in hydrostatic compression. However, a few materials have been observed which expand in one or two directions under hydrostatic compression. At present, the list of materials demonstrating this unusual behaviour is confined to a small number of relatively rare crystal phases, biological materials, and designed structures, and the lack of widespread availability hinders promising technological applications. Using improved representations of elastic properties, this study revisits existing databases of elastic constants and identifies several crystals missed by previous reviews. More importantly, several common materials-drawn polymers, certain types of paper and wood, and carbon fibre laminates-are found to display NLC. We show that NLC in these materials originates from the misalignment of polymers/fibres. Using a beam model, we propose that maximum NLC is obtained for misalignment of 26°. The existence of such widely available materials increases significantly the prospects for applications of NLC.

  2. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  3. Electron-Acoustic Compressive Soliton and Electron Density Hole in Aurora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2003-01-01

    Electron-acoustic solitary waves have been studied in an electron-beam plasma system. It is found that the solution of compressive soliton only exists within a limited range of soliton velocity around the electron beam velocity. A compressive electron-acoustic soliton always accompanies with a cold electron density hole. This theoretical model is used to explain the ‘fast solitary wave' event observed by the FAST satellite in the midaltitude auroral zone.

  4. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  5. Measurements of electron drift and diffusion properties in a large cylindrical drift chamber (TPC) with parallel electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes measurements on the drift of electrons in gases, using the TPC90, the prototype of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber. Tracks which were created by UV-Laser ionization have been drifted over distances of up to 1.3 m in parallel electric and magnetic fields. Electron drift properties have been systematically measured as a function of these, in several gas mixtures. (orig./HSI)

  6. X-ray Raman compression via two-stream instability in dense plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Son, S.; Moon, Sung Joon

    2011-01-01

    A Raman compression scheme suitable for x-rays, where the Langmuir wave is created by an intense beam rather than the pondermotive potential between the seed and pump pulses, is proposed. The required intensity of the seed and pump pulses enabling the compression could be mitigated by more than a factor of 100, compared to conventionally available other Raman compression schemes. The relevant wavelength of x-rays ranges from 1 to 10 nm.

  7. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The nozzles types used were the standard flat fan XR as a reference nozzle and the DG, XLTD, IDN, AIXR and AIRmix as drift reducing nozzles types. A Patternator was used to check the cross distribution...

  8. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e. peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species. This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, and which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. PMID:27052738

  9. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  10. Geometric Signal Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Zhou; Hu-Jun Bao; Jiao-Ying Shi; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Compression of mesh attributes becomes a challenging problem due to the great need for efficient storage and fast transmission. This paper presents a novel geometric signal compression framework for all mesh attributes, including position coordinates, normal, color, texture, etc. Within this framework, mesh attributes are regarded as geometric signals defined on mesh surfaces. A planar parameterization algorithm is first proposed to map 3D meshes to 2D parametric meshes. Geometric signals are then transformed into 2D signals, which are sampled into 2D regular signals using an adaptive sampling method. The JPEG2000 standard for still image compression is employed to effectively encode these regular signals into compact bit-streams with high rate/distortion ratios. Experimental results demonstrate the great application potentials of this framework.

  11. SYMBOLIC VERSOR COMPRESSION ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongbo

    2009-01-01

    In an inner-product space, an invertible vector generates a reflection with re-spect to a hyperplane, and the Clifford product of several invertible vectors, called a versor in Clifford algebra, generates the composition of the corresponding reflections, which is an orthogonal transformation. Given a versor in a Clifford algebra, finding another sequence of invertible vectors of strictly shorter length but whose Clifford product still equals the input versor, is called versor compression. Geometrically, versor compression is equivalent to decomposing an orthogoual transformation into a shorter sequence of reflections. This paper proposes a simple algorithm of compressing versors of symbolic form in Clifford algebra. The algorithm is based on computing the intersections of lines with planes in the corresponding Grassmann-Cayley algebra, and is complete in the case of Euclidean or Minkowski inner-product space.

  12. Beam Characterization at the KAERI UED Beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Setiniyaz, Sadiq; Baek, In-Hyung; Nam, Jinhee; Chae, MoonSik; Han, Byung-Heon; Gudkov, Boris; Jang, Kyu Ha; Park, Sunjeong; Miginsky, Sergey; Vinokurov, Nikolay; Jeong, Young Uk

    2016-01-01

    The UED (ultrafast electron diffraction) beamline of the KAERI's (the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's) WCI (World Class Institute) Center has been successfully commissioned. We have measured the beam emittance by using the quadrupole scan technique and the charge by using a novel measurement system we have developed. In the quadrupole scan, a larger drift distance between the quadrupole and the screen is preferred because it gives a better thin-lens approximation. A high bunch-charge beam, however, will undergo emittance growth in the long drift caused by the space-charge force. We present a method that mitigates this growth by introducing a quadrupole scan with a short drift and without using the thin-lens approximation. The quadrupole in this method is treated as a thick lens, and the emittance is extracted by using the thick-lens equations. Apart from being precise, our method can be readily applied without making any change to the beamline and has no need for a big drift space. For charge measure...

  13. Drift ordered short mean free path closure

    CERN Document Server

    Catto, P J; Catto, Peter J.; Simakov, Andrei N.

    2004-01-01

    The complete short mean free path description of magnetized plasma in the drift ordering has recently been derived. The results correct the previous expressions for the ion pressure anisotropy (or parallel ion viscosity) and the perpendicular ion viscosity - the ion gyro-viscosity is unchanged. In addition, the electron problem is solved for the first time to obtain the electron pressure anisotropy (parallel electron viscosity) and the electron gyro-viscosity - the perpendicular electron viscosity is negligible. The results have been used to obtain a reduced fluid description appropriate to the edge of a tokamak. In addition, the complete description has been used to evaluate the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum that determines the radial electric field and flows in a tokamak.

  14. Wet drift chambers for precise luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of high-precision compact drift chambers has been a vital component of the OPAL luminosity monitor since the start of data-taking at LEP. They were augmented in 1992 by the addition of Small Angle Reference Chambers with a very similar design to the original chamber. The performance of the chambers is reviewed, highlighting both the importance of using polyalkylene glycol (Breox) to maintain a uniform and parallel electric field and the construction techniques used to sustain the required field strength. We describe some of the operating problems, with their solutions, and show how the chambers have been used in achieving a systematic error of 0.41% on the luminosity measurement. ((orig.))

  15. Emergent gravity and ether-drift experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M

    2009-01-01

    In principle, ether-drift experiments could distinguish phenomenologically emergent-gravity approaches, where an effective curvature emerges from hydrodynamic distortions of the same physical, flat-space vacuum, from the more conventional scenario where curvature is considered a fundamental property of space-time down to extremely small length scales and the speed of light represents a universal constant. From an experimental point of view, in this particular context, besides time modulations that might be induced by the Earth's rotation (and its orbital revolution), one should also consider the possibility of random fluctuations of the signal. These might reflect the stochastic nature of the underlying 'quantum ether' and be erroneously interpreted as mere instrumental noise. To test the present interpretation, we have extracted the mean amplitude of the signal from various experiments with different systematics, operating both at room temperature and in the cryogenic regime. They all give the same consisten...

  16. Nonlinear analysis of the gradient drift instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; Vega, Matías de la

    An analytical study of the gradient drift instability in the equatorial electrojet of wavelengths in the order of one kilometer is presented. Different mechanisms, linear, non-local and turbulent, are found in the literature to explain the predominance of the 1 km wavelength in the electrojet. In the present work a simplified model is proposed in which the nonlinear evolution of three coupled modes is followed. By considering that one of the modes attains the stationary state, the evolution of the other two is obtained, and it is found that they follow equations of the Lotka-Volterra type. A stable stationary nonlinear solution for these equations is also found, and the conditions under which periodic solutions are possible are analyzed.

  17. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    CERN Document Server

    Sgalla, Reneé J F

    2014-01-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the $f\\sim 40$ kHz oscillation observed in TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov $\\textit{et al.}$, Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{52}$, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is $\\lambda_r\\sim 25$ cm, i. e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  18. Drift wave vortices and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory and computer simulations are used to describe the inelastic vortex-vortex and vortex-wave interactions that lead to the quasi-coherent transport of plasma across the magnetic field. Monopole and dipole drift wave vortices with radii r0 large compared with the ion inertial scale length /rho//sub s/ are shown to produce transport at the rate un/sub υ/∫dσ(b) ≤ n/sub υ/υ/sub de/r/sub o/ where n/sub υ/ is the vortex line density and dσ(b) is the inelastic collision cross-section for impact parameter b. The transport during collisions and mergings is evaluated from the evolution of a passively convected scalar concentration of test particles. 24 refs., 4 figs

  19. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgalla, R. J. F., E-mail: reneesgalla@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  20. Giving Cosmic Redshift Drift a Whirl

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Alex G; Edelstein, Jerry; Erskine, David

    2014-01-01

    Redshift drift provides a direct kinematic measurement of cosmic acceleration but it occurs with a characteristic time scale of a Hubble time. Thus redshift observations with a challenging precision of $10^{-9}$ require a 10 year time span to obtain a signal-to-noise of 1. We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to address this challenge, potentially requiring less observer time and having greater immunity to common systematics. On the theoretical side we explore allowing the universe, rather than the observer, to provide long time spans; speculative methods include radial baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic pulsars, and strongly lensed quasars. On the experimental side, we explore beating down the redshift precision using differential interferometric techniques, including externally dispersed interferometers and spatial heterodyne spectroscopy. Low-redshift emission line galaxies are identified as having high cosmology leverage and systematics control, with an 8 hour exposure on a 10-meter telesc...

  1. Sonic drifting: sound, city and psychogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhaditya Chattopadhyay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying and perceiving an emerging city by listening to its sounds might be phenomenologically reductive in approach, but it can lead to a framework for understanding the fabric of the urban environment through artistic practice. This paper describes a sound work, Elegy for Bangalore, and examines its artistic processes in order to shed light on the methodologies for listening to an expanding city by engaging with multilayered urban contexts and, subsequently, evoking the psychogeography of the city through sound-based artistic practice. The paper further investigates the project’s approach, development and method to speculate on present urban conditions in countries like India experiencing rapid growth. Devising the unfolding auditory situation of an Indian city in corresponding acts of drifting, listening, recording and composing, this paper examines the processes of perceiving an apparently chaotic and disorganised urban environment with its multisensory complexity.

  2. EU law revisions and legislative drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghetto, Enrico; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    European Union research has made great strides in understanding the dynamics of the European Union decision-making process. In contrast to this progress, the dynamics unfolding after the enactment of a European Union secondary legislative act has largely been ignored. Some of these acts remain...... in force in their original form for several years while others are revised soon after their enactment. What factors account for this variation? We empirically analyze the proposition that in the presence of ‘legislative drift,’ i.e. the intertemporal variation of decision-makers’ preferences, major...... revisions of European Union legislative acts are more likely to occur. Based on an analysis of the revision histories of 158 major European Union acts in the time period between 1958 and 2003, we find significant support for this hypothesis....

  3. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Zhang, Xin [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-15

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman-α forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the ''redshift desert'' of 2 drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of Ω{sub m}, H{sub 0}, w, and γ could be substantially improved using future probes. (orig.)

  4. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of the Lyman-α forest of distant quasars, the Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the ''redshift desert'' of 2 drift observations would help break the geometric degeneracies in a meaningful way, thus the measurement precisions of Ωm, H0, w, and γ could be substantially improved using future probes. (orig.)

  5. Rotational Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune;

    1995-01-01

    The European Structural Integrity Society-Technical Committee 9, has initiated a Round Robin on 'Scale Effects and Transitional Failure Phenomena of Reinforced Concrete Beams in Flexure'. In Denmark, Aalborg University is participating. The programme for Aalborg University involves an experimental...... programme where 120 reinforced concrete beams, 54 plain concrete beams and 324 concrete cylinders are tested. For the reinforced concrete beams four different parar meters are varied. The slenderness is 6, 12 and 18, the beam depth is 100 mm, 200 mm and 400 mm giving nine different geometries, five...... reinforcement ratios between 0.14% and 1.57%, and the concrete has a compressive strength of approximately 60 MPa or 90 MPa. The beams are tested in threepoint bending in a servo controlled materials testing system specially designed for the wide range of geometries The casting of the beams is finished. The...

  6. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  7. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  8. Isentropic compression of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  9. Design of an alternating phase focusing Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac with low injection energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Pang, J.; He, X.; Ying, Z.; Shi, J.

    2016-01-01

    An Inter-digital H-mode (IH) Drift Tube Linac (DTL) was designed to accelerate a proton beam in the low energy region with high RF efficiency and high gradient. The IH DTL is 1.078 m long and operates at 200 MHz. Protons could be accelerated from 0.04 MeV to 2.4 MeV (the β range is from 0.0092 to 0.0714). The method of alternating phase focusing (APF) was applied for beam focusing. The simulation results show that the transmission is 38% and the longitudinal acceptance is approximately 140°. The shunt impedance of the entire cavity is 365 MΩ/m. Adjustments of the electric-field were performed, and the beam dynamics design was described. The beam loss and voltage sensitivity were calculated.

  10. Image compression in local helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, Björn; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Context. Several upcoming helioseismology space missions are very limited in telemetry and will have to perform extensive data compression. This requires the development of new methods of data compression. Aims. We give an overview of the influence of lossy data compression on local helioseismology. We investigate the effects of several lossy compression methods (quantization, JPEG compression, and smoothing and subsampling) on power spectra and time-distance measurements of supergranulation flows at disk center. Methods. We applied different compression methods to tracked and remapped Dopplergrams obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio of the travel times computed from the compressed data as a function of the compression efficiency. Results. The basic helioseismic measurements that we consider are very robust to lossy data compression. Even if only the sign of the velocity is used, time-distance helioseismology is still...

  11. Paleozoic Structural Deformation of Bachu Uplift,Tarim Basin of Northwest China: Implications for Plate Drifting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Guangyu; He Zhiliang; Zhang Hongan; Lin Lu; Chen Qianglu; Qian Yixiong; Gu Yi; Zhu Zhixin; Zhu Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    Based on high-resolution 2D seismic profiles,the Paleozoic structural deformation characteristics of Bachu (巴楚) uplift of northwestern Tarim basin,NW China,are exhibited in this article The deformation happened during three main geological periods: the end of Middle-Late Ordovician (O2-3),the end of Early-Middle Devonian (D1-2),and the end of Late Permian (P2).In the Bachu uplift,there developed a series of NW-trending thrust faults and imbricate structures due to the effect of the NW-SE compression stress towards the end of Middle-Late Ordovician (O2-3) (middle Caledonian movement),and there developed some NNE-trending thrust faults and fault blocks under the control of the NEE-SWW compression stress at the end of Early-Middle Devonian (D1-2) (early Hercynian movement).However,at the end of Late Permian (P2) (late Hercynian movement),some NE-trending thrust faults and associated folds developed as a result of the NE-SW compression stress.The first-stage (O2-3) deformation is obviously more violent than those of the latter two stages (D1-2and P2),which implies that the Tarim plate drifted quickly to the north at around the same time basin.

  12. Spectroscopic measurements with a silicon drift detector having a continuous implanted drift cathode-voltage divider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; D'Acunto, L; Franck, D; Gregorio, A; Pihet, P; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) prototype where the drift electrode also plays the role of a high-voltage divider has been realised and characterised for spectroscopic applications at near-room temperatures. Among the advantages of this design, is the absence of metal on the sensitive surface which makes this detector interesting for soft X-rays. The detector prototype has a large sensitive area (2x130 mm sup 2) and the charge is collected by two anodes (butterfly-like detector). The energy resolution of a such a detector has been investigated at near-room temperatures using a commercial, hybrid, low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier. The results obtained for the X-ray lines from sup 5 sup 5 Fe and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am are presented.

  13. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  14. The initial value problem in Lagrangian drift kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    > Existing high-order variational drift kinetic theories contain unphysical rapidly varying modes that are not seen at low orders. These unphysical modes, which may be rapidly oscillating, damped or growing, are ushered in by a failure of conventional high-order drift kinetic theory to preserve the structure of its parent model's initial value problem. In short, the (infinite dimensional) system phase space is unphysically enlarged in conventional high-order variational drift kinetic theory. I present an alternative, `renormalized' variational approach to drift kinetic theory that manifestly respects the parent model's initial value problem. The basic philosophy underlying this alternate approach is that high-order drift kinetic theory ought to be derived by truncating the all-orders system phase-space Lagrangian instead of the usual `field particle' Lagrangian. For the sake of clarity, this story is told first through the lens of a finite-dimensional toy model of high-order variational drift kinetics; the analogous full-on drift kinetic story is discussed subsequently. The renormalized drift kinetic system, while variational and just as formally accurate as conventional formulations, does not support the troublesome rapidly varying modes.

  15. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Idrish Miah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  16. Filtering and analysis on the random drift of FOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Yun-Zeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyro (FOG) is an optical gyroscope which is based on the Sagnac effect and uses the optical fiber coil as light propagation channel. Gyro drift consists of two components: systemic drift and random drift. Systemic drift can be compensated by testing and calibrating. Random drift changes with time, so it becomes an important indicator to measure the precision of gyroscope, which has a great impact on the inertial navigation system. It can't be compensated by the simple method. Random drift is a main error of fiber optic gyro (FOG). The static output of FOG is a random project and it has more random noise when as the inertial navigation sensor, which will affect the measurement accuracy. It is an efficient method to reduce the random drift and improve the accuracy by modeling and compensation from the output of FOG. According to the characteristic of fiber optic gyro, the random drift model is studied. Using the time series method, the constant component of the random noise original data is extracted. After stationarity and normality tests, a normal random process is acquired. Based on this, the model is established using the recursive least squares, and then the model is applied to the normal Kalman and adaptive Kalman, finally the data is process with the filter. After experimental verification, the noise variance was reduced after filtering, and the effect is obvious.

  17. SEMICLASSICAL LIMIT FOR BIPOLAR QUANTUM DRIFT-DIFFUSION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Qiangchang; Chen Li

    2009-01-01

    Semiclassical limit to the solution of transient bipolar quantum drift-diffusion model in semiconductor simulation is discussed. It is proved that the semiclassical limit ofthis solution satisfies the classical bipolar drift-diffusion model. In addition, the authors also prove the existence of weak solution.

  18. The Semiclassical Limit in the Quantum Drift-Diffusion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chang JU

    2009-01-01

    Semiclassical limit to the solution of isentropic quantum drift-diffusion model in semicon-ductor simulation is discussed. It is proved that the semiclassical limit of this solution satisfies the classical drift-diffusion model. In addition, we also proved the global existence of weak solutions.

  19. Wright and Fisher on Inbreeding and Random Drift

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, James F

    2010-01-01

    Sewall Wright and R. A. Fisher often differed, including on the meaning of inbreeding and random gene frequency drift. Fisher regarded them as quite distinct processes, whereas Wright thought that because his inbreeding coefficient measured both they should be regarded as the same. Since the effective population numbers for inbreeding and random drift are different, this would argue for the Fisher view.

  20. The electronics readout system for the OPAL Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vertex Drift Chamber for the OPAL experiment at LEP provides high quality track co-ordinates using multi-hit sub-nanosecond timing to detect the drifted electrons. This paper explains the electronic techniques that have been devised and implemented for the detector. The overall performance of the system is demonstrated with measurements from the final OPAL chamber. (author)

  1. Nonlinear propagation of short wavelength drift-Alfven waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    Making use of a kinetic ion and a hydrodynamic electron description together with the Maxwell equation, the authors derive a set of nonlinear equations which governs the dynamics of short wavelength ion drift-Alfven waves. It is shown that the nonlinear drift-Alfven waves can propagate as two...

  2. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  3. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  4. Modification of low-frequency drift oscillation spectra in the field of HF pumping wave near the lower hybrid resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a high-frequency pumping wave on ionic-sound drift oscillations, whose frequency exceeds the ionic cyclotron one, is experimentally studied. A cylinder pinch was produced in a homogeneous magnetic field by a beam of low-energy electrons. The strength of a stationary magnetic field oriented along the plasma cylinder axis amounted to 400-600 Oe. The concentration of plasma was approximately 1010 cm3, the temperature of electrons approximately 6 eV, the pressure of a neutral gas (argon) was approximately 2-3x10-4 Tor. Low-frequency drift oscillations were recorded by single probes operating in a regime of saturation ionic current, and also by a photomultiplier tube according to integral luminous radiation of plasma. It is shown that threshold-less modificatjon of frequency spectrum of ionic-sound drift oscillations takes place with increasing high-frequency pumping field, and that they are incompletely suppressed from the side of hjgher frequencies. Displacement of peaks in the spectra of drift oscillations to the side of high values of frequency was observed at the values of a high-frequency pumping field Esub(0) <= 3 V/cm. It is shown that the less is the frequency of a pumping wave the sharper is the decrease in the drift oscillation intensity with increasing Esub(0). A comparison of experimental and theoretical data shows that the HF-field component normal to the magnetic fjeld may produce an essential influence upon the dynamics of drift-dissipative instability

  5. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.;

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  6. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Mess

  7. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate Messag

  8. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li;

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries...

  9. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-03-29

    In this paper, we propose a seeding scheme that compresses an initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space of an electron beam by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C , where Cis the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Using two lasers as energy chirpers, such a modulation compression scheme can generate kilo-Ampershort wavelength current modulation with significant bunching factor from an initial a few tens Amper current. This compression scheme can also be used togenerate a prebunched single atto-second short wavelength current modulation and prebunched two color, two atto-second modulations.

  10. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J

    2015-01-01

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7\\,cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163\\,K), the drift speed is 0.193 $\\pm$ 0.003 cm/$\\mu$s while the drift speed in the solid phase (157\\,K) is 0.397 $\\pm$ 0.006 cm/$\\mu$s at 900 V/cm over 8.0\\,cm of uniform electric fields. Therefore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon.

  11. Drifting sub-pulses in two newly discovered pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, S. M.; Edwards, R.; Bailes, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have detected the rare phenomenon of stable, drifting sub-pulse behaviour in two pulsars discovered in the recent Swinburne intermediate latitude pulsar survey. The pulsars, PSR J1231-47 and PSR J1919+0134, have approximate periods (P) of 1.873 and 1.6039s respectively. Both pulsars have multicomponent profiles, and distinct drifting is observed across them. We have identified a single drift mode in both pulsars: the drift rate for PSR J1231-47 being 5.4(1) ms P-1 and 5.8(2) ms P-1 for PSR 1919+0134. The drifting is linear across the profile with no departure from linearity at the edges within the sensitivity of our observations.

  12. Effect of magnetic field on light-induced ion drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper is devoted to theoretical study of the force aspect of magnetic field effect on the light-induced ion drift. One studied three-component (electrons, single-charge positive ions and neutral atoms) slightly ionized gas in the constant homogeneous magnetic field. One derived formulae describing ion drift under the effect of mobile monochromatic light wave. It was determined that in slightly ionized gas at superposition of the external magnetic field a component of light-induced ion drift speed that was transverse to the radiation propagation direction might occur. One estimates the magnetic field value when the projection of ion drift speed on radiation direction should change its sign. In this case, one may observe anomalous light-induced ion drift

  13. Energy storage, compression, and switching. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a compilation of papers presented at the Second International Conference on Energy Storage, Compression, and Switching, which was held in order to assemble active researchers with a major interest in plasma physics, electron beams, electric and magnetic energy storage systems, high voltage and high current switches, free-electron lasers, and pellet implosion plasma focus. Topics covered include: Slow systems: 50-60 Hz machinery, homopolar generators, slow capacitors, inductors, and solid state switches; Intermediate systems: fast capacitor banks; superconducting storage and switching; gas, vacuum, and dielectric switching; nonlinear (magnetic) switching; imploding liners capacitors; explosive generators; and fuses; and Fast systems: Marx, Blumlein, oil, water, and pressurized water dielectrics; switches; magnetic insulation; electron beams; and plasmas

  14. Experimental study of fast electron propagation in compressed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on experimental results of the fast electron transport in compressed plasmas, created by laser-induced shock propagation in both cylindrical and planar geometry. Two experiments were carried out. The first one was based on the compression of a polyimide cylinder filled with foams of three different initial densities (ρ0). X-ray and proton radiographies of the target during the compression coupled with hydrodynamic simulations show that the obtained core densities and temperatures range from 2 to 11 g/cm3 and from 30 to 120 eV, respectively. By studying the K-shell fluorescence from dopant atoms inside the target and from tracer layers situated at both front and rear side of the target it has been possible to investigate the fast electron propagation. The results show that Cu Kα yield emitted by the target rear side foil decreases with increasing compression, independently of ρ0. An electron collimation can also be observed for certain experimental conditions where a convergent resistivity gradient interacts with the fast electron beam. The second experiment was performed in a planar geometry with a compressing shock counter-propagative to the fast electron beam. In this case the areal density ρz seen by the electrons is constant during the compression in such a way that changes in the fast electron range should be ascribed to collective mechanisms. The study of the Kα fluorescence, from buried fluorescent layers of different atomic numbers, shows that the electrons with energy <75keV are more affected by resistive losses in compressed compared to non-compressed targets. These two experiments were part of the Experimental Fusion Validation Program of the HiPER project.

  15. Non-twist map bifurcation of drift-lines and drift-island formation in saturated 3D MHD equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, David; Cooper, Wilfred A.; Graves, Jonathan P.

    2015-11-01

    Based on non-canonical perturbation theory, guiding-centre drift equations are identified as perturbed magnetic field-line equations. The topology of passing-particle orbits, called drift-lines, is completely determined by the magnetic configuration. In axisymmetric tokamak fields, drift-lines lie on shifted flux-surfaces, called drift-surfaces. Field-lines and drift-lines are subject to island structures at rational surfaces only when a non-axisymmetric component is added. The picture is different in the case of 3D saturated MHD equilibrium like the helical core associated with a non-resonant internal kink mode. In assuming nested flux-surfaces, these bifurcated states, expected for a reversed q-profile with qmin close yet above unity and conveniently obtained in VMEC, feature integrable field-lines. The helical drift-lines however become resonant with the axisymmetric component in the region of qmin and spontaneously generate drift-islands. Due to the locally reversed sheared q-profile, the drift-island structure follows the bifurcation/reconnection mechanism of non-twist maps. This result provides a theoretical interpretation of NBI fast ion helical hot-spots in Long-Lived Modes as well as snake-like impurity density accumulation in internal MHD activity.

  16. Study on crack propagation in tubular joints under compressive fatigue loadings

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Claire; NUSSBAUMER, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Large scale tubular truss beams, approximately of 9 m long and 2 m high, were tested under constant amplitude fatigue loading. The beams were made out of circular hollow sections of steel S355, welded to form a uni-planar truss with K-joints, in a shape common to bridge construction. The main goal of these tests was to focus on the fatigue behavior of the joints loaded in compression that is with chord in compression, one diagonal in compression and the remaining diagonal in tension. The test...

  17. Design of bunch compressing system with suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation for ATF upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Yichao [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedurin, Mikhail [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    One of the operation modes for Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) upgrade is to provide high peak current, high quality electron beam for users. Such operation requires a bunch compressing system with a very large compression ratio. The CSR originating from the strong compressors generally could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for the entire bunch compressing system that will limit the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss and detail the performance from the start to end simulation of such a compressor for ATF.

  18. Propagation in compressed matter of hot electrons created by short intense lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed the first experimental study of propagation in compressed matter of hot electrons created by a short pulse intense laser. The experiment has been carried out with the VULCAN laser at Rutherford compressing plastic targets with two ns laser beams at an intensity ≥1014 W/cm2. A CPA beam with an intensity ≥1016 W/cm2 irradiated the rear side of the target and created hot electrons propagating through the compressed matter. K-α emission was used as diagnostics of hot electron penetration by putting a chloride plastic layer inside the target

  19. Propagation in compressed matter of hot electrons created by short intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.; Masella, V.; Pisani, F.; Koenig, M.; Krishnan, J.; Benuzzi, A.; Ellwi, S.; Hall, T.; Norreys, P.; Djaoui, A.; Neely, D.; Rose, S.; Fews, P.; Key, M.

    1998-02-01

    We performed the first experimental study of propagation in compressed matter of hot electrons created by a short pulse intense laser. The experiment has been carried out with the VULCAN laser at Rutherford compressing plastic targets with two ns laser beams at an intensity ⩾1014W/cm2. A CPA beam with an intensity ⩾1016W/cm2 irradiated the rear side of the target and created hot electrons propagating through the compressed matter. K-α emission was used as diagnostics of hot electron penetration by putting a chloride plastic layer inside the target.

  20. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO3-SO4-Br-CO3-SiO2-CO2-O2-H2O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the

  1. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases

  2. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  3. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  4. Randomness Testing of Compressed Data

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Weiling; Yun, Xiaochun; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Xiangzhan

    2010-01-01

    Random Number Generators play a critical role in a number of important applications. In practice, statistical testing is employed to gather evidence that a generator indeed produces numbers that appear to be random. In this paper, we reports on the studies that were conducted on the compressed data using 8 compression algorithms or compressors. The test results suggest that the output of compression algorithms or compressors has bad randomness, the compression algorithms or compressors are not suitable as random number generator. We also found that, for the same compression algorithm, there exists positive correlation relationship between compression ratio and randomness, increasing the compression ratio increases randomness of compressed data. As time permits, additional randomness testing efforts will be conducted.

  5. Data Compression for Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löptien, Björn

    2015-10-01

    Efficient data compression will play an important role for several upcoming and planned space missions involving helioseismology, such as Solar Orbiter. Solar Orbiter, to be launched in October 2018, will be the next space mission involving helioseismology. The main characteristic of Solar Orbiter lies in its orbit. The spacecraft will have an inclined solar orbit, reaching a solar latitude of up to 33 deg. This will allow, for the first time, probing the solar poles using local helioseismology. In addition, combined observations of Solar Orbiter and another helioseismic instrument will be used to study the deep interior of the Sun using stereoscopic helioseismology. The Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images of the Sun required for helioseismology will be provided by the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). Major constraints for helioseismology with Solar Orbiter are the low telemetry and the (probably) short observing time. In addition, helioseismology of the solar poles requires observations close to the solar limb, even from the inclined orbit of Solar Orbiter. This gives rise to systematic errors. In this thesis, I derived a first estimate of the impact of lossy data compression on helioseismology. I put special emphasis on the Solar Orbiter mission, but my results are applicable to other planned missions as well. First, I studied the performance of PHI for helioseismology. Based on simulations of solar surface convection and a model of the PHI instrument, I generated a six-hour time-series of synthetic Doppler velocity images with the same properties as expected for PHI. Here, I focused on the impact of the point spread function, the spacecraft jitter, and of the photon noise level. The derived power spectra of solar oscillations suggest that PHI will be suitable for helioseismology. The low telemetry of Solar Orbiter requires extensive compression of the helioseismic data obtained by PHI. I evaluated the influence of data compression using

  6. The electron-ion streaming instabilities driven by drift velocities of the order of electron thermal velocity in a nonmagnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We examine the electron-ion streaming instabilities driven by drift velocities of the order of the electron thermal velocity in a nonmagnetized plasma by one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell code which adopts an ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1600. An initial state is set up where the ion bulk speed is zero while the electrons drift relative to ions, and where electrons are much hotter. We examine in detail four runs where drift velocity is systematically varied from lower than to larger than the electron thermal velocity. In all runs the Langmuir waves with Doppler-shifted frequencies dominate early on when streaming instabilities are too weak to discern. And then intense ion-acoustic waves or Buneman instabilities appear, which tend to be accompanied by localized electron and ion beams. Ion-acoustic modes and Buneman modes co-exist in the system when the initial drift velocity is just over the electron thermal speed. Beam modes are excited when the localized beams with large enough velocities appea...

  7. Plasmas in particle accelerators: adiabatic theories for bunched beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different formalisms for discussing Vlasov's equation for bunched beam problems with anharmonic space charge forces are outlined. These correspond to the use of a drift kinetic equation averaged over random betatron motions; a fluidkinetic adiabatic regime analogous to the theory of Chew, Goldberger, and Low; and an adiabatic hydrodynamic theory

  8. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.;

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  9. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.;

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  10. Beam Commissioning Plan and Result of KOMAC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jiho; Kwon, Hyeokjung; Kim, Hansung; Cho, Yongsub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    This work summarized the present status and near-future plan of the beam commissioning. The development and installation of the 100-MeV proton linac were finished. Beam commissioning is scheduled in May 2013. Hence we hope we can report the initial beam commissioning result in the spring meeting of Korea Nuclear Society. The beam commissioning of the KOMAC (Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex) 100-MeV proton linear accelerator is in progress. The linac includes a 50-keV ion source, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole), a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The final goal of the beam commissioning is accelerating 100-MeV proton beams to the beam dump in the accelerator tunnel and into a target room.

  11. Redshift drift constraints on holographic dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    He, Dong-Ze; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The Sandage-Loeb (SL) test is a promising method for probing dark energy because it measures the redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, covering the "redshift desert" of $2\\lesssim z\\lesssim5$, which is not covered by existing cosmological observations. Therefore, it could provide an important supplement to current cosmological observations. In this paper, we explore the impact of SL test on the precision of cosmological constraints for two typical holographic dark energy models, i.e., the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model and the Ricci holographic dark energy (RDE) model. To avoid data inconsistency, we use the best-fit models based on current combined observational data as the fiducial models to simulate 30 mock SL test data. The results show that SL test can effectively break the existing strong degeneracy between the present-day matter density $\\Omega_{m0}$ and the Hubble constant $H_0$ in other cosmological observations. For the considered two typical dark e...

  12. Admixture and Drift in Oscillating Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, V A

    2010-01-01

    The motions of a passive scalar $\\hat{a}$ in a general high-frequency oscillating flow are studied. Our aim is threefold: (i) to obtain different classes of general solutions; (ii) to identify, classify, and develop related asymptotic procedures; and (iii) to study the notion of drift motion and the limits of its applicability. The used mathematical approach combines a version of the two-timing method, the Eulerian averaging procedure, and several novel elements. Our main results are: (i) the scaling procedure produces two independent dimensionless scaling parameters: inverse frequency $1/\\omega$ and displacement amplitude $\\delta$; (ii) we propose the \\emph{inspection procedure} that allows to find the natural functional forms of asymptotic solutions for $1/\\omega\\to 0, \\delta\\to 0$ and leads to the key notions of \\emph{critical, subcritical, and supercritical asymptotic families} of solutions; (iii) we solve the asymptotic problems for an arbitrary given oscillating flow and any initial data for $\\hat{a}$; ...

  13. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  14. The PHENIX Drift Chamber Front End Electroncs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancake, C.; Velkovska, J.; Pantuev, V.; Fong, D.; Hemmick, T.

    1998-04-01

    The PHENIX Drift Chamber (DC) is designed to operate in the high particle flux environment of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and provide high resolution track measurements. It is segmented into 80 keystones with 160 readout channels each. The Front End Electronics (FEE) developed to meet the demanding operating conditions and the large number of readout channels of the DC will be discussed. It is based on two application specific integrated circuits: the ASD8 and the TMC-PHX1. The ASD8 chip contains 8 channels of bipolar amplifier-shaper-discriminator with 6 ns shaping time and ≈ 20 ns pulse width, which satisfies the two track resolution requirements. The TMC-PHX1 chip is a high-resolution multi-hit Time-to-Digital Converter. The outputs from the ASD8 are digitized in the Time Memory Cell (TMC) every (clock period)/32 or 0.78 ns (at 40 MHz), which gives the intrinsic time resolution of the system. A 256 words deep dual port memory keeps 6.4 μs time history of data at 40 MHz clock. Each DC keystone is supplied with 4 ASD8/TMC boards and one FEM board, which performs the readout of the TMC-PHX1's, buffers and formats the data to be transmitted over the Glink. The slow speed control communication between the FEM and the system is carried out over ARCNET. The full readout chain and the data aquisition system are being tested.

  15. Redshift drift exploration for interacting dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    By detecting redshift drift in the spectra of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest of distant quasars, Sandage-Loeb (SL) test directly measures the expansion of the universe, covering the "redshift desert" of $2 \\lesssim z \\lesssim5$. Thus this method is definitely an important supplement to the other geometric measurements and will play a crucial role in cosmological constraints. In this paper, we quantify the ability of SL test signal by a CODEX-like spectrograph for constraining interacting dark energy. Four typical interacting dark energy models are considered: (\\romannumeral1) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_c$, (\\romannumeral2) $Q=\\gamma H\\rho_{de}$, (\\romannumeral3) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_c$, and (\\romannumeral4) $Q=\\gamma H_0\\rho_{de}$. The results show that for all the considered interacting dark energy models, relative to the current joint SN+BAO+CMB+$H_0$ observations, the constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $H_0$ would be improved by about 60\\% and 30--40\\%, while the constraints on $w$ and $\\gamma$ would be slightly improved, with a 30-y...

  16. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien

    2008-10-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes\\' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities such as the asymptotic speed of the center of mass or the effective diffusion coefficient. Using an equivalent tilted ratchet model, we observe that the speed of the center of mass converges exponentially to its limiting value. A diffuse, oscillating front attached to the center of mass appears. The description of the front is given using an asymptotic expansion. The asymptotic solution attracts all solutions at an algebraic rate which is determined by the effective diffusion coefficient. The proof relies on an entropy estimate based on homogenized logarithmic Sobolev inequalities. In the travelling frame, the macroscopic profile obeys to an isotropic diffusion. Compared with the original diffusion, diffusion is enhanced or reduced, depending on the regime. At least in the limit cases, the rate of convergence to the effective profile is always decreased. All these considerations allow us to define a notion of efficiency for coherent transport, characterized by a dimensionless number, which is illustrated on two simple examples of travelling potentials with a sinusoidal shape in the first case, and a sawtooth shape in the second case. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  18. Drift power supply for Si(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drift power supply for Si(Li) detector has been developed, which is completely different from many other power supplies for common use. The drift power supply provides the most extensive useful voltage range of 0∼1000 V, and is continuously adjustable. It has good stability, constant power and compact structure, and the maximum output current is 100 mA. Since SCR's (silicon-controlled-rectifier) with trigger diodes and other new components are adopted and a power restriction circuit is considered in design, so during the operation when the resistance rate of silicon pieces in drifting process changes with the temperature, the power remains constant. The lower the resistance rate when the temperature raises, the higher the drift current and lower the voltage on the silicon piece. On the contrast, the higher the resistance rate when the temperature lowers, the lower the drift current, and higher the voltage on the silicon piece. Forty pieces of Si(Li) detector have been successfully drifted by using this drift power supply

  19. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Arif; Fanany, Mohamad Ivan; Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect "underfitting" condition. PMID:27594879

  20. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Arif; Fanany, Mohamad Ivan; Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect "underfitting" condition.

  1. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Budiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM. It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect “underfitting” condition.

  2. Injection, compression and confinement of electrons in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Helmholtz coil configuration has been constructed where the magnetic field can be increased to about 10 kGauss in 20 μsec. Electrons are injected from a hot tantalum filament between two plates across which a potential of about 5 keV is applied. The electric field E is perpendicular to the magnetic field B so that the direction of the E x B drift is radial--into the magnetic mirror. About 1014 electrons were injected and about 1013 electrons were trapped. The initial electron energy was about 5 keV and after compression 500 keV x-rays were observed. The confinement time is very sensitive to vacuum. Confinement times of milliseconds and good compression were observed at vacuum of 5.10-5 torr or less. Above 5.10-5 torr there was no trapping or compression. After a compressed ring of electrons was formed, it was released by a pulse applied to one of the Helmholtz coils that reduced the field. Ejection of the electron ring was observed by x-ray measurements

  3. Het effect van spuitboombeweging en windvector op de drift : Randvariatie metingen 2007-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, T.T.; Stallinga, H.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Velde, van der, G.; Zande, van de, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spray drift measurements have been performed to quantify the effect of variations in wind angle and wind speed during application and the sprayer boom movement alongside the sprayed edge of the field on spray drift deposition alongside a sprayed potato field (2007-2008). Results of these spray drift measurements are used to develop spray drift models incorporating the effects of wind variability and sprayer boom movement on spray drift deposition. Measured spray drift deposition patterns are ...

  4. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  5. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-13

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  6. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  7. Distribution of drifting seaweeds in eastern East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa; Tatsukawa, Kenichi; Filippi, Jean B.; Sagawa, Tatsuyuki; Matsunaga, Daisuke; Mikami, Atsuko; Ishida, Kenichi; Ajisaka, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Aoki, Masakazu; Wang, Wei-Ding; Liu, Hui-Fei; Zhang, Shou-Du; Zhou, Min-Dong; Sugimoto, Takashige

    2007-09-01

    In offshore waters with relatively low primary production, drifting seaweeds composed of Sargassum species form an identical ecosystem such as an oasis in desert. Commercially important pelagic fishes such as jack mackerel ( Trachurus japonicus) and yellow tail ( Seriola quinqueradiata) spawn in East China Sea pass their juvenile period accompanying drifting seaweeds. Therefore drifting seaweeds are very important not only in offshore ecosystem but also fishery resources. However the distribution of drifting seaweeds in East China Sea has scarcely known. Then we conducted two research cruises of R/V Hakuho-Maru in May 2002 and in March 2004. During the cruises, drifting seaweeds were visually observed from the bridge and sampled with a towing net. The observation revealed that the drifting seaweeds were distributed along the front between the Kuroshio Current and coastal waters and mainly composed of one seaweed species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh from spring to early summer. There are no reports on geographical distribution of this species in the coasts south of southern Kyushu Island in Japan. Kuroshio Current flows northeastward there. Buoys with GPS attached to drifting seaweeds released off Zhejiang Province, China, in March 2005 to track their transport. Their positions monitored by ORBCOM satellite showed that they were transported to the area in East China Sea, where the drifting seaweeds were observed during the cruises, in 2 months. These facts suggest that S. horneri detached from Chinese coast in March or months earlier than March could be transported to fringe area of continental shelf and waters influenced by Kuroshio Current from March to May. Therefore the Sargassum forests, especially S. horneri, along the Chinese coast play a very important role in the ecosystem of the East China Sea as a source of drifting seaweeds.

  8. An obliquely propagating electromagnetic drift instability in the lower hybrid frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell; Fox, William; Yamada, Masaaki

    2005-08-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) wave in the electron frame and the forward propagating sound (slow) wave in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of a large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma.

  9. Compressible motion fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviano, Giuseppe; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2013-01-01

    Traditional video compression methods obtain a compact representation for image frames by computing coarse motion fields defined on patches of pixels called blocks, in order to compensate for the motion in the scene across frames. This piecewise constant approximation makes the motion field efficiently encodable, but it introduces block artifacts in the warped image frame. In this paper, we address the problem of estimating dense motion fields that, while accurately predicting one frame from ...

  10. Compression-based similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitányi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    First we consider pair-wise distances for literal objects consisting of finite binary files. These files are taken to contain all of their meaning, like genomes or books. The distances are based on compression of the objects concerned, normalized, and can be viewed as similarity distances. Second, we consider pair-wise distances between names of objects, like "red" or "christianity." In this case the distances are based on searches of the Internet. Such a search can be performed by any search...

  11. Compressibility of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, P.; Ferrante, J.; Rose, J. H.; Smith, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A universal form is proposed for the equation of state (EOS) of solids. Good agreement is found for a variety of test data. The form of the EOS is used to suggest a method of data analysis, which is applied to materials of geophysical interest. The isothermal bulk modulus is discussed as a function of the volume and of the pressure. The isothermal compression curves for materials of geophysical interest are examined.

  12. Beam dynamics and commissioning of low and medium energy H- beam at Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Satri, Masoomeh Yarmohammadi; Lamehi-Rachti , Mohammad

    The First step of the CERN Large Hadron Collider injectors upgrade (LIU) project is Linac4. It accelerates H- ions to 160 MeV in an 80 m long accelerator housed in a tunnel 12 m underground, presently under construction. It will replace the present 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector of the proton accelerator complex to increase the LHC luminosity. It consists of a 45 keV RF volume source, a twosolenoid Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 352.2 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating the beam to 3 MeV, a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The MEBT houses a fast chopper to selectively remove unwanted micro-bunches in the 352 MHz sequence and avoid losses at capture in the CERN PSB (1 MHz). After chopping, the beam acceleration continues by a 50 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a 100 MeV Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac and a Pi-Mode Structure bringing the beam to the final energy of 160 MeV. Linac4 has been commissioned with a temporary source up to 12 MeV. The beam commissioning stages of Linac4 in LEBT...

  13. Beam diagnostic suite for the SNS linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardekopf, R. A.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Power, J. F.; Shafer, R. E.; Stovall, J. E.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is the next-generation pulsed neutron source to be built in the United States. The accelerator chosen to produce the 2 MW beam power on the neutron-producing target is an H- linear accelerator (linac) to 1 GeV, followed by a proton accumulator ring. The ring compresses the 1 ms long beam bunches from the linac to less than 1 μs. The linac is pulsed at 60 Hz with a 6% duty factor. Stringent control of the pulse structure and stability of the high-intensity H- beam is needed to minimize beam loss in the linac and to optimize injection into the accumulator ring. This requires a set of beam diagnostics that can operate at high peak currents (˜52 mA) with high sensitivity and minimum beam interception.

  14. Timing calibration of the trigger system for the drift tube detector of the OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkeit, Jan

    2015-11-15

    The OPERA experiment searches for ν{sub μ} → ν{sub τ} oscillations in an almost pure ν{sub μ} beam. The goal is to observe the oscillations in appearance mode by using a large-scale lead/emulsion target to resolve individual ν{sub τ} interactions. Magnetic spectrometers measure the charge and momentum of beam induced muons leaving the target sections. The Precision Tracker, a drift tube detector consisting of almost 10000 drift tubes, provides the tracking information inside the spectrometers. The coordinate measurement in the drift tubes is derived from a time measurement relative to an external trigger signal. In order to reach the required momentum resolution of less than 25 % for particle momenta up to 25 GeV, the uncertainty on the trigger timing must not exceed a value of 5 ns. In this thesis, a procedure for the timing calibration of the trigger system is presented. A step-by-step calibration of the corresponding signal paths is described. Applying all calibration results, a spatial resolution of 255 μm is achieved for the Precision Tracker, meeting the specified requirements. Furthermore, a method using the calibrated trigger system for performing time of flight measurements with atmospheric muons is developed. The average error on the measured flight times is ±4.5 ns.

  15. Compression of Cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Sarah; Houghton, Brittany; Renfro, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    The fall university physics class, at McMurry University, created a compression modulus experiment that even high school students could do. The class came up with this idea after a Young's modulus experiment which involved stretching wire. A question was raised of what would happen if we compressed something else? We created our own Young's modulus experiment, but in a more entertaining way. The experiment involves measuring the height of a cake both before and after a weight has been applied to the cake. We worked to derive the compression modulus by applying weight to a cake. In the end, we had our experimental cake and, ate it too! To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2012.TSS.B1.1 APS Home | APS Meetings | Join APS | Help | Contact APS Meetings var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try var pageTracker = gat.getTracker("UA-324916-13"); pageTracker.trackPageview(); catch(err)

  16. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  17. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF DEFORMATION OF THE CONTINENTAL AND OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF THE EARTH CORE NORTHERN DRIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Goncharov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drifting and submeridional compression of the continental and oceanic lithosphere, both with the northward vector (Figure 1 are revealed at the background of various directions of horizontal displacement combined with deformations of horizontal extension, compression and shear of the lithosphere (Figures 7–14. Among various structural forms and their paragenezises, indicators of such compression, the north vergence thrusts play the leading role (Figures 15–17, 19, and 22–24. This process was discontinuous, manifested discretely in time, and superimposed on processes of collisional orogenesis and platform deformations of the continental lithosphere and accretion of the oceanic lithosphere in spreading zones. Three main stages of submeridional compression of the oceanic lithosphere are distinguished as follows: Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous, Late Miocene, and the contemporary stages.Based on the concept of balanced tectonic flow in the Earth’s body, a model of meridional convection (Figure 25 is proposed. In this case, meridional convection is considered as an integral element of the overglobal convective geodynamic system of the largest-scale rank, which also includes the western component of the lithosphere drift (Figure 6 and the Earth’s ‘wrenching’. At the background of this system, geodynamic systems of smaller scale ranks are functioning (Table 1; Figures 2, and 3. The latters are responsible for the periodic creation and break-up of supercontinents, plate tectonics and regional geodynamical processes; they also produce the ‘structural background’, in the presence of which it is challenging to reveal the above mentioned submeridional compression structures. Formation of such structures is caused by the upper horizontal flow of meridional convection.Meridional convection occurs due to drifting of the Earth core towards the North Pole (which is detected by a number of independent methods and resistance of the mantle to

  18. General ignition requirements in TMR's with drift pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drift pumping of collisionally trapped DT ions and thermal alpha ash in the transitions and thermal barriers of TMR plugs can be shown by simple models to dominate the central cell energy losses, requiring in fact more radial ion loss by drift pumping than axial ion loss through the potential plugs, and setting a minimum central cell length for ignition. Induced electron transport due to drift pumping is shown to be small, so grids are not needed on the direct converter to separate ion and electron currents

  19. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  20. Agricultural sprays in cross-flow and drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, M.; Balachandar, R.; Wulfsohn, Dvoralai;

    2001-01-01

    The droplet size and velocity characteristics of an agricultural spray were studied in a wind tunnel in the presence of a non-uniform cross-flow. The spray was generated at three nozzle-operating pressures. The droplet size and velocity was measured in both the cross-flow direction and the vertical....... A size-velocity correlation factor was adopted to discuss the potential drift of the droplets. For the lower pressure, at a distance of 100 mm below the nozzle exit, the droplets are prone to drift at all downstream locations. dt the higher pressure, the droplets are prone to drift beyond a distance...