WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam drift compression

  1. Optimizing beam transport in rapidly compressing beams on the neutralized drift compression experiment – II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton D. Stepanov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II is an induction linac that generates intense pulses of 1.2 MeV helium ions for heating matter to extreme conditions. Here, we present recent results on optimizing beam transport. The NDCX-II beamline includes a 1-m-long drift section downstream of the last transport solenoid, which is filled with charge-neutralizing plasma that enables rapid longitudinal compression of an intense ion beam against space-charge forces. The transport section on NDCX-II consists of 28 solenoids. Finding optimal field settings for a group of solenoids requires knowledge of the envelope parameters of the beam. Imaging the beam on the scintillator gives the radius of the beam, but the envelope angle is not measured directly. We demonstrate how the parameters of the beam envelope (radius, envelop angle, and emittance can be reconstructed from a series of images taken by varying the B-field strengths of a solenoid upstream of the scintillator. We use this technique to evaluate emittance at several points in the NDCX-II beamline and for optimizing the trajectory of the beam at the entry of the plasma-filled drift section. Keywords: Charged-particle beams, Induction accelerators, Beam dynamics, Beam emittance, Ion beam diagnostics, PACS Codes: 41.75.-i, 41.85.Ja, 52.59.Sa, 52.59.Wd, 29.27.Eg

  2. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  3. Drift compression and final focus for intense heavy ion beams with nonperiodic, time-dependent lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a nonperiodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the same focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the integrated beam experiment being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory.

  4. Drift Compression and Final Focus for Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Non-periodic, Time-dependent Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    In the currently envisioned configurations for heavy ion fusion, it is necessary to longitudinally compress the beam bunches by a large factor after the acceleration phase. Because the space-charge force increases as the beam is compressed, the beam size in the transverse direction will increase in a periodic quadrupole lattice. If an active control of the beam size is desired, a larger focusing force is needed to confine the beam in the transverse direction, and a non-periodic quadrupole lattice along the beam path is necessary. In this paper, we describe the design of such a focusing lattice using the transverse envelope equations. A drift compression and final focus lattice should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. This is difficult with a fixed lattice, because different slices of the beam may have different perveance and emittance. Four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of drift compression to focus the entire pulse onto the sam e focal spot. Drift compression and final focusing schemes are developed for a typical heavy ion fusion driver and for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) being designed by the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory

  5. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  6. Drift Compression and Final Focus Options for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Qin; Davidson, Ronald C.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2005-01-01

    A drift compression and final focus lattice for heavy ion beams should focus the entire beam pulse onto the same focal spot on the target. We show that this requirement implies that the drift compression design needs to satisfy a self-similar symmetry condition. For un-neutralized beams, the Lie symmetry group analysis is applied to the warm-fluid model to systematically derive the self-similar drift compression solutions. For neutralized beams, the 1-D Vlasov equation is solved explicitly, and families of self-similar drift compression solutions are constructed. To compensate for the deviation from the self-similar symmetry condition due to the transverse emittance, four time-dependent magnets are introduced in the upstream of the drift compression such that the entire beam pulse can be focused onto the same focal spot

  7. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Hoon, Michiel Jan Laurens [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal compression of space-charge dominated beams can be achieved by imposing a head-to-tail velocity tilt on the beam. This tilt has to be carefully tailored, such that it is removed by the longitudinal space-charge repulsion by the time the beam reaches the end of the drift compression section. The transverse focusing lattice should be designed such that all parts of the beam stay approximately matched, while the beam smoothly expands transversely to the larger beam radius needed in the final focus system following drift compression. In this thesis, several drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression systems were designed within these constraints, based on a given desired pulse shape at the end of drift compression. The occurrence of mismatches due to a rapidly increasing current was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of drift compression to errors in the initial velocity tilt and current profile was studied. These calculations were done using a new computer code that accurately calculates the longitudinal electric field in the space-charge dominated regime.

  8. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  9. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  10. Beam test of a large area silicon drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Chinnici, S.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Palma, F.; Sampietro, M.; Rehak, P.; Ballocchi, G.; Kemmer, J.; Holl, P.; Cox, P.T.; Giacomelli, P.; Vacchi, A.

    1992-01-01

    The results from the tests of the first large area (4 x 4 cm 2 ) planar silicon drift detector prototype in a pion beam are reported. The measured position resolution in the drift direction is (σ=40 ± 10)μm

  11. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-01-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warm-dense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ∼1275 C, a space-charge-limited Li + beam current density of J ∼1 mA/cm 2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ∼50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 (micro) s.

  12. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  13. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  14. The Single Pass RF Driver: Final beam compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Single Pass RF Driver (SPRFD) compacts the beam from the linac without storage rings by manipulations that take advantage of the multiplicity of isotopes (16), the preserved µbunch structure, and increased total linac current. Magnetic switches on a first set of delay lines rearrange the internal structure of the various isotopic beams. A second set of delay lines sets the relative timing of the 16 isotopic beam sections so they will telescope at the pellet, in one of multiple fusion chambers, e.g. 10. Shortening each isotopic beam section uses preservation of the µbunch structure up to the final ∼2 km drift before final focus. Just before the final drift, differential acceleration of the µbunches in each isotopic beam section (128 total) launches an axial collapse, referred to as the “Slick”. The µbunches interpenetrate as their centers of mass move toward each other and individual µbunches lengthen due to their momentum spread. In longitudinal phase space they slide over one another as they lengthen in time and slim down in instantaneous energy spread. The permissible amount of µbunch lengthening is set by the design pulse shape at the pellet, which varies for different groups of isotopes. In narrow bands of ranges according to the role for each isotope group in the pellet, the ranges extend from 1 to 10 g/cm 2 to drive the cylinder barrel and thin hemispherical end caps, to heat the ∼0.5 g/cm 2 ρR fast ignition zone, and to improve the quasi-sphericity of the compression of the fast ignition zones at the pellet's ends. Because the µbunch–µbunch momentum differences are correlated, time-ramped beamline transport elements close after the differential accelerator are used to correct the associated shifts of focal point. Beam neutralization is needed after the differential acceleration until adjacent bunches begin to overlap. Concurrent collapse of each isotope and telescoping of the 16 isotopes cause the current in each beamline to rise

  15. Dynamics of heavy ion beams during longitudinal compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Bangerter, R.O.; Lee, E.P.; Brandon, S.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    Heavy ion beams with initially uniform line charge density can be compressed longitudinally by an order of magnitude in such a way that the compressed beam has uniform line charge density and velocity-tilt profiles. There are no envelope mismatch oscillations during compression. Although the transverse temperature varies along the beam and also varies with time, no substantial longitudinal and transverse emittance growth has been observed. Scaling laws for beam radius and transport system parameters are given

  16. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  17. Conceptual design of heavy ion beam compression using a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion beams are a useful tool for conducting high energy density physics (HEDP experiments. Target heating can be enhanced by beam compression, because a shorter pulse diminishes hydrodynamic expansion during irradiation. A conceptual design is introduced to compress ∼100  MeV/u to ∼GeV/u heavy ion beams using a wedge. By deflecting the beam with a time-varying field and placing a tailor-made wedge amid its path downstream, each transverse slice passes through matter of different thickness. The resulting energy loss creates a head-to-tail velocity gradient, and the wedge shape can be designed by using stopping power models to give maximum compression at the target. The compression ratio at the target was found to vary linearly with (head-to-tail centroid offset/spot radius at the wedge. The latter should be approximately 10 to attain tenfold compression. The decline in beam quality due to projectile ionization, energy straggling, fragmentation, and scattering is shown to be acceptable for well-chosen wedge materials. A test experiment is proposed to verify the compression scheme and to study the beam-wedge interaction and its associated beam dynamics, which will facilitate further efforts towards a HEDP facility.

  18. Kinetic description of neutralized drift compression and transverse focusing of intense ion charge bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model based on the Vlasov equation is used to describe the axial drift compression and transverse focusing of an intense ion charge bunch propagating along the axis of a solenoidal focusing field B^{sol}(x. The space charge and current of the ion charge bunch are assumed to be completely neutralized by the electrons provided by a dense background plasma. In the absence of self-field forces, the Vlasov equation is solved exactly for general initial distribution function f_{b}(x,v,0, using the method of characteristics. It is shown that the Vlasov equation possesses a class of exact, dynamically evolving solutions f_{b}(W_{⊥},W_{z}, where W_{⊥} and W_{z} are transverse and longitudinal constants of the motion. Detailed dynamical properties of the charge bunch are calculated during axial compression and transverse focusing for several choices of distribution function f_{b}(W_{⊥},W_{z}.

  19. SU-F-T-279: Impact of Beam Energy Drifts On IMRT Delivery Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddu, S [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kamal, G; Herman, A; Edwards, S; Cai, B [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Yaddanapudi, S [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Oddiraju, S [Baylor Scot & White, Temple, TX (United States); Rangaraj, D [Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, TX (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: According to TG-40 percent-depth-dose (PDD) tolerance is ±2% but TG-142 is ±1%. Now the question is, which one is relevant in IMRT era? The primary objective of this study is to evaluate dosimetric impact of beam-energy-drifts on IMRT-delivery. Methods: Beam-energy drifts were simulated by adjusting Linac’s bending-magnet-current (BMC) followed by tuning the pulse-forming network and adjusting gun-current. PDD change of −0.6% and +1.2% were tested. Planar-dosimetry measurements were performed using an ionization-chamber-array in solid-water phantoms. Study includes 10-head-and-neck and 3-breast cancer patients. en-face beam-deliveries were also tested at 1.3cm and 5.3cm depths. Composite and single-field dose-distributions were compared against the plans to determine %Gamma pass-rates (%GPRs). For plan dose comparisons, changes in %Gamma pass-rates (cPGPRs) were computed/reported to exclude the differences between dose-computation and delivery. Dose distributions of the drifted-energies were compared against their baseline measurements to determine the% GPRs. A Gamma criteria of 3%/3mm was considered for plan-dose comparisons while 3%/1mm used for measured dose intercomparisons. Results: For composite-dose delivery, average cPGPRs were 0.41%±2.48% and −2.54%±3.65% for low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) drifts, respectively. For measured dose inter-comparisons, the average%GPRs were 98.4%±2.2% (LE-drift) and 95.8%±4.0 (HE-drift). The average %GPR of 92.6%±4.3% was noted for the worst-case scenario comparing LE-drift to HE-drift. All en-face beams at 5.3 cm depth have cPGPRs within ±4% of the baseline-energy measurements. However, greater variations were noted for 1.3cm depth. Average %GPRs for drifted energies were >99% at 5.3cm and >97% at 1.3cm depths. However, for the worst-case scenario (LE-drift to HE-drift) these numbers dropped to 95.2% at 5.3cm and 93.1% at 1.3cm depths. Conclusion: The dosimetric impact of beam-energy drifts was

  20. SU-F-T-279: Impact of Beam Energy Drifts On IMRT Delivery Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddu, S; Kamal, G; Herman, A; Edwards, S; Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Oddiraju, S; Rangaraj, D; Mutic, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: According to TG-40 percent-depth-dose (PDD) tolerance is ±2% but TG-142 is ±1%. Now the question is, which one is relevant in IMRT era? The primary objective of this study is to evaluate dosimetric impact of beam-energy-drifts on IMRT-delivery. Methods: Beam-energy drifts were simulated by adjusting Linac’s bending-magnet-current (BMC) followed by tuning the pulse-forming network and adjusting gun-current. PDD change of −0.6% and +1.2% were tested. Planar-dosimetry measurements were performed using an ionization-chamber-array in solid-water phantoms. Study includes 10-head-and-neck and 3-breast cancer patients. en-face beam-deliveries were also tested at 1.3cm and 5.3cm depths. Composite and single-field dose-distributions were compared against the plans to determine %Gamma pass-rates (%GPRs). For plan dose comparisons, changes in %Gamma pass-rates (cPGPRs) were computed/reported to exclude the differences between dose-computation and delivery. Dose distributions of the drifted-energies were compared against their baseline measurements to determine the% GPRs. A Gamma criteria of 3%/3mm was considered for plan-dose comparisons while 3%/1mm used for measured dose intercomparisons. Results: For composite-dose delivery, average cPGPRs were 0.41%±2.48% and −2.54%±3.65% for low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) drifts, respectively. For measured dose inter-comparisons, the average%GPRs were 98.4%±2.2% (LE-drift) and 95.8%±4.0 (HE-drift). The average %GPR of 92.6%±4.3% was noted for the worst-case scenario comparing LE-drift to HE-drift. All en-face beams at 5.3 cm depth have cPGPRs within ±4% of the baseline-energy measurements. However, greater variations were noted for 1.3cm depth. Average %GPRs for drifted energies were >99% at 5.3cm and >97% at 1.3cm depths. However, for the worst-case scenario (LE-drift to HE-drift) these numbers dropped to 95.2% at 5.3cm and 93.1% at 1.3cm depths. Conclusion: The dosimetric impact of beam-energy drifts was

  1. Resolution and drift measurements on the Advanced Photon Source beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.

    1994-01-01

    The resolution and long-term drift of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics were measured using the charged particle beams in the ESRF storage ring with various beam current and configurations (single bunch, 8 and 16 equally spaced bunches, and 1/3-fill). The energy of the stored electrons was 6 GeV. The integrated BPM electronics system as used for this work is capable of measuring the beam position on a turn-by-turn basis, which can be accumulated for N turns (N = 2 n , n = 1, 2, ... , 11). Estimation of the BPM resolution apart from the low-frequency beam motion was made by measuring the standard deviation in the measured beam position with different Ns. The analysis of the results indicates a BPM resolution of 18/√ N [μm] for the APS storage ring, which is equivalent to 0.07 μm/√Hz. For the miniature insertion device BPM with 2.8 times higher sensitivity, the resolution will be 0.02 μm/√Hz. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion was measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Comparison of the results with the laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Implication of the BPM resolution limit on the proposed global and local beam position feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed

  2. Influence of initial energy modulation on premodulated electron beam propagating through a drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    Influence of the initial energy modulation caused by the self-potential depression on the premodulated electron-beam propagation through a drift tube is investigated. The potential depression κ can significantly vary because of the initial current modulation. Thus, beam close-quote s kinetic energy at the injection varies accordingly. A self-consistent nonlinear theory of current modulation of the premodulated electron beam is developed. It is shown that the initial energy modulation caused by the self-potential depression at injection plays a significant role in the current modulation for long range propagation. It is also found from a small signal theory that reduction of the beam close-quote s kinetic energy due to its potential depression accelerates debunching process of the initial current modulation. Although the initial current modulation is debunched quickly for high current beam, amplitude of the current modulation never becomes zero because of the initial energy modulation. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Free-beam soliton self-compression in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Pugžlys, A.; Panchenko, V. Ya; Shumakova, V.; Ališauskas, S.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    We identify a physical scenario whereby soliton transients generated in freely propagating laser beams within the regions of anomalous dispersion in air can be compressed as a part of their free-beam spatiotemporal evolution to yield few-cycle mid- and long-wavelength-infrared field waveforms, whose peak power is substantially higher than the peak power of the input pulses. We show that this free-beam soliton self-compression scenario does not require ionization or laser-induced filamentation, enabling high-throughput self-compression of mid- and long-wavelength-infrared laser pulses within a broad range of peak powers from tens of gigawatts up to the terawatt level. We also demonstrate that this method of pulse compression can be extended to long-range propagation, providing self-compression of high-peak-power laser pulses in atmospheric air within propagation ranges as long as hundreds of meters, suggesting new ways towards longer-range standoff detection and remote sensing.

  4. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  5. Analysis of axial compressive loaded beam under random support excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wensheng; Wang, Fengde; Liu, Jian

    2017-12-01

    An analytical procedure to investigate the response spectrum of a uniform Bernoulli-Euler beam with axial compressive load subjected to random support excitations is implemented based on the Mindlin-Goodman method and the mode superposition method in the frequency domain. The random response spectrum of the simply supported beam subjected to white noise excitation and to Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum excitation is investigated, and the characteristics of the response spectrum are further explored. Moreover, the effect of axial compressive load is studied and a method to determine the axial load is proposed. The research results show that the response spectrum mainly consists of the beam's additional displacement response spectrum when the excitation is white noise; however, the quasi-static displacement response spectrum is the main component when the excitation is the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum. Under white noise excitation, the amplitude of the power spectral density function decreased as the axial compressive load increased, while the frequency band of the vibration response spectrum increased with the increase of axial compressive load.

  6. Effects of ambient gas in beam drift space on performance of high brightness and low energy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Nakamura, S.; Ueda, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Goto, S.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of the ambient gas in the ion drift space on the transport property of the low energy (155 eV) and high brightness beam are studied experimentally. A bucket ion source with single-aperture triode extraction is used. Beam characteristics such as the divergence angle and the current density are improved by the increase in the ambient gas pressure in the high brightness beam (high deceleration voltage, -2000 V), but not in the low brightness beam (low deceleration voltage, -600 V). The beam spreading due to the space charge of the ion beam is seen at the low ambient gas pressure when the central current density, which is measured at 35 cm downstream side from the electrode system, exceeds 5 μA/cm 2 . The electron density in the ion-beam plasma increases with the ambient gas pressure, but the space charge is not sufficiently neutralized by the electrons produced by the ambient gas atom ionization. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Flexural torsional buckling of uniformly compressed beam-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, M.

    2018-02-01

    A Timoshenko beam model embedded in a 3D space is introduced for buckling analysis of multi-store buildings, made by rigid floors connected by elastic columns. The beam model is developed via a direct approach, and the constitutive law, accounting for prestress forces, is deduced via a suitable homogenization procedure. The bifurcation analysis for the case of uniformly compressed buildings is then addressed, and numerical results concerning the Timoshenko model are compared with 3D finite element analyses. Finally, some conclusions and perspectives are drawn.

  8. A beam test of a prototype of the BESIII drift chamber in magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.B.; Qin, Z.H.; Wu, L.H.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, B.A.; Chen, Y.B.; Jin, Y.; Liu, R.G.; Ma, X.Y.; Ma, Y.Y.; Tang, X.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.H.; Zhang, G.F.; Zhu, M.X.; Zhu, Q.M.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of the BESIII drift chamber was tested with He/C 3 H 8 (60/40) gas mixture in a 1T magnetic field at the π-2 beam line of KEK 12GeV PS. The drift distance-time relationship was extracted for various conditions. The performance of the chamber, such as the spatial resolution, the dE/dx resolution and the cell efficiency, was studied in detail. The dE/dx was measured as a function of βγ to calculate the particle separation power. Based on the test results, the operating voltage of the BESIII drift chamber is optimized to be 2200V, resulting in a spatial resolution better than 110μm, a cell efficiency over 98%, a dE/dx resolution better than 5% and the 3σπ/K separation at a momentum exceeding 700MeV/c. These results confirm the validation of the physics design of the BESIII drift chamber

  9. Beam Aborts in PEP-II Rings and Lingering Drift Chamber Currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkat, N.

    2004-01-01

    The BABAR detector at SLAC was designed to study CP-violation in B-meson decays from electron-positron collisions in the PEP-II electron-positron storage rings. Background radiation in the High Energy Ring (HER) and Low Energy Ring (LER) of PEP-II has the potential to damage the sensitive equipment in the BABAR detector. As a result, the beams in the HER and LER can be aborted to prevent such damage. In the span of a few microseconds, the HER and LER currents drop from, for example, 1450 micro Amps and 2300 micro Amps, respectively, to zero. At this time the voltage in the Drift Chamber is rapidly ramped down from a potential of 1930 V to a safe potential of 800 V, thus we would expect the currents in the Drift Chamber to quickly go to zero once the beams are aborted. However, we observe an average 15 second delay in the measured time it takes for all current in the Drift Chamber to fall below 1 micro Amp. This delay has been hypothesized as an instrumentation issue and not as a physical phenomenon. The specific sources of this error are still not completely known, but analysis suggests that it results from the interplay of the CAEN High Voltage supplies and the EPICS system and/or limitations within those systems

  10. Laboratory and test beam results from a large-area silicon drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; Giubellino, P; Gregorio, A; Idzik, M; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nouais, D; Petta, C; Rashevsky, A; Randazzo, N; Reito, S; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A very large-area (6.75*8 cm/sup 2/) silicon drift detector with integrated high-voltage divider has been designed, produced and fully characterised in the laboratory by means of ad hoc designed MOS injection electrodes. The detector is of the "butterfly" type, the sensitive area being subdivided into two regions with a maximum drift length of 3.3 cm. The device was also tested in a pion beam (at the CERN PS) tagged by means of a microstrip detector telescope. Bipolar VLSI front-end cells featuring a noise of 250 e/sup -/ RMS at 0 pF with a slope of 40 e/sup -//pF have been used to read out the signals. The detector showed an excellent stability and featured the expected characteristics. Some preliminary results will be presented. (12 refs).

  11. Drift tube alignment and beam emittance codes in use at the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.A.

    1974-01-01

    Two Fortran-IV codes in use at the SuperHILAC are of significant value in optimizing the geometry of the accelerator and in evaluating the performance of the heavy ion beams. The first routine described is used to determine the existing root mean square deviation of the 210 internal drift tube quadrupoles fitted to a straight line or to a second-order quadratic. It then predicts the minimum number of drift tubes, and their identities, to be moved in order to attain a user-elected margin of error fit. Brief mention is made of the pulsed-wire alignment technique for the quadrupole positioning. The second program described is part of a data system which utilizes a PDP-8/I as a control device for the manipulation of beam-scanning hardware and a CDC-6600 in an off-line interactive mode which gives the user maximum versatility in treating the raw data and displaying the results of calculations. The code portrays the transverse beam emittance figures and their transmission through the accelerator and transport lines. Also discussed are future plans which include on-line data reduction and CRT display by the PDP-8/I to enable the operators to optimize the tuning of the HILAC. (U.S.)

  12. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Oller, J.C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs

  13. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. Tokamak heating by neutral beams and adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1973-08-01

    ''Realistic'' models of tokamak energy confinement strongly favor reactor operation at the maximum MHD-stable β-value, in order to maximize plasma density. Ohmic heating is unsuitable for this purpose. Neutral-beam heating plus compression is well suited; however, very large requirements on device size and injection power seem likely for a DT ignition experiment using a Maxwellian plasma. Results of the ATC experiment are reviewed, including Ohmic heating, neutral-beam heating, and production of two-energy-component plasmas (energetic deuteron population in deuterium ''target plasma''). A modest extrapolation of present ATC parameters could give zero-power conditions in a DT experiment of the two-energy-component type. (U.S.)

  15. Drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Hongli; Yuen, Manwai

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the analytical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with dependent-density viscosity. By using the characteristic method, we successfully obtain a class of drifting solutions with elliptic symmetry for the Navier-Stokes model wherein the velocity components are governed by a generalized Emden dynamical system. In particular, when the viscosity variables are taken the same as Yuen [M. W. Yuen, “Analytical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations,” J. Math. Phys. 49, 113102 (2008)], our solutions constitute a generalization of that obtained by Yuen. Interestingly, numerical simulations show that the analytical solutions can be used to explain the drifting phenomena of the propagation wave like Tsunamis in oceans

  16. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  17. Compression of pulsed electron beams for material tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metel, Alexander S.

    2018-03-01

    In order to strengthen the surface of machine parts and investigate behavior of their materials exposed to highly dense energy fluxes an electron gun has been developed, which produces the pulsed beams of electrons with the energy up to 300 keV and the current up to 250 A at the pulse width of 100-200 µs. Electrons are extracted into the accelerating gap from the hollow cathode glow discharge plasma through a flat or a spherical grid. The flat grid produces 16-cm-diameter beams with the density of transported per one pulse energy not exceeding 15 J·cm-2, which is not enough even for the surface hardening. The spherical grid enables compression of the beams and regulation of the energy density from 15 J·cm-2 up to 15 kJ·cm-2, thus allowing hardening, pulsed melting of the machine part surface with the further high-speed recrystallization as well as an explosive ablation of the surface layer.

  18. Design and construction of drift tube linac cavities for RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Yamada, K.; Arai, S.; Chiba, Y.; Kase, M.; Okuno, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kamigaito, O.

    2013-09-01

    A new injector linac "RILAC2", has recently been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. The main part of the RILAC2 is a drift tube linac that consists of three newly designed cavities. These cavities operate in continuous wave (CW) mode at a fixed frequency of 36.5 MHz. Their structure is based on a quarter-wavelength resonator because this is the smallest resonator available in this frequency range among the available structures. We adopted the direct coupling method in the construction of these cavities. A power amplifier was directly coupled to the cavity without a long transmission line to reduce the installation area and simultaneously reduce construction cost. A detailed cavity and coupler design was carried out via simulation. Our work also describes the design process using three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation software. Construction and operation tests are also shown.

  19. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaf, G. ten; Wouters, S. H. W.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geer, S. B. van der [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  20. Compensation of errors due to incident beam drift in a 3 DOF measurement system for linear guide motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Mao, Shuai; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-11-02

    A measurement system with three degrees of freedom (3 DOF) that compensates for errors caused by incident beam drift is proposed. The system's measurement model (i.e. its mathematical foundation) is analyzed, and a measurement module (i.e. the designed orientation measurement unit) is developed and adopted to measure simultaneously straightness errors and the incident beam direction; thus, the errors due to incident beam drift can be compensated. The experimental results show that the proposed system has a deviation of 1 μm in the range of 200 mm for distance measurements, and a deviation of 1.3 μm in the range of 2 mm for straightness error measurements.

  1. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  2. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  3. Extraction Compression and Acceleration of High Line Charge Density Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grote, D P; Peters, Craig; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    HEDP applications require high line charge density ion beams. An efficient method to obtain this type of beams is to extract a long pulse, high current beam from a gun at high energy, and let the beam pass through a decelerating field to compress it. The low energy beam bunch is loaded into a solenoid and matched to a Brillouin flow. The Brillouin equilibrium is independent of the energy if the relationship between the beam size (a), solenoid magnetic field strength (B) and line charge density is such that (Ba)2

  4. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  5. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi, E-mail: paryanto-ds@yahoo.com; Sugiman,; Saputra, Yudhi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Mataram, Mataram, West Nusa Tenggara (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  6. Coupling sections, emittance growth, and drift compensation in the use of bent solenoids as beam transport elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Norem

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Bent solenoids can transmit charged particle beams while providing momentum dispersion. While less familiar than quadrupole and dipole systems, bent solenoids can produce superficially simple transport lines and large acceptance spectrometers for use at low energies. Design issues such as drift compensation and coupling sections between straight and bent solenoids are identified, and aberrations such as shears produced by perpendicular error fields are discussed. Examples are considered which provide the basis for the design of emittance exchange elements for the cooling system of a muon collider.

  7. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  8. Improving The Voided Reinforced Concrete Beams Behavior by Strenthining The Compression Zone Concrete Using Polyvinyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Hasan Ali Al-Salim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available  Determining dimensions of  continuous RC beam depend on the critical span. Practically, changing the dimensions of others spans is difficult. So that, this work aimed to discuss the possibility of adding voids within the beams which its dimensions are more than required in order to reduce the cost and dead load. The selected percent of voids to volume of  tested  beams was 10%.  The shape of voids was a first variable (spherical voids or conic voids. Also, the alteration in behavior when a (5cm concrete layer thickness of compression zone was replaced with a concrete layer modified with adding polyvinyl alcohol (PVA was investigated, as a second variable. After testing six samples, the result showed that the failure criteria of normal concrete voided beams is transformed from flexural behavior to shear behavior, while the failure criteria of control solid specimen was flexure behavior. Also, the modified beams failed in flexural behavior except the beam with conic voids failed in shear behavior. Corresponding to this transform, the ultimate load varied in the same manner. Where, the normal concrete voided beams failed with lesser ultimate load than control solid beam of about (6.4% and 18.3% for spherical and conic voids, respectively. While, the ultimate load of modified concrete beams is increased of about (13.8%, 5.4% and 3.1% for solid beam, spherical and conic voided beams respectively in comparing control specimen.

  9. An evaluation of the sandwich beam compression test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sandwich beam in a four-point bending compressive test method for advanced composites is evaluated. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were obtained for graphite/polyimide beam specimens tested at 117 K, room temperature, and 589 K. Tensile elastic properties obtained from the specimens were assumed to be equal to the compressive elastic properties and were used in the analysis. Strain gages were used to record strain data. A three-dimensional finite-element model was used to examine the effects of the honeycomb core on measured composite mechanical properties. Results of the analysis led to the following conclusions: (1) a near uniaxial compressive stress state existed in the top cover and essentially all the compressive load was carried by the top cover; (2) laminate orientation, test temperature, and type of honeycomb core material were shown to affect the type of beam failure; and (3) the test method can be used to obtain compressive elastic constants over the temperature range 117 to 589 K.

  10. Target design for the cylindrical compression of matter driven by heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es; Temporal, M. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lopez Cela, J.J. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Grandjouan, N. [LULI, UMR 7605, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Tahir, N.A. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Serna Moreno, M.C. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Portugues, R.F. [E. T. S. I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-21

    The compression of a cylindrical sample of hydrogen contained in a hollow shell of Pb or Au has been analyzed in the framework of the experiments to be performed in the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 to be constructed at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. The target implosion is driven by an intense beam of heavy ions with a ring-shaped focal spot. We report the results of a parametric study of the final state of the compressed hydrogen in terms of the target and beam parameters. We consider the generation of the annular heated region by means of a radio-frequency wobbler that rotates the beam at extremely high frequencies in order to accommodate symmetry constraints. We have also studied the hydrogen conditions that can be achieved with a non-rotating beam with Gaussian focal spot and the possibility to use a beam stopper as an alternative way to avoid the direct heating of the sample. Finally, we report the analysis of the hydrodynamic instabilities that affect the implosion and the mitigating effects of the elastoplastic properties of the shell.

  11. ELF wave production by an electron beam emitting rocket system and its suppression on auroral field lines - Evidence for Alfven and drift waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.; Abe, Y.; Steffen, J. E.; Malcolm, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Orthogonal probes on a free-flying plasma diagnostics payload are used to study ELF electric disturbances in the auroral ionosphere that are due to the injection of powerful electron beams. Frequency spectrograms are presented for various pitch angles, pulsing characteristics, and other properties of the injected beams; the large scale DC ionospheric convection electric field is measured, together with auroral particle precipitation, visual auroral forms, and ionospheric parameters. In view of the experimental results obtained, it is postulated that the observed ELF waves are in the Alfven and drift modes, and are generated by the positive vehicle potential during beam injection.

  12. A modified and calibrated drift-diffusion-reaction model for time-domain analysis of charging phenomena in electron-beam irradiated insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftari, Behrouz; Budko, Neil; Vuik, Kees

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a modified self-consistent drift-diffusion-reaction model suitable for the analysis of electron-beam irradiated insulators at both short and long time scales. A novel boundary condition is employed that takes into account the reverse electron current and a fully dynamic trap-assisted generation-recombination mechanism is implemented. Sensitivity of the model with respect to material parameters is investigated and a calibration procedure is developed that reproduces experimental yield-energy curves for uncharged insulators. Long-time charging and yield variations are analyzed for stationary defocused and focused beams as well as moving beams dynamically scanning composite insulators.

  13. Initial Measurements of CSR from a Bunch-Compressed Beam at APS

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Borland, M; Sereno, N S

    2005-01-01

    The interest in bunch compression to generate higher peak current electron beams with low emittance continues in the free-electron laser (FEL) community. At the Advanced Photon source (APS) we have both an rf thermionic gun and an rf photocathode (PC) gun on the S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point in the linac, we have a flexible chicane bunch compressor whose four dipoles bend the beam in the horizontal plane. There is also a vertical bend dipole after the chicane that allows measurement of energy and horizontal beam size at the imaging screen station to study possible effects on emittance due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the chicane. A far-infrared (FIR) coherent radiation monitor is located downstream of the chicane as well. We have begun recommissioning of this device with coherent transition radiation (CTR), but we also have directly observed CSR from the bunch-compressed beam as it transits the vertical dipole and goes into the down leg. The unique geometry allows simultaneous tracking of b...

  14. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  15. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  16. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  17. Natural Frequencies of a Cracked Beam Coupled with a Compressible Sloshing Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Di Sciuva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes studies into the flexural vibration of a cracked cantilevered beam in contact with a non-viscous fluid. The crack has been represented by a mass-less rotational spring, the flexibility of which has been calculated using linear fracture mechanics. The coupled system is subject to undisturbed boundary condition at infinity in the fluid domain. A range of different boundary conditions have been analysed such as both incompressible and compressible fluid, with and without sloshing. Various crack sizes and positions have been considered in order to assess the effect of damage in the fluid-structure interaction problem.

  18. First test experiment to produce the slowed-down RI beam with the momentum-compression mode at RIBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikama, T., E-mail: sumikama@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ahn, D.S.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kubo, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aoi, N. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d’Orsay (IPNO), CNRS/IN2P3, 91405 Orsay (France); Hasegawa, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ideguchi, E. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Imai, N. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Otsu, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimoura, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    The {sup 82}Ge beam has been produced by the in-flight fission reaction of the {sup 238}U primary beam with 345 MeV/u at the RIKEN RI beam factory, and slowed down to about 15 MeV/u using the energy degraders. The momentum-compression mode was applied to the second stage of the BigRIPS separator to reduce the momentum spread. The energy was successfully reduced down to 13 ± 2.5 MeV/u as expected. The focus was not optimized at the end of the second stage, therefore the beam size was larger than the expectation. The transmission of the second stage was half of the simulated value mainly due to out of focus. The two-stage separation worked very well for the slowed-down beam with the momentum-compression mode.

  19. Characterization and mitigation of coherent-optical-transition-radiation signals from a compressed electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Lumpkin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Photon Source (APS injector complex includes an option for rf photocathode (PC gun beam injection into the 450-MeV S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point, a four-dipole chicane was used to compress the micropulse bunch length from a few ps to sub-0.5 ps (FWHM. Noticeable enhancements of the optical transition radiation (OTR signal sampled after the APS chicane were then observed as has been reported in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS injector commissioning. A far-infrared (FIR coherent transition radiation detector and interferometer were used to monitor the bunch compression process and correlate the appearance of localized spikes of OTR signal (5 to 10 times brighter than adjacent areas within the beam-image footprint. We have performed spectral-dependency measurements at 375 MeV with a series of bandpass filters centered in 50-nm increments from 400 to 700 nm and with an imaging spectrometer and observed a broadband enhancement in these spikes. Mitigation concepts of the observed coherent OTR, which exhibits an intensity enhancement in the red part of the visible spectrum as compared to incoherent OTR, are described.

  20. An evaluation of the sandwich beam in four-point bending as a compressive test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental phase of the study included compressive tests on HTS/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide, 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, and 5052 aluminum honeycomb at room temperature, and tensile tests on graphite/polyimide at room temperature, -157 C, and 316 C. Elastic properties and strength data are presented for three laminates. The room temperature elastic properties were generally found to differ in tension and compression with Young's modulus values differing by as much as twenty-six percent. The effect of temperature on modulus and strength was shown to be laminate dependent. A three-dimensional finite element analysis predicted an essentially uniform, uniaxial compressive stress state in the top flange test section of the sandwich beam. In conclusion, the sandwich beam can be used to obtain accurate, reliable Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio data for advanced composites; however, the ultimate compressive stress for some laminates may be influenced by the specimen geometry.

  1. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  2. Measurements of the toroidal plasma rotation velocity in TFTR major-radius compression experiments with auxiliary neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Wong, K.L.; Scott, S.; Hsuan, H.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Tait, G.

    1990-01-01

    The time history of the central toroidal plasma rotation velocity in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2587 (1985)] with auxiliary heating by neutral deuterium beam injection and major-radius compression has been measured from the Doppler shift of the emitted Ti XXI Kα line radiation. The experiments were conducted for neutral beam powers in the range 2.1--3.8 MW and line-averaged densities in the range 1.8--3.0x10 19 m -2 . The observed rotation velocity increase during compression is consistent with theoretical estimates

  3. Performance of 2D Compressive Sensing on Wide-Beam Through-the-Wall Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Cristofani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing has become an accepted and powerful alternative to conventional data sampling schemes. Hardware simplicity, data, and measurement time reduction and simplified imagery are some of its most attractive strengths. This work aims at exploring the possibilities of using sparse vector recovery theory for actual engineering and defense- and security-oriented applications. Conventional through-the-wall imaging using a synthetic aperture configuration can also take advantage of compressive sensing by reducing data acquisition rates and omitting certain azimuth scanning positions. An ultra-wideband stepped frequency system carrying wide beam antennas performs through-the-wall imaging of a real scene, including a hollow concrete block wall and a corner reflector behind it. Random downsampling rates lower than those announced by Nyquist’s theorem both in the fast-time and azimuth domains are studied, as well as downsampling limitations for accurate imaging. Separate dictionaries are considered and modeled depending on the objects to be reconstructed: walls or point targets. Results show that an easy interpretation of through-the-wall scenes using the -norm and orthogonal matching pursuit algorithms is possible thanks to the simplification of the reconstructed scene, for which only as low as 25% of the conventional SAR data are needed.

  4. Nuclotron Beam Momentum Estimation Using Multiwire Proportional Chambers and Drift Chambers in the BM@N Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapishin, Mikhail; Lenivenko, Vasilisa; Palichik, Vladimir; Voytishin, Nikolay

    2018-02-01

    The BM@N experiment is considered as the first phase of NICA Mega science project. The energy of the beam will vary from 1 to 6 GeV/u. The beams delivered by Nuclotron will be of different types from protons to Au. The ability to reconstruct the beam momentum with high precision is one way for showing that the tracking detectors are tuned in the right way and the reconstruction procedure performs well. A quick overview of the experimental setup is given in the work along with the description of some of the main tracking detectors. The beam momentum reconstruction procedure is described and results are presented for different values of the beam energy.

  5. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF; Validacion en el Test Beam del CERN/GIF de la electronica de Lectura de las Camaras de Muones del Experimento CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M. c.; Marin, J.; Oller, J. C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L. J.

    2002-07-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  6. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  7. Estimates of post-acceleration longitudinal bunch compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A simple analytic method is developed, based on physical approximations, for treating transient implosive longitudinal compression of bunches of heavy ions in an accelerator system for ignition of inertial-confinement fusion pellet targets. Parametric dependences of attainable compressions and of beam path lengths and times during compression are indicated for ramped pulsed-gap lines, rf systems in storage and accumulator rings, and composite systems, including sections of free drift. It appears that for high-confidence pellets in a plant producing 1000 MW of electric power the needed pulse lengths cannot be obtained with rings alone unless an unreasonably large number of them are used, independent of choice of rf harmonic number. In contrast, pulsed-gap lines alone can meet this need. The effects of an initial inward compressive drift and of longitudinal emittance are included

  8. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  9. Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.

    2004-01-01

    The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K + beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25(micro) C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designed to produce a 2(micro)s rectangular 1 Ampere C s + beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K + , was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1mm radius spot at a

  10. CROSS DRIFT ALCOVE/NICHE UTILITIES ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Goodin

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the design basis and general arrangement requirements of the non-potable water, waste water, compressed air and ventilation (post excavation) utilities required in support of the Cross Drift alcoves and niches

  11. 2-D emittance equation with acceleration and compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.D.; Smith, L.

    1988-10-01

    Since both acceleration and compression are required for an Inertial Fusion Driver, the understanding of their effect on the beam quality, emittance, is important. This report attempts to generalize the usual emittance formula for the drifting beam to include these effects. The derivation of the 2-D emittance equation is carried out and a comparison with the particle code results is given. The 2-D emittance at a given axial location is reasonable to consider for a long beam, particularly with velocity tilt; transverse emittance averaged over the entire bunch is not a useful quantity. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Digital Beam Forming and Compressive Sensing Based DOA Estimation in MIMO Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents different processing schemes that have been investigated in order to evaluate the direction of arrival (DOA) with a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. Conventional digital beam forming (DBF) and super resolution algorithm (MUSIC) have been applied. The results provided

  13. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  14. Pulse line ion accelerator based design for the neutralized drift chamber experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, C. Y.; Yu, S. S.; Henestroza, E.; Grote, D. P.; Friedman, A.

    2009-04-01

    The pulse line ion accelerator (PLIA) is a promising approach to accelerating heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for the study of high energy density physics (HEDP) and warm dense matter in a cost effective way. In this paper we demonstrate a PLIA-based design for a proposed HEDP machine, the neutralized drift compression experiment II. The simulation results from the injector to the exit of the accelerator using the particle-in-cell code WARP are presented. We show how the traveling wave structure of PLIA suggests straightforward strategies in controlling the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the ion beam.

  15. Radial focusing and energy compression of a laser-produced proton beam by a synchronous rf field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a MeV laser-produced proton beam affected by a radio frequency (rf electric field has been studied. The proton beam was emitted normal to the rear surface of a thin polyimide target irradiated with an ultrashort pulsed laser with a power density of 4×10^{18}  W/cm^{2}. The energy spread was compressed to less than 11% at the full width at half maximum (FWHM by an rf field. Focusing and defocusing effects of the transverse direction were also observed. These effects were analyzed and reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results show that the transversely focused protons had a broad continuous spectrum, while the peaks in the proton spectrum were defocused. Based on this new information, we propose that elimination of the continuous energy component of laser-produced protons is possible by utilizing a focal length difference between the continuous spectral protons and the protons included in the spectral peak.

  16. Double compression system to increase beam quality in medical linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.; Ahmadizadeh, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The modern radiation therapy is now one of the most powerful tools for the treatment of tumors and cancers. During these treatments, the quality of the operation and the clinical requirements are critical. Here in the present work, based on the beam dynamics of the electrons in RF cavities, a new design for enhancing the quality of bunches is proposed. The simulation results show that the new design can increase the quality of the output bunches which consequently increase the quality of the radiotherapy treatment.

  17. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  18. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  19. Simulation of integrated beam experiment designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.; Sharp, W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of designs of an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) class accelerator have been carried out. These simulations are an important tool for validating such designs. Issues such as envelope mismatch and emittance growth can be examined in a self-consistent manner, including the details of injection, accelerator transitions, long-term transport, and longitudinal compression. The simulations are three-dimensional and time-dependent, and begin at the source. They continue up through the end of the acceleration region, at which point the data is passed on to a separate simulation of the drift compression. Results are be presented

  20. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  1. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows: application to baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations and to drift-flux model; Methodes de correction de pression pour les ecoulements compressibles: application aux equations de Navier-Stokes barotropes et au modele de derive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldo, L

    2007-11-15

    We develop in this PhD thesis a simulation tool for bubbly flows encountered in some late phases of a core-melt accident in pressurized water reactors, when the flow of molten core and vessel structures comes to chemically interact with the concrete of the containment floor. The physical modelling is based on the so-called drift-flux model, consisting of mass balance and momentum balance equations for the mixture (Navier-Stokes equations) and a mass balance equation for the gaseous phase. First, we propose a pressure correction scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations based on mixed non-conforming finite elements. An ad hoc discretization of the advection operator, by a finite volume technique based on a dual mesh, ensures the stability of the velocity prediction step. A priori estimates for the velocity and the pressure yields the existence of the solution. We prove that this scheme is stable, in the sense that the discrete entropy is decreasing. For the conservation equation of the gaseous phase, we build a finite volume discretization which satisfies a discrete maximum principle. From this last property, we deduce the existence and the uniqueness of the discrete solution. Finally, on the basis of these works, a conservative and monotone scheme which is stable in the low Mach number limit, is build for the drift-flux model. This scheme enjoys, moreover, the following property: the algorithm preserves a constant pressure and velocity through moving interfaces between phases (i.e. contact discontinuities of the underlying hyperbolic system). In order to satisfy this property at the discrete level, we build an original pressure correction step which couples the mass balance equation with the transport terms of the gas mass balance equation, the remaining terms of the gas mass balance being taken into account with a splitting method. We prove the existence of a discrete solution for the pressure correction step. Numerical results are presented; they

  2. Transmission and compression of an intense relativistic electron beam produced by a converging annular diode with return current feedback through the cathode. Pt. 2. The experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Schuch, R.L.

    1976-02-01

    The complete results of the experiments with the converging annular diode within return current fedback through the cathode (Triax) are reported herein. The diode was designed to focus a relativistic high-current electron beam to a small focus. It did confirm the Triaxial theory detailed in Part I, and it did achieve a factor of 10 areal compression with 50% efficiency (which was below expectations). There were two principal reasons for this shortfall. First, the rapid diode plasma motion of 10 cm/μsec that was discovered necessitated the use of larger A-K gaps than expected and led to thicker beam sheets than are needed for good focusing. Second, the intrinsic angular spread of the electrons, even from the best cathode surfaces, introduced excessive angular momentum into the beam so that only a minor portion of the electrons could reach the axis. However, the yield of useful information about diode physics in general and about the influence of prepulse, the role of diode plasmas, the motion of energetic beams within conducting boundaries, diode emission properties, and diode diagnostic techniques in particle has had a significant and useful impact on the electron beam program at Sandia

  3. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are consider...

  4. Effects of focused ion beam milling on the compressive behavior of directionally solidified micro-pillars and the nanoindentation response of an electro-polished surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Sang Hoon; Bei, Hongbin; Miller, Michael K; Pharr, George Mathews; George, Easo P

    2009-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling is the typical way in which micro-pillars are fabricated to study small-scale plasticity and size effects in uniaxial compression. However, FIB milling can introduce defects into the milled pillars. To investigate the effects of FIB damage on mechanical behavior, we tested Mo-alloy micro-pillars that were FIB milled following directional solidification, and compared their compressive response to pillars that were not FIB milled. We also FIB milled at glancing incidence a Mo-alloy single-crystal surface, and compared its nanoindentation response to an electro-polished surface of the same crystal. Consequences for the interpretation of data obtained from FIB milled micro-pillars are discussed

  5. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  6. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  7. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B ∼ 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  8. Single wire drift chamber design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krider, J.

    1987-03-30

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 ..mu..m rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles.

  9. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Postfach 11 19 32, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A R [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Varentsov, D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Udrea, S [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D H H [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Juranek, H [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Redmer, R [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Portugues, R F [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lomonosov, I [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Fortov, V E [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2003-06-06

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are considered to be the same as expected at the future SIS100 facility. The simulations show that due to multiple shock reflection between the cylinder axis and the lead-hydrogen boundary, one can achieve up to 20 times solid density in hydrogen while keeping the temperature as low as a few thousand K. The corresponding pressure is of the order of 10 Mbar. These values of the physical parameters lie within the range of theoretically predicted values for hydrogen metallization. We have also carried out a parameter study of this problem by varying the target and beam parameters over a wide range. It has been found that the results are very insensitive to such changes in the input parameters.

  10. Effects of γ irradiation on the compression and inter-laminar shear properties of G10 for the BESIII beam pipe supporting flange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lifang, E-mail: zhenglifang@ustb.edu.cn [University of Science & Technology of Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qiao, Zhiming [University of Science & Technology of Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Shijiazhuang Mechanical Engineering College, Shijiazhuang, 050003 (China); Xu, Xiaohui; Wang, Li [University of Science & Technology of Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • After γ irradiation, the epoxy resin matrix in G10 is destroyed; the connection between it and glass fibers loosens. • The compression strength drops. • The fragmentation and expansion of the resin matrix enhance the mutual sliding friction in G10. • The ILSS increases. - Abstract: Given their excellent electrical insulating performance and mechanical properties, G10 epoxy glass cloth-laminated sheets (G10) are used as spare materials for the supporting flange of the Beijing Spectrometer III beam pipe in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BECPII). However, during BECPII operation, the beam pipe suffers a significant amount of γ and neutron irradiation. Studies have demonstrated that when the G10 is exposed to γ irradiation for a sufficiently long time, the material will become damaged, and its mechanical properties will change. In the present work, the compression strength and inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of G10 samples were tested. Results showed that after 20 and 200 kGy γ irradiation, the compression strength decreased by 1.26% and 2.15%, respectively, whereas the ILSS increased by 16.17% and 17.95%, respectively. The micro-structural pattern of the samples was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The firm mesh structure of the epoxy resin matrix was destroyed, and the bonding interface between the glass fibers and the epoxy resin was damaged after γ irradiation. Some microcracks were observed in the glass fibers after γ irradiation. The epoxy resin before and after the irradiation was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that the degradation reaction was dominant during the irradiation compared with the cross-linking reaction in the epoxy resin, leading to the fracture of the molecular chain. The degree of binding between the epoxy resin also decreased.

  11. Source-to-target simulation of simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing of heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Welch

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal bunching factors in excess of 70 of a 300-keV, 27-mA K^{+} ion beam have been demonstrated in the neutralized drift compression experiment [P. K. Roy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 234801 (2005PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.234801] in rough agreement with particle-in-cell source-to-target simulations. A key aspect of these experiments is that a preformed plasma provides charge neutralization of the ion beam in the last one meter drift region where the beam perveance becomes large. The simulations utilize the measured ion source temperature, diode voltage, and induction-bunching-module voltage waveforms in order to determine the initial beam longitudinal phase space which is critical to accurate modeling of the longitudinal compression. To enable simultaneous longitudinal and transverse compression, numerical simulations were used in the design of the solenoidal focusing system that compensated for the impact of the applied velocity tilt on the transverse phase space of the beam. Complete source-to-target simulations, that include detailed modeling of the diode, magnetic transport, induction bunching module, and plasma neutralized transport, were critical to understanding the interplay between the various accelerator components in the experiment. Here, we compare simulation results with the experiment and discuss the contributions to longitudinal and transverse emittance that limit the final compression.

  12. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Olmos, P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  13. Effect of ion and ion-beam mass ratio on the formation of ion-acoustic solitons in magnetized plasma in the presence of electron inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, B. C.; Barman, S. N.

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized plasma with cold ions and ion-beams together with electron inertia has been investigated theoretically through the Korteweg-de Vries equation. Subject to the drift velocity of the ion beam, the existence of compressive solitons is found to become extinct as α (=cold ion mass/ion-beam mass) tends to 0.01 when γ=0.985 (γ is the beam velocity/phase velocity). Interestingly, a transitional direction of propagation of solitary waves has been unearthed for change over, from compressive solitons to rarefactive solitons based on α and σ υ (=cosine of the angle θ made by the wave propagation direction ξ with the direction of the magnetic field) for fixed Q(=electron mass/ion mass). Further, the direction of propagation of ion-acoustic waves is found to be the deterministic factor to admit compressive or rarefactive solitons subject to beam outsource.

  14. Broad-band beam buncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a broad-band beam buncher. This beam buncher consists of: a housing adapted to be eacuated, an electron gun in the housing for producing a beam of electrons, buncher means in the housing forming a buncher cavity which has an entrance opening for receiving the electron beam and an exit opening through which the electron beam passes out of the buncher cavity, a drift tube electrode in the buncher cavity and disposed between the entrance opening and the exit opening with first and second gaps between the drift tube electrode and the entrance and exit openings, the drift tube electrode which has a first drift space through which the electron beam passes in traveling between the entrance and exit openings, modulating means for supplying an ultrahigh frequeny modulating signal to the drift tube electrode for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the electron beam as the electrons pass through the buncher cavity and the drift tube electrode between the entrance opening and the exit opening, drift space means in the housing forming a second drift space for receiving the velocity modulated electron beam from the exit opening, the velocity modulated electron beam being bunched as it passes along the second drift space, the drift space means has a discharge opening through which the electron beam is discharged from the second drift space after being bunched therein, the modulating means containing a signal source for producing an ultrahigh frequency signal, a transmission line connected between the signal source and the drift tube electrode, and terminating means connected to the drift tube electrode for terminating the transmission line in approximately its characteristic impedance to afford a broad response band with minimum 6 variations therein

  15. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  16. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  17. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  18. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  19. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    A statistical description of the probable block sizes formed by fractures around the emplacement drifts has been developed for each of the lithologic units of the repository host horizon. A range of drift orientations with the drift azimuth varied in 15{sup o} increments has been considered in the static analysis. For the quasi-static seismic analysis, and the time-dependent and thermal effects analysis, two drift orientations have been considered: a drift azimuth of 105{sup o} and the current emplacement drift azimuth of 75{sup o}. The change in drift profile resulting from progressive deterioration of the emplacement drifts has been assessed both with and without backfill. Drift profiles have been determined for four different time increments, including static (i.e., upon excavation), 200 years, 2,000 years, and 10,000 years. The effect of seismic events on rock fall has been analyzed. Block size distributions and drift profiles have been determined for three seismic levels, including a 1,000-year event, a 5,000-year event, and a 10,000-year event. Data developed in this modeling and analysis activity have been entered into the TDMS (DTN: MO0109RDDAAMRR.003). The following conclusions have resulted from this drift degradation analysis: (1) The available fracture data are suitable for supporting a detailed key block analysis of the repository host horizon rock mass. The available data from the north-south Main Drift and the east-west Cross Drift provide a sufficient representative fracture sample of the repository emplacement drift horizon. However, the Tptpln fracture data are only available from a relatively small section of the Cross Drift, resulting in a smaller fracture sample size compared to the other lithologic units. This results in a lower degree of confidence that the key block data based on the Tptpln data set is actually representative of the overall Tptpln key block population. (2) The seismic effect on the rock fall size distribution for all events

  20. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic...

  1. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package

  2. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  3. Dynamics of layered reinforced concrete beam on visco-elastic foundation with different resistances of concrete and reinforcement to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Y. V.; Tikhonov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Originally, fundamentals of the theory of limit equilibrium and dynamic deformation of building metal and reinforced concrete structures were created by A. A. Gvozdev [1] and developed by his followers [4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12]. Forming the basis for the calculation, the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material has enabled to determine in many cases the ultimate load bearing capacity and upper (kinematically possible) or lower (statically valid) values for a wide class of different structures with quite simple methods. At the same time, applied to concrete structures the most important property of concrete to significantly differently resist tension and compression was not taken into account [10]. This circumstance was considered in [3] for reinforced concrete beams under conditions of quasistatic loading. The deformation is often accompanied by resistance of the environment in construction practice [8, 9]. In [2], the dynamics of multi-layered concrete beams on visco-elastic foundation under the loadings of explosive type is considered. In this work we consider the case which is often encountered in practical applications when the loadings weakly change in time.

  4. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  5. Drift in Diffusion Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Marchesoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The longstanding problem of Brownian transport in a heterogeneous quasi one-dimensional medium with space-dependent self-diffusion coefficient is addressed in the overdamped (zero mass limit. A satisfactory mesoscopic description is obtained in the Langevin equation formalism by introducing an appropriate drift term, which depends on the system macroscopic observables, namely the diffuser concentration and current. The drift term is related to the microscopic properties of the medium. The paradoxical existence of a finite drift at zero current suggests the possibility of designing a Maxwell demon operating between two equilibrium reservoirs at the same temperature.

  6. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    . We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  7. Continental drift before 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  8. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  9. Investigations of SPS orbit drifts

    CERN Document Server

    Drøsdal, L; Cornelis, K; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Wenninger, J; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is filled from the last pre-injector, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. Over the LHC injection processes, a drift of the beam trajectories has been observed in TI 2 and TI 8, requiring regular correction of the trajectories, in order to ensure clean injection into the LHC. Investigations of the trajectory variations in the transfer lines showed that the main source of short term trajectory drifts are current variations of the SPS extraction septa (MSE). The stability of the power converters has been improved, but the variations are still present and further improvements are being investigated. The stability over a longer period of time cannot be explained by this source alone. The analysis of trajectory variations shows that there are also slow variations in the SPS closed orbit at extraction. A set of SPS orbit measurements has been saved and analysed. These observations will be used together with simulations and observed field errors to locate the s...

  10. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  11. Cylindrical geometry for proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1975-06-01

    For experiments performed around storage rings such as e + e - rings or the ISR pp rings, cylindrical wire chambers are very attractive. They surround the beam pipe completely without any dead region in the azimuth, and fit well with the geometry of events where particles are more or less spherically produced. Unfortunately, cylindrical proportional or drift chambers are difficult to make. Problems are discussed and two approaches to fabricating the cathodes are discussed. (WHK)

  12. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  13. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  14. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  15. Development of a prototype tapered cell drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blissett, J.A.; Hasell, D.K.; Kendall, E.W.; Payne, B.T.; Saxon, D.H.

    1984-06-01

    Drift chamber cells have been constructed and tested using an electron test beam facility at DESY. The cells were operated under different voltage conditions and with different gas mixtures at 1 bar. Aspects of the construction and operation are discussed. Resolutions were typically less than 100 microns. The dependence of the drift cell resolution on distance from the sense wire and operating conditions are presented. (author)

  16. Development of a prototype tapered cell drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blissett, J.A.; Hasell, D.K.; Kendall, E.W.; Payne, B.T.; Saxon, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Drift chamber cells have been constructed and tested using an electron test beam facility at DESY. The cells were operated under different voltage conditions and with different gas mixtures at 1 bar. Aspects of the construction and operation are discussed. Resolutions were typically less than 100 μm. The dependence of the drift cell resolution on distance from the sense wire and operating conditions are presented. (orig.)

  17. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage (∼ 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10 11 cm -3 . The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K + ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments

  18. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Snydstrup, L.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the electron beam test stand (EBTS) project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory is to build a versatile device to develop technologies that are relevant for a high intensity electron beam ion source (EBIS) and to study the physics of ion confinement in a trap. The EBTS will have all the main attributes of EBIS: a 1-m-long, 5 T superconducting solenoid, electron gun, drift tube structure, electron collector, vacuum system, ion injection system, appropriate control, and instrumentation. Therefore it can be considered a short prototype of an EBIS for a relativistic heavy ion collider. The drift tube structure will be mounted in a vacuum tube inside a open-quotes warmclose quotes bore of a superconducting solenoid, it will be at room temperature, and its design will employ ultrahigh vacuum technology to reach the 10 -10 Torr level. The first gun to be tested will be a 10 A electron gun with high emission density and magnetic compression of the electron beam. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  20. Large planar drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, Gérard; Bréhin, S; Devaux, B; Diamant-Berger, Alain M; Leschevin, C; Maillard, J; Malbequi, Y; Martin, H; Patoux, A; Pelle, J; Plancoulaine, J; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René

    1977-01-01

    The authors describe 14 m/sup 2/ hexagonal planar drift chambers designed for the neutrino experiment of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg- Saclay Collaboration. Details on mechanical construction, electronic read-out, results on efficiency and accuracy are presented. (6 refs).

  1. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  2. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms...

  3. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  4. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  5. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  6. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Laso, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  7. Slow Drift-Oscillations of a Ship in Irregular Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd M. Faltinsen

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available A procedure to calculate horizontal slow drift excitation forces on an infinitely long horizontal cylinder in irregular beam sea waves is presented. The hydrodynamic boundary-value problem is solved correctly to second order in wave amplitude. Results in the form of second order transfer functions are presented for different, two-dimensional shapes. It is concluded that Newman's approximative method is a practical way to calculate slow drift excitation forces on a ship in beam sea and it is suggested that it may be used in a more general case. Applications of the results for moored ships are discussed.

  8. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  9. Compression of Ultrafast Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    pulse shaper construction are covered, including part selection, alignment , and calibration curve determination. This technical report also discusses...the theory, construction, and evaluation of 2 separate algorithms, a modified genetic algorithm and the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase...prism compressor and a single-prism compressor. One advantage of the single-prism compressor is that alignment is needed for one prism instead of two

  10. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  11. Intense Ion Beams for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimbucher, Lynn; Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K + ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of

  12. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  13. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  14. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  15. Drift chambers in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2017-01-01

    In first step, the radius vs drift time calibration curve is estimated and applied to calculate DCH hit closest approach coordinates. These coordinates are used to construct hits in each DCH under the assumption of track linearity. Hits in both the DCHs are subsequently aligned and fitted to produce global linear track candidates. Eventually the hit and track reconstruction is optimized by the autocalibration method. The coordinate resolutions are estimated from Gaussian fits of the DCH hit residual spectra for different DCH planes. Furthermore, the deuteron beam momentum value is reconstructed in order to check reliability of the employed track reconstruction algorithm.

  16. Autocalibration of high precision drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacci, C.; Bini, C.; Ciapetti, G.; De Zorzi, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Lacava, F.; Nisati, A.; Pontecorvo, L.; Rosati, S.; Veneziano, S.; Cambiaghi, M.; Casellotti, G.; Conta, C.; Fraternali, M.; Lanza, A.; Livan, M.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Vercesi, V.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results on MDT (monitored drift tubes) autocalibration studies obtained from the analysis of the data collected in Summer 1995 on the H8B Muon Test Beam. In particular we studied the possibility of autocalibration of the MDT using four or three layers of tubes, and we compared the calibration obtained using a precise external tracker with the output of the autocalibration procedure. Results show the feasibility of autocalibration with four and three tubes and the good accuracy of the autocalibration procedure. (orig.)

  17. Drifting black aurorae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoute-Vanneck, H.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of eastward drifting forms, previously described in the literature as black aurorae, have been identified in low-light level TV camera data. The TV field of view was within the field of view of STARE and that of an all-sky camera. On the basis of these observations the authors propose that these auroral forms are a manifestation of folds or waves on the borders of auroral bands propagating along the dark regions between neighboring auroral bands. Conditions under which the folds or waves occur are compatible with their formation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz electrostatic instability

  18. ABSTRACTION OF DRIFT SEEPAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Drift seepage refers to flow of liquid water into repository emplacement drifts, where it can potentially contribute to degradation of the engineered systems and release and transport of radionuclides within the drifts. Because of these important effects, seepage into emplacement drifts is listed as a ''principal factor for the postclosure safety case'' in the screening criteria for grading of data in Attachment 1 of AP-3.15Q, Rev. 2, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''. Abstraction refers to distillation of the essential components of a process model into a form suitable for use in total-system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this analysis/model is to put the information generated by the seepage process modeling in a form appropriate for use in the TSPA for the Site Recommendation. This report also supports the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report. The scope of the work is discussed below. This analysis/model is governed by the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000a). Details of this activity are in Addendum A of the technical work plan. The original Work Direction and Planning Document is included as Attachment 7 of Addendum A. Note that the Work Direction and Planning Document contains tasks identified for both Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO). Only the PAO tasks are documented here. The planning for the NEPO activities is now in Addendum D of the same technical work plan and the work is documented in a separate report (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The Project has been reorganized since the document was written. The responsible organizations in the new structure are the Performance Assessment Department and the Unsaturated Zone Department, respectively. The work plan for the seepage abstraction calls for determining an appropriate abstraction methodology, determining uncertainties in seepage, and providing

  19. Correction of Dopant Concentration Fluctuation Effects in Silicon Drift Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P G; Crescio, E; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A A; Montaño-Zetina, L M; Nilsen, B S; Piemonte, C; Rachevsky, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R

    2001-01-01

    Dopant fluctuations in silicon wafers are responsible for systematic errors in the determination of the particle crossing point in silicon drift detectors. In this paper, we report on the first large scale measurement of this effect by means of a particle beam. A significant improvement of the anodic resolution has been obtained by correcting for these systematic deviations.

  20. Analysis of the SPS Long Term Orbit Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velotti, Francesco [CERN; Bracco, Chiara [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Fraser, Matthew [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN

    2016-06-01

    The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is the last accelerator in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) injector chain, and has to deliver the two high-intensity 450 GeV proton beams to the LHC. The transport from SPS to LHC is done through the two Transfer Lines (TL), TI2 and TI8, for Beam 1 (B1) and Beam 2 (B2) respectively. During the first LHC operation period Run 1, a long term drift of the SPS orbit was observed, causing changes in the LHC injection due to the resulting changes in the TL trajectories. This translated into longer LHC turnaround because of the necessity to periodically correct the TL trajectories in order to preserve the beam quality at injection into the LHC. Different sources for the SPS orbit drifts have been investigated: each of them can account only partially for the total orbit drift observed. In this paper, the possible sources of such drift are described, together with the simulated and measured effect they cause. Possible solutions and countermeasures are also discussed.

  1. Preliminary test for the aging effects of drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MA Ji-Mao; WANG Yun-Yong; MAO Ze-Fe; LU Xin-Hua; XIE Pei-Pei; YAN Jie

    1985-01-01

    The degradation of some performance characteristics of drift chambers irradiated with a 5 MeV electron beam was tested. The gas mixtures Ar/CO 2 , Ar/CH 4 , and Ar/ iC 4 H 10 were used. The dark current, the pulse height, the energy resolution and the counting rate plateau were measured during the irradiation

  2. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  3. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  4. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  5. Velocity bunching of high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly

  6. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  7. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented

  8. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  9. Nonlinear theory of drift instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, T.

    1981-01-01

    In this chapter, we review recent works on the analytical and numerical analysis for the nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities. Only the case of a coherent wave is considered. Contributions to the turbulence theory for drift instabilities are already presented in Chapter 4. (author)

  10. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  11. Drift chamber and pulse height readout systems using analog multiplexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros, E.L; Kang, H.K.; Hall, J.N.; Larsen, R.S.

    1976-11-01

    Drift chamber and pulse-height readout systems are being developed for use in a new large scale detector at the SPEAR colliding beam facility. The systems are based upon 32 channels of sample-and-hold together with an analog multiplexer in a single-width CAMAC module. The modules within each crate are scanned by an autonomous controller containing a single ADC and memory plus arithmetic capability for offset, gain and linearity corrections. The drift chamber module has a facility for extracting hit wire information for use in trigger decision circuitry

  12. Assembly of Drift Tubes (DT) Chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid)

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2003-01-01

    The construction of muon drift tube chambers (DT) has been carried out in four different european institutes: Aachen (Germany), CIEMAT-Madrid (Spain), Legnaro and Turin (Italy), all of them following similar procedures and quality tests. Each chamber is composed by three or two independent units called superlayers, with four layers of staggered drift cells each. The assembly of a superlayer is a succesive glueing of aluminium plates and I-beams with electrodes previously attached, forming a rectangular and gas-tight volume. These pictures illustrate the various processes of material preparation, construction, equipment and assembly of full chambers at CIEMAT (Madrid).

  13. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime

  14. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  15. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  16. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  17. Drift-free MPEG-4 AVC semi-fragile watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnaoui, M.; Mitrea, M.

    2014-02-01

    While intra frame drifting is a concern for all types of MPEG-4 AVC compressed-domain video processing applications, it has a particular negative impact in watermarking. In order to avoid the drift drawbacks, two classes of solutions are currently considered in the literature. They try either to compensate the drift distortions at the expense of complex decoding/estimation algorithms or to restrict the insertion to the blocks which are not involved in the prediction, thus reducing the data payload. The present study follows a different approach. First, it algebraically models the drift distortion spread problem by considering the analytic expressions of the MPEG-4 AVC encoding operations. Secondly, it solves the underlying algebraic system under drift-free constraints. Finally, the advanced solution is adapted to take into account the watermarking peculiarities. The experiments consider an m-QIM semi-fragile watermarking method and a video surveillance corpus of 80 minutes. For prescribed data payload (100 bit/s), robustness (BER < 0.1 against transcoding at 50% in stream size), fragility (frame modification detection with accuracies of 1/81 from the frame size and 3s) and complexity constraints, the modified insertion results in gains in transparency of 2 dB in PSNR, of 0.4 in AAD, of 0.002 in IF, of 0.03 in SC, of 0.017 NCC and 22 in DVQ.

  18. Design and operation of a warm electron beam ion trap (WEBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.W.; Schneider, D.

    1993-01-01

    This contribution describes the operating principles and capabilities of a Non-Cryogenic or Warm Electron Beam Ion Trap (WEBIT). WEBIT is designed as a table top device capable of producing intermediately charged ions up to about Xe40 + at a rate of about 10 5 ions per second. WEBIT consists of an energetic electron beam that is compressed in a strong magnetic field, a potential trap and an ion extraction system. The electron beam ionizes the low-charge state ions via repeated collisions while its space charge confines the ions radially. The potential trap is such that the ions are trapped longitudinally within a potential well formed by the drift tubes. The ion extraction system consists of a focusing Einsel lens and a magnetic analyzer to momentum analyze the ions. Preliminary results for the production of highly charged ions are discussed

  19. The controlled-drift detector

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, A; Guazzoni, C; Longoni, A; Rehak, P; Strüder, L

    2000-01-01

    A new position-sensing X-ray detector is presented. The novel device is called Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD). The detector is fully depleted and is operated by switching between integration and drift modes. The relevant details of the detector design are discussed. A complete experimental characterization of the fast readout of the integrated signal charges achievable with static drift fields in the range 100-400 V/cm has been carried out. Preliminary measurements to evaluate the charge-handling capacity are also shown. The CDD can provide unambiguous two-dimensional position measurement, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time resolution below 1 ms.

  20. The controlled-drift detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castoldi, A. E-mail: andrea.castoldi@polimi.it; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Longoni, A.; Rehak, P.; Strueder, L

    2000-01-11

    A new position-sensing X-ray detector is presented. The novel device is called Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD). The detector is fully depleted and is operated by switching between integration and drift modes. The relevant details of the detector design are discussed. A complete experimental characterization of the fast readout of the integrated signal charges achievable with static drift fields in the range 100-400 V/cm has been carried out. Preliminary measurements to evaluate the charge-handling capacity are also shown. The CDD can provide unambiguous two-dimensional position measurement, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time resolution below 1 ms.

  1. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  2. Dφ vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D OE experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO 2 (95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with [9.74+8.68(|E|-1.25)] μm/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < |E| z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 μm or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 μm. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  3. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  4. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator's lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement

  5. Imaging riometer observations of drifting absorption patches in the morning sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Makarevitch

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by a 7x7-beam imaging riometer in Kilpisjärvi, Finland (~66° MLAT of the drifting cosmic noise absorption (CNA structures in the morning sector near the zonal drift reversals are presented. The examination of the absorption intensity images revealed several regions with enhanced CNA (absorption patches slowly drifting through the riometer field of view (FoV. The absorption patches were found to vary in shape, orientation (for elongated arc-like patches, and drift direction. The latter was calculated from the regression lines to positions of the absorption maxima in the FoV images and compared with the direction of electrojet plasma flow from horizontal magnetic perturbations and (for one event tristatic ion drift velocities in the F-region. A reasonable agreement was found between these directions both in point-by-point comparisons and in terms of direction reversal timings. The absorption patches of lower intensity appear to have smaller drift velocities and to be associated with weaker magnetic perturbations. These results are consistent with the notion that relatively slow motions of the auroral absorption near the zonal drift reversals are associated with the drift of the entire magnetic flux tube as opposed to the gradient-curvature drift of energetic electrons injected into the ionosphere at the substorm onset. The absorption drift velocity magnitude, on the other hand, was found to be substantially lower than that of the plasma flow based on the results of limited comparison with tristatic ion drift measurements. A comparison of the drift directions with those of the patch elongation showed that a considerable number of patches had these directions close to each other. Using this observation, we demonstrate a satisfactory agreement between the patch drift velocities (both in direction and magnitude as determined from the absorption images and keograms under the assumption that some patches were propagating in a direction

  6. Pulsar bi-drifting: implications for polar cap geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    For many years it has been considered puzzling how pulsar radio emission, supposedly created by a circulating carousel of sub-beams, can produce the drift bands demonstrated by PSR J0815+0939, and more recently PSR B1839-04, which simultaneously drifts in opposing directions. Here, we suggest that the carousels of these pulsars, and hence their beams, are not circular but elliptical with axes tilted with respect to the fiducial plane. We show that certain relatively unusual lines of sight can cause bi-drifting to be observed, and a simulation of the two known exemplars is presented. Although bi-drifting is rare, non-circular beams may be common among pulsars and reveal themselves by having profile centroids displaced from the fiducial plane identified by polarization position angle swings. They may also result in profiles with asymmetric- and frequency-dependent component evolution. It is further suggested that the carousels may change their tilt by specific amounts and later reverse them. This may occur suddenly, accompanying a mode change (e.g. PSR B0943+10), or more gradually and short lived as in `flare' pulsars (e.g. PSR B1859+07). A range of pulsar behaviour (e.g. the shifting drift patterns of PSRs B0818-41 and B0826-34) may also be the result of non-circular carousels with varying orientation. The underlying nature of these carousels - whether they are exclusively generated by polar cap physics or driven by magnetospheric effects - is briefly discussed.

  7. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms.

  8. Development of a tapered cell drift chamber. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blissett, J.A.; Hasell, D.K.; Parham, A.G.; Payne, B.T.; Saxon, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Several designs for drift cells have been constructed and tested in an electron beam at DESY. The designs tested consisted of pairs of adjacent tapered cells, of eight sense wires each, to simulate a portion of a layer of drift cells in a central tracking detector. For operation in a magnetic field three different tilts for the plane of the sense wires (0 0 , 20 0 and 45 0 ) were used. Tests were made to study the operation and resolution of the drift cells under a variety of conditions. Ar:C 2 H 6 (50:50) and Ar:CO 2 :CH 4 (90:9:1) gas mixtures were used at absolute pressures of 1 to 4 bar for the former and at 1 bar for the latter. Measurements were made at different electric drift fields in conjunction with magnetic fields varying from 0 to 1.82 T. Aspects of the construction, electronics and operation are discussed and results regarding the resolution as a function of drift distance and operating conditions are presented with some model calculation. (orig.)

  9. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  10. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    1999-02-26

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause.

  11. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory's multiparticle spectrometer drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etkin, A.; Kramer, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A system of drift chambers is being built to replace the present spark chambers in the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Multiparticle Spectrometer. This system will handle a beam of approx. 3 million particles per second and have a resolution of 200 μm. A summary of the status of the chambers and the custom integrated circuits is presented. The data acquisition system is described. Prototype chambers have been built and tested with results that are consistent with the expected chamber properties

  13. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates and in Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00213689; Horvat, S.; Legger, F.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Richter, R.; Valderanis, Ch.; Rauscher, F.; Staude, A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer uses drift-tube chambers for precision tracking. The performance of these chambers in the presence of magnetic field and high radiation fluxes is studied in this article using test-beam data recorded in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The measurements are compared to detailed predictions provided by the Garfield drift-chamber simulation programme.

  14. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  15. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  16. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  17. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  18. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  19. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Gianfelice Wendt, E; Cornelis, K; Norderhaug Drosdal, L; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Papaphilippou, Y; Wenninger, J

    2014-01-01

    Beside producing beams for fixed target operation, the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) accelerates beams for injection into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During the 2012-2013 run drifts of the extracted beam horizontal trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. The feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, has been therefore investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed. As the observed drift is mainly horizontal, the horizontal plane only will be considered.

  20. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab; Bartosik, Hannes [CERN; Cornelis, Karel [CERN; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene [CERN; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Papaphilippou, Yannis [CERN; Wenninger, Jorg [CERN

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  1. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  2. Electronic circuits for recording signals from drift chambers of a neutrino calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnin, Yu.B.; Isaev, A.N.; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Marchikhin, N.K.; Sen'ko, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Electronic circuits for data acquisition from the system of neutrino calorimeter drift chambers are described. The equipment contains forming amplifiers, 24-input moduli of time-to-digital converters providing the quantization of 10 ns per a count and a computer-controlled timing generator. The system equipment for 1500 signal wires are located in 8 ''Vector'' crates and provide recording of up to 64 singnals from each drift chamber plane during one accelerator beam extraction period

  3. Measurement of drift mobility and life time of electrons in tetramethylsilane samples made in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, A.I.; Balakin, A.A.; Gorbatko, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    A possibility to apply domestic tetramethylsilane (TMS) in liquid ionization detectors as a working medium is investigated. Results of measuring the drift mobility and electron lifetime in TMS-samples, irradiated with 5 MeV energy electron beam are presented. It is ascertained, that drift mobility makes up 90 cm 2 /sxv, the lifetime constant is approximately equal to 7x10 -6 s. The results obtained allow one to conclude, that TMS application in ionizing detectors is possible

  4. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Correa-Restrepo, Dario

    1996-01-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T v (x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  5. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  6. A 55 cm{sup 2} cylindrical silicon drift detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ceretto, F. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Faschingbauer, U. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wurm, J.P. [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Castoldi, A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Departimento di Fisica, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gatti, E. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    1996-08-01

    AZTEC, a large area cylindrical silicon drift detector was designed, produced and tested. AZTEC will be the building block of the NA45 and WA98 micro vertex detectors at CERN. Two AZTEC detectors are placed down stream from the target to measure trajectories of charged particles produced in the forward direction. The active area of AZTEC is practically the full usable surface of a 100 mm diameter wafer. The electrons drift radially from the center towards the outside. The sensing anodes are located at a radius of 42 mm. The center of the wafer is cut out and forms a passage for the noninteracting beam. With a minimal radius for this hole the active region of the drift detector starts at an inner radius of 3.1 mm. Any larger radius can be selected if necessary. With this geometry and a typical operating voltage the maximum drift time is less than 4 {mu}s. Due to constrains in the mask layout the readout region and field electrodes are designed along the 360 sides of a symmetric polygon. All structures on one surface of the wafer are rotated by 0.5 with respect to the other surface. In the middle plane of the detector, where the electrons are mostly transported, the effective geometry is close to a smoothed polygon with 720 sides, cancelling practically all effects of the non-perfect cylindrical symmetry. The radial position of fast charged particles is measured by the electron drift time within the detector. The drift velocity can be monitored by 48 injection points at three different radii. The azimuthal angle is measured by the 360 readout anodes. Each anode is subdivided into five segments, which are interlaced with the neighbouring anodes. By this methode the azimuthal resolution is improved and corresponds to a 720 channel read out. (orig.).

  7. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  8. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10 12 Ω cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  9. Review of semiconductor drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Emilio; Rehak, Pavel

    2005-04-01

    A short review of semiconductor drift detectors is given. The emphasis is given to detectors intended for tracking of fast charged particles for experiments in particle physics and high energy heavy-ion physics. The use and performance of this kind of detector in past, present and future experiments is described together with the experience learned during the design, production and data taking phases.

  10. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  11. The Continental Drift Convection Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents, and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson Cycle). Highly developed but realistic numerical models cannot resolve if continents respond passively to mantle convection or whether they modulate flow. Our simplified numerical model addresses this problem: A thermally insulating continent floats on a stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties in a chamber 8 times longer than its depth. The continent moves back and forth across the chamber driven by a "continental drift convection cell" of a form not previously described. Subduction exists at the upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent. Fluid moves with the continent in the upper region of this cell with return flow near the bottom. Many continent/subduction regions on Earth have these features. The drifting cell enhances vertical heat transport by approximately 30% compared to a fixed continent, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and significantly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences. However, continent drift or fixity has smaller effects on profiles of horizontally averaged temperature. Although calculations are done at Rayleigh numbers lower than expected for Earth's mantle (2x105 and 106), the drift speed extrapolates to reasonable Wilson Cycle speeds for larger Ra.

  12. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  13. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  14. First results from the DRIFT-1 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, R.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Lawson, T.B.; Martoff, C.J.; Morgan, B.; Paling, S.M.; Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Spooner, N.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    DRIFT-I is the world's first WIMP dark matter detector with sensitivity to the direction of nuclear recoils. This article discusses the DRIFT-I detector, and presents some preliminary data from underground engineering runs

  15. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  16. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  17. Application of bulk high-TC superconductors to electron beam ion sources: present status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Terada, Masashi; Endo, Atsumi; Nakai, Yoichi; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Ken-ichiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an electron beam ion source (EBIS) assembling three rings made of high-T C superconductor as a solenoid, which enables us to construct a 'table-top' EBIS operated at the liquid N 2 temperature with a strong magnetic field. Optimizing a pulse field magnetization procedure, the assembly yielded a magnetic field as high as 0.8 T under a persistent mode, which stably lasted more than two days. An electron beam of 12 keV-50 mA was successfully compressed and guided by the magnetic field along the axis of the drift tube and 'soft-landed' on an electron collector with a collection efficiency of more than 99%. As a result, highly charged ions such as Ar 17+ and Xe 42+ have been produced and extracted

  18. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  19. Ultrahigh Pressure Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Laser-based dynamic compression provides a new opportunity to study the lattice structure and other properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions ranging from 100 - 1000 GPa (1 TPa) and beyond. Such studies have fundamental applications to understanding the Earth's core as well as the interior structure of super-Earths and giant planets. This talk will review recent dynamic compression experiments using high-powered lasers on materials including Fe-Si, MgO, and SiC. Experiments were conducted at the Omega laser (University of Rochester) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford). At Omega, laser drives as large as 2 kJ are applied over 10 ns to samples that are 50 microns thick. At peak compression, the sample is probed with quasi-monochromatic X-rays from a laser-plasma source and diffraction is recorded on image plates. At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a 40-J laser with a 10-ns pulse. The sample is probed with X-rays form the LCLS free electron laser providing 1012 photons in a monochromatic pulse near 10 keV energy. Diffraction is recorded using pixel array detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray beam, the sample can be probed at various times relative to the shock wave transiting the sample. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Ramp compression produces less heating than shock compression, allowing samples to be probed to ultrahigh pressures without melting. Results for iron alloys, oxides, and carbides provide new constraints on equations of state and phase transitions that are relevant to the interior structure of large, extrasolar terrestrial-type planets.

  20. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  1. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation

  2. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Y [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ball, B; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Gregory, J [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beretta, M [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P P M [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brandenburg, G W; Fries, T; Costa, J Guimaraes da; Harder, S; Huth, J [Harvard University, Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ceradini, F [INFN Roma Tre and Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Hazen, E [Boston University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, L E [Brandeis University, Department of Physics, Waltham, MA (United States); Koenig, A C [Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef, Dept. of Exp. High Energy Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lanza, A [INFN Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Mikenberg, G [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot (Israel)], E-mail: brandenburg@physics.harvard.edu (and others)

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 {mu}m, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at p{sub T}= 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  3. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Beretta, M; Boterenbrood, H; Brandenburg, G W; Ceradini, F; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Fries, T; Gregory, J; Guimarães da Costa, J; Harder, S; Hazen, E; Huth, J; Jansweijer, P P M; Kirsch, L E; König, A C; Lanza, A; Mikenberg, G; Oliver, J; Posch, C; Richter, R; Riegler, W; Spiriti, E; Taylor, F E; Vermeulen, J; Wadsworth, B; Wijnen, T A M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 microns, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT = 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  4. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Je, U.K.; Lee, M.S.; Cho, H.S.; Hong, D.K.; Park, Y.O.; Park, C.K.; Cho, H.M.; Choi, S.I.; Woo, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality

  5. Carrier-envelope Phase Drift Detection of Picosecond Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A bandwidth-independent, linear and scalable method for carrier-envelope phase drift measurement demonstrated. Our experiments reveal that carrier-envelope phase drift of a picosecond pulse train can be directly obtained from the spectrally resolved interference pattern of a length-stabilized multiple-beam interferometer. The retrieved phase from the pattern correlates well with the strongly CEP-sensitive coupling signal between the frequency combs of the picosecond oscillator and an ultra-high finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer. Our results can lead to the generation of a robust CEP-stabilized seed pulse train for high resolution comb spectroscopy as well as to compact Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

  6. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  7. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  8. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N2). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  9. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Ambrose, D.; Arroyo, C.; Bachman, M.; Connor, D.; Eckhause, M.; Ecklund, K.M.; Graessle, S.; Hamela, M.; Hamilton, S.; Hancock, A.D.; Hartman, K.; Hebert, M.; Hoff, C.H.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kanematsu, N.; Kuang, Y.; Lee, R.; Marcin, M.; Martin, R.D.; McDonough, J.; Milder, A.; Molzon, W.R.; Ouimette, D.; Pommot-Maia, M.; Proga, M.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Rubin, P.D.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5-mm-diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds

  10. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, K. E-mail: lang@mail.hep.utexas.edu; Ambrose, D.; Arroyo, C.; Bachman, M.; Connor, D.; Eckhause, M.; Ecklund, K.M.; Graessle, S.; Hamela, M.; Hamilton, S.; Hancock, A.D.; Hartman, K.; Hebert, M.; Hoff, C.H.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kanematsu, N.; Kuang, Y.; Lee, R.; Marcin, M.; Martin, R.D.; McDonough, J.; Milder, A.; Molzon, W.R.; Ouimette, D.; Pommot-Maia, M.; Proga, M.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Rubin, P.D.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S

    2004-04-21

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5-mm-diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds.

  11. Resolution and Efficiency of the ATLAS Muon Drift-Tube Chambers at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, M.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Manz, A.; Mohrdieck-Mock, S.; Rauscher, F.; Richter, Robert; Staude, A.; Stiller, W.

    2016-01-01

    The resolution and efficiency of a precision drift-tube chamber for the ATLAS muon spectrometer with final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in a 100 GeV muon beam and at photon irradiation rates of up to 990 Hz/square cm which corresponds to twice the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. A silicon strip detector telescope was used as external reference in the beam. The pulse-height measurement of the read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections which lead to an improvement of the average drift-tube resolution from 104 microns to 82 microns without irradiation and from 128 microns to 108 microns at the maximum expected rate. The measured drift-tube efficiency agrees with the expectation from the dead time of the read-out electronics up to the maximum expected rate.

  12. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  13. Drift vortices in continuous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernousenko, V.M.; Chernenko, I.V.; Chernyshenko, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation into the problems of large-scale cortex drift and generation in continuous media based on the solution of notably non-linear differential equations. Using the capability of the modern computer technique it is possible to consider a series of cases with regard to medium viscosity and its inhomogeneity and with regard to three-dimensional vortex nature. Based on the solutions obtained the large-scale steady-state vortex generation processes are considered. The results can be used when studying non-linear phenomena in plasma and processes of substance and energy transfer in non-equilibrium media. 16 refs.; 5 figs

  14. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  15. Managing Capacity by Drift Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ormeci Matoglu, Melda; Vande Vate, John

    2009-01-01

    We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem and seek a policy that minimizes the long-term average cost. We assume the controller can, at some cost, shift the processing rate among a finite set of alternatives by, for example, adding or removing staff, increasing or reducing the number of shifts or opening or closing production lines. The controller incurs a cost for capacity per unit time and a delay cost that reflects th...

  16. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  17. Drift chambers for a precision measurement of the Michel parameters in muon decay

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Y; Comyn, M; Depommier, P; Doornbos, J; Faszer, W; Gagliardi, C A; Gill, D R; Green, P; Gumplinger, P; Hardy, J C; Hasinoff, M D; Helmer, R; Henderson, R; Khruchinsky, A; Kitching, P; Koetke, D D; Korkmaz, E J; Lachin, Yu Yu; Maas, D; MacDonald, J A; MacDonald, R; Manweiler, R; Marshall, G; Mathie, E L; Miassoedov, L; Musser, J R; Nord, P M; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Ottewell, D; Porcelli, T; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Price, G; Quraan, M A; Rodning, N L; Schaapman, J; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Sobratee, F; Soukup, J; Stanislaus, T D S; Stinson, G M; Tacik, R; Torokhov, V D; Tribble, R E; Vasilev, M A; Walter, H C; Wright, D

    2001-01-01

    Planar drift chambers will be used in a solenoidal magnetic field to measure the Michel parameters in muon decay. The chamber manufacture procedure uses flat glass tables and precise ceramic glass spacers to provide precise anode-cathode spacing. Results of bench and beam tests of the prototype chambers are discussed.

  18. Drift chambers for a precision measurement of the Michel parameters in muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, Yu.; Andersson, W.; Comyn, M.; Depommier, P.; Doornbos, J.; Faszer, W.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gill, D.R.; Green, P.; Gumplinger, P.; Hardy, J.C.; Hasinoff, M.; Helmer, R.; Henderson, R.; Khruchinsky, A.; Kitching, P.; Koetke, D.D.; Korkmaz, E.; Lachin, Yu.; Maas, D.; Macdonald, J.A.; MacDonald, R.; Manweiler, R.; Marshall, G.; Mathie, E.L.; Miassoedov, L.; Musser, J.R.; Nord, P.; Olin, A.; Openshaw, R.; Ottewell, D.; Porcelli, T.; Poutissou, J-M.; Poutissou, R.; Price, G.; Quraan, M.A.; Rodning, N.L.; Schaapman, J.; Selivanov, V.; Sheffer, G.; Shin, B.; Sobratee, F.; Soukup, J.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Stinson, G.; Tacik, R.; Torokhov, V.; Tribble, R.E.; Vasiliev, M.A.; Walter, H.C.; Wright, D.

    2001-01-01

    Planar drift chambers will be used in a solenoidal magnetic field to measure the Michel parameters in muon decay. The chamber manufacture procedure uses flat glass tables and precise ceramic glass spacers to provide precise anode-cathode spacing. Results of bench and beam tests of the prototype chambers are discussed

  19. Drift chambers for a precision measurement of the Michel parameters in muon decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, Yu. E-mail: davydov@triumf.ca; Andersson, W.; Comyn, M.; Depommier, P.; Doornbos, J.; Faszer, W.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gill, D.R.; Green, P.; Gumplinger, P.; Hardy, J.C.; Hasinoff, M.; Helmer, R.; Henderson, R.; Khruchinsky, A.; Kitching, P.; Koetke, D.D.; Korkmaz, E.; Lachin, Yu.; Maas, D.; Macdonald, J.A.; MacDonald, R.; Manweiler, R.; Marshall, G.; Mathie, E.L.; Miassoedov, L.; Musser, J.R.; Nord, P.; Olin, A.; Openshaw, R.; Ottewell, D.; Porcelli, T.; Poutissou, J-M.; Poutissou, R.; Price, G.; Quraan, M.A.; Rodning, N.L.; Schaapman, J.; Selivanov, V.; Sheffer, G.; Shin, B.; Sobratee, F.; Soukup, J.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Stinson, G.; Tacik, R.; Torokhov, V.; Tribble, R.E.; Vasiliev, M.A.; Walter, H.C.; Wright, D

    2001-04-01

    Planar drift chambers will be used in a solenoidal magnetic field to measure the Michel parameters in muon decay. The chamber manufacture procedure uses flat glass tables and precise ceramic glass spacers to provide precise anode-cathode spacing. Results of bench and beam tests of the prototype chambers are discussed.

  20. Design of a 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift tube Linac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole. (RFQ), and a 10 MeV drift tube Linac (DTL), which will be operated at 1.25% duty factor. Cell geometry of the DTL is optimized to house quadrupole magnets and to get maximum effective shunt impedance. Transmission efficiency and ...

  1. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I), and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations.

  2. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  3. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  4. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process

  5. The large cylindrical drift chamber of TASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.; Fischer, H.M.; Hartmann, H.; Loehr, B.; Wollstadt, M.; Fohrmann, R.; Schmueser, P.; Cassel, D.G.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.

    1980-03-01

    We have built and operated a large cylindrical drift chamber for the TASSO experiment at the DESY storage ring, PETRA. The chamber has a length of 3.5 m, a diameter of 2.5 m, and a total of 2340 drift cells. The cells are arranged in 15 concentric layers such that tracks can be reconstructed in three dimensions. A spatial resolution of 220 μm has been achieved for tracks of normal incidence on the drift cells. (orig.)

  6. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  7. Performance of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, , G.A.; Chen, W.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister; J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2008-10-20

    Several sets of hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) arrays were produced at BNL and by a commercial vendor, KETEK. Each array consists of 14 independent detectors (pixels) and two additional test pixels at two of the corners. The side of the detector upon which the X-ray radiation is incident (window side) has a thin junction covering the entire active area. The opposite side (device side) contains a drift-field electrode structure in the form of a hexagonal spiral and an electron collecting anode. There are 4 guard rings surrounding the 14-pixel array area on both sides of the detector. Within each array, 7 of the pixels have an aluminum field plate - interrupted spirals that stabilize the electric potential under the Si-SiO2 interface, while the other 7 do not. The drift field in the silicon volume is controlled by three biases: one is applied to a rectifying contact, one to the detector entrance window, and the third to a contact on the outer portion of the spiral common to all pixels in the array. Some arrays have been newly measured in NSLS beam line U3C at BNL. The complete assemblies were installed in the vacuum and cooled to ?27 C. During this run, spectra for energies ranging between 400 and 900 eV were collected in several pixels, some with field plates and others without. The detailed testing results of several arrays are reported here.

  8. Biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T M; Price, R M; Mead, L S; McElhinny, T L; Thanukos, A; Perez, K E; Herreid, C F; Terry, D R; Lemons, P P

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct misconceptions about genetic drift. The accuracy of students' conceptions ranges considerably, from responses indicating only superficial, if any, knowledge of any aspect of evolution to responses indicating knowledge of genetic drift but confusion about the nuances of genetic drift. After instruction, a significantly greater number of responses indicate some knowledge of genetic drift (p = 0.005), but 74.6% of responses still contain at least one misconception. We conclude by presenting a framework that organizes how students' conceptions of genetic drift change with instruction. We also articulate three hypotheses regarding undergraduates' conceptions of evolution in general and genetic drift in particular. We propose that: 1) students begin with undeveloped conceptions of evolution that do not recognize different mechanisms of change; 2) students develop more complex, but still inaccurate, conceptual frameworks that reflect experience with vocabulary but still lack deep understanding; and 3) some new misconceptions about genetic drift emerge as students comprehend more about evolution.

  9. Biology Undergraduates’ Misconceptions about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, T. M.; Price, R. M.; Mead, L. S.; McElhinny, T. L.; Thanukos, A.; Perez, K. E.; Herreid, C. F.; Terry, D. R.; Lemons, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates’ misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students’ definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct misconceptions about genetic drift. The accuracy of students’ conceptions ranges considerably, from responses indicating only superficial, if any, knowledge of any aspect of evolution to responses indicating knowledge of genetic drift but confusion about the nuances of genetic drift. After instruction, a significantly greater number of responses indicate some knowledge of genetic drift (p = 0.005), but 74.6% of responses still contain at least one misconception. We conclude by presenting a framework that organizes how students’ conceptions of genetic drift change with instruction. We also articulate three hypotheses regarding undergraduates’ conceptions of evolution in general and genetic drift in particular. We propose that: 1) students begin with undeveloped conceptions of evolution that do not recognize different mechanisms of change; 2) students develop more complex, but still inaccurate, conceptual frameworks that reflect experience with vocabulary but still lack deep understanding; and 3) some new misconceptions about genetic drift emerge as students comprehend more about evolution. PMID:22949422

  10. Development of a tapered cell drift chamber II: operation in high magnetic fields and different gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blissett, J.A.; Hasell, D.K.; Parham, A.G.; Payne, B.T.; Saxon, D.H.

    1985-11-01

    Several designs for drift cells have been constructed and tested in an electron beam at DESY. The designs tested consisted of pairs of adjacent tapered cells, of eight sense wires each, to simulate a portion of a layer of drift cells in a central tracking detector. Tests were made to study the operation and resolution of the drift cells under a variety of conditions. Ar:C 2 H 6 (50:50) and Ar:CO 2 :CH 4 (90:9:1) gas mixtures were used at absolute pressures of one to four bar for the former and at one bar for the latter. Measurements were made at different electric drift fields in conjunction with magnetic fields varying from 0 to 1.82 T. Aspects of the construction, electronics and operation are discussed and results regarding the resolution as a function of drift distance and operating conditions are presented with some model calculations. (author)

  11. Local Trigger Electronics for the CMS Drift Tubes Muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglini, R

    2003-01-01

    In the CMS detector in preparation for the CERN LHC collider, the Drift Tubes Muon Chambers are equipped with mini-crates hosting custom electronics for fast data processing and local trigger generation. In particular the Trigger Server of a DTC consists of Track Sorter Slave ASICs and a Track Sorter Master system. The trigger electronics boards are in production, to be ready for the muon detector installation in the CMS barrel starting at the end of 2003.In this work, the performance of the Trigger Server will be discussed, on the basis both of high-statistics tests with predefined patterns and of test beam data collected at CERN, where a DTC was exposed to a muon beam having an LHC-like bunch structure. Finally, some system performance expectations, concerning radiation tolerance and signal transmission issues during LHC running, will be also discussed.

  12. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  13. The Diagonal Compression Field Method using Circular Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    concrete beam. To illustrate the new design method, a specific example of a prestressed concrete beam is calcaluted. In the example it is shown, that the tradionel method with constant -values requires 23% more shear reinforcement than calculated by the new method using circular fan solutions.......In a concrete beam with transverse stirrups the shear forces are carried by inclined compression in the concrete. Along the tensile zone and the compression zone of the beam the transverse components of the inclined compressions are transferred to the stirrups, which are thus subjected to tension....... Since the eighties the diagonal compression field method has been used to design transverse shear reinforcement in concrete beams. The method is based on the lower-bound theorem of the theory of plasticity, and it has been adopted in Eurocode 2. The paper presents a new design method, which...

  14. Electron drift time in silicon drift detectors: A technique for high precision measurement of electron drift mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Rehak, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a precise absolute measurement of the drift velocity and mobility of electrons in high resistivity silicon at room temperature. The electron velocity is obtained from the differential measurement of the drift time of an electron cloud in a silicon drift detector. The main features of the transport scheme of this class of detectors are: the high uniformity of the electron motion, the transport of the signal electrons entirely contained in the high-purity bulk, the low noise timing due to the very small anode capacitance (typical value 100 fF), and the possibility to measure different drift distances, up to the wafer diameter, in the same semiconductor sample. These features make the silicon drift detector an optimal device for high precision measurements of carrier drift properties. The electron drift velocity and mobility in a 10 kΩ cm NTD n-type silicon wafer have been measured as a function of the electric field in the range of possible operation of a typical drift detector (167--633 V/cm). The electron ohmic mobility is found to be 1394 cm 2 /V s. The measurement precision is better than 1%. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Tsang, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  16. Silicon drift detectors with the drift field induced by pureB-coated trenches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanver, Lis Karen; Kneževi´c, Tihomir; Suligoj, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Junction formation in deep trenches is proposed as a new means of creating a built-in drift field in silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The potential performance of this trenched drift detector (TDD) was investigated analytically and through simulations, and compared to simulations of conventional

  17. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  18. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    In a statistical analysis pair correlation of particles is eventually destroyed by small scale fluctuations giving rise to relative particle diffusion. However, in any one given realization of the statistical ensemble particles may remain correlated in certain regions of space. A perfectly frozen......, two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation...... is proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence...

  19. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  20. Theory of suppression of loss cone instabilities by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.; Sinha, M.

    1981-01-01

    A new mechanism for the suppression of Drift Cyclotron Loss Cone instabilities by electron beams injected along the field lines is given. The mechanism explains some of the recent observations. (author)

  1. A Robust H.264/AVC Video Watermarking Scheme with Drift Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghao Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme for copyright protection with self-adaptive drift compensation is proposed. In our scheme, motion vector residuals of macroblocks with the smallest partition size are selected to hide copyright information in order to hold visual impact and distortion drift to a minimum. Drift compensation is also implemented to reduce the influence of watermark to the most extent. Besides, discrete cosine transform (DCT with energy compact property is applied to the motion vector residual group, which can ensure robustness against intentional attacks. According to the experimental results, this scheme gains excellent imperceptibility and low bit-rate increase. Malicious attacks with different quantization parameters (QPs or motion estimation algorithms can be resisted efficiently, with 80% accuracy on average after lossy compression.

  2. A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme with drift compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinghao; Sun, Tanfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Wan; Shi, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    A robust H.264/AVC video watermarking scheme for copyright protection with self-adaptive drift compensation is proposed. In our scheme, motion vector residuals of macroblocks with the smallest partition size are selected to hide copyright information in order to hold visual impact and distortion drift to a minimum. Drift compensation is also implemented to reduce the influence of watermark to the most extent. Besides, discrete cosine transform (DCT) with energy compact property is applied to the motion vector residual group, which can ensure robustness against intentional attacks. According to the experimental results, this scheme gains excellent imperceptibility and low bit-rate increase. Malicious attacks with different quantization parameters (QPs) or motion estimation algorithms can be resisted efficiently, with 80% accuracy on average after lossy compression.

  3. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-06

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoff, C.J.; Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Ohnuki, T.; Spooner, N.; Lehner, M.

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 μm has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with zero magnetic field. The method can provide high spatial resolution in detectors with long drift distances and zero magnetic field. Negative ion drift chambers would be particularly useful at low pressures and in situations such as space-based or underground experiments where detector size scaleability is important and cost, space, or power constraints preclude the use of a magnetic field

  5. Energy drift in reversible time integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, R I; Perlmutter, M

    2004-01-01

    Energy drift is commonly observed in reversible integrations of systems of molecular dynamics. We show that this drift can be modelled as a diffusion and that the typical energy error after time T is O(√T). (letter to the editor)

  6. Iceberg drift modelling in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenkova, Irina; Gusev, Anatoly; Fomin, Vladimir; Diansky, Nikolay; Korshenko, Evgeniya; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2017-04-01

    Iceberg drift model is developed in the N.N.Zubov State Oceanographic Institute (SOI) of the Roshydromet. The model is forced by atmospheric reanalysis data from the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and by ocean and sea ice data from the Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model (INMOM). The iceberg drift model is validated using observations of iceberg drift trajectory obtained during the annual expedition of RV Lance in the beginning of May 2009 in the Barents Sea. Field data collected in this expedition are also used for the modelling of iceberg drift. Verification tests with hindcast data from selected atmospheric and oceanic models and data from field studies were carried out to compare model predictions with field observations. Two different approaches are used to simulate iceberg drift. The first approach is a variation of wind and water drag coefficients in order to simulate the observed iceberg drift trajectory. High uncertainties in environmental driving forces and in iceberg shape and mass resulted in using ensemble forecast technique, which is the second approach to simulate the iceberg trajectory. The presented iceberg drift model shows a good capability of reproducing the observed iceberg drift.

  7. The high momentum spectrometer drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D.; Baker, O. K.; Beaufait, J.; Bennett, C.; Bryant, E.; Carlini, R.; Kross, B.; McCauley, A.; Naing, W.; Shin, T.; Vulcan, W.

    1992-12-01

    The High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C will use planar drift chambers for charged particle track reconstruction. The chambers are constructed using well understood technology and a conventional gas mixture. Two (plus one spare) drift chambers will be constructed for this spectrometers. Each chamber will contain 6 planes of readout channels. This paper describes the chamber design and gas handling system used.

  8. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  9. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorišin, Ján

    2018-02-01

    The drift chambers (DCH's) are an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH's are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  10. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons (1). Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  11. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor ...

  12. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  13. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2018-01-01

    The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH’s are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  14. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  15. Role of drifts in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The role played by shock-associated drifts during the diffusive acceleration of charged particles at collisionless MHD shocks is evaluated. In the rest frame of the shock, the total energy gained by a particle is shown to result from two coupled acceleration mechanisms, the usual first-order Fermi mechanism and the drift mechanism. When averaged over a distribution of particles, the ratio of the drift-associated energy gain to the total energy is found to be independent of the total energy at a given theta1 (the angle between the shock normal and the unperturbed upstream magnetic field) in agreement with theoretical predictions. No evidence is found for drift-associated deceleration, suggesting that drifts always augment acceleration. 35 references

  16. Low frequency fluid drift turbulence in magnetised plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.

    2001-03-01

    We start with the first principles of fluid dynamics and classical electrodynamics and then find the regime in which we can reduce to quasineutral dynamics, which also implicitly underlies MHD. Then, we find the limits under which we can specialise to the MHD model as a subset, first of two fluid dynamics, then of the fluid drift dynamics that results when the motions are not vigorous enough to compress the magnetic field. In Chapters 4 and 5 we find the basic character of small disturbances in this system. Chapters 6 through 9 treat various aspects of fluid drift turbulence, also called drift wave turbulence, moving from a simple consideration of the underlying nonlinear dynamics, to some methods by which one can diagnose computations to find out what is going on, and then to the nonlinear instability which is the hallmark of this physics, and then to the interactions with large scale sheared flows. Chapter 10 introduces interchange turbulence, which is the plasma analog of the buoyant convection well known from fluid dynamics. Chapters 11 through 13 treat electromagnetic drift wave turbulence in closed magnetic field geometry, starting with a simplified model treating only the electron pressure and then introducing the electron and ion temperatures. Chapter 14 treats the basic characteristics of the transport that results from fluid drift turbulence, as this is quite different from the kinetic diffusion, such as heat conduction, that is more familiar. Appendices A and B treat the details of the numerical methods and models of magnetic field geometry necessary to treat all but the simplest cases. For this subject is dominated by nonlinear physics and therefore numerical computation. Computations therefore form an integral part of its study right from the beginning. Citations to the literature are not intended to be comprehensive but to serve as starting points for further reading, a section for which is included in every chapter. Much of this work is very new, and

  17. Quasi-static drift-tube accelerating structures for low-speed heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1977-11-03

    The major attractions of the pulsed drift-tubes are that they are non-resonant structures and that they appear suitable for accelerating a very high current bunch at low energies. The mechanical tolerances of the non-resonant structure are very loose and the cost per meter should be low; the cost of the transport system is expected to be the major cost. The pulse power modulators used to drive the drift-tubes are inexpensive compared to r.f. sources with equivalent peak-power. The longitudinal emittance of the beam emerging from the structure could be extremely low.

  18. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  19. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  20. Absolute beam current monitoring in endstation c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochna, C.

    1995-01-01

    The first few experiments at CEBAF require approximately 1% absolute measurements of beam currents expected to range from 10-25μA. This represents errors of 100-250 nA. The initial complement of beam current monitors are of the non intercepting type. CEBAF accelerator division has provided a stripline monitor and a cavity monitor, and the authors have installed an Unser monitor (parametric current transformer or PCT). After calibrating the Unser monitor with a precision current reference, the authors plan to transfer this calibration using CW beam to the stripline monitors and cavity monitors. It is important that this be done fairly rapidly because while the gain of the Unser monitor is quite stable, the offset may drift on the order of .5μA per hour. A summary of what the authors have learned about the linearity, zero drift, and gain drift of each type of current monitor will be presented

  1. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  2. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming its existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, and ground

  3. Analysis of particle species evolution in neutral beam injection lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Haselton, H.H.

    1978-07-01

    Analytic solutions to the rate equations describing the species evolution of a multispecies positive ion beam of hydrogen due to charge exchange and molecular dissociation are derived as a function of the background gas (H 2 ) line density in the neutralizing gas cell and in the drift tube. Using the solutions, calculations are presented for the relative abundance of each species as a function of the gas cell thickness, the reionization loss rates in the drift tube, and the neutral beam power as a function of the beam energy and the species composition of the original ion beam

  4. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  5. New ORNL neutral beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.L.; Davis, R.C.; Haselton, H.H.; Schnechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The Princeton Large Torus (PLT) neutral beam injection systems have proven themselves to be a solid foundation on which next generation systems can be based. There are two areas in the new systems receiving particular emphasis: (a) increased power per beam line and (b) higher beam transmission efficiency. Two different methods are being investigated to improve the transmission efficiency. First the drift tube region, the region of the beam line between the vacuum chamber housing the ion source and the torus, is being enlarged. In this manner a second, large cryopump will be installed in the drift tube to lower the pressure to approx.10 -5 torr. Thus, neutral beam reionization on the background gas will be significantly reduced from the measured losses at a few 10 -4 torr of the PLT system. Second, the beam divergence will be reduced by application of one or more of three known techniques developed on a single aperture source in the laboratory. Each of these methods has shown a reduction in single beamlet divergence from theta/sub HWHM/ approx. 1 0 to approx.0.5 0 . The low beamlet divergence coupled with a differentially pumped drift tube will effectively accommodate the larger ion sources under development. All future beam line systems will benefit either directly or indirectly from the experience gained operating and upgrading the PLT beam line concept

  6. Drift-modeling and monitoring comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Congress is looking into the conglomeration of nuclear reactors into energy centers of limited area. Drift from cooling towers can corrode and damage structures in the immediate vicinity of the towers, cause a public nuisance if located near parking lots or high-density traffic areas, and endanger local vegetation. The estimation of salt deposition has relied primarily on predictions from a variety of models, with very few direct measurements. One of the major efforts in our program is to evaluate the assumptions, limitations, and applicabilities of various analytical models for drift deposition prediction. Several drift deposition models are compared using a set of standard input conditions. The predicted maximum drift deposition differs by two orders of magnitude, and the downwind locations of the maximum differ by one order of magnitude. The discrepancies are attributed mainly to different assumptions in the models regarding the initial effective height of the droplets. Current programs in which drift characteristics at the tower mouth and drift deposition downwind of the tower are being measured are summarized. At the present time, drift deposition measurements, sufficiently comprehensive for model verifications, are unavailable. Hopefully, the Chalk Point Program will satisfy this need

  7. Generation of an intense ion beam by a pinched relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilad, P.; Zinamon, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The pinched electron beam of a pulsed electron accelerator is used to generate an intense beam of ions. A foil anode and vacuum drift tube are used. The space charge field of the pinched beam in the tube accelerates ions from the foil anode. Ion currents of 10 kA at a density of 5kA/cm 2 with pulse length of 50 ns are obtained using a 5 kJ, 450 kV, 3 Ω diode. (author)

  8. Numerical analysis of nonlinear collisional drift instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi-kawa, K.I.; Hatori, T.; Terashima, Y.

    1978-04-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisional drift wave instability is studied numerically. Model equations of quasilinear type are used which describe the modification of background density and the amplitude of unstable drift wave. Their solutions are classified according to the value of a parameter (n) which is proportional to the ratio of ion viscous damping to linear growth rate. In the vicinity of marginal stability, the unstable drift waves are shown to be saturated by flattening of the background density. An N decreases further, periodic and later aperiodic solutions are obtained. The wave associated diffusion coefficient is obtained numerically as a function of N and found to be much less than the usual estimate.

  9. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Theory With Polarization Drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Hahm, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    A set of the electrostatic toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov equation and the Poisson equation, which explicitly includes the polarization drift, is derived systematically by using Lie-transform method. The polarization drift is introduced in the gyrocenter equations of motion, and the corresponding polarization density is derived. Contrary to the wide-spread expectation, the inclusion of the polarization drift in the gyrocenter equations of motion does not affect the expression for the polarization density significantly. This is due to modification of the gyrocenter phase-space volume caused by the electrostatic potential [T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4658 (1996)].

  10. Heuristic Drift Elimination for Personnel Tracking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Johann; Ojeda, Lauro

    This paper pertains to the reduction of the effects of measurement errors in rate gyros used for tracking, recording, or monitoring the position of persons walking indoors. In such applications, bias drift and other gyro errors can degrade accuracy within minutes. To overcome this problem we developed the Heuristic Drift Elimination (HDE) method, that effectively corrects bias drift and other slow-changing errors. HDE works by making assumptions about walking in structured, indoor environments. The paper explains the heuristic assumptions and the HDE method, and shows experimental results. In typical applications, HDE maintains near-zero heading errors in walks of unlimited duration.

  11. Pixelated CdZnTe drift detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2005-01-01

    A technique, the so-called Drift Strip Method (DSM), for improving the CdZnTe detector energy response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays was applied as a pixel geometry. First tests have confirmed that this detector type provides excellent energy resolution and imaging performance. We specifically...... report on the performance of 3 mm thick prototype CZT drift pixel detectors fabricated using material from eV-products. We discuss issues associated with detector module performance. Characterization results obtained from several prototype drift pixel detectors are presented. Results of position...

  12. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  13. Ultra-High Density Electron Beams for Beam Radiation and Beam Plasma Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Scott; Frigola, Pedro; Gibson, David J; Hartemann, Fred V; Jacob, Jeremy S; Lim, Jae; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Current and future applications of high brightness electron beams, which include advanced accelerators such as the plasma wake-field accelerator (PWFA) and beam-radiation interactions such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS), require both transverse and longitudinal beam sizes on the order of tens of microns. Ultra-high density beams may be produced at moderate energy (50 MeV) by compression and subsequent strong focusing of low emittance, photoinjector sources. We describe the implementation of this method used at LLNL's PLEIADES ICS x-ray source in which the photoinjector-generated beam has been compressed to 300 fsec duration using the velocity bunching technique and focused to 20 μm rms size using an extremely high gradient, permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) focusing system.

  14. The optimization of the electrostatic field inside the ZEUS forward drift chambers: Calculations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobberstein, M.P.; Krawczyk, F.; Schaefer-Jotter, M.

    1990-11-01

    The electrostatic field inside small drift cells shows in general edge effects which are not negligible. These are usually corrected by field shaping wires or strips. The operating voltages of the field shaping electrodes have to be adjusted to maximize the field homogeneity. We present the underlying ideas of such an optimization procedure for the cells of the ZEUS forward drift chambers. Using the finite difference code PROFI, the optimization can be performed automatically by a multiple solution of the Poisson equation. An experimental verification of the optimal voltages was carried out measuring the gas amplifications at the six sense wires. Modifications of the drift cell geometry were necessary for calibration measurements with a laser beam. This caused additional distortions of the electrostatic field. Their influence was calculated using the MAFIA code, which allows to include open boundary conditions. (orig.)

  15. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-02

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  16. Drift and Behavior of E. coli Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Gabriele; Colin, Rémy; Sourjik, Victor; Endres, Robert G.

    2017-12-01

    Chemotaxis of the bacterium Escherichia coli is well understood in shallow chemical gradients, but its swimming behavior remains difficult to interpret in steep gradients. By focusing on single-cell trajectories from simulations, we investigated the dependence of the chemotactic drift velocity on attractant concentration in an exponential gradient. While maxima of the average drift velocity can be interpreted within analytical linear-response theory of chemotaxis in shallow gradients, limits in drift due to steep gradients and finite number of receptor-methylation sites for adaptation go beyond perturbation theory. For instance, we found a surprising pinning of the cells to the concentration in the gradient at which cells run out of methylation sites. To validate the positions of maximal drift, we recorded single-cell trajectories in carefully designed chemical gradients using microfluidics.

  17. Stabilization Strategies for Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085420; Lamehi Rashti, Mohammad

    The average axial electric fields in drift tube linac cavities are known to be sensitive with respect to the perturbation errors. Postcoupler is a powerful stabilizer devices that is used to reduce this sensitivity of average axial field. Postcouplers are the cylindrical rod which is extended from cavity wall toward the drift tube without touching the drift tube surface. Postcouplers need to be adjusted to the right length to stabilize the average axial field. Although postcouplers are used successfully in many projects, there is no straightforward procedure for postcouplers adjustment and it has been done almost based on trial and errors. In this thesis, the physics and characteristics of postcouplers has been studied by using an equivalent circuit model and 3D finite element method calculations. Finally, a straightforward and accurate method to adjust postcouplers has been concluded. The method has been verified by using experimental measurements on CERN Linac4 drift tube linac cavities.

  18. Operational beams for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y.; Rumolo, G.; Manglunki, D.

    2014-01-01

    The variety of beams, needed to set-up in the injectors as requested in the LHC, are reviewed, in terms of priority but also performance expectations and reach during 2015. This includes the single bunch beams for machine commissioning and measurements (probe, Indiv) but also the standard physics beams with 50 ns and 25 ns bunch spacing and their high brightness variants using the Bunch Compression Merging and Splitting (BCMS) scheme. The required parameters and target performance of special beams like the doublet for electron cloud enhancement and the more exotic 8b$\\oplus$4e beam, compatible with some post-scrubbing scenarios are also described. The progress and plans for the LHC ion production beams during 2014-2015 are detailed. Highlights on the current progress of the setting up of the various beams are finally presented with special emphasis on potential performance issues across the proton and ion injector chain.

  19. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  20. Neutron recoils in the DRIFT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Ohnuki, T.; Rykoff, E.S.; Martoff, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Directional Recoil Identification From Tracks (DRIFT) project is an endeavor to build and operate a low pressure negative ion TPC to search for weakly interacting massive particles thought to make up the dark matter in our Galaxy. This paper will focus on a neutron exposure of a small DRIFT prototype, a Monte Carlo to simulate these events, and the derivation of the range and ionization as a function of energy for Sulfur and Carbon recoils in CS 2 gas

  1. Drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, M.; Melchior, H.

    1968-01-01

    A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated.......A dispersion relation for low frequency drift waves in a weakly ionized plasma has been derived, and through numerical calculations the effect of collisions between the charged and the neutral particles is estimated....

  2. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2003-01-01

    A multi-grid part-in-cell algorithm for a shearless slab drift wave model with kinetic electrons is presented. The algorithm, which is based on an exact separation of adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, is used to investigate the presence of strange attractors in drift wave turbulence. Although the simulation model has a large number of degrees of freedom, it is found that the strange attractor is low-dimensional and that it is strongly affected by dissipative (collisional) effects

  3. Status of the KEDR drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Baru, S E; Blinov, V E; Groshev, V R; Kolachev, G M; Minakov, G D; Onuchin, A P; Popkov, I N; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shusharo, A I; Talyshev, A A; Todyshev, K Y; Yushkov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The 1 m long and 1 m outer diameter chamber consists of 42 layers. The chamber is based on a jet type cells with drift distance of 30 mm. The measurements of the spatial and dE/dx resolution were performed with DME gas with the cosmic particles. The resolution averaged over the drift distance is equal to 110 mu m while dE/dx resolution is 8.2%.

  4. Effects of Fault Displacement on Emplacement Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate potential effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts, including drip shields and waste packages emplaced in emplacement drifts. The output from this analysis not only provides data for the evaluation of long-term drift stability but also supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) process model report (PMR) and Disruptive Events Report currently under development. The primary scope of this analysis includes (1) examining fault displacement effects in terms of induced stresses and displacements in the rock mass surrounding an emplacement drift and (2 ) predicting fault displacement effects on the drip shield and waste package. The magnitude of the fault displacement analyzed in this analysis bounds the mean fault displacement corresponding to an annual frequency of exceedance of 10 -5 adopted for the preclosure period of the repository and also supports the postclosure performance assessment. This analysis is performed following the development plan prepared for analyzing effects of fault displacement on emplacement drifts (CRWMS M and O 2000). The analysis will begin with the identification and preparation of requirements, criteria, and inputs. A literature survey on accommodating fault displacements encountered in underground structures such as buried oil and gas pipelines will be conducted. For a given fault displacement, the least favorable scenario in term of the spatial relation of a fault to an emplacement drift is chosen, and the analysis is then performed analytically. Based on the analysis results, conclusions are made regarding the effects and consequences of fault displacement on emplacement drifts. Specifically, the analysis will discuss loads which can be induced by fault displacement on emplacement drifts, drip shield and/or waste packages during the time period of postclosure

  5. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martoff, C J; Ohnuki, T; Spooner, N J C; Lehner, M

    2000-01-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 mu m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with ze...

  6. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  7. Beam dancer fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    To accomplish fusion of two or more fusion fuel elements numerous minute spots of energy or laser light are directed to a micro target area, there to be moved or danced about by a precision mechanical controlling apparatus at the source of the laser light or electromagnetic energy beams, so that merging and coinciding patterns of light or energy beams can occur around the area of the fuel atoms or ions. The projecting of these merging patterns may be considered as target searching techniques to locate responsive clusters of fuel elements and to compress such elements into a condition in which fusion may occur. Computerized programming may be used

  8. MUON DETECTOR: BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT) AND ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    After months of cosmics data taking the drift tube (DT) detector is in good shape, ready for LHC beams. Several hundreds of millions of cosmics events have been recorded; out of those, more than 90% were triggered by the DT system. Data integrity analyses have shown a very reliable read-out system, also during high rate tests. With a 98% of the detector operational, only awaiting the arrival of some low voltage modules and for the completion of the DT Track Finder system, data taking is starting to become routine job. These continuous running exercises have been very useful to study performance and reliability of the detector in a medium term period, allowing understanding and fixing failures that have occurred with low frequency. Drift tubes have become a very stable system, becoming a service of muon triggering for the tracker after its final installation. During the last months, major efforts have taken place in synchronization tasks, within the DT system (250 chambers) and also with the rest of the CMS su...

  9. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  10. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    these results handle a position-dependent (variable) drift that was not covered by previous drift theorems with tail bounds. Moreover, our theorem can be specialized into virtually all existing drift theorems with drift towards the target from the literature. Finally, user-friendly specializations...

  11. Performance of prototypes of the H1 outer z-drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baerwolff, H.; Gensch, U.; Harder, U.; Henschel, H.; Kaufmann, H.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Lippold, H.; Meissner, J.; Naumann, T.; Winde, M.

    1989-01-01

    Test measurements were performed with prototypes (full-scale radius and single cells) of the outer z-drift chamber (COZ) of the central tracker of the HERA experiment H1. The COZ consists of a 2.20 m long cylindrical arrangement of rectangular drift cells made of 24 identical rings of 47 cm radius with sense wires strung in a 24-fold polygon around the beam axis. The signals are transmitted via flexible twin lines to the preamplifiers located outside the gas volume at the end flanges. The tests were performed at a DESY test beam using Ar/CH 4 and Ar/C 3 H 8 and a 100 MHz FADC readout. Detailed results on the geometric efficiency, resolution and charge division are reported. (orig.)

  12. A compact beam stop for a rare kaon decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J.; Diwan, M.; Eckhause, M.; Guss, C.M.; Hancock, A.D.; Heinson, A.P.; Highland, V.L.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kettell, S.H.; Kuang, Y.; Lang, K.; McDonough, J.; McFarlane, W.K.; Molzon, W.R.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Winter, R.G.; Witkowski, M.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.D. E-mail: worm@fnal.gov; Yamashita, A

    1999-06-01

    We describe the development and testing of a novel beam stop for use in a rare kaon decay experiment at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The beam stop is located inside a dipole spectrometer magnet in close proximity to straw drift chambers and intercepts a high-intensity neutral hadron beam. The design process, involving both Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests of alternative beam-stop shielding arrangements, had the goal of minimizing the leakage of particles from the beam stop and the resulting hit rates in detectors, while preserving maximum acceptance for events of interest. The beam tests consisted of measurements of rates in drift chambers, scintillation counter hodoscopes, a gas threshold Cherenkov counter, and a lead glass array. Measurements were also made with a set of specialized detectors which were sensitive to low-energy neutrons, photons, and charged particles. Comparisons are made between these measurements and a detailed Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, F., E-mail: federica.bonomo@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati - CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cristofaro, S. [Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  14. Rater Severity Drift in Peer Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü BÖRKAN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There are not enough psychometrically sound studies about the validity and reliability of the scores obtained from peer assessment. This study examined degree of rater severity drift, a rater effect, in peer assessment. The college students’ presentations were scored by 29 peers in the class using a rating scale. Nine presentations were held on four separate days, two presentations on each of the first three days and three presentations on the fourth day. Drift was investigated with two many-facet Rasch measurement models (separate models and dummy time MFRM. Standardized differences were calculated from the estimates obtained with separate models and interaction terms were calculated with the dummy time MFRM. In drift analysis, shifts in estimations were examined from Day-1 which is a baseline to other three days. Results showed that peer raters varied according to their level of severity and they tend to be lenient. Statistics showed that the quality of the scale was acceptable and its items behaved as expected. In drift analysis, standardized differences and interaction term provided very similar results. Between Day-1 and 2, there was no statistically significant difference in the estimates of the rater severity. Between Day-1 and 3, the percentage of scorers with significant drift in the estimates was 38.10%. The raters’ severity shifts on the average of about 0.14 logit and they displayed more severe scoring behavior. Between Day-1 and 4, the number of raters who had significant shifts in their estimates was three according to the standardized difference method, while one according to interaction method. On the average, the raters became more severe. Among three comparison, Day-4 had the largest rater severity drift on the average; Day 3, however, has the highest number of raters with rater severity drift.

  15. Development and characterisation of new high-rate muon drift tube detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, Bernhard

    2012-07-25

    With the increase of the LHC luminosity above the design value and the higher background counting rates, detectors in the ATLAS muon spectrometer have to be replaced because the limits of the radiation tolerance will be exceeded. Therefore drift tube chambers with 15 mm tube diameter were developed. The required construction accuracy was verified and the limits of the resolution and efficiency were determined in a muon beam and under gamma irradiation and compared to model expectations.

  16. Three-dimensional simulation studies of 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is proposed to build a drift tube Linac (DTL) at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, India, that will form a part of the future Spallation Neutron Source. This DTL will accelerate 30 mA H-ion beam from 3 MeV to 10 MeV. The DTL is designed to operate at 352.2 MHz with a maximum duty cycle of 3%.

  17. A doublet of 3 in. cylindrical silicon drift detectors in the CERES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faschingbauer, U.; Agakichiev, G.; Baur, R.; Ceretto, F.; Dress, A.; Fraenkel, Z.; Fuchs, C.; Gatti, E.; Glaessel, P.; Hess, F.; Hemberger, M.; De los Heros, C.P.; Holl, P.; Irmscher, D.; Jacob, C.; Kemmer, J.; Minaev, Y.; Panebrattsev, Y.; Pfeiffer, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Razin, S.; Rehak, P.; Sampietro, M.; Schukraft, J.; Shimanskiy, S.; Socol, E.; Specht, H.J.; Tel-Zur, G.; Tserruya, I.; Ullrich, T.; Voigt, C.; Wurm, J.P.; Yurevich, V. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[JINR, RU-141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)]|[Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Weizmann Institute, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)]|[Politecnico di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)]|[Ketek GmbH, D-85764 Oberschleissheim (Germany)]|[Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]|[CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    We report on the performance of a doublet of 3 in. cylindrical silicon drift detectors installed as an upgrade of the CERES/NA45 electron pair spectrometer for the Pb-beam at the CERN SPS. The silicon detectors provide external particle tracking and background rejection of conversions and close Dalitz pairs. Results on vertex reconstruction and rejection from a Pb test-run in 1994 are presented. (orig.).

  18. A doublet of 3" cylindrical silicon drift detectors in the CERES/NA45 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Faschingbauer, U; Baur, R; Ceretto, F; Drees, A; Fraenkel, Zeev; Fuchs, C; Gatti, E; Glässel, P; Hemberger, M; Pérez de los Heros, C; Hess, F; Holl, P; Irmscher, D; Jacob, C; Kemmer, J; Minaev, Yu I; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pfeiffer, A; Ravinovich, I; Razin, S V; Rehak, P; Sampietro, M; Schükraft, Jürgen; Shimansky, S S; Socol, E; Specht, H J; Tel-Zur, G; Tserruya, Itzhak; Ullrich, T S; Voigt, C A; Wurm, J P; Yurevich, V I

    1995-01-01

    We report on the performance of a doublet of 3" cylindrical silicon drift detectors installed as an upgrade of the CERES/NA45 electron pair spectrometer for the Pb-beam at the CERN SPS. The silicon detectors provide external particle tracking and background rejection of conversions and close Dalitz pairs. Results on vertex reconstruction and rejection from Pb test-run in 1994 are presented.

  19. Development and characterisation of new high-rate muon drift tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of the LHC luminosity above the design value and the higher background counting rates, detectors in the ATLAS muon spectrometer have to be replaced because the limits of the radiation tolerance will be exceeded. Therefore drift tube chambers with 15 mm tube diameter were developed. The required construction accuracy was verified and the limits of the resolution and efficiency were determined in a muon beam and under gamma irradiation and compared to model expectations.

  20. Final focus system for high intensity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Henestroza

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The neutralized transport experiment (NTX at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final-focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. The final-focus scenario in a heavy ion fusion driver consists of several large aperture quadrupole magnets followed by a drift section in which the beam space charge is neutralized by a plasma. This beam is required to hit a millimeter-sized target spot at the end of the drift section. The objective of the NTX experiments and associated theory and simulations is to study the various physical mechanisms that determine the final spot size (radius r_{s} at a given distance (f from the end of the last quadrupole. In a fusion driver, f is the standoff distance required to keep the chamber wall and superconducting magnets properly protected. The NTX final quadrupole focusing system produces a converging beam at the entrance to the neutralized drift section where it focuses to a small spot. The final spot is determined by the conditions of the beam entering the quadrupole section, the beam dynamics in the magnetic lattice, and the plasma neutralization dynamics in the drift section. The main issues are the control of emittance growth due to high order fields from magnetic multipoles and image fields. In this paper, we will describe the theoretical and experimental aspects of the beam dynamics in the quadrupole lattice, and how these physical effects influence the final beam size. In particular, we present theoretical and experimental results on the dependence of final spot size on geometric aberrations and perveance.

  1. A pulsed drift cavity to capture 30 keV ion bunches at ground potential

    CERN Document Server

    Coeck, S

    2007-01-01

    To capture radioactive ion beams of tens of keV in an ion trap, the use of a pulsed drift cavity allows one to avoid placing the complete setup on a high voltage (HV) platform. By pulsing down the voltage on a long electrode while the ion bunch is inside it, the electric potential zero level can be shifted down over a range equal to the initial beam energy, thus allowing the ions to be captured in a trap at ground potential. The pulsed drift cavity of the WITCH setup, which is completely HV-platform free, is described here. It is demonstrated that bunched beams with energies of typically 30–60 keV, as will become available to all users at the ISOLDE facility after the installation of an RFQ buncher, can be transported over distances of tens of meters to the experiments and by means of a pulsed drift cavity directly be injected into a purification Penning trap. Simulation work showing the efficiency of such a system is discussed and tests showing the feasibility of such a system are presented. An estimate of...

  2. Optical drift effects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Kopiński, Jarosław

    2018-03-01

    We consider the question of determining the optical drift effects in general relativity, i.e. the rate of change of the apparent position, redshift, Jacobi matrix, angular distance and luminosity distance of a distant object as registered by an observer in an arbitrary spacetime. We present a fully relativistic and covariant approach, in which the problem is reduced to a hierarchy of ODE's solved along the line of sight. The 4-velocities and 4-accelerations of the observer and the emitter and the geometry of the spacetime along the line of sight constitute the input data. We build on the standard relativistic geometric optics formalism and extend it to include the time derivatives of the observables. In the process we obtain two general, non-perturbative relations: the first one between the gravitational lensing, represented by the Jacobi matrix, and the apparent position drift, also called the cosmic parallax, and the second one between the apparent position drift and the redshift drift. The applications of the results include the theoretical study of the drift effects of cosmological origin (so-called real-time cosmology) in numerical or exact Universe models.

  3. Drift emplaced waste package thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffner, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.; Platt, E.A.; Blink, J.A.; Doering, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal calculations of the effects of radioactive waste decay heat on the I repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada have been conducted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in conjunction with the B ampersand W Fuel Company. For a number of waste package spacings, these 3D transient calculations use the TOPAZ3D code to predict drift wall temperatures to 10,000 years following emplacement. Systematic tcniperature variation occurs as a function of fuel age at emplacement and Areal Mass Loading (AML) during the first few centuries after emplacement. After about 1000 years, emplacement age is not a strong driver on rock temperature; AML has a larger impact. High AMLs occur when large waste packages are emplaced end-tocnd in drifts. Drift emplacement of equivalent packages results in lower rock teniperatures than borehole emplacement. For an emplacement scheme with 50% of the drift length occupied by packages, an AML of 138 MTU/acre is about three times higher than the Site Characterization Plan-Conceptual Design (SCP-CD) value. With this higher AML (requiring only 1/3 of the SCP-CD repository footprint), peak drift wall temperatures do not exceed 160*C, but rock temperatures excetd the boiling point of water for about 3000 years. These TOPAZ3D results Iiive been compared with reasonable agreement with two other computer codes

  4. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  5. Community Air Monitoring for Pesticide Drift Using Pesticide Action Network's (PAN) Drift Catcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, E.

    2016-12-01

    Community air monitoring projects for pesticides in the air have been conducted by PAN in collaboration with community members and locally based groups engaged around pesticide issues. PAN is part of an international network working to promote a just, thriving food system and replace the use of hazardous pesticides with ecologically sound alternatives. The Drift Catcher is an air-monitoring device with a design based on the California Air Resource Board's air monitoring equipment, and has been used in community-based projects in 11 states. Observations of pesticide drift made by community members cannot always be confirmed by regulatory agencies—if an inspection is made hours or days after a drift incident, the evidence may no longer be present. The Drift Catcher makes it possible to collect scientific evidence of pesticide drift in areas where people live, work, and play. One of the most recent Drift Catcher projects was done in California, in partnership with the Safe Strawberry Coalition and led by the statewide coalition Californians for Pesticide Reform. The data were used to support a call for stronger mitigation rules for the fumigant chloropicrin and to support a campaign asking for stronger pesticide rules to protect children attending school in close proximity to agricultural fields. The Drift Catcher data are used by organizers and community members to engage policymakers with the intention of making policy change on a local and/or statewide level. On the national level, PAN's Drift Catcher data has helped win regulatory recognition of volatilization drift for pesticides other than fumigants. Lessons learned from conducting community-based research projects will also be discussed. PAN is also currently assessing other community-based monitoring tools, such as community surveys and drift questionnaires that may allow communities to collect data that can also support the campaign work.

  6. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  7. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  8. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  9. Space-charge effects on the propagation of hollow electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, J.J.; Stellati, C.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of hollow electron beams with gyro motion propagating down a cylindrical drift tube is analysed on the basis of a non-adiabatic-gun-generated laminar beam. Due to the action of beam's self-space charge field, the transverse velocity spread has an oscillatory behavior along the drift tube wherein the spatial auto modulation period shortens with increasing current. Numerical simulation results indicate that even at a 10 A beam current, the resulting transverse velocity spread is still less than the spread for a zero beam current. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  10. Correcting sample drift using Fourier harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-González, G; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Guerrero, E; Reyes, D F; Braza, V; Yañez, A; Nuñez-Moraleda, B; González, D; Galindo, P L

    2018-04-21

    During image acquisition of crystalline materials by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, the sample drift could lead to distortions and shears that hinder their quantitative analysis and characterization. In order to measure and correct this effect, several authors have proposed different methodologies making use of series of images. In this work, we introduce a methodology to determine the drift angle via Fourier analysis by using a single image based on the measurements between the angles of the second Fourier harmonics in different quadrants. Two different approaches, that are independent of the angle of acquisition of the image, are evaluated. In addition, our results demonstrate that the determination of the drift angle is more accurate by using the measurements of non-consecutive quadrants when the angle of acquisition is an odd multiple of 45°. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  12. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervell, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K L (λ L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed

  13. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design. After a summary of dynamical considerations, two major topics are addressed here: transportable current limits, which determine the choice of focal system for the linac, and longitudinal control of the beams, which are potentially destabilized by their interaction with the pulsed power system

  14. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Mac Kinnon, A. J.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Nicolai, P.; Pasley, J.; Ravasio, A.; Richetta, M.; Santos, J. J.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vauzour, B.; Volpe, L.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams (~4 × 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53 µm) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm-3). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm-3 and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 × 1018 W cm-2. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  15. Continental drift under the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffetaut, Eric

    2003-12-01

    Contrary to what happened in many other countries in the 1930s and 1940s, Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift was not generally rejected in Nazi Germany, although several leading German geologists of the time did not accept it. It was actually presented as the modern view of Earth history in books and magazine articles aimed at the general public. Although outlandish geological theories such as Hörbiger's Welteislehre were favoured by some Nazi dignitaries, they were not widely accepted in scientific circles. On the other hand, continental drift received official support under the Third Reich, at a time when it was ignored or ridiculed by most earth scientists outside Germany.

  16. Do the pyramids show continental drift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawley, G S; Abrahamsen, N

    1973-03-02

    The mystery of the orientation of the Great Pyramids of Giza has remained unexplained for many decades. The general alignment is 4 minutes west of north. It is argued that this is not a builders' error but is caused by movement over the centuries. Modern theories of continental drift do not predict quite such large movements, but other causes of polar wandering give even smaller shifts. Thus, continental drift is the most likely explanation, although somewhat implausible, especially as relevant measurements have been made over a 50-year period, whereas geophysical measurements of sea-floor spreading relate to million-year time scales.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... polarity, i.e. a pair of electrostatic convective cells....

  18. Drifts of Dust or Something Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    While the interior and far walls of the crater dubbed 'Bonneville' can be seen in the background, the dominant foreground features in this 180-degree navigation camera mosaic are the wind-deposited drifts of dust or sand. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit completed this mosaic on sol 71, March 15, 2004, from its newest location at the rim of 'Bonneville' crater. Scientists are interested in these formations in part because they might give insight into the processes that formed some of the material within the crater. Thermal emission measurements by the rover indicate that the dark material just below the far rim of this crater is spectrally similar to rocks that scientists have analyzed along their journey to this location. They want to know why this soil-like material has a spectrum that more closely resembles rocks rather than other soils examined so far. The drifts seen in the foreground of this mosaic might have the answer. Scientists hypothesize that these drifts might consist of wind-deposited particles that are the same as the dark material found against the back wall of the crater. If so, Spirit may spend time studying the material and help scientists understand why it is different from other fine-grained material seen at Gusev. The drifts appear to be lighter in color than the dark material deposited on the back wall of the crater. They might be covered by a thin deposit of martian dust, or perhaps the drift is like other drifts seen during Spirit's journey and is just a collection of martian dust. To find out, Spirit will spend some of sol 72 digging its wheels into the drift to uncover its interior. After backing up a bit, Spirit will use the panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer to analyze the scuffed area. If the interior material has a similar spectrum to the dark deposit in the crater, then Spirit will most likely stay here a little longer to study the drift with the instruments on its robotic arm. If the material is uniform

  19. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assiro, R.; Cappelli, L.; Cascella, M.; De Lorenzis, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Ignatov, F.; L'Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A.; Miccoli, A.; Onorato, G.; Perillo, M.; Piacentino, G.; Rella, S.; Rossetti, F.; Spedicato, M.; Tassielli, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce

  20. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  1. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  2. Beam halo studies in LEHIPA DTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S.; Pande, R.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) project at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) consists of a 20 MeV, 30 mA proton linac. The accelerator comprises of a 3 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a 20 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL). In such high intensity accelerators, beam halos are of concern as they not only cause an increase in emittance, but also lead to beam loss and radio activation. We have studied the effect of beam mismatch at the DTL input on halo formation and propagation. The particle core model is used to excite the three envelope eigen modes; the quadrupole mode, the fast mode and the slow mode by giving input beam mismatch. These modes get damped as the beam progresses through the DTL. The damping mechanism is clearly Landau damping and leads to increase in rms emittance of the beam. The evolution of these modes and the corresponding increase in beam emittance and maximum beam extent, as the beam propagates through the DTL, has been studied for different space charge tunes. The halo parameter based on the definition of Allen and Wangler has been calculated. It is seen that beam halos are very important for LEHIPA DTL, even at 20 MeV and leads to emittance and beam size increase and also to beam loss in some cases. The longitudinal halo is present even without mismatch and transverse halos arise in the presence of beam mismatch.

  3. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  4. Equatorial ionospheric zonal drift model and vertical drift statistics from UHF scintillation measurements in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Sheehan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available UHF scintillation measurements of zonal ionospheric drifts have been conducted at Ancon, Peru since 1994 using antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction to cross-correlate geo-synchronous satellite signals. An empirical model of average drift over a wide range of Kp and solar flux conditions was constructed from successive two-dimensional fits of drift vs. the parameters and day of year. The model exhibits the typical local time trend of maximum eastward velocity in the early evening with a gradual decrease and reversal in the early morning hours. As expected, velocities at all hours increase with the solar flux and decrease with Kp activity. It was also found that vertical drifts could contribute to the variability of drift measurements to the east of Ancon at a low elevation angle. The vertical drift at the ionospheric intersection to the east can be estimated when combined with nearly overhead observations at Ancon or a similar spaced-antenna site at Antofagasta, Chile. Comparisons on five days with nearly simultaneous measurements of vertical drift by the Julia radar at Jicamarca, Peru show varying agreement with the spaced-antenna estimates. Statistical results from 1997 to 2001 generally agree with radar and satellite studies.

  5. A beam position feedback system for beam lines at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, T.; Kamiya, Y.; Haga, K.; Mitsuhashi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The beam position of the synchrotron radiation produced from the Storage Ring was stabilized by a twofold position feedback system. A digital feedback system was developed to suppress the diurnal beam movement (one cycle of sin-like drifting motion per day) which became a serious problem in low-emittance operation. The feedback was applied to the closed-orbit-distortion (COD) correction system in order to cancel the position variation at all the beam lines proportionately to the variation monitored at one beam line. An analog feedback system is also used to suppress frequency components faster than the slow diurnal movement

  6. Beam Dynamics and Pulse Duration Control During Final Beam Bunching in Driver System for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Katayama, Takeshi; Kawata, Shigeo; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Someya, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    Beam dynamics is investigated by multi-particle simulations during a final beam bunching in a driver system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). The longitudinal bunch compression causes the beam instability induced by the strong space charge effect. The multi-particle simulation can indicate the emittance growth due to the longitudinal bunch compression. Dependence in the beam pulse duration is also investigated for effective pellet implosion in HIF. Not only the spatial nonuniformity of the beam illumination, but also the errors of the beam pulse duration cause changes of implosion dynamics. The allowable regime of the beam pulse duration for the effective fusion output becomes narrow with decreasing the input beam energy. The voltage accuracy requirement at the beam velocity modulator is also estimated for the final beam bunching. It is estimated that the integrated voltage error is allowable as a few percent.

  7. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  8. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  9. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  10. Consideration of beam plasma ion-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Fumimichi; Kusano, Norimasa; Ishida, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental analyses and their comparison were made on the plasma generation and on the beam extraction for the beam plasma ion-source. The operational principle and the structure of the ion-source are explained in the first part. Considerations are given on the electron beam-plasma interaction and the resulting generation of high frequency or microwaves which in turn increases the plasma density. The flow of energy in this system is also explained in the second part. The relation between plasma density and the imaginary part of frequency is given by taking the magnetic flux density, the electron beam energy, and the electron beam current as parameters. The relations between the potential difference between collector and drift tube and the plasma density or the ion-current are also given. Considerations are also given to the change of the plasma density due to the change of the magnetic flux density at drift tube, the change of the electron beam energy, and the change of the electron beam current. The third part deals with the extraction characteristics of the ion beam. The structure of the multiple-aperture electrode and the relation between plasma density and the extracted ion current are explained. (Aoki, K.)

  11. Wegener and his Theory of Continental Drift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 7. Wegener and his Theory of Continental Drift. Ramesh Chander. General Article Volume 4 Issue 7 July 1999 pp 24-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/07/0024-0041 ...

  12. Comment on the drift mirror instability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2008), 054502/1-054502/2 ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : drift mirror instability * linear theory Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.427, year: 2008

  13. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  14. Wegener and his Theory of Continental Drift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 12. Wegener and his Theory of Continental Drift. Ramesh Chander. Volume 10 Issue 12 December 2005 pp 58-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/12/0058-0075 ...

  15. Backward stochastic differential equations with Young drift

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Joscha; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    We prove via a direct fixpoint argument the well-posedness of backward stochastic differential equations containing an additional drift driven by a path of finite $p$-variation with $p \\in [1,2)$. An application to the Feynman-Kac representation of semilinear rough partial differential equations is given.

  16. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  17. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Low-Drift Micro Flow Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The emerging fields of micro total-analysis systems (micro-TAS), micro-reactors and bio-MEMS drives the need for further miniaturisation of sensors measuring quantities such as pressure, temperature and flow. The research described in this thesis concerns the development of low-drift micro flow

  19. DRIFT PATTERNS OF ANCHOVY ENGRAULIS CAPENSIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the southern Benguela, successful recruitment of Cape anchovy Engraulis capensis is highly variable and seems to be dependent on the spawning biomass only to a small extent. This paper investigates how the variations in the drift patterns of larvae from the spawning areas on the Agulhas Bank to the ...

  20. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  1. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  2. Learning drifting concepts with neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Schwarze, Holm

    1993-01-01

    The learning of time-dependent concepts with a neural network is studied analytically and numerically. The linearly separable target rule is represented by an N-vector, whose time dependence is modelled by a random or deterministic drift process. A single-layer network is trained online using

  3. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R., E-mail: rrios@lanl.go [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Tatar, E. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Bacon, J.D.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Green, J.A.; Hogan, G.E.; Ito, T.M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.L.; Mortenson, R.; Pasukanics, F.E.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sondheim, W.E.; Teasdale, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Saltus, M. [Sloan Enterprises, NC (United States); Back, H.O.; Cottrell, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  4. Conceptual design report for the SDC barrel and intermediate muon detectors based on a jet-type drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Higashi, Y.

    1992-04-01

    We propose a jet-type drift chamber for the barrel and intermediate muon detectors of SDC. The chamber system consists of large multiwire drift chambers having a simple box-type frame structure: 2. 5 x 0.4 m 2 in cross section and maximum 9 m in length. A chamber module consists of double layers of small jet cells. The drift cell is composed of a wire plane, including 3 sense wires, and cathode plates parallel to the wire plane. The two layers in a chamber are staggered to each other by half a cell width. The jet cell is tilted such that its principle axis points to the interaction point. Such an arrangement, together with a constant drift velocity of the jet cell, allows us to design a simple and powerful trigger system for high momentum muons utilizing a drift time sum between a pair of staggered cells. The multi-hit capability will be helpful to distinguish high momentum muon tracks from associated electromagnetic debris as has been demonstrated by the Fermilab beam test T816. The maximum drift time fulfills the SDC requirement. A preliminary FEM analysis of the chamber module verified the excellent structural stiffness. It makes the support structure and the alignment system relatively simple. These features will reduce the total cost as well as ensure a good performance of the chamber system. (J.P.N.)

  5. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  6. The Physics of E×B-Drifting Jets Wolfgang Kundt & Gopal Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    (adiabatic expansion) losses when moving through a (strictly) vacuum channel. We describe a beam .... (3) shows that the radially moving charges of deviant γ must fall through the electric potential such .... gets compressed like the windings of a coil, and so are the convected charge clouds. Both electric charges and ...

  7. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  8. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  9. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  10. Improvement of the drift chamber system in the SAPHIR detector and first measurements of the Φ meson production at threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholmann, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    The SAPHIR detector at ELSA enables the measurement of photon induced Φ meson production from threshold up to 3 GeV in the full kinematical range. A considerable improvement of the drift chamber system is a precondition of gaining the necessary data rate in an acceptable time. The research focuses attention on the choice of the chamber gas and on a different mechanical construction, so as to minimize the negative influences of the photon beam crossing the sensitive volume of the drift chamber system. In addition, first preliminary results of the total and the differential cross section for the Φ meson production close to threshold were evaluated. (orig.)

  11. A drift chamber with uniform electric field and measurements of the electron drift velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Chimao; Mao Zepu; Zhou Jie; Yan Jie

    1985-01-01

    The measurements of the electron drift velocity as a function of the electric field have been made in a small drift chamber with uniform electric field for Ar/CH 4 , Ar/i-C 4 H 10 , Ar/CO 2 and SQS gas mixtures. The values of the electric field range from about 0.3 to 2.5 kV/cm. The results of the measurements are discussed

  12. Drift chamber with uniform electric field and measurements of the electron drift velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MA Chi-mao; MAO Ze-pu; ZHOU Jie; YAN Jie

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the electron drift velocity as a function of the electric field have been made in a small drift chamber with uniform electric field for Ar/CH 4 , Ar/i-C 4 H 10 , Ar/CO 2 , and SQS gas mixtures. The value of the electric field ranges from about 0.3 to 2.5 kV/cm. The results of the measurements are discussed

  13. A Differential Resonant Accelerometer with Low Cross-Interference and Temperature Drift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented in this paper is a high-performance resonant accelerometer with low cross-interference, low temperature drift and digital output. The sensor consists of two quartz double-ended tuning forks (DETFs and a silicon substrate. A new differential silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the temperature drift and cross-interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the quartz DETF is theoretically calculated, and then the axial stress on the vibration beams is verified through finite element method (FEM under a 100 g acceleration which is loaded on x-axis, y-axis and z-axis, respectively. Moreover, sensor chip is wire-bonded to a printed circuit board (PCB which contains two identical oscillating circuits. In addition, a steel shell is selected to package the sensor for experiments. Benefiting from the distinctive configuration of the differential structure, the accelerometer characteristics such as temperature drift and cross-interface are improved. The experimental results demonstrate that the cross-interference is lower than 0.03% and the temperature drift is about 18.16 ppm/°C.

  14. The Effects of Clock Drift on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khaled S.; Vanelli, C. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    All clocks drift by some amount, and the mission clock on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) is no exception. The mission clock on both MER rovers drifted significantly since the rovers were launched, and it is still drifting on the Opportunity rover. The drift rate is temperature dependent. Clock drift causes problems for onboard behaviors and spacecraft operations, such as attitude estimation, driving, operation of the robotic arm, pointing for imaging, power analysis, and telecom analysis. The MER operations team has techniques to deal with some of these problems. There are a few techniques for reducing and eliminating the clock drift, but each has drawbacks. This paper presents an explanation of what is meant by clock drift on the rovers, its relationship to temperature, how we measure it, what problems it causes, how we deal with those problems, and techniques for reducing the drift.

  15. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  16. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  17. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  18. Electromagnetic drift modes in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Pecseli, H. L.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices......A pair of nonlinear equations is derived which describes the dynamics of the electromagnetic drift oscillations in a nonuniform magnetized electron gas. It is shown that the nonlinear electromagnetic drift modes can propagate in the form of dipole vortices...

  19. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  20. Velocity and Magnetic Compressions in FEL Drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, L

    2005-01-01

    We will compare merits and issues of these two techniques suitable for increasing the peak current of high brightness electron beams. The typical range of applicability is low energy for the velocity bunching and middle to high energy for magnetic compression. Velocity bunching is free from CSR effects but requires very high RF stability (time jitters), as well as a dedicated additional focusing and great cure in the beam transport: it is very well understood theoretically and numerical simulations are pretty straightforward. Several experiments of velocity bunching have been performed in the past few years: none of them, nevertheless, used a photoinjector designed and optimized for that purpose. Magnetic compression is a much more consolidated technique: CSR effects and micro-bunch instabilities are its main drawbacks. There is a large operational experience with chicanes used as magnetic compressors and their theoretical understanding is quite deep, though numerical simulations of real devices are still cha...

  1. 'Pipetron' beam dynamics with noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.D.

    1996-10-01

    Extra-large hadron collider, ''Pipetron'', at 100 TeV energy is currently under consideration. In this article we study the Pipetron transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics under influence of external noises. The major effects are growths of transverse and longitudinal emittances of the beam caused by noisy forces which vary over the revolution period or synchrotron oscillation period, respectively; and closed orbit distortions induced by slow drift of magnet positions. Based on analytical consideration of these phenomena, we estimate tolerable levels of these noises and compare them with available experimental data. Although it is concluded that transverse and, probably, longitudinal feedback systems are necessary for the emittance's preservation, and sophisticated beam-based orbit correction methods should be used at the Pipetron, we observe no unreasonable requirements which present and impenetrable barrier to the project

  2. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  3. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  4. Application of Deformable Templates for Recognizing Tracks Detected with High Pressure Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baginyan, S.; Baranov, S.; Glazov, A.; Ososkov, G.

    1994-01-01

    The modification of the deformable template method (DTM) application to the problem of track finding and track parameter determination for data detected with high pressure drift tubes (HPDT) in the design of ATLAS for the muon spectrometer experiment is proposed. Our DTM applications consist of two parts, according to two stages of the study. The first part relates to the stage of HPDT study on the CERN muon beam (BEAM-TEST) with the simplest one-prong events without noise signals, where the main obstacle is the left-right ambiguities for each tube. In the second part more complicated HPDT data are to be handled with noise signals. It was shown that the suggested DTM development solves the problem of track recognition and track parameter determination for both noiseless and noise data. Results are obtained on the real beam test data and on data simulating the muon spectrometer on the basis of HPDT. 14 refs., 10 figs

  5. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  6. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  7. Improved coincidence rejection for silicon drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Richard B.

    2010-12-01

    The high count rates possible with silicon drift detectors (SDDs) raise the importance of coincidence ("pile-up") rejection in the pulse processor. Detection efficiency for close coincidence is energy dependent, with resolving times increasing sharply when at least one X-ray of the pair is below 1 keV. Traditional pile-up detection for low energies is done by applying a width test to the output of a shaping filter. SDDs have varying rise times at the preamplifier output due to the expansion of the charge cloud with drift path length, which limits the effectiveness of pulse width testing. Novel digital methods have been developed, which are largely immune to variations in rise time and significantly improve pulse-pair resolving times. Digital pulse processor filter parameters must take resolving times into account to achieve good sum peak position and shape for optimum software removal of sum peak artifacts during spectrum post-processing.

  8. Hole drift mobility in poly(hexylphenylsilane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimi, Y.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Poly(n-alkylphenylsilane)s in which n-alkyl were changed from methyl to octyl were polymerized. Hole transport properties of poly(alkyllphenylsilane)s were systematically studied by the DC time-of-flight (TOF) technique. While the hole drift mobility of poly(methylphenylsilane) increased monotonously in entire field, those of poly(hexylphenylsilane) and poly(octylphenylsilane) decreased with increase in the field strength. Temperature dependence of hole drift mobility in those polymers was small. On the basis of Baessler's disorder formalism the mobility was analyzed quantitatively to disserve complex contributions of charge transport. The analyzed results indicated that with increase in the length of n-alkyl side-groups, the energetic disorder of hopping sites became smaller and the disorder of distance between hopping sites became larger. These results were supported by the results obtained by UV absorption measurement and positron annihilation life-time spectroscopy measurement. (author)

  9. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  10. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  11. Analysis of particle species evolution in neutral-beam injection lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Haselton, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Analytic solutions to the rate equations describing the species evolution of a multispecies positive ion beam of hydrogen due to charge exchange and molecular dissociation are derived as a function of the background gas (H 2 ) line density in the neutralizing gas cell and in the drift tube. Using the solutions, calculations are presented for the relative abundance of each species as a function of the gas-cell thickness, the reionization loss in the drift tube, and the neutral-beam power as a function of the beam energy and the species composition of the original ion beam

  12. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  13. Unintended Positional Drift and Its Potential Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Walking-In-Place interaction techniques seem particularly useful in relation to immersive virtual environments where the user's movement is greatly constrained by a limited physical space. However, current techniques may not be particularly useful in combination with head-mounted displays since...... many users unintentionally move forward while walking in place. We refer to this phenomenon accidental movement as Unintended Positional Drift. The poster presents evidence of the phenomenon's existence and subsequently discusses different design solutions which potentially could circumvent the problem....

  14. Drift Wave Simulations with Reduced Stellarator Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-01-01

    A three-field model to study drift-resistive, low-frequency waves in low-beta, non-axisymmetric plasmas [J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas, 4 (11) 4023 (1997)] is used to analyze the effect of the inhomogeneities in the stellarator magnetic field on the fastest (linear) growth rate, gamma. Extensive numerical calculations for a toroidal heliac show that not all Fourier components in the representation of the equilibrium configuration are important as far as gamma is concerned

  15. Spin-drift transport in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2008-02-07

    We present a study on spin transport in semiconductors under applied electric fields. Our experiments detect photoinjected electron spins and their relaxation during drift transport in intrinsic and moderately n-doped GaAs, based on the extraordinary Hall (eH) effect. For relatively low electric field (E), the optically spin-induced eH effect in n-doped GaAs is found to be enhanced with increasing doping density and not to depend much on E, indicating that a substantial amount of optical spin polarization is preserved during the drift transport in these extrinsic semiconductors. However, when the spin-oriented electrons are injected with a high E, a very significant decrease is observed in the eH voltage (V{sub eH}) due to an increase in the spin precession frequency of the hot electrons. Spin relaxation by the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism is calculated, and is suggested to be the reason for such a rapid spin relaxation for hot electrons under a high E. However, in an intrinsic GaAs (i-GaAs), a much weaker V{sub eH} is observed and, as the electron spins scattered by holes due to the Coulomb interaction in i-GaAs, the spin relaxation by the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism is considered. Skew scattering and side jump as possible mechanisms of the optically spin-induced transverse Hall currents are discussed. Based on a spin drift-diffusion model, drift and diffusion contributions to the V{sub eH} are examined. The results are also discussed in comparison with theoretical investigations.

  16. Continued Drift, but without the Acrimony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian L.

    2013-01-01

    If the measure of Barack Obama's success in mending US–European relations is whether the tone has improved, his presidency has been a great success. If the measure of success, however, is halting the drifting apart of policy preferences, the picture looks a lot less rosy. This article argues....... The Obama administration realises that, and by this more limited measure, it has succeeded brilliantly....

  17. Agile linear interferometric method for carrier-envelope phase drift measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jójárt, P; Börzsönyi, Á; Borchers, B; Steinmeyer, G; Osvay, K

    2012-03-01

    A bandwidth-independent and linear interferometric method for the measurement of the carrier-envelope phase drift of ultrashort pulse trains is demonstrated. The pulses are temporally overlapped in a resonant multiple-beam interferometer. From the position of the spectral interference pattern, the relative carrier-envelope phase between two subsequent oscillator pulses is obtained at data acquisition rates up to 200 Hz. Cross calibration has been performed by f-to-2f interferometry in two independent experiments. The optical length of the interferometer has been actively stabilized, leading to a phase jitter of 117 mrad (rms). These results indicate a reduced noise and quicker data acquisition in comparison with previous linear methods for measuring the carrier-envelope phase drift. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  18. Diffusion by Infragravity Stokes Drift Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, P.; Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.; Kirshner, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The group-scale variability of ocean waves variability drives infragravity Stokes drift fluctuations, which are important for small-scale diffusion of passive tracers (to the order of a few kilometers), and can thus be important for the break-up and dispersion of e.g. oil spills or sewage outflow, and coastal transport in general. The implications of this were first considered theoretically by Herterich and Hasselmann (1982, JPO), who demonstrated that on small scales, wave diffusion can compete with other upper ocean diffusive processes, but their theory has thus far not been extensively validated with field observations. To investigate drift fluctuations and wave-induced diffusion, we consider the wave-induced dispersion of a cluster of O(10) buoys. The experiment, conducted offshore of San Francisco, uses a cluster of Lagrangian drifters equipped with fast-sampling GPS sensor packages, to accurately resolve both the surface wave motions, and directly measure the Lagrangian dynamics, including surface drift fluctuations. We revisit the Herterich and Hasselmann theory, expand it to include shallow water and variable wave conditions, and compare the theoretical predictions with the new observations.

  19. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  20. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  1. Adjustable rare earth quadrupole drift tube magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Tanabe, J.; Halbach, K.; Koehler, G.; Green, M.I.

    1987-03-01

    A prototype permanent-magnet drift tube quadrupole with adjustable field strength has been constructed and tested. The magnet uses iron pole pieces to provide the required field shape along with rare earth permanent-magnet material (samarium cobalt) to energize the magnet. A unique feature of the configuration is the adjustability of the field, accomplished by rotating the outer rings consisting of permanent magnets and iron. In contrast with a previous prototype magnet, this new design uses ball bearings in place of slide bearings to eliminate potential failures. The rotation is now achieved with a bevel gear mechanism. The prototype design also incorporates a new drift tube shell vacuum seal to allow easy disassembly. Tests were made of the magnetic properties and the mechanical performance of this magnet. Field errors are extremely small, and the magnet passed an accelerated ten year lifetime test. It is planned to use this type of magnet to replace 24 of the SuperHILAC prestripper drift tubes

  2. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  3. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  4. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  5. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  6. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  7. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  8. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2001-01-10

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  9. Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, N.D.; Sassani, D.

    2000-01-01

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes an abstraction, for the performance assessment total system model, of the near-field host rock water chemistry and gas-phase composition. It also provides an abstracted process model analysis of potentially important differences in the thermal hydrologic (TH) variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository obtained from models that include fully coupled reactive transport with thermal hydrology and those that include thermal hydrology alone. Specifically, the motivation of the process-level model comparison between fully coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) and thermal-hydrologic-only (TH-only) is to provide the necessary justification as to why the in-drift thermodynamic environment and the near-field host rock percolation flux, the essential TH variables used to describe the performance of a geologic repository, can be obtained using a TH-only model and applied directly into a TSPA abstraction without recourse to a fully coupled reactive transport model. Abstraction as used in the context of this AMR refers to an extraction of essential data or information from the process-level model. The abstraction analysis reproduces and bounds the results of the underlying detailed process-level model. The primary purpose of this AMR is to abstract the results of the fully-coupled, THC model (CRWMS M andO 2000a) for effects on water and gas-phase composition adjacent to the drift wall (in the near-field host rock). It is assumed that drift wall fracture water and gas compositions may enter the emplacement drift before, during, and after the heating period. The heating period includes both the preclosure, in which the repository drifts are ventilated, and the postclosure periods, with backfill and drip shield emplacement at the time of repository closure. Although the preclosure period (50 years) is included in the process models, the postclosure performance assessment starts at the end of this initial period

  10. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner, P.

    2001-01-01

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a), an analysis of the effects of salts and precipitates on the repository chemical environment is to be developed and documented in an Analyses/Model Report (AMR). The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The purpose of this ICN is to qualify and document qualification of the AMR's technical products. The scope of this document is to develop a model of the processes that govern salt precipitation and dissolution and resulting water composition in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS). This model is developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical modeling work performed by PAO and is to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. However, the concepts may also apply to some near and far field geochemical processes and can have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone and saturated zone transport modeling efforts. The intended use of the model developed in this report is to estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the pH, chloride concentration, and ionic strength of water on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the post-closure period. These estimates are based on evaporative processes that are subject to a broad range of potential environmental conditions and are independent of the presence or absence of backfill. An additional intended use is to estimate the environmental conditions required for complete vaporization of water. The presence and composition of liquid water

  11. The genetic drift inventory: a tool for measuring what advanced undergraduates have mastered about genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M; Andrews, Tessa C; McElhinny, Teresa L; Mead, Louise S; Abraham, Joel K; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures upper-division students' understanding of this concept. We used an iterative approach that included extensive interviews and field tests involving 1723 students across five different undergraduate campuses. The GeDI consists of 22 agree-disagree statements that assess four key concepts and six misconceptions. Student scores ranged from 4/22 to 22/22. Statements ranged in mean difficulty from 0.29 to 0.80 and in discrimination from 0.09 to 0.46. The internal consistency, as measured with Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.58 to 0.88 across five iterations. Test-retest analysis resulted in a coefficient of stability of 0.82. The true-false format means that the GeDI can test how well students grasp key concepts central to understanding genetic drift, while simultaneously testing for the presence of misconceptions that indicate an incomplete understanding of genetic drift. The insights gained from this testing will, over time, allow us to improve instruction about this key component of evolution.

  12. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures upper-division students’ understanding of this concept. We used an iterative approach that included extensive interviews and field tests involving 1723 students across five different undergraduate campuses. The GeDI consists of 22 agree–disagree statements that assess four key concepts and six misconceptions. Student scores ranged from 4/22 to 22/22. Statements ranged in mean difficulty from 0.29 to 0.80 and in discrimination from 0.09 to 0.46. The internal consistency, as measured with Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.58 to 0.88 across five iterations. Test–retest analysis resulted in a coefficient of stability of 0.82. The true–false format means that the GeDI can test how well students grasp key concepts central to understanding genetic drift, while simultaneously testing for the presence of misconceptions that indicate an incomplete understanding of genetic drift. The insights gained from this testing will, over time, allow us to improve instruction about this key component of evolution. PMID:24591505

  13. A novel silicon drift detector with two dimensional drift time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijzen, E.A.; Schooneveld, E.M.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W.; Sarro, P.M.; Van den Bogaard, A.

    1994-01-01

    Until now silicon drift detectors with two dimensional position resolution made use of drift time measurement in one dimension only. The resolution in the other dimension was obtained by dividing the collecting anode into small pixels. In this paper we present a new type of drift detector that uses drift time measurements for both dimensions. The design consists of concentric quadrilateral closed strips with a small collecting anode in the centre. At first electrons will travel perpendicular to the strips until they reach a diagonal. Then they will proceed along this diagonal until they are collected at the centre. Position resolution in two dimensions can be obtained when both the time the electrons need to reach the diagonal and the time they need to reach the centre are measured. The latter is obtained from the collecting anode, the former from a diagonal strip present at the back side of the detector. Compared to common 2D drift detectors this detector offers the advantage of a small amount of readout electronics. It also has the advantage of having just one small collecting anode with a very low capacitance, resulting in low noise and therefore in a good energy resolution. ((orig.))

  14. Airborne organophosphate pesticides drift in Mediterranean climate: The importance of secondary drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivan, Ohad; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-02-01

    Pesticide application is a short-term air-pollution episode with near and far field effects due to atmospheric drift. In order to better evaluate resulting air concentrations in nearby communities following pesticide application, measurements of airborne pesticides were conducted at ∼70 m from field edge. This was done following three different application events of the organophosphate pesticide Chlorpyrifos in a persimmon orchard. Complementary information on larger spatial scale was obtained using CALPUFF modeling in which application and meteorological data was used to better evaluate dispersion patterns. Measurements indicated high airborne concentrations during application hours (few μg m-3 for 8 h average), which dropped to tens of ng m-3 in the following days. Measured atmospheric concentrations show that secondary drift (i.e., post-application drift) involves significant loads of pesticides and hence should not be ignored in exposure considerations. Furthermore, CALPUFF modeling revealed the complex dispersion pattern when weak winds prevailed, and showed that during the 24 h after application air concentrations reached levels above the hourly Texas effect screening level (0.1 μg m-3). Interestingly, weak winds on the night after application resulted in a secondary peak in measured and modeled air concentrations. Long exposure time (when secondary drift is considered) and concentrations measured following such common air-assisted orchard application, suggest pesticide drift may have health repercussions that are currently unknown, and emphasize the need for further epidemiological studies.

  15. Eulearian approach to bounce-transit and drift resonance with magnetic drifts in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, Ker Chung; Seol, J.; Chu, M. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    Bounce-transit and drift resonance can be important to plasma confinement in tokamaks with broken symmetry, and can have implications on the wave-particle resonance. Usually, the resonance is either treated by integrating along the unperturbed orbits or calculated using an action-angle approach. An Eulerian approach has been developed so that momentum conservation property of the Coulomb collision operator can be taken into account. The parallel flows appear in the thermodynamic forces in the Eulerian approach. However, in the existing theory, only E × B drift is kept; the magnetic drifts are neglected by adopting the large aspect ratio assumption. Here, E is the electric field, and B is the magnetic field. The importance of the magnetic drifts in finite aspect ratio tokamaks is demonstrated in. Here, the Eulerian approach is extended to include the magnetic drifts to calculate neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in finite aspect ratio tokamaks. The relation to the nonlinear plasma viscosity in the plateau regime will also be discussed. This work was supported by Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology under Grant No. 100-2112-M-006-004-MY3, and Republic of Korea MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning) under KSTAR program.

  16. Compressed sensing for STEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Laurène; Nilchian, Masih; Trépout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Marco, Sergio; Unser, Michael

    2017-08-01

    A central challenge in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is to reduce the electron radiation dosage required for accurate imaging of 3D biological nano-structures. Methods that permit tomographic reconstruction from a reduced number of STEM acquisitions without introducing significant degradation in the final volume are thus of particular importance. In random-beam STEM (RB-STEM), the projection measurements are acquired by randomly scanning a subset of pixels at every tilt view. In this work, we present a tailored RB-STEM acquisition-reconstruction framework that fully exploits the compressed sensing principles. We first demonstrate that RB-STEM acquisition fulfills the "incoherence" condition when the image is expressed in terms of wavelets. We then propose a regularized tomographic reconstruction framework to recover volumes from RB-STEM measurements. We demonstrate through simulations on synthetic and real projection measurements that the proposed framework reconstructs high-quality volumes from strongly downsampled RB-STEM data and outperforms existing techniques at doing so. This application of compressed sensing principles to STEM paves the way for a practical implementation of RB-STEM and opens new perspectives for high-quality reconstructions in STEM tomography. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Development of an equipment diagnostic system that evaluates sensor drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanada, Masaki; Arita, Setsuo; Tada, Nobuo; Yokota, Katsuo

    2011-01-01

    The importance of condition monitoring technology for equipment has increased with the introduction of condition-based maintenance in nuclear power plants. We are developing a diagnostic system using process signals for plant equipment, such as pumps and motors. It is important to enable the diagnostic system to distinguish sensor drift and equipment failure. We have developed a sensor drift diagnostic method that combines some highly correlative sensor signals by using the MT (Mahalanobis-Taguchi) method. Furthermore, we have developed an equipment failure diagnostic method that measures the Mahalanobis distance from the normal state of equipment by the MT method. These methods can respectively detect sensor drift and equipment failure, but there are the following problems. In the sensor drift diagnosis, there is a possibility of misjudging the sensor drift when the equipment failure occurs and the process signal changes because the behavior of the process signal is the same as that of the sensor drift. Oppositely, in the equipment failure diagnosis, there is a possibility of misjudging the equipment failure when the sensor drift occurs because the sensor drift influences the change of process signal. To solve these problems, we propose a diagnostic method combining the sensor drift diagnosis and the equipment failure diagnosis by the MT method. Firstly, the sensor drift values are estimated by the sensor drift diagnosis, and the sensor drift is removed from the process signal. It is necessary to judge the validity of the estimated sensor drift values before removing the sensor drift from the process signal. We developed a method for judging the validity of the estimated sensor drift values by using the drift distribution based on the sensor calibration data. And then, the equipment failure is diagnosed by using the process signals after removal of the sensor drifts. To verify the developed diagnostic system, several sets of simulation data based on abnormal cases

  20. Primary beams of an electron beam ion source (EBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenoir-Zink, E.

    1986-06-01

    Electron guns for the ion sources of the SATURN II facility were tested and compared with models. The guns tested were a gun with 36 mm diameter cathode, 7 mm, 4 mm, 4 mm with insulated Whenelt, and 8 mm. A lanthanium hexaboride cathode is presented. For the primary ion beams, zeolite and plasma sources were realized. In DIONE, which will replace CRYEBIS as ion source in SATURNE, the density of the electron beam compressed within the maximum magnetic field can be evaluated. Results indicate a factor of 3 improvement compared with CRYEBIS. Lithium sources can be used, but gas sources do not produce significant improvements [fr

  1. Demersally drifting invertebrates from Kongsfjorden, Svalbård (Arctic Ocean)-a comparison of catches from drift-pump and drift-nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Joo, Hyoung-Min; Lee, Jae Hyung; Yun, Mi Sun; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Sang Heon

    2015-12-01

    Demersally drifting organisms were collected at Ny Ålesund (Svalbård-Arctic Ocean) to study the taxon composition and relative abundances in the Arctic summer. Catch potentials of two collection devices for demersal drift were compared. A lowvolume submersible drift-pump and a drift-net unit were employed for the collection of demersally drifting biota, particularly for shallow aquatic habitats. With the exception of Appendicularia, Chaetognatha, Coelenterata, and Ctenophora, which were damaged at times, the pump catches were in good condition and sufficient for identification and quantification of less mobile fauna. A comparison of the two devices revealed that the drift-pump collected more specimens than the drift-net. However, the drift-net may have caused an underestimation of the abundances of invertebrates. No differences in identified taxon number and indices of richness, evenness and diversity were found. However, the proportion of invertebrate animals in the two devices was different for the three groups: zooplankton, macrofauna and meiofauna. At Svalbård, zooplankton, larvae of macrofauna, and meiofauna were successfully collected by the two collecting devices. However, the catchibility of the two devices in collecting various invertebrate taxa was different and, therefore, a sound `Device Effect' was revealed.

  2. Performance of a prototype drift chamber with 100 MHz FADC readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.M.; Blissett, J.A.; Hart, J.C.; Hasell, D.K.; Parham, A.G.; Payne, B.T.; Roberts, J.H.C.; Saxon, D.H.; Foster, B.; Gilmore, R.S.; Malos, J.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilkinson, N.

    1988-01-01

    Rectangular drift chamber cells have been constructed and tested using an electron test beam facility at DESY. A systematic study of the time, spatial, energy and double track resolutions with a 100 MHz FADC readout is presented. The resolution is 100 to 120 μm and the double track resolution is 2.5 mm with an Ar:C 2 H 6 (50:50) gas mixture at atmospheric pressure. The dE/dx resolution obtained corresponds to 6% resolution for a 72-layer chamber. (orig.)

  3. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  4. The drift tube track finder muon trigger at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, I

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose experiment designed to study proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the LHC, proton beams will cross each other at a rate of 40 MHz, producing on average 20 p-p interactions. The CMS level-1 trigger must select interesting collisions at a rate smaller than 100 kHz. This report describes in particular the CMS drift tube track finder (DTTF) muon trigger. Its motivation, electronic implementation, and expected performance are presented.

  5. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  6. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  7. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, Jerome L.V.

    2003-01-01

    There are growing experimental, numerical and theoretical evidences that the anomalous transport observed in tokamaks and stellarators is caused by slow, drift-type modes (such as trapped electron modes and ion-temperature gradient-driven modes). Although typical collision frequencies in hot, magnetized fusion plasmas can be quite low in absolute values, collisional effects are nevertheless important since they act as dissipative sinks. As it is well known, dissipative systems with many (strictly speaking more than two) degrees of freedom are often chaotic and may evolve towards a so-called attractor

  8. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  9. Analysis of digisonde drift measurements quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    90-91, December (2012), s. 212-221 ISSN 1364-6826. [IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES-II TG4 Workshop on Vertical Coupling in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere System /4./. Prague, 14.02.2011-18.02.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300420904; GA AV ČR IAA300420704 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Ionosphere * Plasma drifts * Skymap * Digisonde Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.417, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612001290

  10. Effects of Drifting Macroalgae in Eelgrass Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canal Vergés, Paula; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Kristensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    –10 mg suspended particulate matter (SPM) L-1 to 30–50 mg SPM L 1 for Ceramium sp., Ulva lactuca and Chaetomorpha linum, respectively, while the more rigid Gracilaria sp. and Fucus vesiculosus lead to much higher turbidity (50–180 mg SPM L−1). Preliminary results from Odense Fjord (Denmark) confirm...... and physical damage on eelgrass can occur when macroalgae are drifting as bedload. The ballistic effect of moving macroalgae on surface sediment was tested in the field as well as in a series of annular flume experiments, where simultaneous measurements of macroalgae transport and turbidity were measured...

  11. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  12. Crowdsourcing and annotating NER for Twitter #drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromreide, Hege; Hovy, Dirk; Søgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present two new NER datasets for Twitter; a manually annotated set of 1,467 tweets (kappa=0.942) and a set of 2,975 expert-corrected, crowdsourced NER annotated tweets from the dataset described in Finin et al. (2010). In our experiments with these datasets, we observe two important points: (a......) language drift on Twitter is significant, and while off-the-shelf systems have been reported to perform well on in-sample data, they often perform poorly on new samples of tweets, (b) state-of-the-art performance across various datasets can beobtained from crowdsourced annotations, making it more feasible...

  13. MedArgo: a drifting profiler program in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-M. Poulain

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the EU-funded MFSTEP project, autonomous drifting profilers were deployed throughout the Mediterranean Sea to collect temperature and salinity profile data and to measure subsurface currents. The realization of this profiler program in the Mediterranean, referred to as MedArgo, is described and assessed using data collected between June 2004 and December 2006 (including more than 2000 profiles. Recommendations are provided for the permanent future implementation of MedArgo in support of operational oceanography in the Mediterranean Sea.

    More than twenty drifting profilers were deployed from research vessels and ships-of-opportunity in most areas of the Mediterranean. They were all programmed to execute 5-day cycles with a drift at a parking depth of 350 m and CTD profiles from either 700 or 2000 m up to the surface. They stayed at the sea surface for about 6 h to be localised by, and transmit the data to, the Argos satellite system. The temperature and salinity data obtained with pumped Sea-Bird CTD instruments were processed and made available to the scientific community and to operational users in near-real time using standard Argo protocols, and were assimilated into Mediterranean numerical forecasting models.

    In general, the cycling and sampling characteristics chosen for the MedArgo profilers were found to be adequate for the Mediterranean. However, it is strongly advised to use GPS and global cellular phone telemetry or the future Argos bi-directional satellite system in order to avoid data compression and losses, for the continuation of the Mediterranean drifting profiler program.

  14. Performance Analysis of a Bunch and Track Identifier Prototype (BTI) for the CMS Barrel Muon Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta Pelayo, J.

    2001-01-01

    This note contains a short description of the first step in the first level trigger applied to the barrel muon drift chambers of CMS: the Bunch and Track Identifier (BTI). The test beam results obtained with a BTI prototype have been also analysed BTI performance for different incidence angles and in presence of external magnetic field has been tested, as well as BTI capability as trigger device and track reconstructor. (Author) 30 refs

  15. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  16. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  17. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.T. Raczka

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation.

  18. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ISOLATION DOOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to review and refine key design concepts related to the control system presently under consideration for remotely operating the emplacement drift isolation doors at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis will discuss the key design concepts of the control system that may be utilized for remotely monitoring, opening, and closing the emplacement drift isolation doors. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Discuss the purpose and function of the isolation doors (Presented in Section 7.1). (2) Review the construction of the isolation door and other physical characteristics of the doors that the control system will interface with (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Discuss monitoring and controlling the operation of the isolation doors with a digital control system (either a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) system or a Distributed Control System (DCS)) (Presented in Section 7.3). (4) Discuss how all isolation doors can be monitored and controlled from a subsurface central control center (Presented in Section 7.4). This analysis will focus on the development of input/output (I/O) counts including the types of I/O, redundancy and fault tolerance considerations, and processor requirements for the isolation door control system. Attention will be placed on operability, maintainability, and reliability issues for the system operating in the subsurface environment with exposure to high temperatures and radiation

  19. PWCs and drift chambers at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, H.; Teramoto, Y.; Wheeler, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    Rate effects in proportional chambers and drift chambers are addressed first. The widely used high-gas-gain chambers would have impaired performance at ISABELLE data rates. Improvement can be expected with lower gas gain, and this possibility is investigated with respect to position and time resolution. Results on chamber lifetime are summarized; space-charge effects, gain saturation, and radiation hardness of electronics are considered. The resolution of drift chambers is discussed in some detail; time resolution, double pulse resolution, and momentum resolution and multiple scattering are included. The expected high multiplicity of tracks from a single event, the high event rates, and the requirement for low gas gain necessitate revision of the methods for measuring the second coordinate. Known methods of two-dimensional point localization are summarized according to spatial accuracy, electronics requirements, and multihit capability. Delay lines, charge division, and cathode strips are considered. Particle identification by means of measurement of the relativistic rise of energy loss by conventional and unconventional means was investigated. 32 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  20. Metabolic drift in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H Paul; Epstein, Adrian A; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E; Fox, Howard S; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energymetabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication.

  1. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Mariner

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO 3 -SO 4 -Br-CO 3 -SiO 2 -CO 2 -O 2 -H 2 O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO 3 - , CO 3 2- , OH - , H + , HSO 4 - , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , CaHCO 3 + , MgHCO 3 + , HSiO 3 - , and MgOH + ); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral

  2. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3

  3. Proportional drift tubes for large area muon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Maruyama, A.; Okusawa, T.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahashi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    A proportional drift chamber which consists of eight rectangular drift tubes with cross section of 10 cm x 5 cm, a sense wire of 100 micron phi gold-plated tungsten wire and the length of 6 m, was tested using cosmic ray muons. Spatial resolution (rms) is between 0.5 and 1 mm over drift space of 50 mm, depending on incident angle and distance from sense wire.

  4. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  5. Compression and expansion in central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of central collisions of heavy nuclei in the energy range from few tens of MeV/nucleon to a couple of GeV/nucleon is discussed. As the beam energy increases and/or the impact parameter decreases, the maximum compression increases. It is argued that the hydrodynamic behaviour of matter sets in the vicinity of balance energy. At higher energies shock fronts are observed to form within head-on reaction simulations, perpendicular to beam axis and separating hot compressed matter from cold. In the semi-central reactions a weak tangential discontinuity develops in-between these fronts. The hot compressed matter exposed to the vacuum in directions parallel to the shock front begin to expand collectively into these directions. The expansion affects particle angular distributions and mean energy components and further shapes of spectra and mean energies of particles emitted into any one direction. The variation of slopes and the relative yields measured within the FOPI collaboration are in a general agreement with the results of simulations. As to the FOPI data on stopping, they are consistent with the preference for transverse over the longitudinal motion in the head-on Au + Au collisions. Unfortunately, though, the data can not be used to decide directly on that preference due to acceptance cuts. Tied to the spatial and temporal changes in the reactions are changes in the entropy per nucleon. (authors)

  6. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  7. Transition from avalanche dominated transport to drift-wave dominated transport in a basic laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George; Maggs, James; Sydora, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated plasma pressure embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. The off-axis source is active for a period long compared to the density decay time, i.e. as time progresses the power per particle increases. Two distinct regimes are observed to take place, an initial regime dominated by avalanches, identified as sudden intermittent rearrangements of the pressure profile, and a second regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The transition between the two regimes is sudden, affects the full radial profile and is preceded by the growth of drift Alfvén waves. Langmuir probe data will be shown on the evolution of the density, temperature and flow profiles during the transition. The character of the sustained drift wave activity will also be presented. Work supported by NSF/DOE Grant 1619505, and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  8. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  9. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  10. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  11. Analysis of drift correction in different simulated weighing schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrici, A.; Rebelo, A.; Quintão, D.; Cacais, F. L.; Loayza, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    In the calibration of high accuracy mass standards some weighing schemes are used to reduce or eliminate the zero drift effects in mass comparators. There are different sources for the drift and different methods for its treatment. By using numerical methods, drift functions were simulated and a random term was included in each function. The comparison between the results obtained from ABABAB and ABBA weighing series was carried out. The results show a better efficacy of ABABAB method for drift with smooth variation and small randomness.

  12. A new silicon drift detector with reduced lateral diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castoldi, A. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holl, P. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Paul-Gerhardt-Allee 42, D-81245 Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    We present a method to reduce the effect of diffusion in the direction transverse to the drift in silicon drift detectors. This is achieved by creating regions of deep p-implant parallel to the drift direction that act as rigid guidelines during the drift of the charge cloud generated by a radiation interaction. The influence of the deep implanted acceptors on the lateral confining field is discussed. A prototype has been designed, fabricated and tested. First experimental results are reported which demonstrate the achieved reduction of the lateral width of the electron cloud with respect to free broadening. (orig.).

  13. 3lambda/4 post coupler for drift-tube linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billen, J.H.; Garcia, J.A.; Potter, J.M.; Spalek, G.

    1985-01-01

    New permanent magnets for quadrupole focusing make possible smaller drift tubes in drift-tube linacs (DTLs), resulting in higher shunt impedance. However, ordinary post couplers cannot stabilize a DTL whose drift-tube-to-wall spacing exceeds one-quarter wavelength (lambda/4) by more than a few per cent for the accelerating mode frequency. We have built and tested post couplers that operate in the 3lambda/4 mode. These 3lambda/4 post couplers, when substituted for lambda/4 couplers, had similar stabilization properties. In addition, the coupling between post and drift tube, and the post's resonant frequency can be independently adjusted. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  15. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  16. Recent US advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Qin, H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev, E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2007-01-01

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport, and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by >50X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. We are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy

  17. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  18. A drift chamber track finder for the first level trigger of the H1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, T.; Riedlberger, J.; Arpagaus, M.; Bernet, R.; Eichler, R.; Grab, C.; Beck, H.P.; Egli, S.; Eichenberger, S.; Mueller, K.; Meyer, C.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The information from the central drift chamber of the H1 experiment is used in a first level trigger to find an count charged tracks, originating from genuine ep collisions at the HERA storage ring. Background processes, predominantly from beam-wall and beam-gas interactions, are discriminated because their distance of closest approach to the collision vertex differs from good events. The track finder is desgined in a pipelined fashion, producing decisions at the bunch crossing frequency of f b =10.4 MHz, however delayed by a fixed decision time of 2.3 μs. This operation is deadtime free but still uniquely related to the specific bunch crossing 24 cycles earlier. The hardware implementation relies on XILINX logic cell arrays which are programmable providing a high flexibility. (orig.)

  19. Simulation of extraction of high current uranium beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, W.; Spaedtke, P.; Hollinger, R.; Galonska, M.; Heymach, F.

    2005-01-01

    To generate uranium ion beam with high current and high brightness to fill up the heavy ion synchrotron SIS to its space charge limit, the behavior of the uranium ion beam in the extraction system and the postacceleration system for a high current metal vapor vacuum arc ion source has been investigated using the KOBRA3-INP code. The beam trajectory and space charge map in the extraction system as well as space profiles and the emittance diagrams of the ion beam along the beam line are presented. The influences of degree of the space charge compensation on the characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. The results show that the ion beam has to be space charge compensated from the screening electrode to the entrance of the acceleration gap; otherwise the transport would not be possible. Simulation also quantitatively supports the experimental results under the assumption of the full space charge compensation in the drift sections

  20. Silicon Drift Detectors with the Drift Field Induced by PureB-Coated Trenches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihomir Knežević

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Junction formation in deep trenches is proposed as a new means of creating a built-in drift field in silicon drift detectors (SDDs. The potential performance of this trenched drift detector (TDD was investigated analytically and through simulations, and compared to simulations of conventional bulk-silicon drift detector (BSDD configurations. Although the device was not experimentally realized, the manufacturability of the TDDs is estimated to be good on the basis of previously demonstrated photodiodes and detectors fabricated in PureB technology. The pure boron deposition of this technology allows good trench coverage and is known to provide nm-shallow low-noise p+n diodes that can be used as radiation-hard light-entrance windows. With this type of diode, the TDDs would be suitable for X-ray radiation detection down to 100 eV and up to tens of keV energy levels. In the TDD, the drift region is formed by varying the geometry and position of the trenches while the reverse biasing of all diodes is kept at the same constant voltage. For a given wafer doping, the drift field is lower for the TDD than for a BSDD and it demands a much higher voltage between the anode and cathode, but also has several advantages: it eliminates the possibility of punch-through and no current flows from the inner to outer perimeter of the cathode because a voltage divider is not needed to set the drift field. In addition, the loss of sensitive area at the outer perimeter of the cathode is much smaller. For example, the simulations predict that an optimized TDD geometry with an active-region radius of 3100 µm could have a drift field of 370 V/cm and a photo-sensitive radius that is 500-µm larger than that of a comparable BSDD structure. The PureB diodes on the front and back of the TDD are continuous, which means low dark currents and high stability with respect to leakage currents that otherwise could be caused by radiation damage. The dark current of the 3100-µm TDD

  1. Tabulated In-Drift Geometric and Thermal Properties Used In Drift-Scale Models for TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.D. Francis

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to provide in-drift physical properties required by the drift-scale models (both two- and three-dimensional) used in total system performance assessments (TSPA). The physical properties include waste package geometry, waste package thermal properties, emplacement drift geometry including backfill and invert geometry and properties (both thermal and hydrologic), drip shield geometry and thermal properties, all tabulated in a single source

  2. The Diagonal Compression Field Method using Circular Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new design method, which is a modification of the diagonal compression field method, the modification consisting of the introduction of circular fan stress fields. The traditional method does not allow changes of the concrete compression direction throughout a given beam if ...... fields may be used whenever changes in the concrete compression direction are desired. To illustrate the new design method, a specific example of a prestressed concrete beam is calculated.......This paper presents a new design method, which is a modification of the diagonal compression field method, the modification consisting of the introduction of circular fan stress fields. The traditional method does not allow changes of the concrete compression direction throughout a given beam...... if equilibrium is strictly required. This is conservative, since it is not possible fully to utilize the concrete strength in regions with low shear stresses. The larger inclination (the smaller -value) of the uniaxial concrete stress the more transverse shear reinforcement is needed; hence it would be optimal...

  3. Theoretical study of cylindrical energy analyzers for MeV range heavy ion beam probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Hamada, Y.

    1993-07-01

    A cylindrical energy analyzer with drift spaces is shown to have a second order focusing for beam incident angle when the deflection angle is properly chosen. The analyzer has a possibility to be applied to MeV range heavy ion beam probes, and will be also available for accurate particle energy measurements in many other fields. (author)

  4. Compressive and flexural strength of cement mortar stabilized with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test cubes and beams measuring 150 x 150 x 150mm and 160 x 40 x 40mm were cast and subjected to cube and central point loading crushing tests respectively. Density measurements were also taken. The compressive strength of test specimens were found to reduce with increases in RPFP fibre while the flexural ...

  5. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  6. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  7. Electro-mechanics of drift tube wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milburn, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The position and stability of the sense wires in very long drift tubes are affected by both gravitational and electrostatic forces, as well as by the wire tension. For a tube to be used as an element of a high-resolution detector all these forces and their effects must be understood in appropriately precise detail. In addition, the quality control procedures applied during manufacture and detector installation must be adequate to ensure that the internal wire positions remain within tolerances. It may be instructive to practitioners to review the simple theory of a taut wire in the presence of anisotropic gravitational and electrostatic fields to illustrate the conditions for stability, the equilibrium wire displacement from straightness, and the effect of the fields on the mechanical vibration frequencies. These last may be used to monitor the wire configuration externally. A number of practical formulae result and these are applied to illustrative examples. (orig.)

  8. Variable-energy drift-tube linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J.; Potter, J.M.; Stovall, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Practical applications of ion linacs are more viable now than ever before because of the recent development of the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerating structure, as well as other technological advances developed under the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations program. This report describes a practical technique for varying the energy of drift-tube linacs and thus further broadening the possibilities for linac applications. This technique involves using the post couplers (normally used to flatten and stabilize the electric fields) to create a step in the fields, thus terminating the acceleration process. In the examples given for a 70-MeV accelerator design, when using this technique the energy is continuously variable down to 20 MeV, while maintaining a small energy spread

  9. Nonlinear evolution of drift cyclotron modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.; Lee, Y.C.; Liu, C.S.; Nicholson, D.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    The space-time evolution of the drift-cyclotron instability as influenced by the nonlinear shift in the ion-cyclotron frequency is studied analytically, numerically, and by computer simulation. The analysis is specialized to the case of a single coherent wave with frequency near both a cyclotron harmonic and the ion diamagnetic frequency. Such an analysis is motivated by observations of large-amplitude ion-cyclotron waves in the 2XIIB mirror experiment, which were highly monochromatic and often exhibited these frequency characteristics. A nonlinear dispersion relation describing saturation of the instability is derived by means of a self-consistent analytical solution of the Vlasov--Poisson equations to third order in the wave amplitude. Solitary wave and self-similar solutions are obtained that describe nonlinear wave propagation. Numerical solution of a nonlinear evolution equation and particle simulation confirm the analysis

  10. Multilevel Drift-Implicit Tau-Leap

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Hammouda, Chiheb

    2016-01-06

    The dynamics of biochemical reactive systems with small copy numbers of one or more reactant molecules is dominated by stochastic effects. For those systems, discrete state-space and stochastic simulation approaches were proved to be more relevant than continuous state-space and deterministic ones. In systems characterized by having simultaneously fast and slowtimescales, the existing discrete space-state stochastic path simulation methods such as the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) and the explicit tauleap method can be very slow. Implicit approximations were developed in the literature to improve numerical stability and provide efficient simulation algorithms for those systems. In this work, we propose an efficient Multilevel Monte Carlo method in the spirit of the work by Anderson and Higham (2012) that uses drift-implicit tau-leap approximations at levels where the explicit tauleap method is not applicable due to numerical stability issues. We present numerical examples that illustrate the performance of the proposed method.

  11. Physics issues of compact drift optimized stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Hirshman, S.; Berry, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Physics issues are discussed for compact stellarator configurations which achieve good confinement by the fact that the magnetic field modulus, vertical bar B vertical bar, in magnetic coordinates is dominated by poloidally symmetric components. Two distinct configuration types are considered: (1) those which achieve their drift optimization and rotational transform at low β and low bootstrap current by appropriate plasma shaping; and (2) those which have a greater reliance on plasma β and bootstrap currents for supplying the transform and obtaining quasi poloidal symmetry. Stability analysis of the latter group of devices against ballooning, kink and vertical displacement modes has indicated that stable 's on the order of 15% are possible. The first class of devices is being considered for a low β near-term experiment that could explore some of the confinement features of the high beta configurations. (author)

  12. Beam dynamics and commissioning of low and medium energy H- beam at Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Satri, Masoomeh Yarmohammadi; Lombardi, Alessandra; Lamehi-Rachti , Mohammad

    The First step of the CERN Large Hadron Collider injectors upgrade (LIU) project is Linac4. It accelerates H- ions to 160 MeV in an 80 m long accelerator housed in a tunnel 12 m underground, presently under construction. It will replace the present 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector of the proton accelerator complex to increase the LHC luminosity. It consists of a 45 keV RF volume source, a twosolenoid Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 352.2 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating the beam to 3 MeV, a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The MEBT houses a fast chopper to selectively remove unwanted micro-bunches in the 352 MHz sequence and avoid losses at capture in the CERN PSB (1 MHz). After chopping, the beam acceleration continues by a 50 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a 100 MeV Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac and a Pi-Mode Structure bringing the beam to the final energy of 160 MeV. Linac4 has been commissioned with a temporary source up to 12 MeV. The beam commissioning stages of Linac4 in LEBT...

  13. Experimental study of fast electron propagation in compressed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Perez, F.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Benocci, R.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Coury, M.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Honrubia, J. J.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Jarrot, L. C.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Köster, P.; MacKinnon, A. J.; McKenna, P.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Pasley, J.; Ramis, R.; Rhee, Y.; Regan, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Serres, F.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schurtz, G.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vaisseau, X.; Volpe, L.; Yahia, V.

    2011-10-01

    We report on experimental results of the fast electron transport in compressed plasmas, created by laser-induced shock propagation in both cylindrical and planar geometry. Two experiments were carried out. The first one was based on the compression of a polyimide cylinder filled with foams of three different initial densities ( ρ0). X-ray and proton radiographies of the target during the compression coupled with hydrodynamic simulations show that the obtained core densities and temperatures range from 2 to 11 g/cm 3 and from 30 to 120 eV, respectively. By studying the K-shell fluorescence from dopant atoms inside the target and from tracer layers situated at both front and rear side of the target it has been possible to investigate the fast electron propagation. The results show that Cu Kα yield emitted by the target rear side foil decreases with increasing compression, independently of ρ0. An electron collimation can also be observed for certain experimental conditions where a convergent resistivity gradient interacts with the fast electron beam. The second experiment was performed in a planar geometry with a compressing shock counter-propagative to the fast electron beam. In this case the areal density ρz seen by the electrons is constant during the compression in such a way that changes in the fast electron range should be ascribed to collective mechanisms. The study of the Kα fluorescence, from buried fluorescent layers of different atomic numbers, shows that the electrons with energy HiPER project.

  14. Performance of a Thin-Wndow Silicon Drift Detector X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, G.; Chen, W.; De Geronimo, G.; Gaskin, J.; Keister, J.; Li, Z.; Ramey, B.; Rehak, P. and Siddons, P.

    2009-10-01

    Several sets of hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) arrays were produced by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and by the commercial vendor, KETEK. These detector arrays were tested at BNL. Each array consists of 14 independent SDD detectors (pixels) and two additional test pixels located at two corners of the array. The side of the detector upon which the X-ray radiation is incident (window side) has a thin junction covering the entire active area. The opposite side (device side) contains a drift-field electrode structure in the form of a hexagonal spiral and an electron collecting anode. There are four guard rings surrounding the 14-pixel array area on each side of the detector. Within each array, seven pixels have aluminum field plates - interrupted spirals that stabilize the electric potential under the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, while the other seven do not. Three bias voltages are applied to control the drift field in the silicon volume; one is applied to a rectifying contact surrounding the central anode (one for each pixel), one is applied to the detector entrance window (common to the full array), and a third bias is applied to a contact on the outer portion of the spiral, common to all pixels in the array. Some arrays were recently tested in NSLS beam line U3C at BNL. For this work, we installed the complete assemblies in the vacuum and cooled them to -27degC. During this beam run, we collected spectra for energies ranging between 350 and 900 eV in several pixels, some with field plates and others without. The detailed testing results of several arrays are reported here.

  15. Performance of a Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Gabriella A.; Chen, Wei; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Li, Zheng; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; Siddons, David P.

    2009-10-01

    Several sets of hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) arrays were produced by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and by the commercial vendor, KETEK. These detector arrays were tested at BNL. Each array consists of 14 independent SDD detectors (pixels) and two additional test pixels located at two corners of the array. The side of the detector upon which the X-ray radiation is incident (window side) has a thin junction covering the entire active area. The opposite side (device side) contains a drift-field electrode structure in the form of a hexagonal spiral and an electron collecting anode. There are four guard rings surrounding the 14-pixel array area on each side of the detector. Within each array, seven pixels have aluminum field plates - interrupted spirals that stabilize the electric potential under the Si- SiO2 interface, while the other seven do not. Three bias voltages are applied to control the drift field in the silicon volume; one is applied to a rectifying contact surrounding the central anode (one for each pixel), one is applied to the detector entrance window (common to the full array), and a third bias is applied to a contact on the outer portion of the spiral, common to all pixels in the array. Some arrays were recently tested in NSLS beam line U3C at BNL. For this work, we installed the complete assemblies in the vacuum and cooled them to -27degC. During this beam run, we collected spectra for energies ranging between 350 and 900 eV in several pixels, some with field plates and others without. The detailed testing results of several arrays are reported here.

  16. The Roles of Fluid Compression and Shear in Electron Energization during Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Birn, Joachim

    2018-03-01

    Particle acceleration in space and astrophysical reconnection sites is an important unsolved problem in studies of magnetic reconnection. Earlier kinetic simulations have identified several acceleration mechanisms that are associated with particle drift motions. Here, we show that, for sufficiently large systems, the energization processes due to particle drift motions can be described as fluid compression and shear, and that the shear energization is proportional to the pressure anisotropy of energetic particles. By analyzing results from fully kinetic simulations, we show that the compression energization dominates the acceleration of high-energy particles in reconnection with a weak guide field, and the compression and shear effects are comparable when the guide field is 50% of the reconnecting component. Spatial distributions of those energization effects reveal that reconnection exhausts, contracting islands, and island-merging regions are the three most important regions for compression and shear acceleration. This study connects particle energization by particle guiding-center drift motions with that due to background fluid motions, as in the energetic particle transport theory. It provides foundations for building particle transport models for large-scale reconnection acceleration such as those in solar flares.

  17. Spectroscopic measurements with a silicon drift detector having a continuous implanted drift cathode-voltage divider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvicini, V; D'Acunto, L; Franck, D; Gregorio, A; Pihet, P; Rashevsky, A; Vacchi, A; Vinogradov, L I; Zampa, N

    2000-01-01

    A silicon drift detector (SDD) prototype where the drift electrode also plays the role of a high-voltage divider has been realised and characterised for spectroscopic applications at near-room temperatures. Among the advantages of this design, is the absence of metal on the sensitive surface which makes this detector interesting for soft X-rays. The detector prototype has a large sensitive area (2x130 mm sup 2) and the charge is collected by two anodes (butterfly-like detector). The energy resolution of a such a detector has been investigated at near-room temperatures using a commercial, hybrid, low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier. The results obtained for the X-ray lines from sup 5 sup 5 Fe and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am are presented.

  18. A chopper-stabilized long pulse integrator with low drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yongqing; Xie Jikang; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao

    2006-01-01

    A chopper-stabilized integrator for tokamak with a digital signal processing unit to dynamically suppress the primary drift factors of analog integrator, has been designed. Long pulse integrations with low drift have been obtained with this apparatus in experiments. (authors)

  19. Solitary drift waves in the presence of magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.; Horton, W.

    1982-07-01

    The two-component fluid equations describing electron drift and ion acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma are shown to possess nonlinear two-dimensional solitary wave solutions. In the presence of magnetic shear, radiative shear damping is exponentially small in L/sub s//L/sub n/ for solitary drift waves, in contrast to linear waves

  20. The F-Region Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics Drifts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ionospheric plasma drift is one of the most essential parameters for understanding the dynamics of ionospheric F-region. F-region electromagnetic drifts are calculated for three seasonal conditions from ionosonde observations acquired during quiet period of a typical year of high and low solar activity at Ibadan (7.4oN, ...

  1. Drift correction in a multichannel integrated optical Young interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ymeti, Aurel; Greve, Jan; Lambeck, Paul; Wijn, Robert Raimond; Heideman, Rene; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that in a sensor based on a multichannel Young interferometer, the phase information obtained for different pairs of channels can be used to correct the long-term instability (drift) due to temperature differences between measuring and reference channels, the drift in the alignment of

  2. New Pulsars Discovered in Arecibo Drift-Scan Searches

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Champion, D. J.; Xilouris, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D. C.; Cordes, J. M.; Lommen, A. N.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    We report on new pulsars discovered in Arecibo drift-scan data. Processing of 2200 square degrees of data has resulted in the detection of 41 known and 12 new pulsars. New pulsars include two millisecond pulsars, one solitary and one binary recycled pulsar, and one pulsar with very unusual pulse profile morphology and complex drifting subpulse behavior.

  3. Filtering and analysis on the random drift of FOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Yun-Zeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyro (FOG) is an optical gyroscope which is based on the Sagnac effect and uses the optical fiber coil as light propagation channel. Gyro drift consists of two components: systemic drift and random drift. Systemic drift can be compensated by testing and calibrating. Random drift changes with time, so it becomes an important indicator to measure the precision of gyroscope, which has a great impact on the inertial navigation system. It can't be compensated by the simple method. Random drift is a main error of fiber optic gyro (FOG). The static output of FOG is a random project and it has more random noise when as the inertial navigation sensor, which will affect the measurement accuracy. It is an efficient method to reduce the random drift and improve the accuracy by modeling and compensation from the output of FOG. According to the characteristic of fiber optic gyro, the random drift model is studied. Using the time series method, the constant component of the random noise original data is extracted. After stationarity and normality tests, a normal random process is acquired. Based on this, the model is established using the recursive least squares, and then the model is applied to the normal Kalman and adaptive Kalman, finally the data is process with the filter. After experimental verification, the noise variance was reduced after filtering, and the effect is obvious.

  4. Drift wave studies in a linear multiple mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1983-06-01

    The drift wave is modeled by a linear kinetic theory which treats finite ion gyroradius, collisions, an electron temperature gradient, and trapped electrons. The theory predicts three unstable modes, only one of which is consistent with all of the above measurements. This instability is a Doppler shifted drift cyclotron instability modified by trapped particle effects

  5. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-09-15

    On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  6. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Idrish Miah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  7. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  8. Field-crop-sprayer potential drift measured using test bench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balsari, Paolo; Gil, Emilio; Marucco, Paolo; Zande, van de Jan C.; Nuyttens, David; Herbst, Andreas; Gallart, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    Because of variations in environmental conditions, spray-drift field measurements following ISO 22866:2005 involve complicated and time-consuming experiments often with low repeatability. Therefore, simple, repeatable, and precise alternative drift assessment methods that are complementary to the

  9. Resistive drift wave turbulence in a three-dimensional geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    1999-01-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model describing resistive drift waves is investigated analytically and numerically in a three-dimensional periodic geometry. After an initial growth of the energy the drift waves couple nonlinearly to convective cells, which eventually dominate the system completely...

  10. Prediction of littoral drift with artificial neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, A.K.; Deo, M.C.; SanilKumar, V.

    of the rate of sand drift has still remained as a problem. The current study addresses this issue through the use of artificial neural networks (ANN). Feed forward networks were developed to predict the sand drift from a variety of causative variables...

  11. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.C.; Frank, J.A.; Liska, D.J.; Potter, R.C.; Schamaun, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder

  12. A drift free nernstian iridium oxide PH sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, J.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1997-01-01

    A novel way of eliminating drift problems in metal oxide pH sensors is presented. The method employs a FET-structure under the electrode that uses the metal oxide as a gate contact. In addition to the enhanced drift properties, the new sensor has an almost ideal nernstian response. First a

  13. Obtaining the Space-Time Relationship of Drift Tubes from the Drift-Time Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, Mario

    1999-01-01

    Autocalibration of MDT chambers requires a good start-value for the space-time relation\\-ship. This note presents two improvements on the ``Integration Method'': the first corrects for $\\delta$-rays, the second also takes into account resolution and efficiency effects. Both methods use only the drift-time spectrum. The new methods improve the rms error from 345\\,$\\mu$m to 80\\,$\\mu$m and 18\\,$\\mu$m respectively.

  14. Channel box compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamizo, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuki.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the volume of spent fuel channel boxes of power plant facilities to eliminate secondary wastes, suppress generation of radiation sources and improve storage space efficiency. The device has a box-like shape. A support frame is disposed on the lateral side of the box for supporting spent channel boxes. A horizontal transferring unit and a vertical transferring compression unit driven by a driving mechanism are disposed in the support frame. Further, the compression unit may have a rotational compression roller so as to move freely in the transferring unit. In addition, the transferring unit and the driving mechanism may be disposed outside of pool water. With such a constitution, since spent channel boxes are compressed and bent by horizontal movement of the transferring unit and the vertical movement of the compression unit, no cut pieces or cut powders are generated. Further, if the transferring unit and the driving mechanism are disposed outside of the pool water, it is not necessary to make them waterproof, which facilitates the maintenance. (I.S.)

  15. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  16. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  17. Drift estimation for single marker switching based imaging schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Claudia; Hotz, Thomas; Schönle, Andreas; Hell, Stefan W; Munk, Axel; Egner, Alexander

    2012-03-26

    In recent years, the diffraction barrier in fluorescence imaging has been broken and optical nanoscopes now routinely image with resolutions of down to 20 nm, an improvement of more than 10 fold. Because this allows imaging much smaller features and because all super-resolution approaches trade off speed for spatial resolution, mechanical instabilities of the microscopes become a limiting factor. Here, we propose a fully data-driven statistical registration method for drift detection and drift correction for single marker switching (SMS) imaging schemes, including a guideline for parameter choice and quality checks of the drift analysis. The necessary assumptions about the drift are minimal, allowing a model-free approach, but more specific models can easily be integrated. We determine the resulting performance on standard SMS measurements and show that the drift determination can be routinely brought to the range of precision achievable by fiducial marker-tracking methods.

  18. Compressive strength of continuous fiber unidirectional composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald H.

    Dow and Rosen's work in 1965 formed an intellectual framework for compressive strength of unidirectional composites. Compressive strength was explained in terms of micro-buckling, in which filaments are beams on an elastic foundation. They made simplifying assumptions, with a two dimensional idealization and linearized material properties. This study builds on their model, recognizing that the shear mode of instability drives unidirectional compressive strength. As a necessary corollary, the predictive methods developed in this study emphasize correct representation of composite shear stiffness. Non-linear effects related to matrix material properties, fiber misalignment, three dimensional representation, and thermal prestrains are taken into account. Four work streams comprise this study: first, development of a closed form analytical model; second, empirical methods development and model validation; third, creation and validation of a unit cell finite element model; and fourth, a patent application that leverages knowledge gained from the first three work streams. The analytical model characterizes the non-linearity of the matrix both with respect to shear and compressive loading. This improvement on existing analyses clearly shows why fiber modulus affects composite shear instability. Accounting for fiber misalignment in the model and experimental characterization of the fiber misalignment continuum are important contributions of this study. A simple method of compressive strength measurement of a small diameter monofilament glass-resin composite is developed. Sample definition and preparation are original, and necessary technologies are easily assessable to other researchers in this field. This study shows that glass fiber composites have the potential for high compressive strength. This potential is reached with excellent fiber alignment and suitable matrix characteristics, and results are consistent with model predictions. The unit cell three dimensional

  19. Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating pulsed electron and light ion beam accelerators, with the goal of demonstrating the practical application of such drivers as igniters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Recent developments in the program are described. Traditionally, two requirements of ICF reactor operation have been the most difficult to satisfy in conceptual designs. Adequate standoff of critical components from damaging pellet emissions must be assured, and the shot repetition rate must be consistent with the desired reactor power level at reasonable pellet gains. Progress in power compression, beam focusing and transport, first-wall protection schemes, and net-energy-gain target design shows how these requirements can be met

  20. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  1. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  2. Study on crack propagation in tubular joints under compressive fatigue loadings

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Claire; Nussbaumer, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Large scale tubular truss beams, approximately of 9 m long and 2 m high, were tested under constant amplitude fatigue loading. The beams were made out of circular hollow sections of steel S355, welded to form a uni-planar truss with K-joints, in a shape common to bridge construction. The main goal of these tests was to focus on the fatigue behavior of the joints loaded in compression that is with chord in compression, one diagonal in compression and the remaining diagonal in tension. The test...

  3. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  4. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  5. Electromagnetic computer simulations of collective ion acceleration by a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.; Gisler, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    A 2.5 electromagnetic particle-in-cell computer code is used to study the collective ion acceleration when a relativistic electron beam is injected into a drift tube partially filled with cold neutral plasma. The simulations of this system reveals that the ions are subject to electrostatic acceleration by an electrostatic potential that forms behind the head of the beam. This electrostatic potential develops soon after the beam is injected into the drift tube, drifts with the beam, and eventually settles to a fixed position. At later times, this electrostatic potential becomes a virtual cathode. When the permanent position of the electrostatic potential is at the edge of the plasma or further up, then ions are accelerated forward and a unidirectional ion flow is obtained otherwise a bidirectional ion flow occurs. The ions that achieve higher energy are those which drift with the negative potential. When the plasma density is varied, the simulations show that optimum acceleration occurs when the density ratio between the beam (n b ) and the plasma (n o ) is unity. Simulations were carried out by changing the ion mass. The results of these simulations corroborate the hypothesis that the ion acceleration mechanism is purely electrostatic, so that the ion acceleration depends inversely on the charge particle mass. The simulations also show that the ion maximum energy increased logarithmically with the electron beam energy and proportional with the beam current

  6. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  7. Experimental study of fast electron propagation in compressed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauzour, B. [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Talence (France); Santos, J.J., E-mail: Santos.Joao@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Talence (France); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Baton, S.D.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Univ. Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Nicolai, Ph. [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Talence (France); Perez, F. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Univ. Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Beg, F.N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Benedetti, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Benocci, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Brambrink, E. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605 CNRS-CEA-Ecole Polytechnique-Univ. Paris VI, Palaiseau (France); Chawla, S. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Coury, M. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C. [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA), Talence (France); Galimberti, M. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Gizzi, L.A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory at INO-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Heathcote, R. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Higginson, D.P. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Honrubia, J.J. [ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2011-10-11

    We report on experimental results of the fast electron transport in compressed plasmas, created by laser-induced shock propagation in both cylindrical and planar geometry. Two experiments were carried out. The first one was based on the compression of a polyimide cylinder filled with foams of three different initial densities ({rho}{sub 0}). X-ray and proton radiographies of the target during the compression coupled with hydrodynamic simulations show that the obtained core densities and temperatures range from 2 to 11 g/cm{sup 3} and from 30 to 120 eV, respectively. By studying the K-shell fluorescence from dopant atoms inside the target and from tracer layers situated at both front and rear side of the target it has been possible to investigate the fast electron propagation. The results show that Cu K{sub {alpha}} yield emitted by the target rear side foil decreases with increasing compression, independently of {rho}{sub 0}. An electron collimation can also be observed for certain experimental conditions where a convergent resistivity gradient interacts with the fast electron beam. The second experiment was performed in a planar geometry with a compressing shock counter-propagative to the fast electron beam. In this case the areal density {rho}z seen by the electrons is constant during the compression in such a way that changes in the fast electron range should be ascribed to collective mechanisms. The study of the K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence, from buried fluorescent layers of different atomic numbers, shows that the electrons with energy <75keV are more affected by resistive losses in compressed compared to non-compressed targets. These two experiments were part of the Experimental Fusion Validation Program of the HiPER project.

  8. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  9. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner, P.

    2003-01-01

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO 3 -SO 4 -Br-CO 3 -SiO 2 -CO 2 -O 2 -H 2 O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of

  10. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases

  11. Timing calibration of the trigger system for the drift tube detector of the OPERA neutrino oscillation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkeit, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The OPERA experiment searches for ν μ → ν τ oscillations in an almost pure ν μ beam. The goal is to observe the oscillations in appearance mode by using a large-scale lead/emulsion target to resolve individual ν τ interactions. Magnetic spectrometers measure the charge and momentum of beam induced muons leaving the target sections. The Precision Tracker, a drift tube detector consisting of almost 10000 drift tubes, provides the tracking information inside the spectrometers. The coordinate measurement in the drift tubes is derived from a time measurement relative to an external trigger signal. In order to reach the required momentum resolution of less than 25 % for particle momenta up to 25 GeV, the uncertainty on the trigger timing must not exceed a value of 5 ns. In this thesis, a procedure for the timing calibration of the trigger system is presented. A step-by-step calibration of the corresponding signal paths is described. Applying all calibration results, a spatial resolution of 255 μm is achieved for the Precision Tracker, meeting the specified requirements. Furthermore, a method using the calibrated trigger system for performing time of flight measurements with atmospheric muons is developed. The average error on the measured flight times is ±4.5 ns.

  12. The modified drift-Poisson model: Analogies with geophysical flows and Rossby waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Finn, J. M.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss an analogy between magnetically confined nonneutral plasmas and geophysical fluid dynamics. The analogy has its roots in the modified drift Poisson model, a recently proposed model that takes into account the plasma compression due to the variations of the plasma length [1]. The conservation of the line integrated density in the new model is analogous to the conservation of potential vorticity in the shallow water equations, and the variation of the plasma length is isomorphic to variations in the Coriolis parameter with latitude or to topography variations in the quasigeostrophic dynamics. We discuss a new class of linear and nonlinear waves that owe their existence to the variations of the plasma length. These modes are the analog of Rossby waves in geophysical flows

  13. Basalt FRP Spike Repairing of Wood Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Righetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes aspects within an experimental program aimed at improving the structural performance of cracked solid fir-wood beams repaired with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP spikes. Fir wood is characterized by its low density, low compression strength, and high level of defects, and it is likely to distort when dried and tends to fail under tension due to the presence of cracks, knots, or grain deviation. The proposed repair technique consists of the insertion of BFRP spikes into timber beams to restore the continuity of cracked sections. The experimental efforts deal with the evaluation of the bending strength and deformation properties of 24 timber beams. An artificially simulated cracking was produced by cutting the wood beams in half or notching. The obtained results for the repaired beams were compared with those of solid undamaged and damaged beams, and increases of beam capacity, bending strength and of modulus of elasticity, and analysis of failure modes was discussed. For notched beams, the application of the BFRP spikes was able to restore the original bending capacity of undamaged beams, while only a small part of the original capacity was recovered for beams that were cut in half.

  14. Effects of Alfvénic Drift on Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-03-01

    Non-detection of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters has challenged diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at weak collisionless shocks that are expected to form in the intracluster medium. As an effort to address this problem, we here explore possible roles of Alfvén waves self-excited via resonant streaming instability during the CR acceleration at parallel shocks. The mean drift of Alfvén waves may either increase or decrease the scattering center compression ratio, depending on the postshock cross-helicity, leading to either flatter or steeper CR spectra. We first examine such effects at planar shocks, based on the transport of Alfvén waves in the small amplitude limit. For the shock parameters relevant to cluster shocks, Alfvénic drift flattens the CR spectrum slightly, resulting in a small increase of the CR acceleration efficiency, η. We then consider two additional, physically motivated cases: (1) postshock waves are isotropized via MHD and plasma processes across the shock transition, and (2) postshock waves contain only forward waves propagating along with the flow due to a possible gradient of CR pressure behind the shock. In these cases, Alfvénic drift could reduce η by as much as a factor of five for weak cluster shocks. For the canonical parameters adopted here, we suggest η ∼ 10‑4–10‑2 for shocks with sonic Mach number M s ≈ 2–3. The possible reduction of η may help ease the tension between non-detection of γ-rays from galaxy clusters and DSA predictions.

  15. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  16. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate

  17. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  18. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  19. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  20. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...