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Sample records for beam cured composites

  1. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  2. Advanced composites--a new application of electron beam curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Dakuan

    2007-01-01

    Consisting of a matrix phase of epoxy resin and reinforcement phase of high performance synthetic fiber, advanced composites have a number of engineering merits, such as high specific strength and specific modulus, light weight, fatigue resistance, corrosion resistance and dimensional stability, etc. Advanced composites have been applied in aerospace/aircraft industry, military industry, high pressure vessels, automobile industry and sports apparatus. Nowadays, advanced composites are produced by electron beam curing, an environment-friendly technology with greater safety and energy efficiency than conventional curing techniques. This paper gives a review on progresses of electron beam cured advanced composites. (authors)

  3. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  4. Electron beam curing of aramid fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Singh, A.; Lopata, V.J.; Boyer, G.D.; Kremers, W.; Mason, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    High strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios have allowed fiber-reinforced composites to be used for many applications, including aircraft and aerospace products, sporting goods and automotive components. Electron beam (EB) processing involves using electrons to initiate polymerization and/or crosslinking reactions in suitable polymer substrates to enhance specific physical and chemical properties. The advantages of using EB processing rather than thermal curing techniques for composites, include reduced internal stresses, a result of curing at ambient temperature, greatly reduced curing times, and better control of energy absorption. The penetration limit for a 10-MeV electron beam is about 4 cm for one-sided treatment of unit-density material, making EB processing suitable for many applications. The penetration limit is inversely proportional to the density of the material. This paper reports on the authors' research program to study EB-curable aramid fiber-reinforced composites. The program objective is to design and manufacture EB-curable composites that meet mechanical and physical property specifications for selected applications. The suitability of standard fabrication methods, such as filament winding and hand lay-up, to EB processing is also discussed

  5. Gamma and electron beam curing of polymers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Dickson, L.W.; Singh, A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation polymerization has helped us understand polymer chemistry, and is also playing an increasing role in the field of practical applications. Radiation curing has a present market share of about 5% of the total market for curing of polymers and composites and the annual growth rate of the radiation curing market is ≥20% per year. Advantages of radiation curing over thermal or chemical curing methods include: improved control of the curing rate, reduced curing times, curing at ambient temperatures, curing without the need for chemical initiators, and complete (100%) curing with minimal toxic chemical emissions. Radiation treatment may also be used to effect crosslinking and grafting of polymer and composite materials. The major advantage in these cases is the ability to process products in their final shape. Cable insulation, automotive and aircraft components, and improved construction materials are some of the current and near-future industrial applications of radiation curing and crosslinking. 19 refs

  6. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

  7. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  8. Electron beam curing paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu

    1991-04-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) type paint is paint that is specially prepared so that it can be cured and dried by electron beam irradiation. Electron beam irradiation achieves hardly any curing and drying of ordinary normal-temperature drying type paint or heat-drying type paint. The main type of paint in which an electron beam produces a curing reaction is one in which a radical polymerization reaction takes place under irradiation. The use of this EBC painting - drying system has been considered for a variety of fields since it has a number of special features such as the fact that the paint dries instantaneously, no heat is applied and no solvent is used. (Author)

  9. Beam in on curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, Dr.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam curing of paints and allied materials is discussed. Examples of applications are: silicone papers; painting of metal; bonding of flake adhesives; bonding of grinding media (binders); paints for external uses; painting shaped parts; bi-reactive painting systems. An example is given of the calculation of the cost of irradiation. (U.K.)

  10. Beam in on curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, Dr.

    1981-01-01

    This third part of an article on the electron beam curing of paints covers the following aspects: inertising equipment; working without inert gas; increase in temperature when irradiating; irradiating plants; laboratory plants; plant operating from coil to coil; plant for shaped parts; possible applications; decorative films, paper, PVC; packaging material; metallisation of paper films; film bonding; strengthening of flock; coating; pressure sensitive adhesives. (U.K.)

  11. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  12. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor ...

  13. Electron beam-cured coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Naoyuki

    1976-01-01

    The method for hardening coatings by the irradiation with electron beams is reviewed. The report is divided into seven parts, namely 1) general description and characteristics of electron beam-cured coating, 2) radiation sources of curing, 3) hardening conditions and reaction behaviour, 4) uses and advantages, 5) latest trends of the industry, 6) practice in the field of construction materials, and 7) economy. The primary characteristics of the electron beam hardening is that graft reaction takes place between base resin and coating to produce strong adhesive coating without any pretreatment. A variety of base resins are developed. High class esters of acrylic acid monomers and methacrylic acid monomers are mainly used as dilutants recently. At present, scanning type accelerators are used, but the practical application of the system producing electron beam of curtain type is expected. The dose rate dependence, the repetitive irradiation and the irradiation atmosphere are briefly described. The filed patent applications on the electron beam hardening were analyzed by the officer of Japan Patent Agency. The production lines for coatings by the electron beam hardening in the world are listed. In the electron beam-cured coating, fifty percent of given energy is consumed effectively for the electron beam hardening, and the solvents discharged from ovens and polluting atmosphere are not used, because the paints of high solid type is used. The running costs of the electron beam process are one sixth of the thermal oven process. (Iwakiri, K.)

  14. Electron beam curing of coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, S.; Fujikawa, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) method, by which hardened coating film is obtained by polymerizing and cross-linking paint with electron beam, has finally reached industrialized stage. While about seven items such as short curing time, high efficiency of energy consumption, and homogeneous curing are enumerated as the advantages of EBC method, it has limitations of the isolation requirement from air needing the injection of inert gas, and considerable amount of initial investment. In the electron accelerators employed in EBC method, the accelerating voltage is 250 to 750 kV, and the tube current is several tens of mA to 200 mA. As an example of EBC applications, EBC ''Erio'' steel sheet was developed by the cooperative research of Nippon Steel Corp., Dai-Nippon Printing Co. and Toray Industries, Inc. It is a high-class pre-coated metal product made from galvanized steel sheets, and the flat sheets with cured coating are sold, and final products are fabricated by being worked in various shapes in users. It seems necessary to develop the paint which enables to raise added value by adopting the EBC method. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Electron beam curing - taking good ideas to the manufacturing floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.; Lopata, V.; Barnard, J.; Stepanik, T.

    2000-01-01

    Acsion is exploiting several emerging electron beam EB applications ranging from composite curing and repair to viscose manufacturing. EB curing of composite structures offers several advantages: significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; improvements in material handling; and reduced overall manufacturing costs compared to thermal curing. The aerospace industry is developing EB technology in all of their market sectors, including military aviation and space products. Some specific products include cryogenic fuel tanks, improved canopy frames for jet aircraft, and the all-composite military aircraft. This paper discusses each of these opportunities. (author)

  16. Study of Electron Beam Curing Process Using Epoxy Resin System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitsuji, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    The competition among industries in the current globalization system has required a systematic cost reduction without affecting the quality of the final product. This fact has encouraged the use of new technologies application on productive process, especially on polymeric composites, to assure the competitiveness. The possibility of producing a new type of carbon fiber reinforced composite by radiation process with excellent thermal and mechanical properties, has been researched since 90's and it can be a potential application in aerospace, marine and automobile industries. The polymeric composites cured by thermal process (furnace or autoclave) are an example of long curing cycles, which requires time and energy consumption. Electron beam curing technology allows the process at room temperature and reduces curing time; consequently, it becomes the main difference of this technology over thermal curing process. The aim of this work was to study electron beam curable epoxy formulation for filament winding process, as well as to investigate the electron beam curing process parameters using a DC 1500/25 - Job 188 Dynamitron model linear accelerator as radiation source, with 0.5 to 1.5 MeV, 0.1 to 25 mA and 60 to 120 cm scanning electron beam. The resin system consists of commercial epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A - DGEBA) and cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoantimonate) and the polymerization carried out at room temperature with controlled dose rate. Thermal post cure took part of the process to improve the degree of cure and glass transition temperature (Tg) similar to thermal curable resin properties

  17. Curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBC) using micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRaman). Four bulk-fill RBCs were compared to a conventional RBC. RBC blocks were light-cured using a polywave LED light-curing unit. The 24-h degree of conversion (DC) was mapped along a longitudinal cross-section using μRaman. Curing profiles were constructed and 'effective' (>90% of maximum DC) curing parameters were calculated. A statistical linear mixed effects model was constructed to analyze the relative effect of the different curing parameters. Curing efficiency differed widely with the flowable bulk-fill RBCs presenting a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the fibre-reinforced RBC, which on its turn revealed a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the full-depth bulk-fill and conventional (control) RBC. A decrease in 'effective' curing depth within the light beam was found in the same order. Only the flowable bulk-fill RBCs were able to cure 'effectively' at a 4-mm depth for the whole specimen width (up to 4mm outside the light beam). All curing parameters were found to statistically influence the statistical model and thus the curing profile, except for the beam inhomogeneity (regarding the position of the 410-nm versus that of 470-nm LEDs) that did not significantly affect the model for all RBCs tested. Most of the bulk-fill RBCs could be cured up to at least a 4-mm depth, thereby validating the respective manufacturer's recommendations. According to the curing profiles, the orientation and position of the light guide is less critical for the bulk-fill RBCs than for the conventional RBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The cytotoxicity of resin composites cured with three light curing units at different curing distances

    OpenAIRE

    Ergün, Gülfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Cekic Nagas, Isil

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of light curing distance on the cytotoxicity of five resin composites cured with three high-power light curing units. Study design: Seven cylindrical discs of each material (Grandio ®, Voco; Filtek ? Z250, 3M ESPE; Clearfil ? AP-X, Kuraray Co. Ltd.; Aelite ? LS, Bisco Inc. and Simile ®, Pentron) were cured. For curing, soft-up mode of quartz-tungsten-halogen, exponential mode of light emitting diode for 20 s, and ramp-curing m...

  19. Electron beam processing of polymers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Electron beam processing has emerged as one of the foremost techniques for surface treatment of materials. Recently polymers and advanced composites are being treated with the electron beams of 1-10 MeV. In polymers the surface improvement is caused by radiation curing, cross linking and grafting. It has made inroads in vital sector of plastic industries in industrially advanced countries. Advanced composites can also be cured at ambient temperatures thus avoiding emission of volatiles during curing. Details of all these aspects of electron beam processing of polymers and composites are given. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  20. The cytotoxicity of resin composites cured with three light curing units at different curing distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Cekic-Nagas, Isil

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of light curing distance on the cytotoxicity of five resin composites cured with three high-power light curing units. Seven cylindrical discs of each material (Grandio®, Voco; Filtek™ Z250, 3M ESPE; Clearfil™ AP-X, Kuraray Co. Ltd.; Aelite™ LS, Bisco Inc. and Simile®, Pentron) were cured. For curing, soft-up mode of quartz-tungsten-halogen, exponential mode of light emitting diode for 20 s, and ramp-curing mode of plasma arc light curing units for 6 s were used. The curing tip distances were determined as 2 and 9 mm and controlled via the use of metal rings. After ageing the samples for 24 and 72 hours in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium/Ham's F12 (DMEM/F12), cytotoxicity of the extracts to cultured fibroblasts (L 929) was measured by using MTT (tetrazolium salt 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The degree of cytotoxicity for each sample was determined according to the reference value represented by the cells in a pure culture medium. Statistical significance was determined using multifactorial analysis of variance. The type of resin composite (p light curing unit (p curing tip distance (p light emitting diode and plasma arc light curing units were used (p=0.184, F=1.448). The results of this study suggest that the light curing units and resin composites should be harmonized to one another and the curing distance between the tip of the light curing unit and the restoration surface should be as close as possible in order to achieve maximal biocompatibility.

  1. Study of electron beam curing process using epoxy resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Delmo A.; Marinucci, Gerson; Evora, Maria C.; de Andrade e Silva, Leonardo G.

    2007-12-01

    Polymeric matrix composite (PMC) has been used in engineering applications instead of metal in the last few years, due to its corrosion resistance and excellent relation between tensile strength/density and elastic modulus/density. However, PMC materials cured by thermal process require high temperature and are time-consuming. The electron beam (EB) curing technology allows its use at room temperature and reduced curing times, and this is one of the main advantages over thermal technology. The aim of this work is to investigate electron beam curable epoxy formulations to use in filament winding processes to produce composite material with similar or better properties than thermal curable composites. The study has been made with commercial epoxy resins and cationic initiators. The epoxy resin samples were irradiated for few minutes with total dose of 150 kGy. The glass transition temperatures ( Tg) were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and the result was 137 °C. The thermal process was carried out in a furnace following three steps: 4 h at 90 °C, increasing temperature from 90 °C to 130 °C during 4 h and 12 h at 130 °C. The total process time was 20 h. The Tg of this sample was 102 °C.

  2. Study of electron beam curing process using epoxy resin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitsuji, Delmo A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha - CTMSP, Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Marinucci, Gerson [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Evora, Maria C. [Instituto de Estudos Avancados - IEAv/CTA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Andrade Silva, Leonardo G de e [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br

    2007-12-15

    Polymeric matrix composite (PMC) has been used in engineering applications instead of metal in the last few years, due to its corrosion resistance and excellent relation between tensile strength/density and elastic modulus/density. However, PMC materials cured by thermal process require high temperature and are time-consuming. The electron beam (EB) curing technology allows its use at room temperature and reduced curing times, and this is one of the main advantages over thermal technology. The aim of this work is to investigate electron beam curable epoxy formulations to use in filament winding processes to produce composite material with similar or better properties than thermal curable composites. The study has been made with commercial epoxy resins and cationic initiators. The epoxy resin samples were irradiated for few minutes with total dose of 150 kGy. The glass transition temperatures (T{sub g}) were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and the result was 137 deg. C. The thermal process was carried out in a furnace following three steps: 4 h at 90 deg. C, increasing temperature from 90 deg. C to 130 deg. C during 4 h and 12 h at 130 deg. C. The total process time was 20 h. The T{sub g} of this sample was 102 deg. C.

  3. Electron beam curing — taking good ideas to the manufacturing floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, C.; Lopata, V.; Barnard, J.; Stepanik, T.

    2000-03-01

    Acsion is exploiting several emerging electron beam EB applications ranging from composite curing and repair to viscose manufacturing. EB curing of composite structures offers several advantages: significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; improvements in material handling; and reduced overall manufacturing costs compared to thermal curing. The aerospace industry is developing EB technology in all of their market sectors, including military aviation and space products. Some specific products include cryogenic fuel tanks, improved canopy frames for jet aircraft, and the all-composite military aircraft. This paper discusses each of these opportunities.

  4. Electron beam curing of acrylic oligomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, J.; Arakawa, S.; Ishimoto, C.; Miyashita, M.; Nagai, T.; Noguchi, T.; Shibata, A.

    1984-01-01

    The electron-beam curing process of acrylic oligomers, with and without γ-Fe 2 O 3 pigment filler and blended linear polymer, was investigated in terms of molecular structure and reaction mechanism. The polymerized fraction of trimethylolpropane-triacrylate (TMPTA) oligomers increases with increasing total dose, and is independent of the dose rate. Since the reaction rate is linearly dependent on the dose rate, the reaction mechanism involves monomolecular termination. The reaction rate does not depend on the number of functional groups of the oligomer at low doses, but above 0.3 Mrad the rate is slower for oligomers of higher functionality. A gel is formed more readily upon curing of a polyfunctional than a monofunctional oligomer, especially at high conversion to polymer; the resulting loss of flexibility of the polymer chains slows the reaction. Decrease of the molecular weight per functional group results in lower conversion; this is also due to the loss of chain flexibility, which is indicated as well by a higher glass-transition temperature. Modification of the acrylate oligomers with urethane results in more effective cross-linking reactions because of the more rigid molecular chains. Addition of γ-Fe 2 O 3 pigment reduces the reaction rate very little, but has the effect of providing added structural integrity, as indicated by the decrease of solvent-extractable material and the improvement of anti-abrasion properties. However, the flexibility of the coating and its adhesion to a PET base film are diminished. To increase the flexibility, linear polyvinylchloride and/or polyurethane were added to the acrylic oligomers. Final conversion to polymer was nearly 100 percent, and a higher elastic modulus and better antiabrasion properties were realized

  5. Manufacturing prepainted steel sheet by electron beam curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Joji

    1987-01-01

    Several advantages are offered by electron beam curing. A formidably hard and stain resistant paint film which is difficult to obtain by heat curing paint is developed. As a result, a unique new prepainted steel is produced. Four technologies are involved: development high-quality paint, selection of optimum electron beam processor, technology to control electron beam processing atmosphere and secondary X-ray shield technology. These technologies are described in detail. (A.J.)

  6. Application of thiolterminated prepolymers for electron beam curing coating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, Kenji; Isozaki, Osamu; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1988-01-01

    It has been known that the mixture of an unsaturated prepolymer and a thiolated prepolymer can be cured by the relatively low dose of electron beam irradiation. As a thiolated prepolymer, polyether-polythiol prepolymer has been in the market. However, the coating films derived from the composition comprising the thiolated prepolymer do not have enough mechanical strength for practical use. In this study, the synthesis of thiolterminated urethane prepolymer and the coating composition comprising this prepolymer for obtaining the coating films having good mechanical properties were investigated. The raw materials used for the synthesis of thiolterminated urethane prepolymer are shown. Its synthesis and the measurement of thiol content, coating formation, the electron beam curing of the coatings and the testing method of coated film performance are explained. The results of the synthesis of the thiolterminated urethane prepolymer, the thermal stability, curability, physical properties and adhesion strength of the coatings are reported. The coatings can be applied to steel and PVC films, and used as the adhesive for steel-PVC film laminates. (Kako, I.)

  7. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  8. Magnetoactive elastomeric composites: Cure, tensile, electrical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    frequency is due to the hopping of charge carriers (Papa- thanassiou 2002). 5. Conclusions. Magnetoactive composites containing nickel in poly- chloroprene and nitrile matrices have been prepared. The cure characteristics reveal that the processability and flexibility of the matrix is not affected much even up to a maximum ...

  9. Cure Behavior and Thermal Properties of Diepoxidized Cardanol Resin Cured by Electron Beam Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Donghwan; Cheon, Jinsil

    2013-01-01

    Thermal curing of epoxy resin requires high temperature, time-consuming process and the volatilization of hardener. It has known that electron beam curing of epoxy resin is a fast process and occurs at low or room temperature that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in thermosetting polymers. Diepoxidized cardanol (DEC) can be synthesized by an enzymatic method from cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), that constitutes nearly one-third of the total nut weight. A large amount of CNSL can be formed as a byproduct of the mechanical processes used to render the cashew kerneledible and its total production approaches one million tons annually, which can be bio-degradable and replace the industrial thermosetting plastics. It is expected that DEC may be cured as in an epoxy resin, which was constituted on two epoxide group and long alkyl chain, and two-types of onium salts (cationic initiator) were used as a photo-initiator. The experimental variables of this study are type and concentration of photo-initiators and electron beam dosage. In this study, the effects of initiator type and concentration on the cure behavior and the thermal properties of DEC resin processed by using electron beam technology were studied using FT-IR, TGA, TMA, DSC, and DMA. Figure 1 is the FT-IR results, showing the change of chemical structure of pure DEC and electron beam cured DEC. The characteristic absorption peak of epoxide group appeared at 850cm -1 . The shape and the height were reduced when the sample was irradiated with electron beam. From this result, the epoxide groups is DEC were opened by electron beam and cured. After then, electron beam cured DEC was investigated the effect of forming 3-dimensional network

  10. Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    As the size of aerospace composite parts exceeds that of even the largest autoclaves, the development of new out-of-autoclave processes and materials is necessary to ensure quality and performance. Many out-of-autoclave prepreg systems can produce high-quality composites initially; however, due to long layup times, the resin advancement commonly causes high void content and variations in fiber volume. Applied Poleramic, Inc. (API), developed an aerospace-grade benzoxazine matrix composite prepreg material that offers more than a year out-time at ambient conditions and provides exceptionally low void content when out-of-autoclave cured. When compared with aerospace epoxy prepreg systems, API's innovation offers significant improvements in terms of out-time at ambient temperature and the corresponding tack retention. The carbon fiber composites developed with the optimized matrix technology have significantly better mechanical performance in terms of hot-wet retention and compression when compared with aerospace epoxy matrices. These composites also offer an excellent overall balance of properties. This matrix system imparts very low cure shrinkage, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and low density when compared with most aerospace epoxy prepreg materials.

  11. Study on the heat-resistant EB curing composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jianwen; Li Yang; Li Fengmei

    2000-01-01

    There are many advantages in the EB-curing process of composites. Heat-resistant EB-curing composites could substitute for polyimide composites used in aeronautical engine. The effects of catalyst and dose on the cured resin were investigated. The heat-resistance of the resin cured by EB was evaluated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The experiment result shows that the mechanical property of the composites cured by EB could meet the needs of the aeronautical engine in 250degC. (author)

  12. Curing depth of composite resin light cured by LED and halogen light-curing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, L. R.; Lima, D. M.; Queiroz, R. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization effectiveness of a composite resin (Z-250) utilizing microhardness testing. In total, 80 samples with thicknesses of 2 and 4 mm were made, which were photoactivated by a conventional halogen light-curing unit, and light-curing units based on LED. The samples were stored in water distilled for 24 h at 37°C. The Vickers microhardness was performed by the MMT-3 microhardness tester. The microhardness means obtained were as follows: G1, 72.88; G2, 69.35; G3, 67.66; G4, 69.71; G5, 70.95; G6, 75.19; G7, 72.96; and G8, 71.62. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA’s test), adopting a significance level of 5%. The results showed that, in general, there were no statistical differences between the halogen and LED light-curing units used with the same parameters.

  13. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  14. Ultraviolet and electron beams: energy efficient methods of curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, K.

    1982-01-01

    The use of ultraviolet or electron beam radiation for the curing of surface coatings is described. Examples are taken from a number of industries, particular attention being paid to the paper varnishing and printed circuit industries. The components of the coatings used in these processes and toxicology and safety aspects are considered. (author)

  15. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  16. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  17. Electron beam curing polyurethane acrylate oligomer in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zhenkang; Chen, Xing; Zhou, Jichun; Ma, Zue-Teh

    1988-01-01

    It has been found according to our synthesis that a novel kind of polyurethane acrylate oligomer can be cured by electron beam in the presence of oxygen, even at normal atomospheric levels, without any additives. Irradiation of the oligomer with substantially complete cure to a solid non-tacky state is quite remarkable. It has the same gel content (90 %) in air as in nitrogen at dose of 33 kGy. Double bond conversion of the oligomer is about 50 % by I.R. (author)

  18. An emerging alternative to thermal curing: Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; Chung, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites to produce materials with good mechanical properties has been demonstrated by the authors' work, and by Aerospatiale. The attractions of this technology are the technical and processing advantages offered over thermal curing, and the projected cost benefits. Though the work so far has focused on the higher value composites for the aircraft and aerospace industries, the technology can also be used to produce composites for the higher volume industries, such as transportation and automotive

  19. Application of electron beam curing in web-offset printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.M.; Newcomb, W.T.

    1984-01-01

    Four years ago, the first commercial installation of an electron beam processor, coupled with a high speed web offset printing press was described. This line has been in operation since and its success demonstrates the advantages and feasibility of such an application. Just recently, another company has announced that it is using electron beam curing in its printing lines. Judging from the amount of inquiries and opportunities being actively pursued one can state that the use of electron beam systems in printing applications has come of age. This paper describes the advantages of this process, the characteristics of the equipment that are important for industrial use in a multishift environment, and addresses its economics through analysis of some major cost elements

  20. Improvements in self-curing composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Zbigniew; Jałbrzykowski, Marek

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of a barbituric acid derivative acting as a catalyst and small amounts of pyrolytic silica in acrylic resins on color stability, solubility and sorption of a composite. A series of two-component powder/liquid resin systems were prepared. Monomer-like mixtures (bis-GMA, TEGDMA, tertiary amine 60/40) and a quartz powder with additions of various silica and barbituric acid derivatives were used. Temperature of the material during polymerization was measured with the use of a thermometer. In addition, the material's flexural and compressive strength, sorption and solubility were tested pursuant to ISO4049:2009. The powder-based acrylic composition in a liquid mixed immediately before use, after an addition of a 0.5% barbituric acid derivative, has a lower temperature during the polymerization process (a reduction from 43°C to 37°C), whereas color stability over time is improved, with ΔE=1.81 for samples of powder mixtures containing between 0.45% of BPO and 0.15% of barbituric acid derivatives. For silanized quartz powder with 0.55% BPO and 0.1% BA+0.5% Aerosil R711, the obtained sorption value was 4.57±0.22μg/mm 3 , whereas solubility was 1.60±0.32μg/mm 3 . New catalytic system with barbituric acid derivative, improves color stability for samples stored at room condition and under light of high intensity. A two-phase composite (bis GMA TEGDMA/Quartz), with a new catalytic system with barbituric acid derivatives, has a lower self-cured temperature. Adding a small quantity of hydrophobic silica (0.5%) has a significant influence, with reduced sorption and solubility of the material. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studying Room Temperature Curing of Phenolic Resin and their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Beheshty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resins are synthetic low molecular weight thermoset resins which are polymerized and cured to higher molecular weights by condensation method. These resins have high weathering resistance, high oxidative thermal properties and good chemical resistance. Phenolic resins can be cured thermally or by acid curing. The most common method of curing phenolic resin is by thermal curing that takes place in the range of 130-180oC. At room temperature, however, phenolic resins are cured by acid catalysts. In this paper, room temperature curing of resol phenolic resin by para toluene sulphonic acid has been investigated. The acid quantity has been determined for room temperature curing of two types of resols to achieve a reasonable hardness and gelation time. Temperature curing and thermal stability of respective resins have been investigated by DSC and TGA, respectively. A glass-phenolic composite plate has been prepared and cured by these two methods. The results show that the optimum amount of acid is 20% by weight. Optimum mechanical properties, chemical resistance and thermal properties have been achieved for acid cured system. The hot cured resin, however, has better properties.

  2. Coherent instabilities of proton beams in accelerators and storage rings - experimental results, diagnosis and cures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, W.

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses diagnosis and cure of proton beam instabilities in accelerators and storage rings. Coasting beams and bunched beams are treated separately and both transverse and longitudinal instabilities are considered. (B.D.)

  3. Tetraglycidyl epoxy resins and graphite fiber composites cured with flexibilized aromatic diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigs, P.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to synthesize new ether modified, flexibilized aromatic diamine hardeners for curing epoxy resins. The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperatures of a tetraglycidyl epoxy, MY 720, cured with flexibilized hardeners and a conventional aromatic diamine was studied. Unidirectional composites, using epoxy-sized Celion 6000 graphite fiber as the reinforcement, were fabricated. The room temperature and 300 F mechanical properties of the composites, before and after moisture exposure, were determined. The Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of the composites was characterized using a double cantilever beam technique to calculate the critical strain energy release rate.

  4. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling the curing process of thick-section autoclave cured composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, A. C.; Dara, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature gradients are significant during cure of large area, thick-section composites. Such temperature gradients result in nonuniformly cured parts with high void contents, poor ply compaction, and variations in the fiber/resin distribution. A model was developed to determine the temperature distribution in thick-section autoclave cured composites. Using the model, long with temperature measurements obtained from the thick-section composites, the effects of various processing parameters on the thermal response of the composites were examined. A one-dimensional heat transfer model was constructed for the composite-tool assembly. The governing differential equations and associated boundary conditions describing one-dimensional unsteady heat-conduction in the composite, tool plate, and pressure plate are given. Solution of the thermal model was obtained using an implicit finite difference technique.

  6. Curing of Thick Thermoset Composite Laminates: Multiphysics Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, S.; Dhaliwal, G. S.; Huo, Z.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Apetre, N.; Iyyer, N.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are used in high-performance aerospace applications as they are resistant to fatigue, corrosion free and possess high specific strength. The mechanical properties of these composite components depend on the degree of cure and residual stresses developed during the curing process. While these parameters are difficult to determine experimentally in large and complex parts, they can be simulated using numerical models in a cost-effective manner. These simulations can be used to develop cure cycles and change processing parameters to obtain high-quality parts. In the current work, a numerical model was built in Comsol MultiPhysics to simulate the cure behavior of a carbon/epoxy prepreg system (IM7/Cycom 5320-1). A thermal spike was observed in thick laminates when the recommended cure cycle was used. The cure cycle was modified to reduce the thermal spike and maintain the degree of cure at the laminate center. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the effect of air flow in the oven, post cure cycles and cure temperatures on the thermal spike and the resultant degree of cure in the laminate.

  7. Rubber composites cured with sulphur and peroxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulphur, peroxide and mixed sulphur/peroxide curing systems were introduced in cross-linking of rubber matrices. The aim was to investigate the influence of curing system composition on ... types of rubber compounds with incorporated untraditional fillers as .... ment is based on the analysis of time dependence of thermal.

  8. A comparative evaluation of curing depth and compressive strength of dental composite cured with halogen light curing unit and blue light emitting diode: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C N Vijaya; Gururaj, M; Paul, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the curing depth and compressive strength of dental composite using halogen light curing unit and light emitting diode light curing unit. Eighty cylindrical composite specimens were prepared using posterior composite P60(3M). Forty specimens, out of which 20 samples (group A) cured with halogen light and 20 samples (group B) cured using light emitting diode (LED) light were checked for curing depth according to ISO 4049. Remaining 40 samples out of which 20 samples (group I) cured using halogen light and 20 samples (group II) cured using LED light were checked for compressive strength using Instron universal testing machine. Twenty samples (group A) cured with halogen light showed better curing depth than 20 samples (group B) cured with LED light. Twenty samples (group I) cured with halogen light showed almost similar results as 20 samples (group II) cured with LED light for compressive strength. Halogen light commonly used to cure composite resin have greater depth of cure, when compared to LED light, while both the lights produced compressive strength which is almost similar. Lower depth of cure with the LED unit, compared to the QTH unit, is associated with different light scattering due to differences in spectral emission. LED technology differs from QTH by the spectral emission that favorably matches the absorption spectrum of camphorquinone.

  9. Dual-cure luting composites: Part I: Filler particle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, S; Willems, G; Van Meerbeek, B; Lambrechts, P; Braem, M; Vanherle, G

    1993-03-01

    Fourteen dual-cure luting composites were analyzed for their filler particle shape, predominant and maximum filler size, and filler weight in function of their clinical use. Polished surfaces were etched with an argon ion beam and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The type of filler particles, either inorganic or prepolymerized, could clearly be recognized. Their shapes were angular, rounded or spherical, depending on the product. The maximum filler size varied extremely from less than 1 micron to 250 microns. A particle-size distribution analyser disclosed a bell-shaped filler-size distribution. The predominant filler size for all the products was much smaller than the maximum filler size. The filler weight varied from 36 to 77%. After ion etching, some products showed small areas with a low degree of filler loading. A classification of the luting composites based on the maximum filler size is proposed. Since the particle size varies widely within the group of products analyzed, a standard specification for luting composites is urgently needed.

  10. Ultraviolet and electron-beam curing of printing inks. January 1980-August 1987 (Citations from World Surface Coatings Abstracts). Report for January 1980-August 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning methods, techniques, and applications for the ultraviolet and electron-beam curing of printing inks. Topics include ink compositions, curing methods and equipment, cured-ink evaluations, screen printing inks, photoinitiators, and ink binders. The pollution and safety problems, and future trends of UV- and E-beam-cured printing inks are considered. Applications in screen printing on polyethylene or polypropylene bottles, and decorative printing of glass are also examined. (This updated bibliography contains 237 citations, 63 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  11. Depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Inaam; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manufacturers have introduced flowable composite resins that reportedly can be placed in increments of 4 mm or greater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins (SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Venus Bulk Fill) and a conventional flowable composite resin (Revolution Formula 2). Depth of cure was measured in terms of bottom-maximum Knoop hardness number (KHN) ratios and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049 scrape technique. Shades A2 and A3 of SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Revolution Formula 2 were tested. Venus Bulk Fill was tested in its only available shade (universal). Specimens in thicknesses of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm were polymerized for 20 or 40 seconds, and a hardness tester was used to determine the hardness ratios for each shade at each thickness. For the scraping technique, after specimens were exposed to the curing light, unpolymerized composite resin was removed with a plastic instrument, the polymerized composite was measured, and the length was divided by 2 per ISO guidelines. According to the KHN ratios and the scrape test, Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the manufacturer's claim of a 4-mm depth of cure at both 20 and 40 seconds of curing time. The overall results for depth of cure showed that Venus Bulk Fill ≥ SureFil SDR Flow ≥ Grandio Flow ≥ Revolution Formula 2.

  12. Influence of curing time, overlay material and thickness on three light-curing composites used for luting indirect composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; Carluccio, Fabio; Vitalone, Laura Merla; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    To assess the microhardness of three resin composites employed in the adhesive luting of indirect composite restorations and examine the influence of the overlay material and thickness as well as the curing time on polymerization rate. Three commercially available resin composites were selected: Enamel Plus HRI (Micerium) (ENA), Saremco ELS (Saremco Dental) (SAR), Esthet-X HD (Dentsply/DeTrey) (EST-X). Post-polymerized cylinders of 6 different thicknesses were produced and used as overlays: 2 mm, 3 mm, 3.5 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. Two-mm-thick disks were produced and employed as underlays. A standardized amount of composite paste was placed between the underlay and the overlay surfaces which were maintained at a fixed distance of 0.5 mm. Light curing of the luting composite layer was performed through the overlays for 40, 80, or 120 s. For each specimen, the composite to be cured, the cured overlay, and the underlay were made out of the same batch of resin composite. All specimens were assigned to three experimental groups on the basis of the resin composite used, and to subgroups on the basis of the overlay thickness and the curing time, resulting in 54 experimental subgroups (n = 5). Forty-five additional specimens, 15 for each material under investigation, were produced and subjected to 40, 80, or 120 s of light curing using a microscope glass as an overlay; they were assigned to 9 control subgroups (n = 5). Three Vicker's hardness (VH) indentations were performed on each specimen. Means and standard deviations were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA. Within the same material, VH values lower than 55% of control were not considered acceptable. The used material, the overlay thickness, and the curing time significantly influenced VH values. In the ENA group, acceptable hardness values were achieved with 3.5-mm or thinner overlays after 120 or 80 s curing time (VH 41.75 and 39.32, respectively), and with 2-mm overlays after 40 s (VH 54

  13. The Effect of Irradiation Distance on Microhardness of Resin Composites Cured with Different Light Curing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of five different resin composites at different irradiation distances (2 mm and 9 mm) by using three light curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light emitting diodes and plasma arc). Methods: A total of 210 disc-shaped samples (2 mm height and 6 mm diameter) were prepared from different resin composites (Simile, Aelite Aesthetic Enamel, Clearfil AP-X, Grandio caps and Filtek Z250). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen, light emitting diode and plasma arc curing units at two irradiation distances (2 mm and 9 mm). Then the samples (n=7/per group) were stored dry in dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin composite layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV). Data were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the resin composite groups, the type of the light curing units and the irradiation distances have significant effects on the microhardness values (P<.05). Conclusions: Light curing unit and irradiation distance are important factors to be considered for obtaining adequate microhardness of different resin composite groups. PMID:20922164

  14. Odontological light-emitting diode light-curing unit beam quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Magalhães Filho, Thales Ribeiro; Weig, Karin de Mello; Werneck, Marcelo Martins; da Costa Neto, Célio Albano; da Costa, Marysilvia Ferreira

    2015-05-01

    The distribution of light intensity of three light-curing units (LCUs) to cure the resin-based composite for dental fillings was analyzed, and a homogeneity index [flat-top factor (FTF)] was calculated. The index is based on the M2 index, which is used for laser beams. An optical spectrum analyzer was used with an optical fiber to produce an x-y power profile of each LCU light guide. The FTF-calculated values were 0.51 for LCU1 and 0.55 for LCU2, which was the best FTF, although it still differed greatly from the perfect FTF=1, and 0.27 for LCU3, which was the poorest value and even lower than the Gaussian FTF=0.5. All LCUs presented notably heterogeneous light distribution, which can lead professionals and researchers to produce samples with irregular polymerization and poor mechanical properties.

  15. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    hydroxyl group reactivity. Current work is directed to- wards the investigation of network formation by e-beam curing of diepoxy based systems (e.g. diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and the effect of presence of different OH containing species on the structural as well as mechanical properties of the e-beam cured materials.

  16. X-ray-cured carbon-fiber composites for vehicle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Arnold; Galloway, Richard A.; Cleland, Marshall R.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Dispenza, Dan; Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced composites were cured in molds using X-rays derived from a high-energy, high-current electron beam. X-rays could penetrate the mold walls as well as the fiber reinforcements and polymerize a matrix system. Matrix materials made from modified epoxy-acrylates were tailored to suitably low viscosity so that fiber wetting and adhesion could be attained. Techniques similar to vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and conventional vacuum bagging of wet lay-ups were used. Inexpensive reinforced polyester molds were used to fabricate vehicle fenders. Moderately low-dose X-ray exposure was sufficient to attain functional properties, such as resistance to heat distortion at temperatures as high as 180 °C. The matrix system contained an impact additive which imparted toughness to the cured articles. "Class A" high gloss surfaces were achieved. Thermo-analytical techniques were used on small-sized samples of X-ray-cured matrix materials to facilitate selection of a system for use in making prototypes of vehicle components. X-rays-penetrated metal pieces that were placed within layers of carbon-fiber twill, which were cured and bonded into a structure that could be mechanically attached without concern over fracturing the composite. X-ray curing is a low temperature process that eliminates residual internal stresses which are imparted by conventional thermo-chemical curing processes.

  17. Mechanical properties and bond strength of dual-cure resin composites to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the regional mechanical properties of dual-cure resin composites and their regional bond strengths to root canal dentin. One of the following dual-cure resin composites was placed in artificial post spaces: Unifil Core (UC), Clearfil DC Core (DC), Build-It FR (BI), Clearfil DC Core-automix (DCA), and photo-cured for 60s. After 24h storage, each specimen was serially sliced to harvest eight hour-glass shaped specimens for measurement of regional ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and the remaining eight semi-circular slabs were polished for the measurement of Knoop Hardness Number (KHN). For the microtensile bond strength (muTBS) test, post cavities were prepared in human premolar roots, and the cavity surfaces treated with Clearfil SE Bond and photo-cured for 10s. The post spaces were then filled with one of the above resin composites and photo-cured for 60s. After 24h storage, each specimen was serially sliced into 8, 0.6x0.6 mm-thick beams for the muTBS test. The data were divided into coronal and apical regions and analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc test (alpha=0.05). UTS and KHN were affected by the type of dual-cure resin composite and region (presin composite possessed superior UTS to that of the hand-mix type. muTBS among the four composite materials were not significantly different at both apical and coronal regions (p>0.05). Regional differences in bond strengths were found for all materials (presin composites varied among each material, however, differences in the mechanical properties of the resin core materials did not affect their adhesion to root canal dentin.

  18. Direct curing of composite material in free space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    The size and mass of modern space constructions (antenna, space satellite, space station or space base) sent to the Earth orbit are limited by capacity of a launch vehicle. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of the polymerization of fiber-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied in free space. The experimental and theoretical investigations on the curing process in high vacuum, space plasma and temperature variations indicate that the curing process can be realized under free space conditions. The curing process is sensitive to conditions of free space environment and to composition of polymer matrix. The selected compositions provide a bubble-free polymer matrix with crosslinking effect under the space irradiations. The results of laboratory experiments and stratospheric flight experiments are discussed. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ESA, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  19. Hardness Evaluation of Composite Resins Cured with QTH and LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Esmaeili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Today light cured composites are widely used. Physical and mechanical properties of composites are related to the degree of conversion. Light curing unit (LCU is an important factor for composite polymerization. Aim of this study is evaluation of composite resins hardness using halogen and LED light curing units. Materials and methods. In this study, 30 samples of Filtek Z250 and C-Fill composite resins were provided. Samples were light cured with Ultralume2, Valo and Astralis7. Vickers hardness number (VHN was measured in 0, 1, 2 mm depth. Statistical analysis used: Data were analysed by SPSS software and compared with each other by T-test, one-way and twoway ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test. Results. In Filtek Z250, at top surface, VHN of Ultralume2 was higher than VHN of Valo (P = 0.02 and Astralis7 (P = 0.04, but in depth of 1, 2 mm, VHN of Ultralume2 and Astralis7 were almost the same and both LCUs were more than Valo which the difference between Ultralume2 and Valo was significant in depth of 1mm (0.05 and 2mm (0.02. In C-Fill composite, at top surface, Astralis7 showed higher VHN, but in depth of 2 mm, performance of all devices were rather similar. Conclusion. In Z250, which contains camphorquinone initiator, light cure LED Ultra-lume2 with narrow wavelength showed higher hardness number than Valo. In C-fill, in top surface, Astralis7 with more exposure time, resulted higher VHN. But In depth of 2 mm, various light curing devices had rather similar hardness number.

  20. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  1. Optimum conditions for radiation curing of polyester/epoxy compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzostowski, A.; Pietrzak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of dose rate of γ 60 Co radiation, heat removal conditions and construction of polyester-epoxy compositions on the curing conditions of the latter were investigated. It was found that the optimum dose rate was within 0.1x10 4 Gy/h and 0.6x10 4 Gy/h for the following composition: 100 parts by weight of polyester resin, 10 to 15 parts by weight of an unsaturated epoxy resin and 100 parts by weight of silicon dioxide. The mixture was well cooled during the curing process. Curing is completed after the absorption of a dose from 0.3x10 4 Gy to 0.45x10 4 Gy. (author)

  2. Pigment colors printing on cotton fabrics by surface coating induced by electron beam and thermal curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, Abdel Wahab M.; Zohdy, Maged H.; Said, Hossam M.; El-Din, Mahmoud S.; Noval, Dalia M.

    2005-01-01

    Cotton fabrics were coated from one surface with different pigment colors incorporated in formulations containing ethylene glycol (EG), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) oligomer as a base material. The coated fabrics were exposed to various doses of accelerated electrons generated from the 1.5 MeV (25 kW) electron beam accelerator machine. In order to find the suitable conditions that afford the highest performance of pigment printing, the effect of irradiation dose and formulation composition on the color strength of the printed fabrics was investigated. The durability of the printed fabrics in terms of color fastness, tensile mechanical, crease resistance and water absorption was also studied. The results of pigment printing by electron beam irradiation was compared with the conventional thermal printing method with the same pigment colors involving the use of pastes containing binder and thickener systems. It was found that cotton fabrics printed with the pigment colors under the effect of electron beam irradiation displayed higher color strength than those fabrics printed by the conventional thermal fixation at equal pigment color ratios. In this regard, the color strength on cotton fabrics printed with the Imperon violet, blue and yellow pigment colors was 85.2, 75.4 and 91.3 in the case of printing with electron beam and 63.5, 46.0 and 50.2 in the case of thermal curing, respectively. The results showed that the pigment printing by electron beam or thermal curing improves the crease recovery and mechanical properties of cotton fabrics and exhibited comparable durability properties in terms of washing, rubbing and handling

  3. Curing A Large Composite Cylinder Without An Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed technique provides application of heat and pressure to cure fiber-wound composite cylinder too large to fit in autoclave. Tube wound around cylinder applies pressure. Blanket distributes pressure. Pressure expels gas bubbles from material. Heat applied by conventional methods.

  4. Research Progress on Microwave Curing of Epoxy Resin and Its Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Xue-hong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Research progress of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was summarized on the basis of introducing the principle of microwave curing technology and its advantages. The paper focused on the effect of microwave curing on the curing rate of epoxy resin and its composites as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of cured products. Two suitable composite systems for wave curing of powder-strengthened epoxy and fiber-strengthened epoxy and a few key technological problems for industrial application are introduced. The application prospect of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was also presented.

  5. Effect of power density of curing unit, exposure duration, and light guide distance on composite depth of cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Anders; Peutzfeldt, Anne; van Dijken, Jan W V

    2005-06-01

    This in vitro study compared the depth of cure obtained with six quartz tungsten halogen and light-emitting diode curing units at different exposure times and light tip-resin composite distances. Resin composite specimens (Tetric Ceram, A3; diameter 4 mm, height 6 mm) were exposed from 0-, 3-, and 6-mm distance. The curing units (200-700 mW/cm2) were used for standard (20 and 40 s), pulse-delay mode (initial exposure of 3 s at 200 mW/cm2, followed by a resting period of 3 min and a final exposure of 10 or 30 s at 600 mW/cm2), or soft-start curing (40 s; exponential ramping). Curing depth was determined by measurement of Wallace hardness for each half millimeter starting at 0.5 mm from the top surface. For each specimen, a mean H(W) value was calculated from the H(W) values determined at the depths of 2.0 mm and less (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, respectively). The depth of cure for each specimen was found by determining the greatest depth before an H(W) value exceeding the minimal H(W) value by 25% occurred. For all curing units, an increase in exposure time led to significantly higher depth of cure. Increasing the light tip-resin composite distance significantly reduced the depth of cure. With a light tip-resin composite distance of 6 mm, median values of depth of cure varied between 2.0 and 3.5 mm following a 20-s (or 3+10 s) exposure and between 3.0 and 4.5 mm following a 40-s (or 3+30 s) exposure. The composite situated above the depth of cure value cured equally well with all curing units. At both exposure times, Luxomax resulted in the significantly lowest depth of cure, and Astralis 7 yielded significantly higher depth. At both exposure times, a significant linear correlation was found between the determined power densities of the curing units and the pooled depth of cure values obtained. It seems that for the resin composite tested, the recommended exposure time of 40 s per 2-mm increment may be reduced to 20 s, or that increments may be increased from 2 to 3

  6. Electron-beam curing of paints and varnishes on wood panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosmaire, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the relative costs of curing polyester coated wood panels using (a) the conventional peroxide cure, (b) treatment with UV light, or (c) electron beams. Electron treatment is shown to compare very favourably with either of the other treatments. (U.K.)

  7. Improvement of the fracture toughness matrix cured by electron beam radiation, by incorporation of thermoplastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauray, E.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the fracture toughness of a vinyl-ester matrix cured by electron beam radiation, by incorporation of a thermoplastic polymer. The ultimate plan is to improve the fracture toughness of the composite material made of this reinforced matrix and carbon fibres. The first step deals with the study of an epoxy matrix reinforced by a polyether-sulfone. This well-known material, as it is used in industrial formulation, allowed us to characterize all the parameters needed to obtain a good reinforcement as for instance the morphology, and also to compare two kinds of processes: thermal and electron beam curing. In fact, we are really interested in increasing fracture toughness of a vinyl-ester matrix that is not miscible with polyether-sulfone. So a copolymer which has a similar structure as polyether-sulfone is synthesized in order to obtain a miscible blend. The corresponding material has good fracture toughness, with an increase of 80 % for 15 % addition of thermoplastic. (author)

  8. Bulk-Fill Composites: Effectiveness of Cure With Poly- and Monowave Curing Lights and Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J K; Yap, A U; Cheong, J W; Arista, N; Tan, Cbk

    This study compared the effectiveness of cure of bulk-fill composites using polywave light-emitting diode (LED; with various curing modes), monowave LED, and conventional halogen curing lights. The bulk-fill composites evaluated were Tetric N-Ceram bulk-fill (TNC), which contained a novel germanium photoinitiator (Ivocerin), and Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR). The composites were placed into black polyvinyl molds with cylindrical recesses of 4-mm height and 3-mm diameter and photopolymerized as follows: Bluephase N Polywave High (NH), 1200 mW/cm 2 (10 seconds); Bluephase N Polywave Low (NL), 650 mW/cm 2 (18.5 seconds); Bluephase N Polywave soft-start (NS), 0-650 mW/cm 2 (5 seconds) → 1200 mW/cm 2 (10 seconds); Bluephase N Monowave (NM), 800 mW/cm 2 (15 seconds); QHL75 (QH), 550 mW/cm 2 (21.8 seconds). Total energy output was fixed at 12,000 mJ/cm 2 for all lights/modes, with the exception of NS. The cured specimens were stored in a light-proof container at 37°C for 24 hours, and hardness (Knoop Hardness Number) of the top and bottom surfaces of the specimens was determined using a Knoop microhardness tester (n=6). Hardness data and bottom-to-top hardness ratios were subjected to statistical analysis using one-way analysis of variance/Scheffe's post hoc test at a significance level of 0.05. Hardness ratios ranged from 38.43% ± 5.19% to 49.25% ± 6.38% for TNC and 50.67% ± 1.54% to 67.62% ± 6.96% for SDR. For both bulk-fill composites, the highest hardness ratios were obtained with NM and lowest hardness ratios with NL. While no significant difference in hardness ratios was observed between curing lights/modes for TNC, the hardness ratio obtained with NM was significantly higher than the hardness ratio obtained for NL for SDR.

  9. A novel calorimetry technique for monitoring electron beam curing of polymer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.; Johnston, A.; Petrescue, L.; Hojjati, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a calorimetry-based technique for monitoring of the curing of electron beam (EB) curable resins, including design of the calorimeter hardware and the development of an analytical model for calculating resin cure rates and radiation dose. Factors affecting the performance of the calorimeter were investigated. Experimental trials monitoring the curing of epoxy resin were conducted under single pass and multiple passes of EB irradiation. Results show that the developed calorimeter is a simple, inexpensive and reasonably accurate technique for monitoring the EB curing of cationic epoxies

  10. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  11. Influences of molecular weight on curing effect of epoxy resin irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Liang Ji; Li Dan; Zhang Zuoguang; Chen Huijuan

    2004-01-01

    The influences of molecular weight on electron beam (EB) curing in epoxy resins were studied. The rate of radiation reaction in epoxy resin systems decreases with the increasing molecular weight. Under the low radiation dose, the curing thickness and curing degree is small for samples with high molecular weight. The effect of molecular weight decreases with the increasing radiation dose. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the storage modulus (E') are under the control of curing degree in samples, and the molecular weight will play a role on the samples with similar curing degree. After heat treatment, the Tg and E' of epoxy resins cured by radiation will increase. The molecular weight is directly associated with effect of heat treatment

  12. Correlation between the beam profile from a curing light and the microhardness of four resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard B T; Labrie, Daniel; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Sullivan, Braden; Kostylev, Ivan; Fahey, John

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the effect of localized irradiance and spectral distribution inhomogeneities of one LED-based dental light-curing unit (LCU) on the corresponding microhardness values at the top, and bottom surfaces of four dental resin-based composites (RBCs), which contained either camphorquinone (CQ) alone or a combination of CQ and monoacylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiators. Localized irradiance beam profiles from a polywave LED-based LCU were recorded five times using a laser beam analyzer, without and with either a 400 nm or 460 nm narrow bandpass filter placed in front of the camera lens. Five specimens of each of the four RBCs (two containing CQ/TPO and two containing CQ-only) were exposed for 5-, 10-, or 30-s with the light guide directly on the top surface of the RBC. After 24 h, Knoop microhardness values were measured at 45 locations across the top and bottom surfaces of each specimen. Microhardness readings for each RBC surface and exposure time were correlated with localized patterns of the LCU beam profile, measured using the 400 nm and 460 nm bandpass filters. Spearman rank correlation was used to avoid relying on an assumption of a bivariate normal distribution for the KHN and irradiance. The local irradiance and spectral emission values were not uniformly distributed across the light tip. There was a strong significant positive correlation with the irradiance beam profile values from the LCU taken through bandpass filters and the microhardness maps of the RBC surfaces exposed for 5 and 10 s. The strength of this correlation decreased with increasing exposure time for the RBCs containing CQ only, and increased for the RBCs containing both CQ and TPO. Localized beam and spectral distributions across the tip end of the light guide strongly correlated with corresponding areas of microhardness in both the top and bottom surfaces among four RBCs with different photoinitiator contents. Significance: A light-curing unit with a highly inhomogeneous

  13. Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    study. v ABSTRACT Objectives: This study evaluated the depth of cure of Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply), Grandio Flow (VOCO) and Venus...bottom/maximum KHN or the scrape technique: Venus ≥ SDR ≥ Grandio ≥ Revolution. Conclusions: Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the...composites are Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply Caulk), Grandio Flow (VOCO) and Venus Bulk Fill (Heraeus Kulzer). 8 Surefil SDR (Stress Decreasing

  14. Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN) Adhesives for Electron Beam Cure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam (e-beam)-processed polymer adhesives have historically performed poorly compared to traditional adhesive technologies due to a lack of toughness engineered into these new types of adhesive materials...

  15. Process for curing ionizing radiation-highly sensitive resin composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Tabei, K.; Goto, K.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for curing a radiation curable composition consisting essentially of (a) an amide represented by the formula R,CONR 2 R 3 and (b) an unsaturated polyester resin by irradiating the composition with an ionizing radiation. R 1 is H, an alkyl groups having from 1 to 17 carbon atoms or an alkenyl groups having from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, and R 2 and R 3 are each -H, -CH 3 , or -CH 2 OH. R 1 and R 2 taken together represent alkylene having 2 to 5 carbon atoms

  16. Method for curing alkyd resin compositions by applying ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Murata, K.; Maruyama, T.

    1975-01-01

    An alkyd resin composition is prepared by dissolving a polymerizable alkyd resin having from 10 to 50 percent of oil length into a vinyl monomer. The polymerizable alkyd resin is obtained by a half-esterification reaction of an acid anhydride having a polymerizable unsaturated group and an alkyd resin modified with conjugated unsaturated oil having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per one molecule. The alkyd resin composition thus obtained is coated on an article, and ionizing radiation is applied on the article to cure the coated film thereon. (U.S.)

  17. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halasz, L.; Zsigmond, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper the possibility of producing a new type carbon fiber reinforced composite is examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. The appearance of the new Hungarian carbon fiber with excellent mechanical properties in the market enables the development of newer type carbon fiber reinforced composites in the continuously widening range of engineering applications. Advanced hollow profiles, pipes and other composite products can be manufactured in continuous operation. A new way of composite production of this kind is the manufacturing of reinforcing structure by braiding technology producing a composite with sufficient mechanical properties from this cross directional fabric-like textile structure by impregnation. This manufacturing process can complete the variety of hollow products serving the same purpose as pultrusion or filament winding. This way a profile type framework element with a hollow cross section is manufactured having favorable mechanical properties. Owing to its small mass and high specific strength this product can be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry. For crosslinking of the matrix the method of high-speed electron beam curing has been examined in order to reach continuous operation. The field of use and application of carbon fiber braided structures has a great chance especially in machine engineering and in the automotive industry. The main reason for this is that braiding processes are capable of producing structures having good mechanical properties at a low processing price. The mass of the composite load-bearing structure produced this way is one fifth of the steel product having similar geometry, and its specific mechanical properties are nearly as good as that of the most commonly applied semiproduct and structural component, the welded steel profile

  18. Effect of three types of light-curing units on 5-year colour changes of light-cured composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Onjen; Altintas, Subutay Han; Ozturk, Nilgun; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine colour changes in a composite cured with tungsten-halogen, light-emitting diode (LED) or a plasma arc after 5 years. Five specimens 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared using Hybrid (Clearfil AP-X) composite for each test group. The corresponding specimens were cured with a tungsten-halogen curing light, a LED unit or with a plasma arc. Specimens were stored in light-proof boxes for 5 years after the curing procedure to avoid further exposure to light and stored in 37 degrees C in 100% humidity. Colorimetric values of the specimens immediately after curing and after 5 years were measured using colorimeter. The DeltaE*( ab ) values varied significantly depending on the curing unit used (p Curing time did not affect the colour changes of the specimens (p = 0.4). The results of this study suggest that composite materials undergo measurable changes due to the curing unit exposure.

  19. Influence of Curing-light Unit and Exposure Conditions on the Properties of Lightcured Resin Composite on Curing-light Units

    OpenAIRE

    岡田, 英俊; 石田, 喜紀; 野口, 博志; 長山, 克也; オカダ, ヒデトシ; イシダ, ヨシキ; ノグチ, ヒロシ; ナガヤマ, カツヤ; Hidetoshi, OKADA; Yoshiki, ISHIDA; Hiroshi, NOGUCHI; Katsuya, NAGAYAMA

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of curing light units and exposure conditions on the prperties of the polymerization of a lightcured resin composite. Lightfil was used as a resin composite. The curing light units used were a JETLITE, as a halogen lamp curing light source (HAL), a MICROWAVE, as a xenon lamp curing light source (XEN), and a AQUABLUE, as a light-emitting diode curing light source (LED). Each curing light unit was used to cure the resin composite with the i...

  20. The characteristics of epoxy resin cured by γ-ray and E-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Y.C.; Kang, Phil Hyun; Park, Jong Seok

    2004-01-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used as high-performance thermosetting resins for many industrial applications. In this study, the effect of an electron beam (E-beam) and γ-ray irradiation on the curing of epoxy resins was investigated. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A(DGEBA), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-F(DGEBF) as epoxy resins, triarylsulfonium hexafluoroantimonate(TASHFA), and triarylsulfonium hexafluorophosphate(TASHFP) as initiators were used in this study. The chemical and mechanical characteristics of irradiated epoxy resins were compared after curing of E-beam and γ-ray irradiation up to 50 kGy in N 2 and air atmosphere. We ascertained the effect of oxygen on the radiation curing of epoxy resin. The thermal properties of cured epoxy were investigated using DMA and TGA. Mechanical properties such as flexural strength were measured. The chemical structures of cured epoxy were characterized by FT-NIR. The gel fraction and the stress at yield of epoxy resins irradiated by E-beam and γ-ray in N 2 atmosphere were also compared with those of epoxy resins irradiated by E-beam and γ-ray in air

  1. Contribution for study on curing of organic coatings in papers, by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taqueda, M.H.S.

    1986-01-01

    The behaviour of national raw material is studied: paper, resins vamishes used on the surface finishing furniture, when subnitted to electron beam curing in an inert atmosphere. The dosimetric control of the irradiation system was made by using CTA films. The minimum cure dose obtained for the EBC 1650/3009 varnish(national polyester) was 2.4 Mrad and of 2.0 Mrad for the EBC 1650/3010 (imported polyester from Germany). The optimun cure dose for both was 3.0 Mrad. The papers impregnated with EBC varnish of with conventional varnish were measured mechanically for resistance in traction and an evaluation of resistance of the finished surfaces with the ebc varnishes was made. The coatings obtained with the EBC varnishes manufactured nationally were compared with the conventional vamishes of thermal cure and with paper samples impregnated and cured in Germany. (author) [pt

  2. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...... @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  3. Comparison of curing depth of a colored polyacid-modified composite resin with different light-curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbulcke, Jeroen D E; Marks, Luc A M; Martens, Luc C; Verbeeck, Ronald M H

    2010-10-01

    To compare the depth of cure (DoC) of a colored polyacid-modified composite resin (PAM-C) with a traditional PAM-C and a fine hybrid composite resin using different light-curing units and different radiant energies. The DoC of the PAM-C Twinky Star (Voco, all shades), the PAM-C Glasiosite (Voco), and the composite resin Z100 (3M ESPE) shades A2 and A4 was determined using a penetrometer test method. The materials were cured in bulk using a halogen-based unit (Elipar Trilight, E = 18 J/cm2 and E = 32 J/cm2; 3M ESPE) and an LED curing unit (Elipar Freelight 2, E = 20 J/cm2; 3M ESPE) in split stainless steel molds. Immediately after curing, the height (mm) of the cured material was measured and taken as the DoC. Ranking of means was performed by Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test, and statistically significant differences among mean values were detected with ANOVA. Mean DoC for all materials and shades varied as follows: 4.705 to 8.870 mm (E = 32 J/cm2); 3.672 to 8.050 mm (E = 20 J/cm2); and 4.090 to 7.357 mm (E = 18 J/cm2). Two-way ANOVA revealed that the DoC depended significantly (P curing device. Moreover, there was a significant interaction (P curing device with the highest energy density exhibited the highest curing depths.

  4. Curing depth of (polyacid-modified) composite resins determined by scraping and a penetrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupis, Nikolaos S; Vercruysse, Chris W J; Marks, Luc A M; Martens, Luc C; Verbeeck, Ronald M H

    2004-12-01

    The present study aimed to compare the curing depth of polyacid-modified composite resins (PAM-C) and some representative composite resins as a function of shade and post-cure using a scraping method and a penetrometer. The curing depth of the PAM-C Hytac, F2000, Glasiosite, Dyract, Dyract AP, and Compoglass F and of the composite resins Durafill VS and Z100 were determined for shade A2 and A4 using a scraping method based on ISO 4049:2000 and a digital penetrometer. Samples were light-cured (800 mW/cm2 at 40 s) in bulk in split stainless steel molds. Immediately after light-curing or after a 24 h post-cure, the height of the cylinder of cured material was measured and taken as the curing depth. For both test methods, the curing depth was independent of post-cure (P > or = 0.05) but differed significantly among materials and shade (Ppenetrometer give comparable curing depths for PAM-C. The curing depth greatly varies among the materials and can be considerably smaller than that of a microfilled composite resin. Shade A2 results in significantly greater values for the curing depth compared to shade A4, the effect depending quantitatively on the formulation of the material.

  5. Changes in the temperature of a dental light-cured composite resin by different light-curing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, A. N. S.; Jacomassi, D. P.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature increase during the polymerization process through the use of three different light-curing units with different irradiation times. One argon laser (Innova, Coherent), one halogen (Optilight 501, Demetron), and one blue LED (LEC 1000, MM Optics) LCU with 500 mW/cm2 during 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s of irradiation times were used in this study. The composite resin used was a microhybrid Filtek Z-250 (3M/ESPE) at color A2. The samples were made in a metallic mold 2 mm in thickness and 4 mm in diameter and previously light-cured during 40 s. A thermocouple (Model 120 202 EAJ, Fenwal Electronic, Milford, MA, USA) was introduced in the composite resin to measure the temperature increase during the curing process. The highest temperature increase was recorded with a Curing Light 2500 halogen LCU (5 and 31°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively), while the lowest temperature increase was recorded for the Innova LCU based on an argon laser (2 and 11°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively). The temperature recorded for LCU based on a blue LED was 3 and 22°C after 5 and 60 s, respectively. There was a quantifiable amount of heat generated during the visible light curing of a composite resin. The amount of heat generated was influenced by the characteristics of the light-curing units used and the irradiation times.

  6. Influence of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composites. METHOD: With a given energy density and for each of two different light-curing units (QTH or LED), the curing rate was reduced by modulating the curing mode. Thus......, the irradiation of resin composite specimens (Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram, Esthet-X) was performed in a continuous curing mode and in a pulse-delay curing mode. Wallace hardness was used to determine the softening of resin composite after storage in ethanol. Degree of conversion was determined by infrared...... spectroscopy (FTIR). Wear was assessed by a three-body test. Data were submitted to Levene's test, one and three-way ANOVA, and Tukey HSD test (alpha = 0.05). Results: Immersion in ethanol, curing mode, and material all had significant effects on Wallace hardness. After ethanol storage, resin composites...

  7. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  8. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Havens, Stephen J.; Dorsey, George F.; Moulton, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  9. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. "Light-emitting diode" light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm(2) and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm(2). The "quartz-tungsten-halogen" LCU (400 mW/cm(2)) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity.

  10. Evaluation of Vickers hardness of bulk-fill composites cured by different light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsh, Turki A.; Yagmoor, Mohammed A.; Alsadi, Fahad M.; Jamleh, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    [Objective] The current in vitro study was performed to evaluate Vickers hardness (VHN) of two different composite resins that were cured by using two different light curing units. [Materials and Methods] Porcelain tube samplers were used to fabricate composite cylinders from either Tetric Evoceram BulkFill (BF; Ivoclar/Vivadent, USA) or SonicFill composite (SF; Kerr, USA). Each composite type had 12 cylindrical specimens, and each specimen was cured with either Blue-phase N light-cure (Bp; Polywave, Ivoclar/Vivadent, USA) or Elipar S10 (El; Monowave, 3M ESPE, Germany). The VHN data were analyzed and tested by using Mann-Whitney U test at a significance level of 5%. [Results] Statistical analyses demonstrated an interaction between the type of composite and the type of light curing source. Significant differences (Plight-cure. This research was supported by King Abdulaziz University.

  11. Cure Cycle Optimization of Rapidly Cured Out-Of-Autoclave Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqi Dong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-autoclave prepreg typically needs a long cure cycle to guarantee good properties as the result of low processing pressure applied. It is essential to reduce the manufacturing time, achieve real cost reduction, and take full advantage of out-of-autoclave process. The focus of this paper is to reduce the cure cycle time and production cost while maintaining high laminate quality. A rapidly cured out-of-autoclave resin and relative prepreg were independently developed. To determine a suitable rapid cure procedure for the developed prepreg, the effect of heating rate, initial cure temperature, dwelling time, and post-cure time on the final laminate quality were evaluated and the factors were then optimized. As a result, a rapid cure procedure was determined. The results showed that the resin infiltration could be completed at the end of the initial cure stage and no obvious void could be seen in the laminate at this time. The laminate could achieve good internal quality using the optimized cure procedure. The mechanical test results showed that the laminates had a fiber volume fraction of 59–60% with a final glass transition temperature of 205 °C and excellent mechanical strength especially the flexural properties.

  12. Anisotropic Dielectric Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites during Microwave Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linglin; Li, Yingguang; Zhou, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Microwave cuing technology is a promising alternative to conventional autoclave curing technology in high efficient and energy saving processing of polymer composites. Dielectric properties of composites are key parameters related to the energy conversion efficiency during the microwave curing process. However, existing methods of dielectric measurement cannot be applied to the microwave curing process. This paper presented an offline test method to solve this problem. Firstly, a kinetics model of the polymer composites under microwave curing was established based on differential scanning calorimetry to describe the whole curing process. Then several specially designed samples of different feature cure degrees were prepared and used to reflect the dielectric properties of the composite during microwave curing. It was demonstrated to be a feasible plan for both test accuracy and efficiency through extensive experimental research. Based on this method, the anisotropic complex permittivity of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite during microwave curing was accurately determined. Statistical results indicated that both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the composite increased at the initial curing stage, peaked at the maximum reaction rate point and decreased finally during the microwave curing process. Corresponding mechanism has also been systematically investigated in this work.

  13. Research on blend system of epoxy resin cured by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Zhong Weihong; Zhang Zuoguang; Mao Shuli

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam curing of various blends of epoxy resin was studied. Radiation effect of epoxy resin systems of 828, 648 and 207, and their blends was compared. The effect of resin compounding ratio and radiation dose on blends of epoxy resin 828 and 648 systems was analyzed. The performance of the blend with different ratio of epoxy resin 207 and 648 was also studied. The results of study show that radiation effect of epoxy resin is associated with its chemical constitution, steric effect, and crystallinity. The mixing of various epoxy resin can improve radiation curing effect of system, reduce required radiation dose, and enhance performance of radiation product

  14. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome.

  15. Application of beam mechanics to sensing the cure development of wood-phenolic joints by dynamic mechanical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinwu [Weyerhaeuser Company, WTC 2B2, PO Box 9777, Federal Way, WA 98063 (United States)], E-mail: Jinwu.Wang@weyerhaeuser.com; Laborie, Marie-Pierre G. [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-1806 (United States)], E-mail: mlaborie@wsu.edu; Wolcott, Michael P. [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-1806 (United States)], E-mail: wolcott@wsu.edu

    2007-12-15

    Modeling and optimizing of wood-based composite manufacture is playing a larger role in the design of processes and manufacturing equipment. In these models, internal temperature and moisture conditions are predicted with an aim towards predicting when polymeric cure is sufficient to avoid delamination. However, most cure kinetics models are focused on predicting the chemical state of the resin rather than the resulting mechanical properties. The objective of this research is to examine the feasibility of obtaining kinetic cure data using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Dynamic three-point bending tests were conducted on a sandwich specimen of two wood adherends bonded with an adhesive layer. The specimen was cured using various isothermal and linear heating regimes. In addition, two commercial PF resins of different molecular weights distributions (labeled as PF-high and -low, respectively) were evaluated under different experimental conditions influencing moisture loss. Theoretically, the E' ratio, defined as, R=E{sup '}{sub max}/E{sup '}{sub min} should be good parameter to evaluate bond development because it eliminates the variation in adherend modulus. However, this parameter was found to be sensitive to variables such as resin loading and changes in the adherend modulus due to moisture loss and thermal softening. The shear modulus and flexural storage modulus of the adhesive were calculated by an analytical solution. The values were in general agreement with the results obtained by parallel-plate rheometry. Overall, the sandwich beam was deemed to be simple in both sample preparation and measurement procedure for obtaining PF resin cure transitions and modulus development.

  16. Effect of temperature, curing time, and filler composition on surface microhardness of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of two composite resins when subjected to three different temperatures and three different light-curing times. Materials and Methods: Two composites were used; Filtek Z250 and Grandio. Three different temperatures (23, 37, and 55oC) were used, utilizing a composite warmer. The heated samples were immediately injected into cylindrical molds (6 mm × 2 mm) and the top surface of the specimens was polymerized for 10, 20, and 40 sec, using a Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen light-curing unit (QTH LCU). Vickers microhardness measurements were performed from both the top and bottom surface of the specimens, following dry storage for 24 hours in the dark. Statistical analysis were performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc test at a level of significance of a = 0.05. Results: The results indicated that there was an increase in microhardness as the temperature of the composite was increased for either the top or the bottom surface (P 0.05). Conclusions: Temperature of composites affects their surface microhardness. Also, light-curing time influence microhardness values of the composites tested. PMID:25829688

  17. Effects of the curing methods on the fabrication of polycarbosilane derived SiCf/SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju; Ryu, Woo Seog; Woo, Chang Hyun; Han, Bum Soo

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide has potential advantages for structural applications in the next generation energy system- VHTR, GFR and the fusion reactor due to its unique properties such as a good irradiation resistance and thermo-mechanical properties, less severe waste generation due to neutron activation and improved plant conversion efficiencies by higher operating temperatures. Among the several fabrication processes for SiC f /SiC composites, the polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) process is the only method derived from polymeric precursors. In the PIP process, the careful control of the oxygen content is important to avoid the property degradation at a high temperature because polymeric precursors are used as source materials of SiC ceramics. During the polymer precursor conversion process, unintended oxygen may be introduced for a cross-linking with producing the Si-O-Si bonds at the curing step. High oxygen content affects the degradation of the high temperature stability in SiC ceramics. Therefore, a decrease of the oxygen content is desirable to obtain SiC ceramics with the high temperature stability. One of the methods to reduce the oxygen content of polymer derived SiC ceramics is the irradiation curing process by gamma ray or electron beam. Polymer derived SiC ceramics with the low oxygen content prepared by the electron beam curing showed the improved thermal stability at a higher temperature. In this study, the electron beam (EB) and the thermal oxidation curing methods were applied to make SiC f /SiC composite using a polymer precursor, polycarbosilane (PCS) by the PIP process. And the evaluations of the curing effects, the pyrolysis behaviors and a high temperature stability were performed

  18. Optimal Design of Laminated Composite Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral

    This thesis presents an optimal design framework for the structural design of laminated composite beams. The possibility of improving the static and dynamic performance of laminated composite beam through the use of optimal design techniques motivates the investigation presented here. A structural....... Furthermore, the devised beam model is able account for the different levels of anisotropic elastic couplings which depend on the laminate lay-up. An optimization model based on multi-material topology optimization techniques is described. The design variables represent the volume fractions of the different...... design of laminated composite beams. The devised framework is applied in the optimal design of laminated composite beams with different cross section geometries and subjected to different load cases. Design criteria such as beam stiffness, weight, magnitude of the natural frequencies of vibration...

  19. Dynamic mechanical studies on epoxy resins cured by electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Gang; Zhang Zuoguang; Liang Zhiyong; Chen Changqi

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analyses on electron beam (EB)-cured epoxy resins were made in the paper. Through the studies on variation rules of gel fraction, tan δ and storage modulus for varied samples, the important effects of EB radiation dosage, initiator dosage, chemical structure, molecular weight and distribution, and heat treatment on curing reaction and properties of epoxy resin systems have been obtained. Under low radiation doses, the gel fraction, glass transition temperature (Tg) and high temperature modulus of cured epoxy resin increase with increasing radiation dose and initiator dosage. The crosslinking density of epoxy resin decreases slightly with increasing molecular weight. When radiation doses increase, the molecular weight has a little influence on the increasing of curing level and an optimal dosage of initiator appears. The experimental results indicate that the radiation reactivity of epoxy resins is directly associated with their chemical structures. Under the same radiation dose, the reaction extent in sample with high polydispersity is higher than that in low polydispersity sample, but the degree of homogeneity in crosslinking structure is lower. When the EB-cured epoxy resin is heated, the crosslinking density is enhanced. If the temperature of heating treatment exceeds the thermal-initiating temperature of initiator, the local thermal-crosslinking network can be formed in resin system

  20. Experimental Control of Curing & Structural Health Monitoring for Composite Patch Repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kalkanis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unquestionably structural integrity of composite materials is of great importance and spans from production to service. The presented experimental investigation, supported initially by numerical analysis, addresses the capability of sensing during the curing cycle of Composite Patch Repair (CPR guaranteeing achievement of optimal cure levels. Results have exhibited identification and completion of cure leading to probable reduction of repair and downtime costs. The sensors were further used post curing for structural integrity where results proved that the optical fibres can render a general state of the strain field inside the patches and possible crack propagation (real time.

  1. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading...

  2. Effects of Different Light Curing Units/Modes on the Microleakage of Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Celik, Cigdem; Dayangac, Berrin; Ozgunaltay, Gul

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different light curing units and modes on microleakage of flowable composite resins. Methods Eighty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 40 extracted human premolars with cervical wall located in dentin and the occlusal wall in enamel. These teeth were randomly assigned into two groups (n=20) and restored with different flowable composites; Group I: Esthet-X Flow, Group II: Grandio Flow. Each group was randomly divided into four subgroups; while the samples of the first subgroup were polymerized with conventional Halogen light, the rest of them were polymerized with different curing modes of Light Emitting Diode (LED). The second subgroup was polymerized with fast-curing; the third subgroup with pulse-curing and those of the fourth subgroup with step-curing modes of LED. After the samples were thermocycled and immersed in dye, they were longitudinally sectioned. Dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results None of the restorations showed leakage on enamel margins. On dentin margins no significant differences were observed between flowable composite resins polymerized with halogen light (P>.05). While step curing mode of LED presented significant differences between the resins, the difference was insignificant when fast-curing and pulse-curing mode of LED were used. No statistically significant differences were observed between curing units for Esthet-X Flow samples. For Grandio Flow samples, only step-curing mode of LED caused statistically higher leakage scores than halogen and other curing modes of LED (P<.05). Conclusions The effect of curing units’ type and curing mode on flowable composite resin leakage might be material-dependent. PMID:19212529

  3. An Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured under Microwave Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, H.; Chan, W. L.; Trada, M.; Baddeley, D.

    2007-12-01

    The shrinkage of vinyl ester particulate composites has been reduced by curing the resins under microwave conditions. The reduction in the shrinkage of the resins by microwaves will enable the manufacture of large vinyl ester composite items possible (H.S. Ku, G. Van Erp, J.A.R. Ball, and S. Ayers, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Fibre Composites during Hardening using Microwaves Irradiation for Curing, Proceedings, Second World Engineering Congress, Kuching, Malaysia, 2002a, 22-25 July, p 177-182; H.S. Ku, Risks Involved in Curing Vinyl Ester Resins Using Microwaves Irradiation. J. Mater. Synth. Proces. 2002b, 10(2), p 97-106; S.H. Ku, Curing Vinyl Ester Particle Reinforced Composites Using Microwaves. J. Comp. Mater., (2003a), 37(22), p 2027-2042; S.H. Ku and E. Siores, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Matrix Particle Reinforced Composites During Hardening Using Microwaves Irradiation, Trans. Hong Kong Inst. Eng., 2004, 11(3), p 29-34). In tensile tests, the yield strengths of samples cured under microwave conditions obtained are within 5% of those obtained by ambient curing; it is also found that with 180 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are also within the 5% of those obtained by ambient curing. While, with 360 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are 5% higher than those obtained by ambient curing. Whereas, with 540 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for most samples are 5% below those obtained by ambient curing (H. Ku, V.C. Puttgunta, and M. Trada, Young’s Modulus of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured by Microwave Irradiation: Preliminary Results, J. Electromagnet. Waves Appl., 2007, 20(14), p. 1911-1924). This project, using 33% by weight fly ash reinforced vinyl ester composite [VE/FLYSH (33%)], is to further investigate the difference in fracture toughness between microwave cured vinyl ester particulate composites and those cured

  4. Statics and rotational dynamics of composite beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorashi, Mehrdaad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of the nonlinear statics and dynamics of composite beams and consists of solutions with and without active elements embedded in the beams. The static solution provides the initial conditions for the dynamic analysis. The dynamic problems considered include the analyses of clamped (hingeless) and articulated (hinged) accelerating rotating beams. Two independent numerical solutions for the steady state and the transient responses are presented. The author illustrates that the transient solution of the nonlinear formulation of accelerating rotating beam converges to the steady state solution obtained by the shooting method. Other key areas considered include calculation of the effect of perturbing the steady state solution, coupled nonlinear flap-lag dynamics of a rotating articulated beam with hinge offset and aerodynamic damping, and static and dynamic responses of nonlinear composite beams with embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. The book is intended as a t...

  5. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, A R; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode. In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent; Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) were stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. The specimens were then either immediately subjected to shear bond strength testing or subjected to artificial aging (6,000 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C baths) prior to testing. Failure modes were also assessed. The shear bond strengths were submitted to factorial analysis of variance, and the failure modes were submitted to a Chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). All but power density (curing mode, resin composite material and mode of aging) significantly affected shear bond strength. The curing mode and resin composite material also influenced the failure mode. At the selected constant energy density, pulse-delay curing reduced bonding of the resin composite to dentin.

  6. Evaluation of microleakage of class II dental composite resin restorations cured with LED or QTH dental curing light; Blind, Cluster Randomized, In vitro cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakavi, Faramarz; Golpasand Hagh, Leila; Sadeghian, Soheila; Freckelton, Virginia; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash; Ghanatir, Elham; Zarnaghash, Najmeh

    2014-07-03

    The aim of this study is to compare the microleakage of Class II dental composite resin restorations which have been cured by three different LED (light emitting diode) light curing modes compared to control samples cured by QTH (quartz tungsten halogen) light curing units (LCUs), to determine the most effective light curing unit and mode of curing. In this experimental study, class II cavities were prepared on 100 sound human premolars which have been extracted for orthodontic treatment. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; three experimental and one control group of 25 teeth each. Experimental groups were cured by either conventional, pulse-delay, or ramped curing modes of LED. The control group was cured for 20 seconds by QTH. The restorations were thermocycled (1000 times, between 5 and 55°C, for 5 seconds dwell time), dyed, sectioned mesio-distally and viewed under stereo-microscope (40×) magnification. Teeth were then scored on a 0 to 4 scale based on the amount of microleakage. The data were analyzed by Chi-square test.No significant difference was demonstrated between the different LCUs (light curing units), or modes of curing, at the enamel side (p > 0.05). At the dentin side, all modes of LED curing could significantly reduce microleakage (p curing improves marginal integrity and seal. High intense curing endangers those aims. Comparison between the three LED mode cured composite resin restorations and QTH curing showed LED curing in all modes is more effective than QTH for reducing microleakage. Both LED and QTH almost completely eliminate the microleakage on the enamel side, however none of them absolutely eliminated microleakage on the dentin side.

  7. UV-cured adhesives for carbon fiber composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsiao-Chun

    Carbon fiber composite materials are increasingly used in automobile, marine, and aerospace industries due to their unique properties, including high strength, high stiffness and low weight. However, due to their brittle characteristic, these structures are prone to physical damage, such as a bird strike or impact damage. Once the structure is damaged, it is important to have fast and reliable temporary repair until the permanent repair or replacement can take place. In this dissertation, UV-based adhesives were used to provide a bonding strength for temporary repair. Adhesively bonded patch repair is an efficient and effective method for temporary repair. In this study, precured patches (hard patches) and dry fabric patches with laminating resins (soft patches) were performed. UV-based epoxy adhesives were applied to both patch repair systems. For precured patch repair, the bonding strengths were investigated under different surface treatments for bonding area and different adhesives thicknesses. The shear stresses of different UV exposure times and curing times were tested. Besides, the large patch repair was investigated as well. For soft patch repair, the hand wet lay-up was applied due to high viscosity of UV resins. A modified single lap shear testing (ASTM D5868) was applied to determine the shear stress. The large patches used fiber glass instead of carbon fiber to prove the possibility of repair with UV epoxy resin by hand wet lay-up process. The hand lay-up procedure was applied and assisted by vacuum pressure to eliminate the air bubbles and consolidate the patches. To enhance the bonding strength and effective soft patch repair, vacuum assisted resin transferring molding (VaRTM) is the better option. However, only low viscosity resins can be operated by VaRTM. Hence, new UV-based adhesives were formulated. The new UV-based adhesives included photoinitiator (PI), epoxy and different solvents. Solvents were used to compound the photoinitiator into epoxy

  8. The applicability of DPSS laser for light curing of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hoon; Jang, Chang-Min; Shin, Dong-Hee; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2008-10-01

    The applicability of diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser for light curing the composite resins was tested with a quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp-based unit and a light emitting diode unit. The emission spectra of the light-curing systems used match with the absorption spectrum of camphorquinone. Among the light-curing systems, DPSS laser showed the narrowest emission bandwidth. The light intensity of DPSS laser was approximately 64% of the other two light-curing units. In most specimens, DPSS laser showed the least attenuation of the number of incident photons. On the top surface, specimens cured with DPSS laser showed similar microhardness values compared to the specimens cured with the other two light-curing units. During the light curing, DPSS laser induced the lowest temperature rise (25.5-35.5 degrees C) in the specimens compared to the other two light-curing units (34.2-41.7 degrees C). In conclusion, DPSS laser has high potential to be an alternative to the other light-curing units or a new light-curing unit.

  9. End-of-cure sensing using ultrasonics for autoclave fabrication of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Paul J.; Cranmer, Joan H.; Nove, Carol A.; Brown, Lawrence M.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the use of ultrasonics to determine the end-of-curve for autoclave cured, graphite/epoxy composite laminates. The fundamental benefit of this work will be understanding when to complete the temperature hold and cool down the autoclave and, therefore, consistently produce composite laminates with the desired material properties. An additional benefit is the ability to follow the changing viscosity of the resin during the initial part of the cure. The general approach to this program involved using pulse-echo ultrasonics to measure the transit time for longitudinal ultrasonic waves to pass through a graphite/epoxy composite laminate during cure. Sixteen, 32 and 64 ply (0/90)s graphite/Fiberite 934 epoxy panels were fabricated and cured to various end-of-cure conditions. Additionally, panels with various starting conditions were run. Sound speed was calculated using the panel thickness divided by the measured transit time.

  10. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  11. Flexural behaviour of post-cured composites at oral-simulating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C T; Vijayaraghavan, T V; Lee, S Y; Tsai, A; Huang, H M; Pan, L C

    2001-07-01

    Post-curing treatments have been known to improve the mechanical stability of visible light-cured composites. After individual post-curing treatment, the flexural strength (FS) of four commercial direct/indirect placement composite materials which differ greatly in composition [oligocarbonate dimethacrylate (OCDMA)-based Conquest C & B (CQT), Bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA)-based Charisma, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based Concept (CCT), and BisGMA/UDMA-based Dentacolor] was evaluated under water in the temperature range of 12-50 degrees C. A control series was tested in air at room temperature (25 +/- 1 degrees C). Data were analysed using ANOVA and Duncan's test. Flexural strengths overall decreased (20-40%, P OCDMA-based materials. Post-cured composites can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environments. Different composition determines the degree of influence.

  12. Hardness of composite resin polymerized with different light-curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengameh Safarcherati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The degree of polymerization depends on the type of light-curing unit. The aim of this study was to compare the hardness of composite resin cured by LED and Halogen light curing units. Methods: In this experimental study, 20 cylindrical samples of Tetric Ceram composite were prepared. Half of them were cured with Ultralume 2 LED and the other half with Astralis 7 Halogen light curing unit. In the depths of 0,1,2 and 3 mm from surface, one point in peripheral and one point in central portion were marked ,then the hardness of these points was measured by Vickers test . The data was analyzed by a pvalue less than 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The mean hardness of samples cured by LED was more than halogen group in different depths and this difference was statistically significant in peripheral points (p=.048 but this was not significant in central points (p=0.644. The mean hardness in both groups had a decreasing trend from surface to the deep parts in central and peripheral parts and this was more in the central parts. Conclusions: Composites cured by LED light curing unit showed more hardness in similar depths, besides the hardness of composites in central parts is more than the peripheral ones in both groups.

  13. Structural investigation of e-beam cured epoxy resins through solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Spinella, Alberto; Caponetti, Eugenio; Dispenza, Clelia; Spadaro, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the network structure of e-beam cured DGEBF based epoxy resins is investigated. Two epoxy systems, having different reactivity and cured in different process conditions, were analyzed through solid state NMR spectroscopy. The analysis shows that the more reactive system has higher cross-linking density and higher uniformity of network distribution. Similar information were obtained, in a previous work, on the same systems through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It is worth noting that unlike DMTA tests, which interfere with the molecular structure of the analyzed material, due to the heating during the analysis itself, more reliable information, without any artefact, are obtained by solid state NMR, carried out at constant room temperature. - Highlights: ► The structure of two e-beam cured epoxy systems is investigated through solid state NMR. ► The aim is to have direct information about the structure without inducing modifications. ► The different molecular structures are able to emphasize the response of solid state NMR. ► T 1 H, T 1ρ H and T CH measurements indicate different cross-linking degrees. ► The NMR results are in agreement with DMTA analysis performed in a previous paper.

  14. Hard and soft computing models of composite curing process looking toward monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, F.; Carlone, P.; Aleksendrić, D.; Ćirović, V.; Sorrentino, L.; Bellini, C.

    2016-10-01

    The curing process of thermosetting resins plays a key role on the final quality of the composite material components. Soft computing techniques proved to be an efficient method to control and optimize the curing process, replacing the conventional experimental and numerical approaches. In this paper artificial neural network (ANN) and fuzzy logic control (FLC) were implemented together to predict and control the temperature and degree of cure profile during the autoclave curing process. The obtained outcomes proved the capability of ANNs and FLC with respect to the hard computing methods.

  15. Vickers Hardness of Composite Resins Cured with LED and QTH Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghemand H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the factors affecting the degree of polymerization of light-cured composites is the type of light-curing unit used. In addition, physicomechanical properties of the composite resins depend on the degree of conversion and polymerization. Objectives: Since the type of initiator in new composite resins is not explained by manufacturers, this study is an attempt to compare the depth of hardening, with two LED and QTH light-curing units. Materials and Methods: Fifteen samples prepared from Gradia Direct and Filtek Z250, both of which being universal, were cured with QTH (Astralis 7 and LED (Bluephase C8 light-curing units. All the samples were molded in polyester resin and cut from the middle by a disk. The hardness of the cut area was evaluated at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4-mm depth intervals and also at the same interval as the width of the sample, with Vickers hardness machine, while the samples were placed in a darkroom. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, t-test and post Hoc Tukey’s tests in SPSS, version 16. Results: Filtek Z250 was harder than Gradia Direct at all the depth with both light-curing units. The hardness of Filtek Z250 sample cured with Astralis 7 was higher than that cured with LED, but with Gradia Direct the LED unit resulted in higher hardness. Curing depth was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.109. Conclusions: Vickers hardness number for both composites used in this study is in an acceptable range for clinical implications. The composites’ composition is important to be considered for selection of light unit. Based on the findings of the present study, LED did not present more curing depth compared with QTH.

  16. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  17. Effects of distance from tip of LED light-curing unit and curing time on surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafadilla, V. A.; Usman, M.; Margono, A.

    2017-08-01

    Polymerization process depends on several variables, including the hue, thickness, and translucency of the composite resin, the size of the filler particles, the duration of exposure to light (the curing time), the intensity of the light, and the distance from the light. This study aimed to analyze the effects of the distance from the tip of the light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit and of curing time on the surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin. 60 specimens were prepared in a mold and divided into 6 groups based on various curing distances and times: 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm and 20 seconds and 40 seconds. The highest surface hardness was seen in the group both closest to the tip and having the longest curing time, while the lowest hardness was seen in the group both farthest from the tip and having the shortest curing time. Significant differences were seen among the various tip distances, except for in the two groups that had 8-mm tip distances, which had no significant differences due to curing time. Both decreased distance from the tip of the LED light-curing unit and increased curing time increase the surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin. However, curing time increases the surface hardness only if the tip distance is ≤ 5 mm.

  18. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Guiraldo Ricardo; Consani Simonides; Xediek Consani Rafael; Mendes Wilson; Lympius Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti Mario

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk ...

  19. A method for hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally sensitive substrata by means of an electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.; Fussa, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally sensitive substrata by means of an electron-beam. That method consists in accurately adjusting the parameters of irradiation by an electron-beam and the beam velocity so as to obtain, a very rapid hardening of adhesives used for fixing flocking materials, or the like, to thermally sensitive substrate. That can be applied to hardening or curing adhesives for flocking thermally-sensitive substrata which normally restrict the hardening rate [fr

  20. Effects of light intensity and curing time of the newest LED Curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, D.; Herda, E.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light intensity and curing time of the latest LED curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins. Sixty-three specimens from three brands (Polofil Supra, Filtek Z250, and Solare X) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The test groups were polymerized with a Flashmax P3 LED curing unit for one or three seconds. The control group was polymerized with a Ledmax 450 curing unit with the curing time based on the resin manufacturer’s instructions. A higher light intensity and shorter curing time did not influence the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins.

  1. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  2. The effects of halogen and light-emitting diode light curing on the depth of cure and surface microhardness of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Batu Can; Efes, Begüm Güray; Dörter, Can; Gömeç, Yavuz; Erdilek, Dina; Büyükgökçesu, Sami

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Light-emitting diode light curing units (LED LCUs) have become more popular than halogen LCUs in routine dental restorative treatment. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of two conventional halogen (Hilux Plus and VIP) and two LED (Elipar FreeLight 2 and Smart Lite) light curing units on the depth of cure and the microhardness of various esthetic restorative materials. Materials and Methods: The curing depth and microhardness of a compomer (Dyract Extra), a resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer), a packable composite (Sculpt It), an ormocer (Admira), a hybrid composite (Tetric Ceram), two microhybrid composites (Miris and Clearfil Photo Posterior) and, a nanofil composite (Filtek Supreme) were determined using a scraping method and a hardness tester. A total of 320 samples were prepared using the eight different materials (n = 10 samples for each subgroup). The scraping test was based on ISO 4049:2000. Vicker's microhardness testing was carried out using hardness tester (Zwick 3212). Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Bonferroni and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests. Results: Best microhardness results were obtained with the LED light curing units and Tetric EvoCeram and Filtek Supreme achieved the highest hardness values. The nanofil composite, Filtek Supreme, showed the best curing depth results in all the tested light curing systems. Conclusions: The LEDs were found to be more successful than the halogen units with respect to both curing depth and microhardness properties. PMID:21814353

  3. Steel Protective Coating Based on Plasticized Epoxy Acrylate Formulation Cured by Electron Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.S.; Said, H.M.; Mohamed, I.M.; Mohamed, H.A.; Kandile, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) was used to cure coatings based on epoxy acrylate oligomer (EA) and different plasticizers such as epoxidized soybean oil, glycerol and castor oil. The effect of irradiation doses (10, 25, 50 kGy) on the curing epoxy acrylate formulations containing plasticizers was studied. In the addition, the effect of the different plasticizers on the end use performance properties of epoxy acrylate coatings such as hardness, bending, adhesion, acid and alkali resistance tests were investigated. It was observed that the incorporation of castor oil in epoxy acrylate, diluted by 1,6 hexandiol diacrylate monomer (HD) with a ratio (EA 70%, HD 20%, castor oil 10%) under the dose 10 kGy improved the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of cured films than the other plasticizers. On the other hand, sunflower free fatty acids were epoxidized in-situ under well established conditions and then was subjected to react with aniline in sealed ampoules under inert atmosphere at 140 degree C. The produced adduct was added at different concentrations to epoxy acrylate coatings under certain EB irradiation dose and then evaluated as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel surfaces in terms of weight loss measurements and corrosion resistance tests. It was observed that the formula containing 0.4 gm of aniline adduct / 100 gm epoxy acrylate resin gave the best corrosion protection for carbon steel

  4. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adh...

  5. Effect of light curing protocol on degree of conversion of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelan, Anderson; Mainardi, Maria do Carmo Aguiar Jordão; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; de Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of two light-cured composites with different protocols of light curing. One hundred and ninety two specimens (n = 8) were prepared (5 mm × 2 mm) according to experimental groups: two composite resins (Filtek Supreme and four seasons); three light curing protocols [20 s with the tip of the light curing unit (LCU) device touching composite surface (C); 20 s with the tip of the LCU at 8 mm distant from composite surface (D); and tip of the LCU at 8 mm distant from composite surface and polymerization time required to obtain a radiant exposure of 16 J/cm(2) (DS)]. Four LCUs (Bluephase 16i, Ultralume LED 5, XL 3000 and Optilux 501C) were used. DC of the bottom and top surface of specimens were measured using a FTIR spectrometer. Data were statistically analyzed by 3-way split splot ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The results showed that DC of the top surface was higher than the bottom at all experimental conditions (p curing at 8 mm of distance did not affect conversion rate on the top surface (p > 0.05), but bottom surfaces showed DC reduction (p curing units with higher light power and/or extended exposure time.

  6. Thermographic analysis of the effect of composite type, layering method, and curing light on the temperature rise of photo-cured composites in tooth cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Ryan Jin-Young; Ferracane, Jack; Lee, In-Bog

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate temperature rise in the composite and dentin of a class I cavity in extracted human molars under different restoration conditions, including the use of different composite types, layering methods, and curing lights. Open occlusal cavities were prepared on 28 extracted human molars. A conventional (Filtek Z250) and a bulk-fill (Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior; BFP) composite were used to restore the preparations. BFP was incrementally layered or bulk-filled. Bulk-filled BFP was cured with two different lights, the Elipar S10 and the BeLite. Each layer was illuminated for 20s, while thermograms of the specimens were recorded for 100s using an infrared thermal camera. Temperature changes on the composite and dentin surfaces were obtained at points of interest (POI) pertaining to successive incremental distances of 0.75mm from the top of the cavity to the pulp. The polymerization kinetics of each composite was determined using photo-differential scanning calorimetry. The greatest temperature rise was observed 0.75mm apical from the top of the cavity. All groups showed over 6°C maximum temperature rise (ΔT max ) at the pulpal side of the dentin. Upon curing, Z250 reached ΔT=5°C faster than BFP; however, ΔT max of the two composites were comparable at any POI. Bulk filling showed greater ΔT max than incremental filling at 0.75mm apical from the top and in the middle of the cavity. The Elipar S10 light generated faster temperature changes in the curing composite at all recorded positions throughout the depth of the cavity and greater ΔT max in all POIs compared to BeLite. Real-time thermographic analysis demonstrated that the composite type and layering method did not influence the temperature rise at the pulpal side of dentin during composite restoration of an occlusal preparation in a tooth. The amount and initial rate of temperature increase was most affected by the radiant exposure of the light curing unit. Within the

  7. A Refined Zigzag Beam Theory for Composite and Sandwich Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sciuva, Marco Di; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A new refined theory for laminated composite and sandwich beams that contains the kinematics of the Timoshenko Beam Theory as a proper baseline subset is presented. This variationally consistent theory is derived from the virtual work principle and employs a novel piecewise linear zigzag function that provides a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear flexible beams than other similar theories. This new zigzag function is unique in that it vanishes at the top and bottom bounding surfaces of a beam. The formulation does not enforce continuity of the transverse shear stress across the beam s cross-section, yet is robust. Two major shortcomings that are inherent in the previous zigzag theories, shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, and that have greatly limited the utility of these previous theories are discussed in detail. An approach that has successfully resolved these shortcomings is presented herein. Exact solutions for simply supported and cantilevered beams subjected to static loads are derived and the improved modelling capability of the new zigzag beam theory is demonstrated. In particular, extensive results for thick beams with highly heterogeneous material lay-ups are discussed and compared with corresponding results obtained from elasticity solutions, two other zigzag theories, and high-fidelity finite element analyses. Comparisons with the baseline Timoshenko Beam Theory are also presented. The comparisons clearly show the improved accuracy of the new, refined zigzag theory presented herein over similar existing theories. This new theory can be readily extended to plate and shell structures, and should be useful for obtaining relatively low-cost, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design an important class of high-performance aerospace structures.

  8. Effect of light curing sources on microhardness of different composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, T. A.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; de Menezes, F. C. H.; Cavalcante, L. M. A.; Pimenta, L. A. F.; de Andrade, M. F.; Dantas, A. A. R.; Rastelli, A. N. S.

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of light-curing units (LCUs) on Knoop microhardness (KHN) of different composite resins formulations. Four LCUs, one Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) for 20 s, one Argon-Ion-Laser (AL) for 10 s, one Plasma-Arc-Curing (PAC) for 9 s, and one Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) for 20 s, and three composite resins, nanofill and easy cure (Filtek™ Supreme), microhybrid and medium cure (Herculite XRV), and microfill and difficult cure (Heliomolar) were used. Discs (4 × 2 mm2) of each composite resin were divided in 12 Groups and KHN was measured at the top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ( p < 0.05). Top presented significantly higher KHN than bottom surface for all composite resins and LCUs tested. Statistical significant differences were observed among the LCUs. At the bottom surface QTH and LED presented higher KHN than PAC and LA. However, at the top surface PAC and LA presented similar results than QTH for nanofill and microhybrid composite resins. Different LCUs play an important effect on Knoop microhardness and the composite resin formulations were significant factor on the photosensitivity.

  9. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  10. The effect of light-cured nanofilled composite resin shades on their under-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, U. A.; Herda, E.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effect of shades of light-cured nanofilled composite resins on their under-surface temperature. Resin composites specimens of shades bright, medium, and dark shade were obtained from a cylindrical mold. While polymerizing using a curing unit, the under-surface temperature was determined at the bottom of the specimens using a thermocouple wire 20 sec after the start. Results showed that the under-surface temperature of the darker shade specimens were relatively higher that those of the brighter shades with significant diffferences between the resin composites of different shades. To conlude, the under-surface temperature of the light-cured nanofilled resin composites raised from the brighter to the darker shades.

  11. Wear and marginal breakdown of composites with various degrees of cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Mitchem, J C; Condon, J R; Todd, R

    1997-08-01

    Loss of anatomical form due to wear has been cited as one factor limiting the clinical use of posterior composites. The physical properties and possibly the wear resistance of composite are influenced by the extent to which it is cured. The aim of this study was to vary degree of conversion (DC) in composites to test the hypothesis that resistance to wear and marginal breakdown could be improved by enhanced curing. A light-cured hybrid composite containing a 50% Bis-GMA/50% TEGDMA resin and 62 vol% of strontium glass (1 to 2 microm) with microfill silica was formulated (Bisco). Composite was placed into two 2.5-mm-diameter cylindrical holes in Co-Cr teeth replacing first and second molars in the mandibular dentures of 50 edentulous patients. The composites were light-cured for different time periods (9 s, 12 s, 25 s, 40 s, and 40 s + 10 min at 120 degrees C) and then polished. The microfill Heliomolar was also tested. DC (%) was measured by FTIR and ranged between 55% for 9 s of light-curing and 67% for 40 s of light-curing followed by heat application. Impressions were evaluated at baseline, 6 mo, 1 yr, and 2 yrs. Stone casts were evaluated independently by three observers to determine the % of the total margin exhibiting breakdown. Epoxy replicas were measured with a profilometer for wear. Wear of the hybrid composite at 2 yrs ranged from a high of 144 microm with 9 s of light-curing to a low of 36 microm with 40 s of light-curing followed by heat. Heliomolar exhibited from 11 to 16 microm of wear at 2 yrs. There was a strong negative correlation (r2 = 0.91) between the degree of cure and the abrasive wear of the hybrid composites. Marginal breakdown was negligible for the hybrids, and was reduced for the microfill from 40% to 15% of the margin by heat treatment. This study showed that the resistance to abrasive wear of a dental composite could be improved by enhancement of its degree of conversion.

  12. A Comparison of Curing Process-Induced Residual Stresses and Cure Shrinkage in Micro-Scale Composite Structures with Different Constitutive Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongna; Li, Xudong; Dai, Jianfeng; Xi, Shangbin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, three kinds of constitutive laws, elastic, "cure hardening instantaneously linear elastic (CHILE)" and viscoelastic law, are used to predict curing process-induced residual stress for the thermoset polymer composites. A multi-physics coupling finite element analysis (FEA) model implementing the proposed three approaches is established in COMSOL Multiphysics-Version 4.3b. The evolution of thermo-physical properties with temperature and degree of cure (DOC), which improved the accuracy of numerical simulations, and cure shrinkage are taken into account for the three models. Subsequently, these three proposed constitutive models are implemented respectively in a 3D micro-scale composite laminate structure. Compared the differences between these three numerical results, it indicates that big error in residual stress and cure shrinkage generates by elastic model, but the results calculated by the modified CHILE model are in excellent agreement with those estimated by the viscoelastic model.

  13. Effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and post shrinkage in neat epoxy and epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Jakobsen, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and warpage is studied for both neat epoxy and glass/epoxy composites. An approach for determining the enthalpy relaxation in the matrix of composite materials combining modulated differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry is presented...

  14. Single Vacuum Bagging and Autoclave Curing System Influence on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Phenolic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mirzapour

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial production of thermoset composite components involves the application of a vacuum bagging and autoclave pressure to minimize void percentage, usually to less than 5%. Phenolic resin systems generate water as a reaction byproduct via condensation reactions during curing at elevated temperatures. In this paper, vacuum bagging and simple manufactured autoclave curing systems are used for manufacturing of asbestos/phenolic composites and the effects of processing conditions on manufactured composites are investigated. The traditional single-vacuum-bag process is unable to manage the volatiles effectively, resulting in inferior laminates having voids. The autoclave process cure cycle (temperature/pressure profiles for the selected composite system is designed to emit volatiles during curing reactions effectively and produce composites with low void contents and excellent mechanical properties. Laminate consolidation quality is characterized by optical photomicrography for the cross-sections and measurements of void content and mechanical properties. The void content of phenolic composites as opposed to other composites increases as pressure increases up to 3 bar and it is then decreased beyond it. A product of 124% lower void content, 13% higher density, 24% higher flexural strength and 27% higher flexural modulus can be fabricated in composites obtainedby autoclave processing.

  15. Fast Cure Repair Kit for Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a need for technologies that will enable them to repair damage to composite structures. Fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials are fast gaining ground...

  16. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes. Sand-blasted CAD/CAM composite blocks were cemented using conventional resin cement, Rely X Ultimate Clicker (RXC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA with Single Bond Universal (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA for the control group or two self-adhesive resin cements: Rely X U200 (RXU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and G-CEM Cerasmart (GC, GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan. RXU and GC groups included different curing modes (light-curing (L and auto-curing (A. Shear bond strength (SBS analyses were performed on all the specimens. The RXC group revealed the highest SBS and the GC A group revealed the lowest SBS. According to Tukey’s post hoc test, the RXC group showed a significant difference compared to the GC A group (p < 0.05. For the curing mode, RXU A and RXU L did not show any significant difference between groups and GC A and GC L did not show any significant difference either. Most of the groups except RXC and RXU L revealed adhesive failure patterns predominantly. The RXC group showed a predominant cohesive failure pattern in their CAD/CAM composite, LavaTM Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA. Within the limitations of this study, no significant difference was found regarding curing modes but more mixed fracture patterns were showed when using the light-curing mode than when using the self-curing mode.

  17. Radiation Supporting Synthezis and Curing of Composites Suitable for Practical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.; Antoniak, M.; Nowicki, A.; Mirkowski, K.; Walo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Epoxy resins (ER) due to favorable combination of superior mechanical and thermal properties with unusual radiation resistance play an important role in some nuclear and aerospace industries. They are also widely used as matrices of reinforced composites since the homogeneous dissipation of fillers in the non-cured material is uncomplicated and efficient. Curing procedure is a very important factor determining final features of the epoxy resin and its composite. It was confirmed that irradiation facilitates molecular mobility and decreases glass transition as a result of chain scission. On the other hand, the increase in local mobility accelerates crosslinking thus the total effect is dependent on the relation between these two processes. Larieva reported that the ratio between degradation and crosslinking is 0.43, thus under selected conditions yield of curing more than twice prevails over yield of decomposition. The nature of hardener and its radiosensitivity also significantly influence the radiation induced curing. During exposure to ionizing radiation the binders participate in the processes initiated both by radiation and by heating, as curing is highly exothermic and considerably increases temperature of the system. Application of radiation treatment lowers energy consumption, shortens curing time and decreases curing temperature enhancing dimensional stability. In the past some attempts were made to improve heat resistance and strength of epoxy resins by the incorporation of various particles, e.g. silica, carbon nanotubes, montmorillonite, etc, however the results were unambiguous. In the reported studies the effects of radiation and thermal curing were investigated for ER and its composites either in the presence of cationic initiator or amine hardener

  18. Beam radiation curing of adhesives for flocking on heat-sensitive substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.; Fussa, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for curing the adhesive used to hold flock fiber material to a heat-sensitive substrate consisting of temperature-sensitive plastic, natural fibers, wood, paper, or paper-foil laminates. An electron-curable adhesive layer (acrylic, epoxy, epoxy esters, acrylic latex, or urethane) a few mils thick is applied to the substrate and a layer of texturing material is attached to the adhesive layer with fibers substantially perpendicular to the layer. The assembly of substrate and adhesively secured material is passed at a rate of about 20 to 80 meters per minute under an unscanned electron curtain beam which possesses an energy of 150 keV +- 30 percent and delivers an electron dose of 2 megarads +- 50 percent to the adhesive layer. (LL)

  19. Monitoring cure properties of out-of-autoclave BMI composites using IFPI sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amardeep; Anandan, Sudharshan; Yuan, Lei; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Xiao, Hai; Phan, Nam

    2016-04-01

    A non-destructive technique for inspection of a Bismaleimide (BMI) composite is presented using an optical fiber sensor. High performance BMI composites are used for Aerospace application for their mechanical strength. They are also used as an alternative to toughened epoxy resins. A femtosecond-laser-inscribed Intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) sensor is used to perform real time cure monitoring of a BMI composite. The composite is cured using the out-of-autoclave (OOA) process. The IFPI sensor was used for in-situ monitoring; different curing stages are analyzed throughout the curing process. Temperature-induced-strain was measured to analyze the cure properties. The IFPI structure comprises of two reflecting mirrors inscribed on the core of the fiber using a femtosecond-laser manufacturing process. The manufacturing process makes the sensor thermally stable and robust for embedded applications. The sensor can withstand very high temperatures of up to 850 °C. The temperature and strain sensitivities of embedded IFPI sensor were measured to be 1.4 pm/μepsilon and 0.6 pm/μepsilon respectively.

  20. Glass transition and degree of conversion of a light-cured orthodontic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela M. D. S. Sostena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the glass transition temperature (Tg and degree of conversion (DC of a light-cured (Fill Magic versus a chemically cured (Concise orthodontic composite. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Anelastic relaxation spectroscopy was used for the first time to determine the Tg of a dental composite, while the DC was evaluated by infrared spectroscopy. The light-cured composite specimens were irradiated with a commercial LED light-curing unit using different exposure times (40, 90 and 120 s. RESULTS: Fill Magic presented lower Tg than Concise (35-84ºC versus 135ºC, but reached a higher DC. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that Fill Magic has lower Tg than Concise due to its higher organic phase content, and that when this light-cured composite is used to bond orthodontic brackets, a minimum energy density of 7.8 J/cm² is necessary to reach adequate conversion level and obtain satisfactory adhesion.

  1. Effect of pre-heating resin composite and light-curing units on monomer conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, E. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Saade, J. L.; Rossato, D. M.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-heating resin composite photo-cured with light-curing units (LCU) by FT-IR. Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (4 mm diameter × 2 mm thick) from composite resin—Tetric Ceram® (Ivoclar/Vivadent) at room temperature (25°C) and pre-heated to 37, 54, and 60°C. The specimens were cured with halogen curing light (QTH) and light emitted by diodes (LED) during 40 s. Then, the specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The data were submitted to statistical analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test. Study data showed no statistically significant difference to the degree of conversion for the different light curing units (QTH and LED) ( p > 0.05). With the increase of temperature there was significant increase in the degree of conversion ( p light curing unit and temperature influenced the degree of conversion.

  2. Influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of resin composites determined by Vickers hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardini, Marco; Chiesa, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adequate polymerization of resin composites could be considered as a crucial factor in obtaining good clinical performance, particularly in stress-bearing areas. An insufficient curing degree affects the resin composite's chemical properties The current in vitro study evaluated the influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of six commercial resin composites by Vickers microhardness (VK). Materials and Methods: Six resin composites were selected: Three microhybrid (Esthet.X HD, Amaris, Filtek Silorane), two nanohybrid (Grandio, Ceram.X mono), and one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT). The VK of the surface was determined by a microhardness tester using a Vickers diamond indenter and a 200 g load applied for 15 s. The bottom to top mean VK ratio was calculated using the formula: Hardness ratio = VK of bottom surface/VK of top surface. Vickers hardness values of test materials during exposure time of 20 and 40 s and depths of cure of 2 and 3 mm were determined and compared. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results: For all the tested materials and with all the exposure time periods, hardness ratio was higher than the minimum value indicated in literature (0.8). Exposure time and depth of cure did not affect hardness ratio values for Filtek Silorane, Grandio, and Filtek Supreme XT. Conclusion: Among the materials tested, the nanofilled and the nanohybrid resin composites were rather insensible to thickness variations. Miicrohybrid composites, instead, had features different from one another. PMID:23559951

  3. Effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of portland composite cement (PCC) mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronge, M. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Hamada, H.; Irmawaty, R.

    2017-11-01

    Cement manufacturing of Indonesia has been introduced Portland Composite Cement (PCC) to minimize the rising production cost of cement which contains 80% clinker and 20% mineral admixture. A proper curing is very important when the cement contains mineral admixture materials. This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to evaluate the effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of PCC mortar. Mortar specimens with water to cement ratio of (W/C) 0.5 were casted. Compressive strength, flexural strength and concrete resistance were tested at 7, 28 and 91 days cured water. The results indicated that water curing duration is essential to continue the pozzolanic reaction in mortar which contributes to the development of strength of mortar made with PCC.

  4. Method of controlling a resin curing process. [for fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Charles Neal (Inventor); Scott, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an analytical technique for controlling the curing process of fiber-reinforced composite materials that are formed using thermosetting resins. The technique is the percent gel method and involves development of a time-to-gel equation as a function of temperature. From this equation a rate-of-gel equation is then determined, and a percent gel is calculated which is the product of rate-of-gel times time. Percent gel accounting is used to control the proper pressure application point in an autoclave cure process to achieve desired properties in a production composite part.

  5. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  6. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Cho, Kyu-Jeong; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  7. The effect of time between curing and tea immersion on composite resin discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Afkhami, Solaleh; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh

    2018-01-01

    One common cause for the replacement of a composite restoration is discoloration. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of tea solution on the discoloration of 3 types of composites at different timepoints after curing. For this study, 150 disc-shaped specimens of 3 types of composite resin-a nanohybrid (Filtek Z350), a microhybrid (Filtek Z250), and a microfilled material (Heliomolar)-were prepared. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10) according to the type of composite and the time from curing to immersion in a tea solution (none [immersed immediately], 1 hour, 6 hours, 12 hours, or 24 hours postcuring). The color for all specimens was measured before and after immersion in tea. Color change (ΔE*) for all specimens was measured, and a ΔE* value of less than 3.3 was considered clinically acceptable. Analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Immediately after curing, the levels of composite discoloration were deemed clinically acceptable (ΔE* composites, the greatest color change was found immediately after curing (P composite resin specimens was significantly greater than that of Heliomolar specimens (P composite group than in the Heliomolar group (P composites were not significantly different from each other (P > 0.05), except with 12-hour postcure immersion. The results suggest that patients should avoid the intake of staining foods or beverages for at least 12 hours after placement of a composite resin restoration, although this restriction may be reduced to 1 hour for microfilled composite resins.

  8. Numerical simulation of steel-concrete composite Virender beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinggui; Cao, Xinming; Luo, Quanrui

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is proposed. The finite element analysis of the new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is carried out by using ABAQUS. To compare the mechanical properties with traditional beam, the normal reinforced concrete beam with the same section size is also analyzed by using ABAQUS. The simulation results show that the material strength of the new type steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is fully utilized, and the flexural capacity and deformation performance of the new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam are greatly improved compared with normal reinforced concrete beam.

  9. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto De Santis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance.

  10. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio; Maietta, Saverio; Martorelli, Massimo; De Luca, Alessandro; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Riccitiello, Francesco; Rengo, Sandro

    2018-03-27

    Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED) curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design)/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance.

  11. Shear bond strength of dual-cured and self-cured resin composites to dentin using different bonding agents and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leevailoj, C; Ua-wutthikrerk, P; Poolthong, S

    2007-01-01

    This study determined the effects of bonding agents on the shear bond strength of dual- and self-cured resin composites to dentin. Two light-cured dentin bonding agents (Excite and One-Step) and a dual-cured bonding agent (Excite DSC) were compared. Light activation of the bonding agents prior to placement of the resin composites was also evaluated. This in vitro study was performed on 120 extracted non-carious human third molars. The occlusal part of the crowns was removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The teeth were then randomly divided into three major groups for Excite, One-Step and Excite DSC as bonding agents. The specimens in each adhesive group were divided into four subgroups: with and without light activation of the bonding agent and with dual-cured (Luxacore Dualcure, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) or light-cured resin (Luxacore, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) composites. After placing the restorations, the specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before being tested for shear bond strength on an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results showed that the shear bond strength of dual-cured resin composite to dentin was significantly higher than that of self-cured resin composite (p = 0.017). Light activation of the bonding agents prior to applying the resin composites led to a significantly higher shear bond strength of the resin composites to dentin, compared to no light activation (p < 0.05).

  12. Effect of Layering Methods, Composite Type, and Flowable Liner on the Polymerization Shrinkage Stress of Light Cured Dental Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    18 TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS 1 Introduction Composite restoration has become an essential part of everyday dental ...thickness of flowable liner, use of RMGI (resin modified glass ionomer ) liner, and light curing methods on the cuspal deflection should be...polymerization shrinkage stress in polymer-based restoratives . J Dent, Vol. 25, pp 435-440, 1997. [4] J. Ferracane. Placing dental composites-A stressful

  13. Optimal cure cycle design of a resin-fiber composite laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeenson

    1987-01-01

    A unified computed aided design method was studied for the cure cycle design that incorporates an optimal design technique with the analytical model of a composite cure process. The preliminary results of using this proposed method for optimal cure cycle design are reported and discussed. The cure process of interest is the compression molding of a polyester which is described by a diffusion reaction system. The finite element method is employed to convert the initial boundary value problem into a set of first order differential equations which are solved simultaneously by the DE program. The equations for thermal design sensitivities are derived by using the direct differentiation method and are solved by the DE program. A recursive quadratic programming algorithm with an active set strategy called a linearization method is used to optimally design the cure cycle, subjected to the given design performance requirements. The difficulty of casting the cure cycle design process into a proper mathematical form is recognized. Various optimal design problems are formulated to address theses aspects. The optimal solutions of these formulations are compared and discussed.

  14. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marcos Daniel Septimio; Andreeta, Marcello Rubens Barsi; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins De

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (pcrowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic. PMID:29211292

  15. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis of E-Beam and Thermally Curable IPN Thermosets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Robert

    2002-01-01

    .... E-beam curing of composites and adhesives offers advantages, such as reduced cure shrinkages, over traditional autoclave processing by curing multiple resins through the thickness for thick-section...

  16. Effect of preheating and light-curing unit on physicochemical properties of a bulk fill composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, Jéssica Dias; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy; Catelan, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of composite preheating and polymerization mode on degree of conversion (DC), microhardness (KHN), plasticization (P), and depth of polymerization (DP) of a bulk fill composite. Forty disc-shaped samples (n = 5) of a bulk fill composite were prepared (5 × 4 mm thick) and randomly divided into 4 groups according to light-curing unit (quartz-tungsten-halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED]) and preheating temperature (23 or 54 °C). A control group was prepared with a flowable composite at room temperature. DC was determined using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, KHN was measured with a Knoop indenter, P was evaluated by percentage reduction of hardness after 24 h of ethanol storage, and DP was obtained by bottom/top ratio. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Regardless of light-curing, the highest preheating temperature increased DC compared to room temperature on bottom surface. LED showed a higher DC compared to QTH. Overall, DC was higher on top surface than bottom. KHN, P, and DP were not affected by curing mode and temperature, and flowable composite showed similar KHN, and lower DC and P, compared to bulk fill. Composite preheating increased the polymerization degree of 4-mm-increment bulk fill, but it led to a higher plasticization compared to the conventional flowable composite evaluated.

  17. Evaluation of wear rate of dental composites polymerized by halogen or LED light curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghehmand H.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sufficient polymerization is a critical factor to obtain optimum physical properties and clinical efficacy of resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear rates of composite resins polymerized by two different systems Light Emitting Diodes (LED to and Halogen lamps. Materials and Methods: In this laboratory study, 20 specimens of A3 Tetric Ceram composite were placed in brass molds of 2*10*10 mm dimensions and cured for 40 seconds with 1 mm distance from surface. 10 specimens were cured with LED and the other 10 were cured with Halogen unit. A device with the ability to apply force was developed in order to test the wear of composites. After storage in distilled water for 10 days, the specimens were placed in the wear testing machine. A chrome cobalt stylus with 1.12 mm diameter was applied against the specimens surfaces with a load of 2 kg. The weight of each samples before and after 5000, 10000, 20000, 40000, 80000 and 120000 cycles was measured using an electronic balance with precision of 10-4 grams. Data were analyzed using t test and paired t test. P0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, LED and halogen light curing units resulted in a similar wear rate in composite resin restorations.

  18. 700 F properties of autoclave cured PMR-II composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Studies were conducted to develop autoclave processing parameters for graphite reinforced PMR-2 resin composite materials intended for use in applications at temperatures up to 371 degrees (700 F). The effect of resin composition on autoclaveability was investigated. The effect of various graphite fibers and resin composition on 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties was also investigated. The results of the processing studies show that PMR-2 resin composites can be easily fabricated under autoclave conditions. Autoclaved laminates exposed to 1 atm of air at 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) exhibited less than 5 percent weight loss after 750 hr exposure to 650 F air and 8 percent weight loss during exposure to 700 F air for 500 hr. After 500 hr exposure, autoclaved laminates exhibited greater than 90 percent retention of initial 650 and 700 F flexural and interlaminar shear strengths. The effect of resin formulated molecular weight and postcure conditions on laminate glass transition temperature is also discussed.

  19. The 700 F properties of autoclave cured PMR-2 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Cifani, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Studies were conducted to develop autoclave processing parameters for graphite reinforced PMR-2 resin composite materials intended for use in applications at temperatures up to 371 degrees (700 F). The effect of resin composition on autoclaveability was investigated. The effect of various graphite fibers and resin composition on 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties was also investigated. The results of the processing studies show that PMR-2 resin composites can be easily fabricated under autoclave conditions. Autoclaved laminates exposed to 1 atm of air at 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) exhibited less than 5 percent weight loss after 750 hr exposure to 650 F air and 8 percent weight loss during exposure to 700 F air for 500 hr. After 500 hr exposure, autoclaved laminates exhibited greater than 90 percent retention of initial 650 and 700 F flexural and interlaminar shear strengths. The effect of resin formulated molecular weight and postcure conditions on laminate glass transition temperature is also discussed.

  20. Rubber composites cured with sulphur and peroxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Electromagnetic Theory, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak. University of Technology, 812 19 Bratislava, Slovakia. MS received 18 March 2016; accepted 30 May 2016. Abstract. In the present work, rubber magnetic composites were prepared by incorporation of strontium ...

  1. E-Beam-Cured Layered-Silicate and Spherical Silica Epoxy Nanocomposites (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang; Anderson, David P

    2007-01-01

    .... The nanofillers can be two dimensional (layered-silicate) and zero dimensional (spherical silica). Both the spherical silica epoxy nanocomposite and the layered-silicate epoxy nanocomposite can be cured to a high degree of curing...

  2. Composite Cure Process Modeling and Simulations using COMPRO(Registered Trademark) and Validation of Residual Strains using Fiber Optics Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite cure process induced residual strains and warping deformations in composite components present significant challenges in the manufacturing of advanced composite structure. As a part of the Manufacturing Process and Simulation initiative of the NASA Advanced Composite Project (ACP), research is being conducted on the composite cure process by developing an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which the process induced factors influence the residual responses. In this regard, analytical studies have been conducted on the cure process modeling of composite structural parts with varied physical, thermal, and resin flow process characteristics. The cure process simulation results were analyzed to interpret the cure response predictions based on the underlying physics incorporated into the modeling tool. In the cure-kinetic analysis, the model predictions on the degree of cure, resin viscosity and modulus were interpreted with reference to the temperature distribution in the composite panel part and tool setup during autoclave or hot-press curing cycles. In the fiber-bed compaction simulation, the pore pressure and resin flow velocity in the porous media models, and the compaction strain responses under applied pressure were studied to interpret the fiber volume fraction distribution predictions. In the structural simulation, the effect of temperature on the resin and ply modulus, and thermal coefficient changes during curing on predicted mechanical strains and chemical cure shrinkage strains were studied to understand the residual strains and stress response predictions. In addition to computational analysis, experimental studies were conducted to measure strains during the curing of laminated panels by means of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGs) embedded in the resin impregnated panels. The residual strain measurements from laboratory tests were then compared with the analytical model predictions. The paper describes the cure process

  3. The effect of exposure time on diametral tensile strength of light-cured resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia M Tetelepta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition or extend the exposure time in using light-cured resin composite are often done by practitioners in order to get a higher mechanical strength. Nevertheless, failure still can occur. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exposure time on Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS of two different resin composite used for provisional crown and bridge restoration and filling materials. A total of 60 cylindrical specimens (6mm diameter x 3mm thickness were divided into three groups (n=10. The first group was cured as recommended by the manufacturer, the second group were cured two times, and the third group were cured three times. Furthermore, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 24 hours at a temperature of 37 °C. DTS were tested by universal testing machine and the results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA continued with Post Hoc Tamhane to see the difference between the groups. The results showed DTS composite as filling materials was significantly higher compared with the resin composite  for provisional crown and bridge restoration. DTS of composite as filling materials in first group had a higher value than first  and third groups. The composite for the provisional crown and bridge restoration in second group had a lower DTS value than in first and third groups. In third group, DTS increased but not significantly. DTS also could be influenced by the composition of filler content and type of matrix. The conclusion of this study was to extend the exposure time can weaken the DTS resin composite.

  4. Influence of the Light Source and Curing Parameters on Microhardness of a Silorane-Based Dental Composite Material

    OpenAIRE

    Malara P.; Czech Z.; Świderski W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the light source and the light-curing parameters (the distance of the material from the light source and time of light-curing) on microhardness of Flitek Silorane dental composite material. Standardized samples of Filtek Silorane material were cured using two types of Light Curing Units (LCUs) – halogen and LED. The distance of the light source and time of curing differed between samples. The Knoop’s microhardness was tested using microha...

  5. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  6. Fabrication and testing of SMA composite beam with shape control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolvi, Basavaraj; S, Raja; Nagaraj, Shanmukha; Mudradi, Varada Raj

    2017-07-01

    Smart materials are the advanced materials that have characteristics of sensing and actuation in response to the external stimuli like pressure, heat or electric charge etc. These materials can be integrated in to any structure to make it smart. From the different types of smart materials available, Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) is found to be more useful in designing new applications, which can offer more actuating speed, reduce the overall weight of the structure. The unique property of SMA is the ability to remember and recover from large strains of upto 8% without permanent deformation. Embedding the SMA wire/sheet in fiber-epoxy/flexible resin systems has many potential applications in Aerospace, Automobile, Medical, Robotics and various other fields. In this work the design, fabrication, and testing of smart SMA composite beam has been carried out. Two types of epoxy based resin systems namely LY 5210 resin system and EPOLAM 2063 resin system are used in fabricating the SMA composite specimens. An appropriate mould is designed and fabricated to retain the pre-strain of SMA wire during high temperature post curing of composite specimens. The specimens are fabricated using vacuum bag technique.

  7. Electron beam-curing coating for pressed cement roof tiles with high-build and excellent durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu; Kiyata, Hiroaki

    1979-01-01

    Thick slate has expanded the demand steadily and spread to whole Japan except the northernmost part as a roof material, because it deals with rain water well, its strength, coldness resistance and endurance are excellent, and it can be worked easily. The ornamental finishing by urethane coating is not satisfactory in view of the improvement of productivity and the measures to pollution as well as the design and color. In order to meet this background, new coating has been sought, and electron beam-curing coating seems to be most suitable to cement roof tiles. The history and the present state of cement roof tiles are explained. About 700 tons/month of the coating for cement roof tiles is used at present, and acryl resin coating occupies about 75%, while urethane resin coating is used in Kyushu relatively more. The urethane coating is applied in shops by electrostatic coating, but the acryl coating is mostly applied in sites after tiling over. Electron beam curing used electron beam of 200 keV, and polymerization starts from the radicals formed through ionization, excitation and neutralization. The features of electron beam-curing coating are good adhesion to roof tiles, keeping luster and endurance to discoloration, strong film and feeling like porcelain, drying at normal temperature, productivity and economy. (J.P.N.)

  8. Influence of aromatic amine hardeners in the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite structures for aerospace applications are mainly made by the well-known prepreg technology. In order to achieve adequate prepreg processing schedules, and consequently maximum fiber strength utilization, one has to know in deep the cure kinetics of matrix, which held the fibers together. This work describes a procedure to study the cure kinetic and has as example how aromatic amine hardeners influence the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites. The investigation was carried out by using the DSC technique and it was found that depending on the system used the cure kinetics of the formulation obeys order n or autocatalytic order.

  9. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adhesive systems, the RMGI samples were cured. Composite layers were applied and shear bond strength was measured. Two samples of each group were evaluated by SEM. Failure mode was determined by streomicroscope. Both curing methods and adhesive systems had significant effect on bond strength (P-value adhesives had significantly higher shear bond strength than the total-etch adhesive (P-value technique improved the bond strength in self-etch adhesives, but decreased the bond strength in total-etch adhesive (P-valueadhesive systems and co-curing technique can improve the bond strength between the RMGI and composite.

  10. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daniel Septimio Lanza

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (p<0.001. The curing protocol 3x20 resulted in higher DC for all tested conditions; lower DC was observed for Zr ceramic crowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic.

  11. [Experimental study on the reinforced effect of light curing composite resins used for crowns and bridges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Zhang, J Z

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate the reinforced effect of the light curing composite resins used for crowns and bridges. Three light curing composite resins which were used for crowns and bridges were chosen, and three polyester fiber sieves and three stainless steel sieves in different mesh were used as the additional reinforced materials. Compressive strength and three point flexural strength of test bars made of those materials were evaluated. The reinforced bridges with special fibers were used as control groups. (1)There was significant increase in the stainless steel sieves groups. Nevertheless, there was some decrease after use of the polyester fibers as the additional reinforced material. (2)The increase of the reinforced crowns was especially obvious. (3)Among the three resins, the property of Targis was better than that of Arglass and Solidex. The properties of the whole composite material were closely correlated with the additional reinforced materials, the resistance to compression of the sieves are better than its resistance to bend.

  12. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraldo Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey′s test (a = 0.05. Results: For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P < 0.05 Knoop hardness number values in the bottom. The mean temperature increase showed no significant statistical differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  13. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Xediek Consani, Rafael Leonardo; Mendes, Wilson Batista; Lympius, Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan). Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P 0.05). The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  14. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahillo, Jose; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Coltène/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Coltène/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual). Specimens were subjected to quantitative marginal analysis before and after thermo-mechanical loading. Higher percentages of marginal adaptation at the total margin length, both before and after thermo-mechanical loading, were found in groups in which enamel was etched with phosphoric acid, without significant differences between the chemically and dual-cured modes. The restorations performance was similar on enamel and dentin, obtaining low results of adaptation on occlusal enamel in the groups without enamel etching, the lowest scores were on cervical dentin in the group with no ortophosphoric acid and self-cured. A dual-cure composite applied in bulk on acid etched enamel obtained acceptable marginal adaptation results, and may be an alternative technique for the restoration of class II cavities. Key words:Dual-cure composite, bulk technique, class II restoration, selective enamel etching, marginal adaptation.

  15. A Simplified Analysis Of the Brazier Effect In Composite Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Lund, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Windturbine blades are often designed as a composite structure. The load bearing element is a composite beam, that carries the load from the tip to the root, which is connected to the rotor. The dimensions of the beam will normally vary along the beam. The primary loads on the beam is the wind load...... which is perpendicular to the axis giving bending and shear with centrifugal loadings giving axial tension. The wind pressure acts on the wing shell and is transferred to the composite beam acting as a load perpendicular to the the beam axis....

  16. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  17. Mechanical properties and polymerization shrinkage of composite resins light-cured using two different lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Jang-Hoon; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of 457 and 473 nm lasers for the curing of composite resins during the restoration of damaged tooth cavity. Monochromaticity and coherence are attractive features of laser compared with most other light sources. Better polymerization of composite resins can be expected. Eight composite resins were light cured using these two lasers and a light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit (LCU). To evaluate the degrees of polymerization achieved, polymerization shrinkage and flexural and compressive properties were measured and compared. Polymerization shrinkage values by 457 and 473 nm laser, and LED ranged from 10.9 to 26.8, from 13.2 to 26.1, and from 11.5 to 26.3 μm, respectively. The values by 457 nm laser was significantly different from those by 473 and LED LCU (p0.05). For the tested LCUs, no specific LCU could consistently achieve highest strength and modulus from the specimens tested. Two lasers (457 and 473 nm) can polymerize composite resins to the level that LED LCU can achieve despite inconsistent trends of polymerization shrinkage and flexural and compressive properties of the tested specimens.

  18. INFLUENCE OF IRRADIATION EXPOSURE TIME ON THE DEPTH CURE OF RESTORATIVE RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fabiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the degree of conversion by the hardness measurements of a commercial resin composite. The specimens were prepared according to ISO 4049 and photo-activated for 20s – 40s – 60s with a light-emitting diodes (LEDs. To establish the optimal increment technique mono-layers 1 mm and 2 mm thick were tested. The ratio bottom-to-top was assessed for the mono-layers groups. Vickers hardness profiles were measured for mono-layer, bi-layer and tri-layer along the cross-section. The microhardness map showed difference in the mechanical characteristic of overlying resin confirmed by SEM images analysis of the fracture mechanics. Curing effectiveness of resin composite is not only dependent on the curing light unit but also from thickness of the resin composite and the duration of the exposure. The data suggest that an exposure time of 40 s or higher is required to provide composites with a homogeneous and high hardness, moreover, a 1 mm buildup multi-layering technique results in adequate curing of the bottom layer and better mechanical properties.

  19. Influence of Emission Spectrum and Irradiance on Light Curing of Resin-Based Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Cak; Sullivan, B; Turbino, M L; Soares, C J; Price, R B

    This study examined the influence of different emission spectra (single-peak and broad-spectrum) light-curing units (LCUs) delivering the same radiant exposures at irradiance values of 1200 or 3600 mW/cm 2 on the polymerization and light transmission of four resin-based composites (RBCs). Two prototype LCUs that used the same light tip, but were either a single-peak blue or a broad-spectrum LED, were used to deliver the same radiant exposures to the top surfaces of the RBCs using either standard (1200 mW/cm 2 ) or high irradiance (3600 mW/cm 2 ) settings. The emission spectrum and radiant power from the LCUs were measured with a laboratory-grade integrating sphere coupled to a spectrometer, and the light beam was assessed with a beam profiler camera. Four RBCs (Filtek Supreme Ultra A2, Tetric EvoCeram A2, Tetric EvoCeram T, and TPH Spectra High Viscosity A2) were photoactivated using four different light conditions: single-peak blue/standard irradiance, single-peak blue/high irradiance, broad-spectrum/standard irradiance, and broad-spectrum/high irradiance. The degree of conversion (N=5) and microhardness at the top and bottom of 2.3-mm-diameter by 2.5-mm-thick specimens (N=5) were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey tests. The real-time light transmission through the RBCs was also measured. For all light conditions, the 2.3-mm-diameter specimens received a homogeneous irradiance and spectral distribution. Although similar radiant exposures were delivered to the top surfaces of the RBCs, the amount of light energy emitted from the bottom surfaces was different among the four RBCs, and was also greater for the single-peak lights. Very little violet light (wavelengths below 420 nm) reached the bottom of the 2.5-mm-thick specimens. The degree of conversion and microhardness results varied according to the RBC (pspectrum lights, while at the bottom, where little violet light was observed, the results were equal or higher when they were photoactivated with

  20. Effect of preheating and light-curing unit on physicochemical properties of a bulk fill composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theobaldo JD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jéssica Dias Theobaldo,1 Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar,1 Núbia Inocencya Pavesi Pini,2 Débora Alves Nunes Leite Lima,1 Priscila Christiane Suzy Liporoni,3 Anderson Catelan3 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, 2Ingá University Center, Maringá, 3Departament of Dentistry, University of Taubaté, Taubaté, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of composite preheating and polymerization mode on degree of conversion (DC, microhardness (KHN, plasticization (P, and depth of polymerization (DP of a bulk fill composite.Methods: Forty disc-shaped samples (n = 5 of a bulk fill composite were prepared (5 × 4 mm thick and randomly divided into 4 groups according to light-curing unit (quartz–tungsten–halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED] and preheating temperature (23 or 54 °C. A control group was prepared with a flowable composite at room temperature. DC was determined using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, KHN was measured with a Knoop indenter, P was evaluated by percentage reduction of hardness after 24 h of ethanol storage, and DP was obtained by bottom/top ratio. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05.Results: Regardless of light-curing, the highest preheating temperature increased DC compared to room temperature on bottom surface. LED showed a higher DC compared to QTH. Overall, DC was higher on top surface than bottom. KHN, P, and DP were not affected by curing mode and temperature, and flowable composite showed similar KHN, and lower DC and P, compared to bulk fill.Conclusion: Composite preheating increased the polymerization degree of 4-mm-increment bulk fill, but it led to a higher plasticization compared to the conventional flowable composite evaluated. Keywords: composite resins, physicochemical phenomena, polymerization, hardness, heating

  1. Time reduction of light curing: Influence on conversion degree and microhardness of orthodontic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Patrícia Alves Ferreira; Martins, Renato Parsekian; dos Santos Cruz, Carlos Alberto; Capella, Marisa Veiga; Martins, Lídia Parsekian

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of curing time and power on the degree of conversion and surface microhardness of 3 orthodontic composites. One hundred eighty discs, 6 mm in diameter, were divided into 3 groups of 60 samples according to the composite used-Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), Opal Bond MV (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah), and Transbond Plus Color Change (3M Unitek)- and each group was further divided into 3 subgroups (n = 20). Five samples were used to measure conversion, and 15 were used to measure microhardness. A light-emitting diode curing unit with multiwavelength emission of broad light was used for curing at 3 power levels (530, 760, and 1520 mW) and 3 times (8.5, 6, and 3 seconds), always totaling 4.56 joules. Five specimens from each subgroup were ground and mixed with potassium bromide to produce 8-mm tablets to be compared with 5 others made similarly with the respective noncured composite. These were placed into a spectrometer, and software was used for analysis. A microhardness tester was used to take Knoop hardness (KHN) measurements in 15 discs of each subgroup. The data were analyzed with 2 analysis of variance tests at 2 levels. Differences were found in the conversion degree of the composites cured at different times and powers (P light cured at 8.5 seconds (80.7%) and 6 seconds (79.0%), but not at 3 seconds (75.0%). The conversion degrees of the composites were different, with group 3 (87.2%) higher than group 2 (83.5%), which was higher than group 1 (64.0%). Differences in microhardness were also found (P Curing time can be reduced up to 6 seconds by increasing the power, with a slight decrease in the degree of conversion at 3 seconds; the decrease has a positive effect on the surface microhardness. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da; Liu, Kai-Lei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Wei-Sheng; Liao, Chu-Hong; Jiang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from lateral to center to form cubic specimens. The lateral surfaces were abrased and polished before water storage and 40 000 thermal cycles (5/55 degrees celsius;). The mean surface roughness (Ra) were measured and compared before and after thermal cycling, and the changes of microstructure were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant decreases of Ra were observed in the composites, especially in Spectrum (from 0.164±0.024 µm to 0.140±0.017 µm, Presins, and fissures occurred on Z350 following the thermal cycling. Water storage and thermal cycling may produce polishing effect on composite resins and cause fissures on nanofilled composite resins.

  3. New insight into the "depth of cure" of dimethacrylate-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprince, Julian G; Leveque, Philippe; Nysten, Bernard; Gallez, Bernard; Devaux, Jacques; Leloup, Gaetane

    2012-05-01

    To demonstrate that determination of the depth of cure of resin-based composites needs to take into account the depth at which the transition between glassy and rubbery states of the resin matrix occurs. A commercially available nano-hybrid composite (Grandio) in a thick layer was light cured from one side for 10 or 40 s. Samples were analyzed by Vickers indentation, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron paramagnetic imaging and differential scanning calorimetry to measure the evolution of the following properties with depth: microhardness, degree of conversion, elastic modulus of the resin matrix, trapped free radical concentration and glass transition temperature. These measurements were compared to the composite thickness remaining after scraping off the uncured, soft composite. There was a progressive decrease in the degree of conversion and microhardness with depth as both properties still exhibited 80% of their upper surface values at 4 and 3.8 mm, respectively, for 10 s samples, and 5.6 and 4.8 mm, respectively, for 40 s samples. In contrast, there was a rapid decrease in elastic modulus at around 2.4 mm for the 10 s samples and 3.0 mm for the 40 s samples. A similar decrease was observed for concentrations of propagating radicals at 2 mm, but not for concentrations of allylic radicals, which decreased progressively. Whereas the upper composite layers presented a glass transition temperature - for 10 s, 55°C (±4) at 1 mm, 56.3°C (±2.3) at 2 mm; for 40 s, 62.3°C (±0.6) at 1 mm, 62°C (±1) at 2 mm, 62°C (±1.7) at 3 mm - the deeper layers did not display any glass transition. The thickness remaining after scraping off the soft composite was 7.01 (±0.07 mm) for 10 s samples and 9.48 (±0.22 mm) for 40 s samples. Appropriate methods show that the organic matrix of resin-based composite shifts from a glassy to a gel state at a certain depth. Hence, we propose a new definition for the "depth of cure" as the depth at which the resin matrix

  4. The role of the epoxy resin: Curing agent ratio in composite interfacial strength by single fibre microbond test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minty, Ross; Thomason, James L.; Petersen, Helga Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an investigation into the role of the epoxy resin: curing agent ratio in composite interfacial shear strength of glass fibre composites. The procedure involved changing the percentage of curing agent (Triethylenetetramine [TETA]) used in the mixture with several different...... percentages used, ranging from 4% up to 30%, including the stoichiometric ratio. It was found by using the microbond test, that there may exist a relationship between the epoxy resin to curing agent ratio and the level of adhesion between the reinforcing fibre and the polymer matrix of the composite....

  5. Effect of different curing modes on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of different composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ali Ajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different curing units and modes on the degree of conversion (DC and microhardness (MH of two different resin composites [ESTELITE ∑ QUICK (EQ, and Z350 XT (Z3]. Materials and Methods: One hundred (100 discs of each tested material were made and divided into two subgroups (n = 50 according to the discs′ dimensions: 5 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness, and 2 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness. Each subgroup was further subdivided into the following five classes (n = 10: I cured with halogen light curing-unit; II cured with light-emitting diode (LED unit; III cured with argon laser; IV cured with halogen light-curing unit for 5 s, 10 s rest followed by 20 s curing; and V cured with halogen light-curing unit for 10 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing. The first subgroup was tested for MH using the Vickers Microhardness tester and the second subgroup was tested for DC using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test P < 0.05. Results: Specimens in class IV showed the highest mean DC and MH, followed by class III, then class II. Class I showed significantly lower mean values for both DC and MH. On the other hand, Z3 showed statistically significantly higher mean DC and MH than EQ. Conclusion: Although the two tested composites did not perform similarly under the test conditions, curing with halogen unit for 5 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing improved the DC and the MH of both the tested materials.

  6. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  7. Effects of cure temperature, electron radiation, and thermal cycling on P75/930 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composites are candidates for future space structures due to high stiffness and dimensional stability requirements of these structures. Typical graphite/epoxy composites are brittle and have high residual stresses which often result in microcracking during the thermal cycling typical of the space environment. Composite materials used in geosynchronous orbit applications will also be exposed to high levels of radiation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of cure temperature and radiation exposure on the shear strength and thermal cycling-induced microcrack density of a high modulus, 275 F cure epoxy, P75/930. The results from the P75/930 are compared to previously reported data on P75/934 and T300/934 where 934 is a standard 350 F cure epoxy. The results of this study reveal that P75/930 is significantly degraded by total doses of electron radiation greater than 10(exp 8) rads and by thermally cycling between -250 F and 150 F. The P75/930 did not have improved microcrack resistance over the P75/934, and the 930 resin system appears to be more sensitive to electron radiation-induced degradation than the 934 resin system.

  8. Random vibrations of composite beams and plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnaser, Ahmad Shehadeh

    In this study, a generalized modal approach is presented to solve more general vibration problems of composite beams and plates. The coupled systems of partial differential equations, representing the equations of motion, are uncoupled into modal equations by utilizing the eigenfunctions of the system and its adjoint. A method is presented to obtain these eigenfunctions for beams with arbitrary boundary conditions and for plates with Levy-type boundary conditions. The forced vibration solutions obtained by this method are then used to calculate the random response characteristics of beams and plates subjected to spatially and temporally correlated random loads. In the analysis of beams, both symmetric cross-ply and angle-ply configurations have been considered. In the symmetric cross-ply configuration with no torsional loads, of course, the warping effects are absent. The angle-ply case, however, includes torsion-warping effects and coupled bending-torsion motions. A simple displacement field is introduced to reflect warping in the third-order shear deformation theory. In the analysis of plates two configurations of the laminates have also been considered: symmetric cross-ply and antisymmetric angle-ply. At this time, these are the only two configurations which can be solved by the closed-form modal analysis approach for the Levy-type boundary conditions. In both cases of the beams and plates, the numerical results with and without shear deformations are obtained and compared. The result for no shear deformation theory are obtained with the classical lamination theory. The results have also been obtained for the first-order shear deformation theory with a somewhat simpler displacement field which has been commonly used in the past. The numerical results are obtained for the global response quantities such as frequencies, displacements, and crossing rates as well as for the local response quantities such as normal and shear stresses across a cross section. The

  9. Single-component and fast-curing epoxy resin for liquid composite molding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of single-component and fast-curing epoxy resins is highly desired for many industry applications. In this work, we report an epoxy system based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4- methylimidazole (1C2E4MIM. The inductive effect of electron-withdrawing cyano group distinctly increases the latency of 1C2E4MIM without sacrificing the curing rate. The results of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements indicate DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system can be fully cured in 15 min. The rheological, thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system were studied in detail. The results show that the shelf life of this epoxy system is more than 4 days at room temperature and more than 6 months at -18 °C. The cured epoxy resins show high glass transition temperature (>155 °C, tensile strength (>80 MPa as well as excellent moist heat resistance. Finally, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs were fabricated using this epoxy system as matrix via vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI process. The mechanical properties of CFRPs, including tensile, flexural, compressive and interlaminar shear properties, were investigated.

  10. Development and Validation of a Constitutive Model for Dental Composites during the Curing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham Kolstad, Lauren

    Debonding is a critical failure of a dental composites used for dental restorations. Debonding of dental composites can be determined by comparing the shrinkage stress of to the debonding strength of the adhesive that bonds it to the tooth surface. It is difficult to measure shrinkage stress experimentally. In this study, finite element analysis is used to predict the stress in the composite during cure. A new constitutive law is presented that will allow composite developers to evaluate composite shrinkage stress at early stages in the material development. Shrinkage stress and shrinkage strain experimental data were gathered for three dental resins, Z250, Z350, and P90. Experimental data were used to develop a constitutive model for the Young's modulus as a function of time of the dental composite during cure. A Maxwell model, spring and dashpot in series, was used to simulate the composite. The compliance of the shrinkage stress device was also taken into account by including a spring in series with the Maxwell model. A coefficient of thermal expansion was also determined for internal loading of the composite by dividing shrinkage strain by time. Three FEA models are presented. A spring-disk model validates that the constitutive law is self-consistent. A quarter cuspal deflection model uses separate experimental data to verify that the constitutive law is valid. Finally, an axisymmetric tooth model is used to predict interfacial stresses in the composite. These stresses are compared to the debonding strength to check if the composite debonds. The new constitutive model accurately predicted cuspal deflection data. Predictions for interfacial bond stress in the tooth model compare favorably with debonding characteristics observed in practice for dental resins.

  11. Radiation curing in the eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrancken, A.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; what is radiation curing; history; radiation curable resins (with properties of products); ultraviolet and electron beam curing; photoinitiation and the ultraviolet light curing process; electron beam curing (initiation; electron beam accelerators); end uses (graphic arts; wood finishing; paper upgrading; adhesives; metal finishing; electronic chemical; floor coatings). (U.K.)

  12. INFLUENCE OF POST-CURE TREATMENTS ON HARDNESS AND MARGINAL ADAPTATION OF COMPOSITE RESIN INLAY RESTORATIONS: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Latempa, Antonio Marcelo Accetta; Chagas, Maurício Alves; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Leal, Mariana Pareira da Silva; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Vickers hardness number (VHN) and the in vitro marginal adaptation of inlay restorations of three hybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250, Opallis and Esthet-X) subjected to two post-cure treatments. Material and Methods: For the microhardness test, three different groups were prepared in accordance with the post-cure treatments: control group (only light cure for 40 s), autoclave group (light cure for 40 s + autoclave for 15 min at 130°C); and microwave group (light cure for 40 s + microwave for 3 min at 450 W). To assess the marginal adaptation, the composite resin was inserted incrementally into a mesial-occlusal-distal cavity brass mold and each increment light-cured for 40 s. A previous reading in micrometers was taken at the cervical wall, using a stereomicroscope magnifying glass equipped with a digital video camera and image-analysis software. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to the post-cure treatments (autoclave and microwave) and a reading was taken again at the cervical wall. Data were compared using ANOVA for the hardness test, split-plot ANOVA for the adaptation assessment and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. A significance level of 5% was adopted for all analyses. Results: The post-cure treatments increased the hardness of conventional composites (pinlay restorations (pinlays. Moreover, Filtek Z250 showed the best results, with higher hardness and lower gap values. PMID:20027437

  13. Effect of different light-curing devices and aging procedures on composite knoop microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltarelli, Fernanda Regina; dos Santos-Daroz, Claudia Batitucci; Alves, Marcelo Corrêa; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing devices (Halogen/HAL, Light Emitting Diodes/LED, Argon Laser/LAS and Plasma Arc/PAC) and aging procedures (Mechanical Cycling/MC, Thermal Cycling/TC, Storage/S, MC+TC and MC+TC+S) on the micro-hardness of bottom/B and top/T surfaces of 2-mm-high composite resin cylinders. The Knoop microhardness test (25 g, 20 s) on both B and T was performed before and after each aging procedure. For B and T, before aging procedures, PAC showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared with HAL. In the T, after TC, PAC and LAS had also showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared to HAL and LED. For all light-curing devices, MC+TC+S and S affected the Knoop microhardness values. In the B, no difference could be observed among the aging procedures for PAC. From all light-curing units, PAC may have rendered composites of reduced quality and the storage aging procedures were the most harmful to the polymer hardness.

  14. Effect of post-curing treatment on mechanical properties of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Chetti, Verónica A; Macchi, Ricardo L; Iglesias, María E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of additional curing procedures on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of indirect and direct composite materials. Twenty-four rectangular prism-shaped 2 mm x 2 mm x 25 mm samples of Belleglass, Premisa (Kerr), Adoro and Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) were prepared. Each composite was packed in an ad-hoc stainless steel device with a TeflonR instrument. A mylar strip and a glass slab were placed on top to obtain a flat surface. Polymerization was activated for 20 seconds with a halogen unit (Astralis 10, Ivoclar - Vivadent) with soft start regime and an output with a 350 to 1200 mw/cm2 range at four different points according to the diameter of the end of the guide. The specimens obtained were then randomly divided into two different groups: with and without additional treatment. In the group with additional treatment, the samples adorro were submitted to 25 minutes in Lumamat 100 (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the rest to 20 minutes in BelleGlass HP (Kerr). After the curing procedures, all samples were treated with sandpapers of decreasing grain size under water flow, and stored in distilled water for 24 h. Flexural strength was measured according to the ISO 404920 recommendations and elastic modulus was determined following the procedures of ANSI/ADA standard No. 27. Statistical differences were found among the different materials and curing procedures employed (Pcomposites, and its clinical relevance.

  15. Effect of different light-curing devices and aging procedures on composite knoop microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Regina Voltarelli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing devices (Halogen/HAL, Light Emitting Diodes/LED, Argon Laser/LAS and Plasma Arc/PAC and aging procedures (Mechanical Cycling/MC, Thermal Cycling/TC, Storage/S, MC+TC and MC+TC+S on the micro-hardness of bottom/B and top/T surfaces of 2-mm-high composite resin cylinders. The Knoop microhardness test (25 g, 20 s on both B and T was performed before and after each aging procedure. For B and T, before aging procedures, PAC showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared with HAL. In the T, after TC, PAC and LAS had also showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared to HAL and LED. For all light-curing devices, MC+TC+S and S affected the Knoop microhardness values. In the B, no difference could be observed among the aging procedures for PAC. From all light-curing units, PAC may have rendered composites of reduced quality and the storage aging procedures were the most harmful to the polymer hardness.

  16. Curing efficiency of dental resin composites formulated with camphorquinone or trimethylbenzoyl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Luis Felipe J; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Prahl, Scott A; Pfeifer, Carmem S; Ferracane, Jack L

    2012-04-01

    Since photoinitiator systems for dental resins based on camphorquinone (CQ) present color disadvantages, trimethylbenzoyl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide (TPO) has been proposed as an alternative. However, there are remaining considerations about its curing efficiency. The aims of the present investigation were: to characterize the relationship between the photoinitiator absorption spectra and the light spectrum emitted from a QTH light (absorbed power density, PD(abs)); to evaluate the kinetics of polymerization, and the depth of cure for filled dimethacrylate resins formulated with different photoinitiator systems. CQ+EDMAB (control); TPO and TPO+EDMAB were used in 50:50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins. Photoinitiator absorption and QTH-light emission were evaluated using a spectrophotometer and kinetics of polymerization with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (n=3). Depth of cure was analyzed by the scraping method (n=5), as recommended by ISO4049. One-way ANOVA/Tukey's (p<0.05) was used to analyze the results. CQ presented higher PD(abs) than TPO (364 and 223 mW/cm(3), respectively). The DSC revealed that TPO and TPO+EDMAB produced a faster reaction than CQ+EDMAB. Composite formulated with CQ+EDMAB produced higher depth of cure (6.3±0.4 mm) than those with TPO (4.3±0.1) or TPO+EDMAB (4.2±0.3). Although CQ presented higher PD(abs) than TPO, formulations containing TPO exhibited higher reactivity than that with CQ. On the other hand, materials formulated with TPO demonstrated lower depth of cure than that with CQ. Therefore, its use as an alternative photoinitiator requires further investigation, with higher concentrations. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. UV curing silicon-containing epoxy resin and its glass cloth reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guang; Tang Zhuo; Huang Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    A UV-curable cationic silicon-containing epoxy resin formulation was developed. The gel conversion of the cured resin after 10-min UV irradiation reached 80% in the presence of 5% diaryliodonium salt photoinitiator and 5.5% polyol chain transfer agent by cationic ring-opening polymerization. The glass cloth-reinforced composites were fabricated with the silicon-containing epoxy resin using the wet lay-up technique and UV irradiation. The mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated. Compared with glass cloth reinforced bisphenol A epoxy resin matrix composites, the silicon-containing epoxy resin matrix composites possessed higher tensile strength and interlayer shear strength which was 158.5MPa and 9.9MPa respectively while other mechanical properties such as flexural property and tensile modulus were similar. (authors)

  18. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) fiber optic monitoring of composites during cure in an autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druy, Mark A.; Elandjian, Lucy; Stevenson, William A.; Driver, Richard D.; Leskowitz, Garett M.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time in situ monitoring of the chemical states of epoxy resins was investigated during cure in an autoclave using infrared evanescent spectroscopy. Fiber evanescent sensors were developed which may be sandwiched between the plies of the prepreg sample. A short length of sapphire fiber was used as the sensor cell portion of the fiber probe. Heavy metal fluoride glass optical fiber cables were designed for connecting the FTIR spectrometer to the sensor fiber within the autoclave. The sapphire fibers have outstanding mechanical thermal properties which should permit their use as an embedded link in all thermoset composites. The system is capable of operation at a temperature of 250 C for periods up to 8 hours without major changes to the fiber transmission. A discussion of the selection of suitable sensor fibers, the construction of a fiber-optic interface, and the interpretation of in situ infrared spectra of the curing process is presented.

  19. Controversial effects of fumed silica on the curing and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fumed silica on the curing of a trimethylolpropane epoxy resin was investigated by thermal analysis methods like Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA. The fumed silica used here is a by-product of the silicon and ferrosilicon industry, consisting of micro and nanosized particles. Both the curing reaction and the properties of the obtained composites were affected by the filler content. Different trends were observed for filler contents above and below the 30 wt%. Up to 30 wt%, the behaviour can be explained as a predominantly agglomeration effect. For 30 wt% and higher filler contents, single particles seem to play a more important role.

  20. Correlating cytotoxicity to elution behaviors of composite resins in term of curing kinetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Junquan; Yang, Huichuan; Cao, Man; Li, Lei; Cai, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Cytotoxicity of photocurable composite resins is a key issue for their safe use in dental restoration. Curing kinetic and elution behaviors of the composite resin would have decisive effects on its cytotoxicity. In this study, composite resins composed of bisphenol-glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), camphorquinone (CQ), N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and barium glass powders were prepared by setting the photoinitiators CQ/DMAEMA at 0.5wt%, 1wt% or 3wt% of the total weight of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA. The ratio of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA was 6:4, the ratio of CQ/DMAEMA was 1:1, and the incorporated inorganic powder was 75wt%. Then, curing kinetics were studied by using real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and photo-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter). Elution behaviors in both ethanol solution and deionized water were monitored by using liquid chromatogram/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by in vitro culture of L929 fibroblasts. Finally, they were all analyzed and correlated in terms of initiator contents. It was found that the commonly used 0.5wt% of photoinitiators was somewhat insufficient in obtaining composite resin with low cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Measurement of linear polymerization shrinkage in light cure Ideal Makoo composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available "nAbstract: Polymerization shrinkage of light cure composite resins causes many complications in conservative and esthetic restorations. The objective of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion and the amount of filler in IDM and tetric ceram composites. Ten disk shaped, uncured specimens (8mm×1.547mm of each composite were placed on glass slide in the center of the metal attached to it. Then specimens were light cured for 60s from underneath. After 30 minutes, the thickness of specimens, using a micrometer and the percent of the polymerization shrinkage of each sample were measured. Statistical analysis was carried out by t-test (P<0.05. Also the degree of conversion of specimens was evaluated with FTIR and the mineral filler content was measured by burning in electric oven. Polymerization shrinkage in IDM and tetric ceram was not significantly different. Degree of conversion and mineral filler content in tetric ceram was greater than that of IDM. "nIt is assumed that the low degree of conversion in IDM is due to its chemical composition and filler content. Also, the similarity in linear polymerization shrinkage between IDM and tetric ceram may be caused by the low degree of conversion in IDM.

  2. Assessment of environmental impact of ultraviolet radiation or electron beam cured print inks on plastic packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardi, Marcelo Augusto Goncalves

    2014-01-01

    The high level of pollution generated by the inadequate disposal of polymeric materials has motivated the search for environmentally friendly systems and techniques such as the application of biodegradable polymers and the replacement of the solvent-based paint systems by those with high solids content, based water or cured by radiation, practically free of volatile organic compounds. However, the cured polymer coatings are neither soluble nor molten, increasing the complexity of the reprocessing, recycling and degradation. Thus, this work aimed to develop print inks modified with pro-degrading agents, cured by ultraviolet radiation or electron beam, for printing or decoration in plastic packaging products of short lifetime, which are biodegradable or not. Six coatings (varnish and inks in five colors: yellow, blue, white, black and red), three pro-degrading agents (cobalt stearate, cerium stearate and manganese stearate), five polymeric substrates (Ecobras®, low density polyethylene and its respective modifications with pro-degrading agents). The coatings were applied to the substrates and cured by ultraviolet radiation or electron beam, resulting in 180 samples. These materials were then exposed to accelerated aging chamber, type 'QUV', and composting in natural environment. In order to assess the effects of the polymer coatings on the degradation process of the specimens, only the yellow and black samples were exposed to a controlled composting environment via respirometry, reducing to 16 the number of samples. The organic compound generated by the biodegradation process was analyzed by the ecotoxicity tests. It was observed that the coating layer acted as a barrier that inhibits degradation of the plastic when exposed to weathering. The addition of pro-degrading agents promoted acceleration in the degradation process, promoting the migration of the metal ion to the medium without affecting the final quality of the organic compost. (author)

  3. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  4. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susila Anand, V.; Balasubramanian, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm 2 with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis, Mann

  5. Finite Element Analysis of a Natural Fiber (Maize) Composite Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Bavan, D. Saravana; Kumar, G. C. Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Natural fiber composites are termed as biocomposites or green composites. These fibers are green, biodegradable, and recyclable and have good properties such as low density and low cost when compared to synthetic fibers. The present work is investigated on the finite element analysis of the natural fiber (maize) composite beam, processed by means of hand lay-up method. Composite beam material is composed of stalk-based fiber of maize and unsaturated polyester resin polymer as matrix with meth...

  6. FEM model-based optimal control synthesis for curing a large composite structure with CAD imported geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevtsov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies a problem of optimal control synthesis for curing a large composite structure using open die moulding in an autoclave. The necessary control should eliminate early hard skin formation, emergence of resin-rich or resin-dry areas, insufficient consolidation, and uneven cure. This purpose is achieved through providing uniform distribution of degree of cure and temperature within the cured part volume. The used approach is illustrated on the example of the large CFRP aircraft panel manufactured by means of two-stage curing cycle. The forward problem combines the heat transfer and autocatalytic kinetic equations, which are linked by the specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity coefficient and by the exothermal heat source that depend on the prepreg’s degree of cure. The control synthesis problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem where minimized objectives are deviations of temperature and degree of cure within a cured part, considering constraints imposed by thermal-kinetic properties of prepreg and manufacturing requirements. The Pareto-based optimization algorithm, which executes the mapping of a subset of design space to the objectives space by the cyclic calling the forward problem implemented as a finite element model, allows estimating the best achievable quality indicators of manufactured composite parts, finding satisfactory parameters of the control law, and decision-making considering all imposed constraints.

  7. Color stability of visible light cured composite resin after soft drink immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizatul Khairani Hasan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is a tooth-colored filling material containing Bis-GMA which exhibits water sorption properties. People tend to consume soft drink with various colors. Water sorption properties can alter the color stability of composite resin purpose. Purpose: This study was to determine the influence of immersion durations of composite resin in soft drink on color stability. Methods: The visible-light cured hybrid composite resin and soft drink were used. Ten disk specimens (2.5 mm thickness and 15 mm diameter of composite resin were prepared and light cured for 20 seconds, then stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37° C. The initial color of specimens were measured by Chromameter. After that, each specimen was immersed in 30 ml of soft drink up to 48, 72, and 96 hours at 37° C. The specimens’ color were measured again after each immersion. The color changes were calculated by CIE L*a*b* system formula. The data was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and LSD (α = 0.05. Result: The ANOVA showed that the immersion durations of composite resin in soft drinks had significant influence on the color stability (p < 0.05. The LSD0.05 tests showed significant differences among all groups. The least color change was detected from the group of 48 hours immersion, while the greatest color change was from the group of 96 hours immersion. Conclusions: The immersion of composite resin in soft drinks influenced the color stability (began after 48 hours immersion.

  8. Determination and Correlation of Depth of Cure of a New Composite Resin Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M; Slaven; Phebus, Jeffrey G; Ragain, James C

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the depth of cure (DOC) of a composite resin system using two different testing criteria. The DOC testing employed two different experimental protocol: 1) Forty-eight previously extracted human molars were randomly assigned to four groups of twelve each (n = 12): Group 1 SonicFill composite resin system, shade A1; Group 2 SonicFill, shade A3; Group 3 Herculite Ultra composite resin, shade A1; Group 4 Herculite Ultra, shade A3. Cylindrical cavities (4.0 mm diameter and 10 mm depth) were prepared at the tooth CEJ, in a mesiodistal direction. The preparations were filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment and polymerized with a LED light for 20 seconds. After 5 minutes, the occlusal surfaces of the teeth (specimens) were ground flat until the composite was exposed in a transverse plane. The uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, using a "modified" ISO 4049 DOC specification, and the remaining cured (hard) material was measured. Three measurements, at different positions of the specimen, were performed, for a total of thirty-six measurements per specimen group. The measurements were averaged and divided by fifty percent, arriving at the final DOC for each specimen. 2) A DOC testing protocol was performed using a two-piece (4.0 mm x 10.0 mm) custom-made Teflon device (mold). The groupings duplicated the previous experimental protocol. The mold was filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment to a 10 mm length (depth). Excess composite material was removed, followed by placement of a Mylar strip over the external orifice. The composite resin specimen was light-polymerized for 20 seconds. Again, the uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, with the same measurement protocol followed as in method 1. Statistical analyses were conducted using ANOVA tests at a p resin. Also, significant differences were displayed between the Al compared to the A3 shades, with the A1 (lighter) shades exhibiting greater DOC. The prepped

  9. Effectiveness of composite resin polymerization using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or halogen-based light-curing units

    OpenAIRE

    Micali,Bianca; Basting,Roberta Tarkany

    2004-01-01

    The clinical performance of composite resins is greatly influenced by the quality of the light-curing unit used. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of a commercial light-emitting diode (LED) with that of a halogen-based light-curing unit by means of dye penetration of a micro hybrid composite resin. The composite resin evaluated was Filtek Z250 (3M Dental). The composite was filled into acrylic moulds that were randomly polymerized for 40 seconds by each of the light-emitting...

  10. Effect of shade, opacity and layer thickness on light transmission through a nano-hybrid dental composite during curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Hong-Keun; Christoferson, Carly K; Pfeifer, Carmem S; Felix, Chris; Ferracane, Jack L

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shade and opacity on the change in light transmission through different thicknesses of a nano-hybrid composite during curing. Twelve different shades of Venus Diamond (Heraeus Kulzer) were placed in disk shaped molds with thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (n = 3 per group) and cured with an LED light-curing unit. Initial, final and average irradiance, and the total amount of energy passing through the specimen were measured using the MARC Resin Calibrator at every 10s for a total of 40s. The translucency parameter and the contrast ratio were obtained using a chromameter. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α = 0.05). All shades and all thicknesses (up to 3 mm) experienced an increase in light transmittance during curing. The majority of the increase occurred during the initial 10s exposure, with significant increase occurring from subsequent exposures only in thicker specimens (i.e., 3 mm). The increase in irradiance at the bottom during curing was dependent on shade, with darker shades and greater depths of material showing less increase. For one specific resin composite formulation, an increase in translucency occurs as cure progresses, and the increase is enhanced for composites with greater lightness and lower contrast ratio. Composites demonstrate increased light transmittance as curing progress, which may improve depth of cure. The thicker composite showed the least increase in light transmission within the same shade. The increase in translucency is enhanced for composites with great lightness and lower contrast ratio. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of pre-heat treatment and different light-curing units on Vickers hardness of a microhybrid composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, E. G.; Bandeca, M. C.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness of a dental composite resin submitted to temperature changes before photo-activation with two light-curing unite (LCUs). Five samples (4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) for each group were made with pre-cure temperatures of 37, 54, and 60°C. The samples were photo-activated with a conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and blue LED LCUs during 40 s. The hardness Vickers test (VHN) was performed on the top and bottom surfaces of the samples. According to the interaction between light-curing unit and different pre-heating temperatures of composite resin, only the light-curing unit provided influences on the mean values of initial Vickers hardness. The light-curing unit based on blue LED showed hardness mean values more homogeneous between the top and bottom surfaces. The hardness mean values were not statistically significant difference for the pre-cure temperature used. According to these results, the pre-heating of the composite resin provide no influence on Vickers hardness mean values, however the blue LED showed a cure more homogeneous than QTH LCU.

  12. Low-temperature-cured highly conductive composite of Ag nanowires and polyvinyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Song; Zhang Xiang; Yang Bingchu; Xu Xiaomei; Chen Hui; Zhou Conghua

    2017-01-01

    Flexible conductive films were fabricated from a low-temperature-cured, highly conductive composite of silver nanowires (as conducting filler) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, as binder). Sheet resistance of 0.12 Ω/sq, conductivity of 2.63×10 4 S/cm, and contact resistance of 1.0 Ω/cm 2 were measured in the films, along with excellent resistance to scratching and good flexibility, making them suitable electrical contact materials for flexible optoelectronic devices. Effects of curing temperature, curing duration, film thickness, and nanowire length on the film’s electrical properties were studied. Due to the abundance of hydroxyl groups on its molecular chains, the addition of PVA improves the film’s flexibility and resistance to scratching. Increased nanowire density and nanowire length benefit film conductance. Monte Carlo simulation was used to further explore the impact of these two parameters on the conductivity. It was observed that longer nanowires produce a higher length-ratio of conducting routes in the networks, giving better film conductivity. (paper)

  13. Characterising Mechanical Properties of Braided and Woven Textile Composite Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauda, Benjamin; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde; Potluri, Prasad

    2009-02-01

    The focus of this paper is on the manufacture of textile composite beams and on the determination of their mechanical properties. This includes investigating the effects of fibre orientation on the mechanical properties of braided and woven textile composites. Composites were manufactured from nominally identical constituents and identical consolidation processes, leaving as the only variables, variations caused by the different fibre architecture of the preform. The repeatability and, hence, reliability of this approach is demonstrated. Results obtained show that fibre architecture affects composite strength and extensibility. Composites with woven preforms are practically linear up to catastrophic failure while composites with braided preforms exhibit non-linearity prior to failure. Also the mechanical properties of the textile composite beams were determined. Results show that by tailoring the braid angle and pick density of braided and woven composite performs, the mechanical properties of the composite beams can be controlled to suit end-use requirement.

  14. Effect of light-curing units on microleakage under dental composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Saade, E. G.; Nadalin, M. R.; Andrade, M. F.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of two light-curing units (QTH and LED) on microleakage of Class II composite resin restorations with dentin cavosurface margins. Twenty extracted mandibular first premolars, free of caries and fractures were prepared two vertical “slot” cavities in the occluso-mesial and -destal surfaces (2 mm buccal-lingually, 2 mm proximal-axially and cervical limit in enamel) and divided into 4 equal groups ( n = 8): GI and GII: packable posterior composite light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively; GIII and GIV: micro-hybrid composite resin light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively. The composite resins were applied following the manufacturer’s instructions. After 24 h of water storage specimens were subjected to thermocycling for a total of 500 cycles at 5 and 55°C and the teeth were then sealed with impermeable material. Teeth were immersed in 0.5% Basic fuchsin during 24 h at room temperature, and zero to three levels of penetration score were attributed. The Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed significant statistically similar ( P > 0.05) from GI to GII and GIII to GIV, which the GII (2.750) had the highest mean scores and the GIII and GIV (0.875) had lowest mean scores. The use of different light-curing units has no influence on marginal integrity of Class II composite resin restorations and the proprieties of composite resins are important to reduce the microleakage.

  15. A New Silarylene-Siloxane Monomeric Resin for Structural Composites: Cure-Chemistry Insight and Thermal Properties of the Cured Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    total resin , according to TGA . The fragment of this compound minus the butyl group was also found (433 daltons). NAWCWD TP 8777 17...NAWCWD TP 8777 A New Silarylene-Siloxane Monomeric Resin for Structural Composites: Cure-Chemistry Insight and Thermal Properties of...FOREWORD Reported here are the synthesis and characterization of a siloxane-silarylene liquid monomer, which is a promising new resin component

  16. Dielectric analysis of depth dependent curing behavior of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Moeginger, Bernhard; Grossgarten, Mandy; Rosentritt, Martin; Hausnerova, Berenika

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate depth dependent changes of polymerization process and kinetics of visible light-curing (VLC) dental composites in real-time. The measured quantity - "ion viscosity" determined by dielectric analysis (DEA) - provides the depth dependent reaction rate which is correlated to the light intensity available in the corresponding depths derived from light transmission measurements. The ion viscosity curves of two composites (VOCO Arabesk Top and Grandio) were determined during irradiation of 40s with a light-curing unit (LCU) in specimen depths of 0.5/0.75/1.0/1.25/1.5/1.75 and 2.0mm using a dielectric cure analyzer (NETZSCH DEA 231 with Mini IDEX sensors). The thickness dependent light transmission was measured by irradiation composite specimens of various thicknesses on top of a radiometer setup. The shape of the ion viscosity curves depends strongly on the specimen thickness above the sensor. All curves exhibit a range of linear time dependency of the ion viscosity after a certain initiation time. The determined initiation times, the slopes of the linear part of the curves, and the ion viscosities at the end of the irradiation differ significantly with depth within the specimen. The slopes of the ion viscosity curves as well as the light intensity values decrease with depth and fit to the Lambert-Beer law. The corresponding attenuation coefficients are determined for Arabesk Top OA2 to 1.39mm(-1) and 1.48mm(-1), respectively, and for Grandio OA2 with 1.17 and 1.39mm(-1), respectively. For thicknesses exceeding 1.5mm a change in polymerization behavior is observed as the ion viscosity increases subsequent to the linear range indicating some kind of reaction acceleration. The two VLC composites and different specimen thicknesses discriminate significantly in their ion viscosity evolution allowing for a precise characterization of the curing process even with respect to the polymerization mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  17. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of light cure glass ionomer cement and light cure composite as coronal sealing material: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Jaiswal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare and evaluate the sealing ability of light cure composite and light cure GIC as coronal sealing materials. Materials and Methods: 30 extracted human teeth were divided into three experimental groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth in group I are obturated without coronal seal, teeth in group II are obturated with light cure GIC (3M ESPE VITREMER as coronal seal and teeth in group III are obturated with light cure composite(3M ESPE filtek z250 as coronal seal, after removing 2mm of coronal gutta percha. These teeth (crown portion are then suspended in methylene blue, sealed and kept for 72 hours, to observe the amount of dye penetration. After 72 hours teeth were removed, washed under running water, dried and sectioned longitudinally, separating buccal and lingual halves. The linear extent of dye penetration was measured from cavosurface margin of the access cavity to the most apical extent of dye penetration point. The length from the cavosurface margin to the apex of the tooth was also measured and percentage linear micro leakage was estimated. Statistical Analysis: Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc Multiple comparison (Bonferroni. Results: In the present study specimens in group I showed the maximum percentage of linear microleakage of 31.51 percent. The specimens in group II showed the minimal amount of linear micro leakage of 6.49 percent. Conclusion: It can be concluded coronal seal reduces the micro leakage, and light cure GIC has better coronal sealing ability.

  18. Synthesis and characterizations of high permittivity ultraviolet cured soft elastomeric networks and composites applicable as dielectric electroactive polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goswami, Kaustav

    siloxane) (PDMS) and polyurethanes are designed with the requirements specific for DEAPs. Thus there is a need to develop elastomers with low elastic modulus, low viscous and dielectric losses and high relative permittivity. Interpenetrating networks and fumed silica reinforced composites of poly...... (propylene oxide) (PPO) were prepared which showed marked improvements in properties compared to the acrylic elastomers. But difficulties in curing by industrial processes and handling of these elastomers posed as limitations. So the focus was on optimizing UV induced thiol-ene reactions for curing...... commercially available PDMS. UV curing of PDMS was successfully established which eliminated the major drawbacks of widely used platinum catalyzed addition curing of PDMS. An advanced sequential curing used to form the PDMS networks showed low elastic modulus and low viscous losses than the former...

  19. Influence of physical assessment of different light-curing units on irradiance and composite microhardness top/bottom ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Susana; Zanini, Renata Aló Maluza; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Agra, Carlos Martins; Calheiros, Fernanda Calabró; Nagase, Denis Yudi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the physical assessment of different light-curing units from 55 dental offices on the irradiance and composite microhardness top/bottom ratio, and the influence of the radiometers for LED or QTH light sources on irradiance measurement. The irradiance of each light-curing unit was evaluated with two radiometers, either for LED or QTH light. A questionnaire regarding the type of source (LED or QTH), time of use, date of last maintenance and light-curing performance assessment applied. The physical assessments were evaluated regarding damage or debris on the light tip. For each light-curing unit, three composite specimens were made (diameter = 7 mm; thickness = 2 mm) with polymerizing time of 20 s, in order to perform the microhardness (Knoop) test. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (α = 0.01). There was wide variation in irradiance (0-1000 mW/cm(2)). Approximately 50 % of the light-curing units presented radiation lower than 300 mW/cm(2); 10 % of light-curing units, especially those with LED source, presented values higher than 800 mW/cm(2), and 43 % of light-curing units worked with adequate irradiance between 301 and 800 mW/cm(2). In almost 60 % of cases, no maintenance of light-curing units was performed in a period of 3 to 10 years. The age of the light-curing units and the use of inadequate tips interfered negatively in irradiance. The data emphasize the importance of periodic maintenance of light-polymerizing, light-curing units.

  20. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer's instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly ( p strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength ( p strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength.

  1. Influence of the Light Source and Curing Parameters on Microhardness of a Silorane-Based Dental Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malara P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the light source and the light-curing parameters (the distance of the material from the light source and time of light-curing on microhardness of Flitek Silorane dental composite material. Standardized samples of Filtek Silorane material were cured using two types of Light Curing Units (LCUs – halogen and LED. The distance of the light source and time of curing differed between samples. The Knoop’s microhardness was tested using microhardness tester Micromet 5103. Using LED light curing unit allowed to achieve significantly higher microhardness of silorane-based dental material Filtek Silorane than using halogen light curing unit. Decreasing the distance from the light source to the surface of silorane-based material Filtek Silorane improved its microhardness. A prolonged curing time could compensate the drop in microhardness of Filtek Silorane material resulting from an increased distance from the light source to the surface of the material only in a limited range of intervals.

  2. [Comparison of surface roughness of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Lv, Da; Liu, Kailei; Zhang, Weisheng; Yao, Yao; Liao, Chuhong

    2014-05-01

    To compare the surface roughness of nanofilled dental composite resin and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from the lateral to the medial layers to prepare 8 mm×8 mm×5 mm cubical specimens. The 4 lateral surfaces of each specimens were polished with abrasive disks (Super-Snap). Profilometer was used to test the mean surface roughness (Ra) after polishing. P60 had the lowest Ra (0.125∓0.030 µm) followed by Z250 and Spectrum. The Ra of Z350 (0.205∓0.052 µm) was greater than that of the other 3 resins, and AP-X had the roughest surfaces. Under scanning electron microscope, the polished faces of P60 resin were characterized by minor, evenly distributed particles with fewer scratches; the polished faces of Z350 presented with scratches where defects of the filling material could be seen. The nanofilled composite Z350 has smooth surface after polishing by abrasive disks, but its smoothness remains inferior to that of other micro-hybrid composite resins.

  3. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoodi, M M; Sapuan, S M; Ali, Aidy [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, D; Khalina, A, E-mail: makinejadm2@asme.org [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-05-15

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  4. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoodi, M M; Sapuan, S M; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D; Khalina, A

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  5. Vibration Analysis of Composite Beams with Sinusoidal Periodically Varying Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Botong; Liu, Chein-Shan; Zhu, Liangliang

    2017-12-01

    As an increasing variety of composite materials with complex interfaces are emerging, we develop a theory to investigate composite beams and shed some light on new physical insights into composite beams with sinusoidal periodically varying interfaces. For the natural vibration of composite beams with continuous or periodically varying interfaces, the governing equation has been derived according to the generalised Hamiltonian principle. For composite beams having different boundary conditions, we transform the governing equations into integral equations and solve them by using the sinusoidal functions as test functions as well as the basis of the vibration modes. Due to the orthogonality of the sinusoidal functions, expansion coefficients in closed form can be found. Therefore, the proposed iterative schemes, with the help of the Rayleigh quotient and boundary functions, can quickly find the eigenvalues and free vibration modes. The obtained natural frequencies agree well with those obtained using the finite element method. In addition, the proposed method can be extended easily to laminated composite beams in more general cases or complex components and geometries in vibration engineering. The effects of different material properties of the upper and lower components and varying interface geometry function on the frequency of the composite beams are examined. According to our investigation, the natural frequency of a laminated beam with a continuous or periodically varying interface can be changed by altering the density or elastic modulus. We also show the responses of the frequencies of the components to the varying periodic interface.

  6. Compressive strength differences between hybrid composites using post curing light box with LED and dry heating, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid type of composite resins is used as dental restorative materials in a wide cavity directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of the composite resin would increase post-curing. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between the compressive strength of hybrid type composite resin post-curing using LED light box and dry heating. This type of research was a quasi-experimental in vitro with the sample size of 30 samples which were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using a Universal Testing Machine (Lloyd at a speed of 1 mm/minute to test the compressive strength. Compressive strength values were recorded when the sample broke. The average value of compressive strength of the two treatment groups was statistically calculated using t-test. The results, of this study, showed that a hybrid composite resin with post curing using a light box with LED was at 194.138 Mpa which was lower than using the dry heat of 227.339 Mpa. It showed the statistically significant difference. The conclusion of this study was that the compressive strength of post-cured hybrid composites using a light box with LED was significantly lower than the post-curing using dry heat.

  7. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Nam Seong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP, crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire♀×Duroc♂ (LYD, Berkshire (Ber, and Duroc (Du pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (p<0.05. It was observed that the dry-cured ham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (p<0.05. Zinc, iron and total monounsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in KNP ham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (p<0.05. Additionally, the KNP dry-cured ham possessed higher Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (p<0.05. Furthermore, breed significantly affected the sensory attributes of dry-cured hams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (p<0.05. The overall outcome of the study is that the breed has a potential effect on the specific chemical composition, texture, color and sensorial properties of dry-cured hams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams.

  8. Physical properties of current dental nanohybrid and nanofill light-cured resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M; Vouvoudi, Evangelia Ch

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this work was the detailed study of sorption characteristics of water or artificial saliva, the determination of flexural strength and the flexural modulus, and the study of the thermal stability of some current commercial dental light-cured nanocomposites containing nano-sized filler particles. Three nanohydrid dental composites (Tetric EvoCeram (TEC), Grandio (GR) and Protofill-nano (PR)) and two nanofill composites (Filtek Supreme Body (FSB) and the Filtek Supreme Translucent (FST)) were used in this work. The volumetric shrinkage due to polymerization was first determined. Also the sorption, solubility and volumetric increase were measured after storage of composites in water or artificial saliva for 30 days. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured using a three-point bending set-up according to the ISO-4049 specification, after immersion of samples in water or artificial saliva for 1 day or 30 days. Thermal analysis technique TGA method was used to investigate the thermal stability of composites. GR and TEC composites showed statistically no difference in volumetric shrinkage (%) which is lower than the other composites, which follow the order PRGrandio had the lowest polymer matrix content, consisting mainly of Bis-GMA. It showed the lowest polymerization shrinkage and water sorption and the highest flexural strength and flexural modulus after immersion in water or artificial saliva for 30 days. The water and artificial saliva generally showed the same effect on physical properties of the studied composites. Thermogravimetric analysis gave good information about the structure and the amount of organic polymer matrix of composites. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Curing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tadashi.

    1969-01-01

    A process for the rapid curing of an electrophoretically applied coating with either compositions of aqueous dispersion or aqueous coating compositions thereof is provided by irradiating with ionizing radiations. The process comprises the steps of (a) neutralizing an aqueous alkyd resin with a base, in which the alkyd resin contains a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid or oil as one of its constituents, (b) dispersing the neutralized resin in water, (c) applying to an electroconductive material the varnishes of the dispersed composition or the dispersed coating composition, and (d) irradiating the coatings with ionizing radiations so as to harden them. The alkyd resins have an acid value of 30 to 100 and the bases are equivalent to 0.7 to 1.2. the process is suitable for coil coating. In examples, a semi-esterified product of acid value 54 was diluted with 440 parts of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether and 110 parts of butanol. Next, they were neutralized with 87 parts of dimethyl amino ethanol. Thereafter, they were mixed with 1,013 parts of water to produce an aqueous dispersion of alkyd resin varnish at a concentration of 40%. To 325 parts of the varnish were added 1.3 parts of cobalt naphthenate- 60% toluene solution and then 675 parts of water to produce water soluble varnish containing 13% of a nonvolatile substance. The varnish was applied by electrophoresis for 10 seconds. The time required for the irradiation was about 1 second. The total radiation dose was 3 Mrad of electron beams at an acceleration energy of 300 kV and 25 mA of current. (Iwakiri, K.)

  10. RC T beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Spagnolo JR

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental data of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites. The tests were composed of eight T beams, b w=15 cm, h=40 cm, flange width 40 cm, flange height 8 cm, and length 300 cm, divided into two series with the same longitudinal steel reinforcement and a reference beam without strengthening in each series. The beams had two types of arrangement of internal steel stirrups. The test variables were the internal and external geometric ratio of the transverse reinforcement and the mechanical ratio of carbon fiber composites stirrups. All the beams were loaded at two points. The strengthened beams were submitted to a preloading and the strengthening was applied to the cracked beam. All the beams were designed in order to guarantee shear failure, and the ultimate load of the strengthened beams was 36% to 54% greater than the reference beams. The Cracking Sliding Model applied to the strengthened beams was evaluated and showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Impact of the distance of light curing on the degree of conversion and microhardness of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelan, Anderson; de Araújo, Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão; da Silveira, Bruna Cilene Martins; Kawano, Yoshio; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the impact of the distance between the light guide tip of the curing unit and material surface on the degree of conversion and Knoop microhardness of a composite resin. Circular samples were carried out of a methacrylate micro-hybrid resin-based composite and light cured at 0, 2 and 4 mm distance. Monomer conversion rate was measured using a Fourier-transform Raman spectrometer and Knoop hardness number was obtained using a microhardness tester on the top and bottom surfaces. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Overall, the increase of curing distance reduced the microhardness (p≤0.05), but did not influence the carbon double bond conversion rate (p>0.05) of the composite resin tested; and the top surface showed better properties compared to the bottom (p≤0.05). The light curing at distance can reduce mechanical properties and could affect long-term durability of the composite restorations. Thus, the use of a curing device with high irradiance is recommended.

  12. The role of oxygen inhibition of a self-etch adhesive on self-cure resin composite bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tatsuo; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strengths on enamel and dentin with a self-etch adhesive (iBond), with or without oxygen-inhibited surface layer, or covered with intermediate self-curing resin, in combination with chemical-cured composite (Core Paste). Bond strengths on human enamel and dentin (n = 8) were determined according to the following procedures: 1. Adhesive cured under ambient air. 2. Inhibited surface wiped with ethanol. 3. Adhesive cured under nitrogen. 4. Adhesive covered with glycerol during activation. 5. Adhesive coated with glycerol for 1 minute after activation. 6. As 5, but covered for 5 minutes. 7. Cured adhesive coated with intermediate self-curing resin. 8. As 7, but intermediate resin's amine component loaded with anion exchange resin in OH- form. Shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured after 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water. SBSs on enamel (7.1 to 25.6 MPa) were, by ranking order (Presin group (mean 19.6 MPa), showed bond strengths resin was low, irrespective of the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer. Deprotonization of the acidic adhesive monomer with an admixed anion exchange compound, added to an intermediate self-cured resin, was effective at overcoming the incompatibility.

  13. EFFECT OF LIGHT CURING UNIT CHARACTERISTICS ON LIGHT INTENSITY OUTPUT, DEPTH OF CURE AND SURFACE MICRO-HARDNESS OF DENTAL RESIN COMPOSITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, B A; Kisumbi, B K; Lesan, W R; Gathece, L W

    2013-09-01

    Modern dental composite restorations are wholly dependent on the use of Visible Light Curing devices. The characteristics of these devices may influence the quality of composite resin restorations. To determine the characteristics of light curing units (LCUs) in dental clinics in Nairobi and their effect on light intensity output, depth of cure (DOC) and surface micro-hardness (SMH) of dental resin composite. Laboratory based, cross-sectional analytical study. Public and private dental clinics in Nairobi, Kenya. Eighty three LCUs which were in use in private and public dental health facilities in Nairobi, Kenya and resin composite specimens. Of the 83 LCUs studied, 43 (51.8%) were Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and 39(47.0%) were Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) and 1 (1.2%) was Plasma Arc Curing (PAC) light. Mean light intensity for QTH and LED lights was 526.59 mW/cm2 and 493.67 mW/cm2 respectively (p=0.574), while the mean DOC for QTH lights was 1.71 mm and LED was 1.67 mm (p=0.690). Mean Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) for LED was 57.44 and for QTH was 44.14 (p=0.713). Mean light intensity for LCUs units > 5 years old (p=0.024). The mean DOC for the two age groups was 1.74 mm and 1.57 mm respectively (p=0.073). For SMH, the 5 years age groups gave a mean VHN of 58.81 and 51.46 respectively (p=0.1). On maintenance history, the frequency of routine inspection, duration since the last repair/replacement of a part or other maintenance activity and the nature of the last maintenance activity were determined and were not found to have influenced the light intensity, DOC and SMH. The LCU age has a statistically significant influence on its light intensity (p=0.024) while the type and maintenance history have no significant influence on its light intensity and composite DOC and SMH (p=0.574, p=0.690, p=0.713 respectively).

  14. STATICS AND BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF ALUMINUM BEAMS WITH COMPOSITE COATS

    OpenAIRE

    CUNEDİOĞLU, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

       In this study, static andbuckling analysis of an aluminum beam coated with fiber reinforced composite material was investigated. Solution of the problemobtained via finite element method by using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. Finiteelement simulation code is developed in MATLAB to calculate the displacementand buckling loads. The effect of surface and core layer thickness, compositematerial volume ratio, fiber orientation angle, different beam configurationsand different aspect ratios on di...

  15. Surface Modified Characteristics of the Tetracalcium Phosphate as Light-Cured Composite Resin Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to characterize the properties of light-cured composite resins that are reinforced with whisker surface-modified particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP and to investigate the influence of thermal cycling on the reinforced composites properties. The characteristics of ultimate diametral tensile strength (DTS, moduli, pH values, and fracture surfaces of the samples with different amounts of surface-modified TTCP (30%–60% were determined before and after thermal cycling between 5°C and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. The trends of all groups were ductile prior to thermal cycling and the moduli of all groups increased after thermal cycling. The ductile property of the control group without filler was not significantly affected. Larger amounts of fillers caused the particles to aggregate, subsequently decreasing the resin’s ability to disperse external forces and leading to brittleness after thermal cycling. Therefore, the trend of composite resins with larger amounts of filler would become more brittle and exhibited higher moduli after thermal cycling. This developed composite resin with surface modified-TTCP fillers has the potential to be successful dental restorative materials.

  16. Temperature rise during adhesive and composite polymerization with different light-curing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Da Silva, A; Alves Da Cunha, L; Pagani, C; De Mello Rode, S

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluated the temperature rise of the adhesive system Single Bond (SB) and the composite resins Filtek Z350 flow (Z) and Filtek Supreme (S), when polymerized by light-emitting diode (LED XL 3000) and quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH Biolux). Class V cavities (3 yen2 mm) were prepared in 80 bovine incisors under standardized conditions. The patients were divided as follows: G1: Control; G2: SB; G3: SB + Z; G4: SB + S. The groups were subdivided into two groups for polymerization (A: QTH, B: LED). Light curing was performed for 40 s and measurement of temperature changes during polymerization was performed with a thermocouple positioned inside the pulp chamber. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests. The factors material (P<0.00001) and curing unit (P<0.00001) had significant influence on temperature rise. The lowest temperature increase (0.15 degrees C) was recorded in G2 B and the highest was induced in G1 A (0.75 degrees C, P<0.05). In all groups, lower pulp chamber temperature measurements were obtained when using LED compared to QTH (P<0.05). QTH caused greater increases in tooth temperature than LED. However, both sources did not increase pulpal temperature above the critical value that may cause pulpal damage.

  17. Post-buckling analysis of composite beams: A simple intuitive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    form expressions for eval- uating the post-buckling behaviour of composite beams with axially immovable ends using an ..... References. Carlos E N M 2009 Buckling and post-buckling of extensible rods revisited: A multiple-scale solution. Int.

  18. Experimental study on beam for composite CES structural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tomoya

    2017-10-01

    Development study on Concrete Encase Steel (CES) composite structure system has been continuously conducted toward the practical use. CES structure is composed of steel and fiber reinforced concrete. In previous study, it was found that CES structure has good seismic performance from experimental study of columns, beam - column joints, shear walls and a two story two span frame. However, as fundamental study on CES beam could be lacking, it is necessary to understand the structural performance of CES beam. In this study, static loading tests of CES beams were conducted with experimental valuable of steel size, the presence or absence of slab and thickness of slab. And restoring characteristics, failure behavior, deformation behavior, and strength evaluation method of CES beam were investigated. As the results, it was found that CES beam showed stable hysteresis behavior. Furthermore it was found that the flexural strength of the CES beam could be evaluated by superposition strength theory.

  19. Quality correction factors of composite IMRT beam deliveries: Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry using ionization chambers, quality correction factors of plan-class-specific reference (PCSR) fields are theoretically investigated. The symmetry of the problem is studied to provide recommendable criteria for composite beam deliveries where correction factors are minimal and also to establish a theoretical limit for PCSR delivery k Q factors. Methods: The concept of virtual symmetric collapsed (VSC) beam, being associated to a given modulated composite delivery, is defined in the scope of this investigation. Under symmetrical measurement conditions, any composite delivery has the property of having a k Q factor identical to its associated VSC beam. Using this concept of VSC, a fundamental property of IMRT k Q factors is demonstrated in the form of a theorem. The sensitivity to the conditions required by the theorem is thoroughly examined. Results: The theorem states that if a composite modulated beam delivery produces a uniform dose distribution in a volume V cyl which is symmetric with the cylindrical delivery and all beams fulfills two conditions in V cyl : (1) the dose modulation function is unchanged along the beam axis, and (2) the dose gradient in the beam direction is constant for a given lateral position; then its associated VSC beam produces no lateral dose gradient in V cyl , no matter what beam modulation or gantry angles are being used. The examination of the conditions required by the theorem lead to the following results. The effect of the depth-dose gradient not being perfectly constant with depth on the VSC beam lateral dose gradient is found negligible. The effect of the dose modulation function being degraded with depth on the VSC beam lateral dose gradient is found to be only related to scatter and beam hardening, as the theorem holds also for diverging beams. Conclusions: The use of the symmetry of the problem in the present paper leads to a valuable theorem showing

  20. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Pil Nam; Park, Kuyng Mi; Kang, Sun Moon; Kang, Geun Ho; Cho, Soo Hyun; Park, Beom Young; Van Ba, Hoa

    2014-08-01

    The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP), crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire)♀×Duroc♂ (LYD), Berkshire (Ber), and Duroc (Du) pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed) were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w) and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (pham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (pham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (pham possessed higher Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (phams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (phams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams.

  1. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Bahillo, Jose; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. Study Design: The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Colt?ne/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Colt?ne/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual)....

  2. Effect of light sources and curing mode techniques on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength of a composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Andreia Assis; Moreira, Francine do Couto Lima; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Souza, João Batista de; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga

    2012-01-01

    Adequate polymerization plays an important role on the longevity of the composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units, curing mode techniques and storage media on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of a composite resin. Two hundred and forty specimens were made of one composite resin (Esthet-X) in a stainless steel mold (2 mm x 8 mm Ø), and divided into 24 groups (n=10) established according to the 4 study factors: light-curing units: quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) lamp and light-emitting diodes (LED); energy densities: 16 J/cm² and 20 J/cm²; curing modes: conventional (CM) and pulse-delay (PD); and permeants: deionized water and 75% ethanol for 28 days. Sorption and solubility tests were performed according to ISO 4049:2000 specifications. All specimens were then tested for BFS according to ASTM F394-78 specification. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). In general, no significant differences were found regarding sorption, solubility or BFS means for the light-curing units and curing modes (p>0.05). Only LED unit using 16 J/cm² and PD using 10 s produced higher sorption and solubility values than QTH. Otherwise, using CM (16 J/cm²), LED produced lower values of BFS than QTH (pcuring units using 16 and 20 J/cm² by CM and PD curing modes produced no influence on the sorption, solubility or BFS of the tested resin.

  3. Synthesis of non-ionic and ionic resins for BEP intaglio inks curing by electron-beam radiation. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, B.J.; Dickens, B.

    1992-01-01

    The inks currently used to print US postage stamps on web presses are dried by heat evaporation of solvents. Emission of solvents into the atmosphere is governed by Local and Federal Government Regulations. Reduction of these emissions to acceptable levels can be accomplished by either of two methods available to the BEP. The work was part of a continuing effort to produce resins for use in formulation of intaglio inks for the printing of postage stamps and security documents. The inks are to be cured by exposure to an electron beam. The uncured inks are cleaned from the roller and wiping blade by washing the wiping blade with neutral water or with caustic water. Laboratory scale work on the urethane/polyethylene oxide/methacrylate resins has now been concluded and information on the synthesis has been provided to BEP for patenting and scaleup. Some effort on nonionic resins continued into FY88

  4. Page 1 s Curing of dental restorative composites 83 Average depth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OCS is more than that of OCDY cured for 60 seconds. This indicates that increased cure time is not an alternative to an adequate level of intensity of light. Hardness values (figure 7), however, do show an increase in hardness for each material with curing time, although the increase is not significant for HLMU. The possible ...

  5. Temperature changes caused by light curing of fiber-reinforced composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Sagsoz, Omer; Karatas, Ozcan; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Çelik, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate temperature change in fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) resin photopolymerized with a light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit (LCU). Materials and Methods: Forty dentine disks (1 mm thick and 8 mm diameter) were prepared from human molars. The FRC specimens (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter) consisted of polyethylene fiber (Construct (CT)) products or glass fiber (ever Stick (ES)) and one hybrid composite bonded to the dentin disks and polymerized with an LED LCU. Control groups were prepared using the hybrid composite. Temperature rise in dentine samples under the FRC bonded disks was measured using a K-type thermocouple, and data were recorded. Temperature change data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's test. Results: The results show that addition of fiber (one or two layers) did not change temperature rise values at any of the exposure times (P > 0.05). The CT fiber/two layer/40 s group exhibited the greatest temperature rise (5.49 ± 0.62) and the ES/one layer/10 s group the lowest rise (1.75 ± 0.32). A significant difference was observed in temperature rise measured during 10 and 20 s exposures (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Maximal temperature rise determined in all groups was not critical for pulpal health, although clinicians need to note temperature rises during polymerization. PMID:26069409

  6. Radiation Curing of Rubber/Thermoplastic Composites Containing Different Inorganic Fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Zayat, M.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Blending of polymeric materials has proved to be a successful method for preparing new polymeric materials having not only the main properties of the blends components but also new modification as well as specific ones. High density polyethylene (HDPE) and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) are both soild and constitute the blend components to be investigated in present study and hence the method of mechanical blending is the most suitable one for its preparation . HDPE thermoplastic is a semi – crystalline polymer ; on the other hand , NBR elastomer is totally amorphous polymer. Both polymers are categorized as crosslinking polymers with respect to ionizing gamma rays with different extents. In order to increase the efficiency of irradiation curing of such NBR/HDPE blend , it may be required to add suitable additives such as reinforcing fillers that may increase the extent of crosslinking at the same irradiation dose . Thus synthetic fillers are used commercially in industrial processing of rubber formulation due to its specific characteristics and hence its high reinforcing capacity and suitable price . To follow property changes occurred to the blend as well as its composites , measurements have been done to monitor the changes that happened to mechanical, physical and thermal properties as a function of irradiation dose and composition of blends and composites.

  7. Microleakage of Resin Composite Restoration with Total-Etch and Self-Etch Systems at Various Curing Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viona Diansari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage still occurs between cavity wall and resin composite restoration, although bonding agent such as Total-etch (TE and Selfetch (SE systems had been used. One of the causes of microleakage was associated to improper polymerization affected by curing distances. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of resin composite restoration using TE and SE adhesive systems that were polymerized at various curing distances. A total of 120 human molars were prepared for class V cavity and were divided into 4 groups with bonded resin composite restoration: Group A (TE: Filtek Z350 + Adper Single Bond 2; Group B (TE: Tetric N Ceram + Tetric N Bond; Group C (SE: Clearfil APX + SE Bond; and Group D (SE: Ceram X + Xeno III. Each group were divided into 3 parts (10 teeth each which were restored at 0; 2 and 4 mm of curing distance respectively. After stored in aquadest at 37oC (24 hours, all specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue solution (24 hours. Dye penetration at coronal site were observed under a stereomicroscope (Nikon SM 2800. The results showed that microleakage between 3 various curing distances of each group were not significantly different (Kruskall-Wallis test, p>0,05. Mann-Whitney U test (p<0,05 showed that microleakage between Group A-C; Group A-D and Group B-D were significantly different at 2 mm curing distance. Conclusion: microleakage of resin composite restoration with TE adhesive system were lower than SE at all curing distances.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.68

  8. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ing and fabrication costs of military systems, including fixed-winged and rotor aircraft, ground vehicles, ... hydroxyl groups, i.e. water, alcohol, polymer chain ends, and comonomer, can favour the AM mechanism. ... In this work, we investigate the effect of presence of water and alcohols on the e-beam induced polymerization.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain in glass fiber/epoxy composites by embedded fiber optic sensors: I. Cure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, R.; D'Acquisto, L.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper (Part I) the use of fiber optic sensors for real-time monitoring of the cure kinetics of GFRP composites is explored. The proposed sensing system allows the simultaneous measurement of both temperature and strain by monitoring the change in reflected wavelength from two coupled fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors that have been embedded into the composite laminate. Instrumented GFRP laminates with 12, 18 and 24 reinforcing plies, respectively, were prepared by means of the vacuum bagging technique. Samples were cured in a thermally controlled oven at 80 °C and 30 kPa for 240 min (isothermal stage) and then cooled down to ambient temperature by turning off the heating source (cooling stage). The obtained results, combined with proper data post-processing, have proven the effectiveness and potentiality of the proposed sensing system to measure the progression of the composite cure kinetics. It was shown that temperature within the specimen can differ significantly from the set-point temperature inside the oven because of the heat released during the exothermal reticulation of the epoxy resin. The combined sensing system also allowed the residual strain accumulated within the composite during the cooling stage to be accurately measured. Once the laminate had been cured, the embedded optical sensing system reveals itself purposeful for real-time structural health monitoring and damage assessment of the finished component. This aspect is discussed with more detail in the accompanying paper (Part II).

  10. Country Report Malaysia [Radiation Curing of Composites for Enhancing the Features and Utility in Health Care and Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh

    2011-01-01

    Polymerization active silico-organic nanoparticles could be prepared by heterogeneous condensation reaction and formed crosslinks in the polymeric substrates. With a relatively high nanopowder content of the nanodispersions, these coating materials could still be cured by ultraviolet light and produced excellent polymeric composites. These coating materials show better resistances toward scratch and abrasion properties compared to pure acrylates. (author)

  11. The influence of two different curing regimens on light energy transmission through bulk-fill resin composites and Vickers hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed; Santini, Ario

    2016-10-01

    To compare the total light energy transmission (J/cm2) through bulk-fill composite materials (BFMs) and Vickers hardness (VH) using a single-peak light curing unit (LCU) using two curing regimens. Samples (n= 5) of viscous BFMs, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TBF), X-tra fil (XF), and flowable BFMs, SureFil SDR (SDR), and X-tra base (XB) were prepared in 4 mm deep rings. The control was Tetric EvoCeram (TEC), a conventional composite. Using MARC-RC, the irradiance delivered to the top surface of the samples was adjusted to either 800 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds (16 J/cm2) or 1,600 mW/cm2 for 10 seconds (16 J/cm2). Samples were stored post-irradiation at 22 ± 2°C for 24 hours. Top and bottom-surface VH were measured and Bottom/Top (B/T) VH ratios were calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (α= 0.05). Total energy transmission for all materials ranged from 1.0 J/cm2 (6.1%) to 2.7 J/cm2 (16.9%). There was a statistically significant difference for total energy transmission to the bottom surface, more being transmitted at 800 mW/cm2 x 20 (Pcured at 800 mW/cm2 x 20 seconds (P 0.05) with either curing regimen. The degree of cure was material-dependent and increasing curing time may be more important than LCU tip irradiation values. Manufacturer's recommended total energy regimen may not always be adequate for effective curing. Some bulk-fill materials, containing additional photo-sensitivity to lower wave lengths, may be adequately cured using a single-peak LCU.

  12. Evaluation of Vickers hardness and depth of cure of six composite resins photo-activated with different polymerization modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, C; Lombardini, M; Gaviati, S; Chiesa, M

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The current in vitro study evaluated Vickers hardness (VK) and depth of cure (hardness ratio) of six resin composites, polymerized with a light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit by different polymerization modes: Standard 20 s, Standard 40 s, Soft-start 40 s. Materials and Methods: Six resin composites were selected for the present study: three microhybrid (Esthet.X HD, Amaris, Filtek Silorane), two nanohybrid (Grandio, Ceram.X mono) and one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme XT). The VK of the surface was determined with a microhardness tester using a Vickers diamond indenter and a 200 g load applied for 15 seconds. The mean VK and hardness ratio of the specimens were calculated using the formula: hardness ratio = VK of bottom surface / VK of top surface. Results: For all the materials tested and with all the polymerization modes, hardness ratio was higher than the minimum value indicated in literature in order to consider the bottom surface as adequately cured (0.80). Curing time did not affect hardness ratio values for Filtek Silorane, Grandio and Filtek Supreme XT. Conclusion: The effectiveness of cure at the top and bottom surface was not affected by Soft-start polymerization mode. PMID:22876009

  13. In vivo wear pattern of experimental light-cured hybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A; Sekiya, K; Fukushima, M; Iwaku, M

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various types of microfiller on the in vivo wear resistance of composite resins. Experimental light-cured composites with two different microfiller systems were prepared: (1) 56 wt % fine quartz filler, 21 wt% organic filler and 3 wt% colloidal silica filler (Hybrid type 1), and (2) 64 wt% fine quartz filler and 21 wt% colloidal silica filler (Hybrid type 2). The resin monomer consisted of 50 wt % Bis-GMA and 50 wt% TEGDMA. These materials were placed in 2 mm diameter cylindrical cavities located in the OCA (occlusal contact area) or the CFA (contact free area) in cast gold-silver-palladium alloy full coverage crowns, which were temporarily set in a volunteer patient's mouth. The crowns were removed at monthly intervals for SEM observation. Hybrid type 1, which contained organic fillers, showed bulk fractures in the OCA, by the second month of the experiment. However, reinforcement of the resin matrix by dispersion of microfiller provided Hybrid type 2 with superior wear resistance for up to two months.

  14. Effect of different photo-initiators and light curing units on degree of conversion of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Cunha Brandt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate: (i the absorption of photo-initiators and emission spectra of light curing units (LCUs; and (ii the degree of conversion (DC of experimental composites formulated with different photo-initiators when activated by different LCUs. Blends of BisGMA, UDMA, BisEMA and TEGDMA with camphorquinone (CQ and/ or 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione (PPD were prepared. Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA was used as co-initiator. Each mixture was loaded with 65 wt% of silanated filler particles. One quartz-tungsten-halogen - QTH (XL 2500, 3M/ESPE and two lightemitting diode (LED LCUs (UltraBlue IS, DMC and UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent were used for activation procedures. Irradiance (mW/cm² was calculated by the ratio of the output power by the area of the tip, and spectral distribution with a spectrometer (USB 2000. The absorption curve of each photo-initiator was determined using a spectrophotometer (Varian Cary 5G. DC was assessed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. No significant difference was found for DC values when using LED LCUs regardless of the photo-initiator type. However, PPD showed significantly lower DC values than composites with CQ when irradiated with QTH. PPD produced DC values similar to those of CQ, but it was dependent on the LCU type.

  15. Application of low-energy electron-beam curing in plastics processing and coating technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czvikovszky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Industrial radiation processing using low-energy electron beam (EB) offers high-speed technologies for converting thin layers of plastics, coatings, varnishes, printing inks etc., on different surfaces. Overviewing the main features of the corresponding technique, machines and materials used, the current state of chemistry and technology of EB-curable polymeric systems, is discussed based on some examples taken from the plastics processing, paper-converting, wood-panel coating, and other industries. (author)

  16. ANALYSIS OF GAP FORMATION AT TOOTH-COMPOSITE RESIN INTERFACE: EFFECT OF C-FACTOR AND LIGHT-CURING PROTOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Gustavo Oliveira; da Silva, Antônio Henrique Monteiro da Fonseca Thomé; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Barcellos, Alexandre de Araújo Lima; Sampaio, Eduardo Martins; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol on gap formation in composite resin restorations. Material and Methods: Cylindrical cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (A=1.0, B=2.0 and C=3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 30 human molars and restored in a single increment with P 60. The composite resin was light-cured according to two protocols: standard - 850 mW/cm2 / 20 s and gradual - 100 up to 1000 mW/cm2/ 10 s + 1000 mW/cm2 / 10 s. After storage in distilled water (37°C/7 days), the restorations were cut into three slices in a buccolingual direction and the gap widths were analyzed using a 3D-scanning system. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). Results: ANOVA detected a significant influence for the C-factor and light-curing protocol as independent factors, and for the double interaction C-factor vs. light-curing protocol. Cavities with higher C-factor presented the highest gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol led to smaller gap formation at cavity interfaces. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that the C-factor played an essential role in gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol may allow relaxation of composite resin restoration during polymerization reaction. PMID:19089143

  17. Analysis of gap formation at tooth-composite resin interface: effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Oliveira dos Santos

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of C-factor and light-curing protocol on gap formation in composite resin restorations. Material and METHODS: Cylindrical cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (A=1.0, B=2.0 and C=3.0 mm were prepared on the occlusal surface of 30 human molars and restored in a single increment with P 60. The composite resin was light-cured according to two protocols: standard - 850 mW/cm² / 20 s and gradual - 100 up to 1000 mW/cm² / 10 s + 1000 mW/cm² / 10 s. After storage in distilled water (37°C/7 days, the restorations were cut into three slices in a buccolingual direction and the gap widths were analyzed using a 3D-scanning system. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha=0.05. RESULTS: ANOVA detected a significant influence for the C-factor and light-curing protocol as independent factors, and for the double interaction C-factor vs. light-curing protocol. Cavities with higher C-factor presented the highest gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol led to smaller gap formation at cavity interfaces. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the C-factor played an essential role in gap formation. The gradual light-curing protocol may allow relaxation of composite resin restoration during polymerization reaction.

  18. The effects of composition, diameter and post-curing methods on the flexural properties of fiber posts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ereifej.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of fiber composition, diameter and post-curing treatments performed at relining on flexural strength and modulus of fiber-posts. Materials and methods: Sixty posts of Reforpost® Glass Fiber [GF] and Reforpost® Carbon Fiber [CF] (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil with diameters of 1.0mm and 1.4mm were used. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups (n=5 according to treatment received: dry-stored control group (C, oven-cured (Ov or autoclaved (Ac. A universal testing machine measured flexural strength and modulus of all specimens. Results: Post composition and post-curing treatments had no significant effects on flexural properties of specimens while post diameter had significant effects (p<0.05. The highest flexural strength and modulus (MPa (1331±95.8 and 21532±1550, respectively were obtained with Ov/GF/1.1, while lowest values (890±79.4 and 10675±952, respectively were for Ac/GF/1.5. Conclusions: 1.1mm diameter posts had better mechanical properties than 1.5mm thick posts. Neither post composition nor post-curing procedures affected the mechanical properties of relined posts.

  19. Current status of visible light activation units and the curing of light-activated resin-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario

    2010-05-01

    Light activation units are standard items of equipment in dental practice. It is essential to understand the many factors which affect the polymerization of light-activated resin composite materials and the choice of a light curing unit. In this respect, the development of high-intensity halogen and light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCUs), many with multiple curing modes, has revolutionized light curing techniques. This article reviews visible light activation unit design and development. Factors influencing the effective use of LCUs and polymerization of resin-based composite materials are discussed, as are the steps which should be taken to maintain the efficiency of units in clinical use. Many LCUs produce lower output intensities than stated by the manufacturer. Newer high power LEDs may present as much of a heat problem as high power quartz tungsten halogen lamps (QTHs).The manufacturer's data should be followed to ensure that the emission spectra of the unit is compatible with the photo-initiator in the resin-based composite material.

  20. How carbon nanotubes affect the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature of their epoxy composites? – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the widespread and contradictory results regarding the glass transition temperature of carbon nanotube (CNT/epoxy composites, we reviewed and analyzed the literature results dealing with the effect of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT on the cure behaviour of an epoxy resin (as a possible source of this discrepancy. The aim of this work was to clarify the effective role of unmodified multiwall carbon nanotubes on the cure kinetics and glass transition temperature (Tg of their epoxy composites. It was found that various authors reported an acceleration effect of CNT. The cure reaction was promoted in its early stage which may be due to the catalyst particles present in the CNT raw material. While SWNT may lead to a decrease of Tg due to their bundling tendency, results reported for MWNT suggested an increased or unchanged Tg of the composites. The present status of the literature does not allow to isolate the effect of MWNT on the Tg due to the lack of a study providing essential information such as CNT purity, glass transition temperature along with the corresponding cure degree.

  1. The effect of different adhesive types and curing methods on microleakage and the marginal adaptation of composite veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleknejad, Fathemeh; Moosavi, Horieh; Shahriari, Resa; Sarabi, Nasrin; Shayankhah, Taybeh

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of application techniques (with pre-curing vs without pre-curing) for dentin adhesive on microleakage and marginal adaptation of indirect composite veneer restorations. A total-etch bonding system, Excite/Variolink II (EXV), and a self-etching primer system, Panavia F2.0 (PF2), were used in the study. Forty-eight human central incisors were prepared for composite veneer restorations. The teeth were divided into two groups (n=24). For each resin cement, one half of each experimental group included an adhesive pre-cure (PC) with a halogen light source while the other half received no pre-cure (NPC) prior to resin cement insertion. Thus, four experimental groups were created: A (PC+EXV), B (NPC+EXV), C (PC+PF2), and D (NPC+PF2). Veneers made of Tetric Ceram resin composite were cemented using dual-cured resin luting agents. After storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the teeth were prepared for marginal leakage. Two samples of each group were selected at random for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and evaluation of marginal adaptation at 1050x magnification. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (a microleakage values were observed in dentinal margins of groups B and A, respectively. Dentin margins opposite to enamel margins had a significant difference in microleakage values of PC and NPC groups (Pmicroleakage and the marginal adaptation, especially dentin margins of indirect composite veneers.

  2. Influence of different curing methods on the fatty acid composition in sausages prepared from red deer meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Šnirc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available These curing agents play a decisive role in obtaining the specific sensory properties, stability and hygienic safety of products such as fermented sausages, ham and, more recently, emulsion type of sausages. The effect of using two different curing agents (sodium chloride and nitrate on fatty acid compounds in dry-cured deer meat was investigated in our study. The concentration of free fatty acids in the fat depends on the hydrolytic activity of the lipases, the microbial metabolic processes, and the oxidative reactions that work on the free fatty acids released in the lipolysis. The main identified fatty acids in all different types of curing were palmitic acid (16 : 0, oleic acid (c18 : 1 cis-9, stearic acid (C18 : 0. The resulting n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in the muscle samples of red deer showed no variation in different types of curing and was beneficially low within the range of 3.9 : 1 and 4.49 : 1. Total free fatty acids, whether saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids, did not increased (p >0.05 greatly through the processing of dry-cured deer meat. Also there was no effect of curing method on fatty acids composition in two different muscles Semitendinosus muscle (ANOVA, p >0.05, F - 0.003, F crit. - 3.041 and Triceps brachii muscle (ANOVA, p >0.05, F - 0.05, F crit. - 3.01. There were found no significant (p >0.05 differences between fatty acids content in sausages prepared by brining in NaCl and Nitrate salt. The present study revealed that game meat can function as a good source of bioactive compounds that are essential for human nutrition. 

  3. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  4. Effect of food/oral-simulating liquids on dynamic mechanical thermal properties of dental nanohybrid light-cured resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouvoudi, Evangelia C; Sideridou, Irini D

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this work was the study of the effect of food/oral simulating liquids on the dynamic mechanical thermal properties (viscoelastic properties) of current commercial dental light-cured resin composites characterized as nanohybrids. These nanohybrids were Grandio, Protofill-nano and Tetric EvoCeram. The properties were determined under dry conditions (1h at 37°C after light-curing) and also after storage in dry air, distilled water, artificial saliva SAGF(®) or ethanol/water solution (75 vol%) at 37°C for up 1, 7, 30 or 90 days. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis tests were performed on a Diamond Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer in bending mode. A frequency of 1Hz and a temperature range of 25-185°C were applied, while the heating rate of 2°C/min was selected to cover mouth temperature and the materials' likely Tg. Storage modulus, loss modulus and tangent delta were plotted against temperature over this period. The Tg of composites was obtained as the temperature indicated by tanδ peak. Moreover, the maximum height of tanδ peak, the width at the half of tanδ maximum and a parameter known as "ζ" parameter were determined. All composites analyzed 1h after light-curing and 1 day in air or in food/oral simulating liquids showed two Tg. All composites stored for 7, 30 or 90 days in any medium showed unique Tg value. Also among the various properties studied the most sensible in the structural changes of composites seems to be the Tg. Storage of composites in dry air at 37°C which is very close to their Tg (40°C) for 1 or 7 days caused post curing reactions, while storage for 30 or 90 days has no further effect on composites. Storage in water or artificial saliva 37°C for 1 or 7 days caused post curing reactions, while storage for 30 or 90 days seems to cause plasticization effect affecting some parameters analogously. Storage in ethanol/water solution (75vol%) 37°C for 1 or 7 days caused also post curing reactions, while storage for 30 or 90 days

  5. Simulation of Air Entrapment and Resin Curing During Manufacturing of Composite Cab Front by Resin Transfer Moulding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppusamy Raghu Raja Pandiyan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mould filling and subsequent curing are the significant processing stages involved in the production of a composite component through Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM fabrication technique. Dry spot formation and air entrapment during filling stage caused by improper design of filling conditions and locations that lead to undesired filling patterns resulting in defective RTM parts. Proper placement of inlet ports and exit vents as well as by adjustment of filling conditions can alleviate the problems during the mould filling stage. The temperature profile used to polymerize the resin must be carefully chosen to reduce the cure time. Instead of trial and error methods that are expensive, time consuming, and non-optimal, we propose a simulation-based optimization strategy for a composite cab front component to reduce the air entrapment and cure stage optimization. In order to be effective, the optimization strategy requires an accurate simulation of the process utilizing submodels to describe the raw material characteristics. Cure reaction kinetics and chemo-rheology were the submodels developed empirically for an unsaturated polyester resin using experimental data. The simulations were performed using commercial software PAM RTM 2008, developed by ESI Technologies. Simulation results show that the use of increase in injection pressure at the inlet filling conditions greatly reduce the air entrapped. For the cab front, the alteration of injection pressure with proper timing of vent opening reduced the air entrapped during mould filling stage. Similarly, the curing simulation results show that the use of higher mould temperatures effectively decreases the cure time as expected.

  6. Effect of Shade and Light Curing Mode on the Degree of Conversion of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sm, Mousavinasab; M, Atai; N, Salehi; A, Salehi

    2016-12-01

    The degree of conversion depends on the material composition, light source properties, distance from light source, light intensity, curing time, and other factors such as shade and translucency. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of different light-curing modes and shades of methacrylate and silorane-based resin composites on the degree of conversion of resin composites (DC). The methacrylate-based (Filtek Z250, 3M, ESPE) and low-shrinkage silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M, ESPE) resin composites were used in three groups as follows: group 1-Filtek Z250 (shade A3), group 2-Filtek Z250 (shade B2), and group 3-Filtek P90 (shade A3). We used a light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit for photopolymerization. 10 samples were prepared in each group to evaluate the degree of conversion; 5 samples were cured using soft-start curing mode, and the other 5 were cured using standard curing mode. The DC of the resin composites was measured using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and one-way ANOVA statistical tests. The degree of conversion of silorane-based resin composite was 70 - 75.8% and that of methacrylate-based resin composites was 60.2 - 68.2% (p = 0.009). The degree of conversion of the composite with brighter colour (B2) was statistically more than the darker composite (A3). Higher degree of conversion was achieved applying the standard curing mode. The results of the study showed that the colour and type of the resin composite and also the curing mode influence the degree of conversion of resin composites.

  7. The UV and Laser Aging for PMMA/BDK/Azo-dye Polymer Blend Cured by UV Light Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A A; Omari, A M

    2015-01-01

    A polymeric-based solution blend composed of Azo-dye methyl red (MR) doped with polymethelmethacrelate (PMMA) solution, in addition, to the BenzylDimethylKetal (BDK) photoinitiator was made with optimum molar ratios and deposited on glass substrate by spin coating technique. The samples were then exposed to UV light beams in order to assist the layers polymerization by the proper exposure process. The photo chemical reaction occurred during the UV light polymerization process induces photo refractive changes which were presented as a function of wavelength or photon energy. Two main strong absorption peaks were observed in the films at around 330 nm (3.75 eV) and 500 nm (2.48 eV) for different curing time periods. This phenomenon enhances the films usage for optical data storage media at these two wavelengths. Since the deposited films were then useful as based layers for Read/Write optical data storage media, they were then tested by UV or laser Read/Write beams independently. The optical properties of the films were investigated while exposed to each beam. Finally, their optical properties were investigated as a function of aging time in order to relate the temporary and/or permanent light-exposure effect on the films compared to their optical properties before the light exposure. The films show a low absorbance at 630 nm (1.97 eV) and high absorbance at 480 nm (2.58 eV). This fact makes it possible to record holographic gratings in the polymeric film upon light exposure. In all cases the optical properties were evaluated by using the very sensitive, non destructive surface testing spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. The films were characterized in the spectral range of 300 to 1000 nm using Lorentz oscillator model with one oscillator centred at 4.15 eV. This study has been supported by the SEM and EDAX results to investigate the effect of the UV and visible beams on their optical properties. The results of this research determined the proper conditions for

  8. Finite Element Analysis of a Natural Fiber (Maize Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Saravana Bavan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites are termed as biocomposites or green composites. These fibers are green, biodegradable, and recyclable and have good properties such as low density and low cost when compared to synthetic fibers. The present work is investigated on the finite element analysis of the natural fiber (maize composite beam, processed by means of hand lay-up method. Composite beam material is composed of stalk-based fiber of maize and unsaturated polyester resin polymer as matrix with methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP as a catalyst and Cobalt Octoate as a promoter. The material was modeled and resembled as a structural beam using suitable assumption and analyzed by means of finite element method using ANSYS software for determining the deflection and stress properties. Morphological analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis for the fiber were examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray diffractometer. From the results, it has been found that the finite element values are acceptable with proper assumptions, and the prepared natural fiber composite beam material can be used for structural engineering applications.

  9. Structural health monitoring of co-cured composite structures using FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Ramesh; Kamath, G. M.; Gupta, Nitesh; Rao, M. Subba

    2005-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of aircraft structures, especially composite structures, has assumed increased significance on considerations of safety and costs. With the advent of co-cured structures, wherein bonded joints are replacing bolted joints there is a concern regarding skin-stiffener separation, which might not be detected unless a rigorous non-destructive testing (NDT) is done. It would hence be necessary to be able to detect and assess skin-stiffener separation in composite structures before it reaches the critical size. One of the health monitoring strategies is through strain monitoring using fibre optic strain sensors such as Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. The first aspect that needs to be addressed is the characterization of the FBG sensors. Issues of embedment in composites have also to be addressed. Before evolving a damage detection strategy, the sensitivity of the structural strain to skin-stiffener separations must be clearly understood and quantified. This paper presents the analysis and experiments done with a composite test box to study the effect of skin-stiffener separation on the strain behaviour. The box consists of two skins stiffened with spars made of Bi-Directional (BD) glass-epoxy prepreg material. The spars are bolted to the skins and removing suitable number of bolts simulates 'de-bonds'. The strains of the healthy box are compared with the unhealthy box. The strains in the experiments are monitored using both strain gauges and Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. The experimental results show that there is significant change in the measured strain near and away from the debond location. The finite element analysis of the box is done using ABAQUS and the analysis is validated with the experimental results. A neural network based methodology is developed here to detect skin-stiffener debonds in structures. A multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network with a feed forward back propagation algorithm is used to determine the

  10. The effect of curing units and methods on degree of conversion of two types of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani Tabatabaei M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Halogen lamp is the commonly used light source for composite photo polymerization. Recently, high power halogen lamps, LED and plasma arc are introduced for improving the polymerization. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of conventional and high power halogen lamps and LED light curing unit on degree of conversion of two different composite resins.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study two halogen units (Coltolux 50 with the intensity of  330 mW/cm2 and Optilux 501 with two different operating modes of standard with the intensity of 820 mW/cm2 and Ramp with the intentsiy of 100-1030mW/cm2 and one LED light curing unit (620 mW/cm2 were used. The composites were hybrid (Tetric ceram and nanofilled (Filteke supreme. Each materials/curing method contained three samples and degree of conversion (DC was measured with FTIR. Data were analyzed statistically with one way and two way ANOVA, Tukey HSD. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance.Results: Tetric ceram revealed higher DCthan Supreme. Tetric ceram showed a significant decrease in DC when Coltolux 50 was used in comparison to LED and Optilux 501. The latters did not show significant effect on DC of this material. DC of Supreme polymerized with various curing modes was not significantly different.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, degree of conversion in hybrid composites was higher than nanofilled. In comparison with conventional halogen lamp (Coltolux 50, high intensity halogen lamps and LED unit significantly lead to higher degree of conversion in hybrid composites.

  11. Investigation of Cure Reaction, Rheology, Volume Shrinkage and Thermomechanical Properties of Nano-TiO2 Filled Epoxy/DDS Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotishkumar Parameswaranpillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure reaction, rheology, volume shrinkage, and thermomechanical behavior of epoxy-TiO2 nanocomposites based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfone have been investigated. The FTIR results show that, at the initial curing stage, TiO2 acts as a catalyst and facilitates the curing. The catalytic effect of TiO2 was further confirmed by the decrease in maximum exothermal peak temperature (DSC results; however, it was also found that the addition of TiO2 decreases the overall degree of cure, as evidenced by lower total heat of reaction of the cured composites compared to neat epoxy. The importance of cure rheology in the microstructure formation during curing was explored by using rheometry. From the PVT studies, it was found that TiO2 decreases the volume shrinkage behavior of the epoxy matrix. The mechanical properties of the cured epoxy composites, such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact strength, and fracture toughness of the polymer composites, were examined. The nanocomposites exhibited good improvement in dimensional, thermal, and mechanical properties with respect to neat cross-linked epoxy system. FESEM micrographs of fractured surfaces were examined to understand the toughening mechanism.

  12. Joining and reinforcing a composite bumper beam and a composite crush can for a vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Elisabeth; Decker, Leland; Armstrong, Dale; Truskin, James; Pasupuleti, Praveen; Dwarmpudi, Ramesh; Doroudian, Mark

    2017-03-21

    A front bumper beam and crush can (FBCC) system is provided for a vehicle. A bumper beam has an interior surface with a plurality of ribs extending therefrom. The ribs and the interior surface are made of a chopped fiber composite and cooperate to engage a crush can. The chopped fiber composite reinforces the engaging surfaces of the crush can and the interior surface of the bumper beam. The crush can has a tubular body made of a continuous fiber composite. The crush can has outwardly-extending flanges at an end spaced away from the bumper beam. The flanges are at least partially provided with a layer of chopped fiber composite to reinforce a joint between the outwardly-extending flange and the vehicle frame.

  13. Vibration suppression of composite laminated beams using distributed piezoelectric patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, M A; Almajed, A A; ElMadany, M M

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to develop an analytical and straightforward approach to suppress the steady state transverse vibration of a symmetric cross-ply laminated composite beam that is excited by an external harmonic force. This is achieved by bonding patches of piezoelectric material at selected locations along the beam. The governing equations for the system are formulated and the dynamic Green's functions are used to obtain an exact solution for the problem. A scheme is proposed for determining the values of the driving voltages, the dimensions of the PZT patches and their locations along the beam, in order to confine the vibration in a certain chosen region where the vibration is not harmful and leave the other chosen region stationary or vibrating with very small amplitudes. Beams with different boundary conditions are considered. Numerical case studies are presented to verify the utility of the proposed scheme

  14. ALL NATURAL COMPOSITE SANDWICH BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS. (R829576)

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of developing an all natural composite roof for housing application,structural panels and unit beams were manufactured out of soybean oil based resinand natural fibers (flax, cellulose, pulp, recycled paper, chicken feathers)using vacuum assisted resin tran...

  15. Post-buckling analysis of composite beams: A simple intuitive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    post-buckling analysis of composite beams poses difficulty in selecting an accurate axial dis- placement ... endeavour of the present work is to propose an approximate closed-form expressions for eval- uating the ..... The post-buckling load expressions presented in table 3 also reveal the existence of quadratic. 0. 10. 20. 30.

  16. Effect of aging and curing mode on the compressive and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-11-21

    Resin composite cements are used in dentistry to bond ceramic restorations to the tooth structure. In the oral cavity these cements are subjected to aging induced by masticatory and thermal stresses. Thermal cycling between 5 and 55 °C simulates the effect of varying temperatures in vitro. Purpose of this study was to compare indirect tensile to compressive strength of different cements before and after thermal cycling. The effect of the curing mode was additionally assessed. Indirect tensile strength and compressive strength of 7 dual-curing resin composite cements (Multilink Automix, Multilink SpeedCem, RelyX Ultimate, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Panavia V5, Panavia SA Plus, Harvard Implant semi-permanent) was measured. The specimens were either autopolymerized or light-cured (n = 10). The mechanical properties were assessed after 24 h water storage at 37 °C and after aging (20,000 thermo cycles) with previous 24 h water storage at 37 °C. Indirect tensile strength ranged from 5.2 ± 0.8 to 55.3 ± 4.2 MPa, compressive strength from 35.8 ± 1.8 MPa to 343.8 ± 19.6 MPa. Thermocyclic aging of 20,000 cycles can be considered a suitable method to simulate the degradation of indirect tensile strength but not compressive strength of resin composite cements. The effect of thermocycling and the curing mode on the resin composite cements is material dependent and cannot be generalized.

  17. Effect of aging and curing mode on the compressive and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background Resin composite cements are used in dentistry to bond ceramic restorations to the tooth structure. In the oral cavity these cements are subjected to aging induced by masticatory and thermal stresses. Thermal cycling between 5 and 55 °C simulates the effect of varying temperatures in vitro. Purpose of this study was to compare indirect tensile to compressive strength of different cements before and after thermal cycling. The effect of the curing mode was additionally assessed. Metho...

  18. A multi-stage curing technique toward improved dimensional infidelity of curve-shaped composites manufactured with vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Kai Jin

    The occurrence of dimensional infidelity during the curing process is detected as curved composites are being released from the mold after full consolidation. On the other hand, the lengthy cure cycle, thermal spiking and non-uniform consolidation in thick composite manufacturing are often strong deterrents to widespread industrial implementation. Therefore, a multi-stage curing technique is implemented and its outcome toward the spring-in phenomenon is investigated in this research. The composite processing technique of stage curing is useful for assessing the effects of thermal spiking, non-uniform consolidation and fiber wrinkling on mechanical integrity for thick composite structures. However, the prediction of spring-in behavior for a multi-stage curing process is still a relatively unexplored area in engineering research. As a result, a compatibility model based on the residual stress that builds up at each curing stage is performed in our study. Since the resin provides a lubricant effect between each curing stage, a partial slipping interface factor w is introduced to our numerical simulation model. The newly developed multi-stage curing model shows good agreement with the experimental results under Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process.

  19. Coating compositions hardenable by ionization beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, D.; Haering, E.; Dobbelstein, A.; Hoselmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    Coating compositions hardenable by ionizing radiation are described which contain as binding agents a mixture of at least 1 unsaturated olefin compound containing urethane groups, and at least 1 further unsaturated olefin compound that may be copolymerized. The unsaturated olefin compound containing the urethane groups is a reaction product of a compound containing carboxylic acid groups and a compound containing at least 1 isocyanate group where the mixture of the two olefins may contain conventional additives of the lacquer industry. 6 claims, no drawings

  20. Influence of the light-curing unit, storage time and shade of a dental composite resin on the fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Gaiao, U.; Cuin, A.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of three light-curing units, storage times and colors of the dental composite resin on the fluorescence. The specimens (diameter 10.0 ± 0.1 mm, thickness 1.0 ± 0.1 mm) were made using a stainless steel mold. The mold was filled with the microhybrid composite resin and a polyethylene film covered each side of the mold. After this, a glass slide was placed on the top of the mold. To standardize the top surface of the specimens a circular weight (1 kg) with an orifice to pass the light tip of the LCU was placed on the top surface and photo-activated during 40 s. Five specimens were made for each group. The groups were divided into 9 groups following the LCUs (one QTH and two LEDs), storage times (immediately after curing, 24 hours, 7 and 30 days) and colors (shades: A2E, A2D, and TC) of the composite resin. After photo-activation, the specimens were storage in artificial saliva during the storage times proposed to each group at 37°C and 100% humidity. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s posthoc tests showed no significant difference between storage times (immediately, 24 hours and 30 days) ( P > 0.05). The means of fluorescence had difference significant to color and light-curing unit used to all period of storage ( P 0.05).

  1. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  2. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT LIGHT-CURING UNITS ON TENSILE STRENGTH AND MICROHARDNESS OF A COMPOSITE RESIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; dos Santos, Patrícia Aleixo; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light-curing units on the tensile bond strength and microhardness of a composite resin (Filtek Z250 – 3M/ESPE). Conventional halogen (Curing Light 2500 – 3M/ESPE; CL) and two blue light emitting diode curing units (Ultraled – Dabi/Atlante; UL; Ultrablue IS – DMC; UB3 and UB6) were selected for this study. Different light intensities (670, 130, 300, and 600 mW/cm2, respectively) and different curing times (20s, 40s and 60s) were evaluated. Knoop microhardness test was performed in the area corresponding to the fractured region of the specimen. A total of 12 groups (n=10) were established and the specimens were prepared using a stainless steel mold composed by two similar parts that contained a cone-shaped hole with two diameters (8.0 mm and 5.0 mm) and thickness of 1.0 mm. Next, the specimens were loaded in tensile strength until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and a 50 kg load cell. For the microhardness test, the same matrix was used to fabricate the specimens (12 groups; n=5). Microhardness was determined on the surfaces that were not exposed to the light source, using a Shimadzu HMV-2 Microhardness Tester at a static load of 50 g for 30 seconds. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Regarding the individual performance of the light-curing units, there was similarity in tensile strength with 20-s and 40-s exposure times and higher tensile strength when a 60-s light-activation time was used. Regarding microhardness, the halogen lamp had higher results when compared to the LED units. For all light-curing units, the variation of light-exposure time did not affect composite microhardness. However, lower irradiances needed longer light-activation times to produce similar effect as that obtained with high-irradiance light-curing sources. PMID:19089182

  3. Preparation of hyperbranched poly (amidoamine)-grafted graphene nanolayers as a composite and curing agent for epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour-Mahmoudalilou, Meysam; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein; Azimi, Reza; Abdollahi, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Thermal properties of epoxy resin were improved by preparation of a curing agent of poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-grafted graphene oxide (GO). Hyperbranched PAMAM-modified GO (GD) was prepared by a divergent dendrimer synthesis methodology. Modification of GO with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), Michael addition of methacrylic acid, and amidation reaction with ethylenediamine results in the curing agent of GD. Then, epoxy resin was cured in the presence of different amounts of GD and the final products were compared with ethylenediamine-cured epoxy resin (E) in their thermal degradation temperature and char contents. Functionalization of GO with APTES and hyperbranched dendrimer formation at the surface of GO were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results. TGA results showed that the weight loss associated with chemical moieties in GONH2, GOMA, and GD is estimated to be 10.1, 12.2, and 14.1%, respectively. Covalent attachment of dendrimer at the surface of GO increases its thermal stability. TGA also showed that decomposition temperature and char content are higher for composites compared with E. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies show that flat and smooth graphene nanolayers are wrinkled in GO and re-stacking and flattening of nanolayers is observed in GD.

  4. Coating compositions hardenable by ionization beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, D.; Haering, E.; Dobbelstein, A.; Hoselmann, W.

    1976-01-01

    Coating compositions hardenable by ionizing radiation comprise as binding agents a mixture of A. at least 1 unsaturated olefin compound containing urethane groups, and B. at least 1 further unsaturated olefin compound that may be copolymerized. The unsaturated olefin compound A. containing the urethane groups in a reaction product of (a) a compound of the general formula (CHR 1 = CR 2 COOCH 2 CH(OH)CH 2 O CO-)/sub n/R where n is 1 or 2, where R stands for a straight chain or branched alkyl group of valence n, where R 1 is hydrogen, methyl; or the group -COOCH 2 CH(OH)CH 2 OCOR 3 - where R 3 is a monovalent alkyl residue and where R 2 is hydrogen or methyl, and (b) a compound containing at least 1 isocyanate group where the mixture of (A) and (B) may contain conventional additives of the lacquer industry. 6 claims

  5. Gelatin/piassava composites treated by Electron Beam Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takinami, Patricia Yoko Inamura; Shimazaki, Kleber; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Mastro, Nelida Lucia del; Colombo, Maria Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    Piassava (Attalea funifera Mart) fiber has been investigated as reinforcement for polymer composites with potential for practical applications. The purpose of the present work was to assess the behavior of specimens of piassava fiber and gelatin irradiated with electron beam at different doses and percentage. The piassava/gelatin specimens were made with 5 and 10% (w/w) piassava fiber, gelatin 25% (w/w), glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer. The samples were irradiated up to 40 kGy using an electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Preliminary results showed mechanical properties enhancement with the increase in radiation dose. (author)

  6. The Properties of SBR/ENR50 Blend Containing Nanoclay/Carbon Black Dual Filler System Cured by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ahmadi-Shooli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites based on an SBR/ENR50 rubber blend with the blend ratio of 50/50 using Cloisite 15A nanoclay (5 and 10 phr and carbon black (20 phr were prepared by melt mixing process. The rubber compounds were crosslinked by electron beam irradiation process at 50 and 100 kGy doses. A reference sample containing carbon black at 35 phr was prepared using a conventional sulphur curing system. The gel content of the samples was specified using gel fraction measurement. The results showed the maximum gel content for the sample having 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black. The dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor, of the nanocomposites were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA tests. The results indicated that, in spite of a well dispersed nanoclay in samples containing 10 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black, a minimum loss factor was observed in the sample containing 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black at 100 kGy. On the other hand, the storage modulus of the reference sample was found to be higher than that of the sample with 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, stress at 100%, 200%, and 300% elongation and the percentage of elongation were measured by a tensile machine. The results showed an increase in tensile strength and the stress at different elongations for a sample with 5 phr nanoclay and 20 phr carbon black compared to the reference sample. In the corresponding SEM images of the samples having nanoclay and carbon black irradiated at 100 kGy a significantly higher surface roughness was observed.

  7. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  8. Ultrasonic cure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, B. Boro

    1999-12-01

    Fiber reinforced organic matrix composites applied to large structures require inexpensive cure process control. This paper reports on work to develop simple ultrasonic NDE sensors suitable for manufacturing and in-field use. This sensor is designed around a short wave-guide ultrasonic probe that is embedded in composite for in-situ cure monitoring applications. The sensor measures changes in resin density and sound velocity during cure and can be quantitatively calibrated for determination of the final cure. The cure monitoring is based on acoustic impedance variance across a material interface and can be utilized over the full cure cycle change of the resin in the composite. Significant advantage of this method is the simplicity of the measurement, low cost of the wave-guide probe and the adaptability of the sensor configuration to various composite-processing environments

  9. Post-Vitrification Cure Kinetics of High Temperature Composite Resins: Implications for Characterization and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    Iso - thermal Cure Kinetics Baseline Residual Cure 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0 50 100 150 200 250 Ba se lin e Co rr ec te d Si gn al...observed values, although all large errors were under-predictions Source (Pred. from iso . DSC run, or “observed” ) TG after curing for temp. (°C...He at F lo w (W /g ) Temperature (°C) ESR255 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 100 200 300 Ta n de lta

  10. An in vitro evaluation of diametral tensile strength and flexural strength of nanocomposite vs hybrid and minifill composites cured with different light sources (QTH vs LED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, Surendra Nath; Priyadarshini; Raturi, Piyush; Shetty, Dinesh; Srikanth, K Venkata

    2013-01-01

    Composites always remained the target of discussion due to lot of controversies around it. Mechanical properties are one of them. With the introduction of new technology and emergence of various composites which combine superior strength and polish retention, nanocomposites have led to a new spark in the dentistry. A recent curing unit LED with various curing modes claims to produce higher degree of conversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diametral tensile strength and flexural strength of nanocomposite, hybrid and minifill composites cured with different light sources (QTH vs LED). Seventy-two samples were prepared using different specially fabricated teflon molds, 24 samples of each composite were prepared for the diametral tensile strength (ADA specification no. 27) and the flexural strength (ISO 4049) of the 12 samples, six were cured with LED (Soft Start curing profile) and other six with QTH curing light and tested on a universal testing machine. The nanocomposite had highest diametral tensile strength and flexural strength which were equivalent to the hybrid composite and superior than the minifill composite. With the combination of superior esthetics and other optimized physical properties, this novel nanocomposite system would be useful for all posterior and anterior applications.

  11. A comparative study of the effects of QTH and LED light curing units on the surface hardness of colored compomer and Hybrid composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effat khodadadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One factor affecting the degree of polymerization is the type of light-curing device. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of LED and QTH light curing units on the surface hardness of composite and compomer. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, 30 samples of composite and compomer were divided into 3 groups of 10 each. One-half of the subgroups in each group were cured with LED and the other half with Halogen light curing units (LCUs. 49 points on the surface were marked and then the hardness of these points was measured by using Vickers hardness test. Results : The mean hardness of composites cured by using LED was more than the Halogen group but in compomer it was reversed and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001. Z 250 composite had the highest level of hardness and the lowest hardness was related to the Heliomolar composite and had significant difference. (p<0.001  Conclusion :In the present study, the results indicated that LED light curing unit had great effect on the hardness of composites but in compomer, the QTH showed a better result.

  12. Comparison between two methods to evaluate temperature changes produced by composite light curing units and polymerization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, F H F; Consani, S; Guiraldo, R D; Consani, R L X; Berger, S B; Carvalho, R V; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Sinhoreti, M A C

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the temperature change into the pulp chamber during the light curing of composite resin by direct (bovine tooth) and indirect (matrix) methods. Direct method: fifty standardized cavities (2x2x2 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, which were randomly assigned to evaluation of the temperature changes in the pulp chamber. Indirect method: temperature changes were evaluated through a dentine slice of 1.0 mm thickness in a elastomer cubic mold (2x2x2 mm). Filtek Z250 composite resin (3M/ESPE) was photo-activated using three light curing units: quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) by continuous, soft-start or intermittent light modulations; light emitting diode (LED); and plasma arc-curing (PAC). Ten groups (N.=10) were established according to technique evaluation and photo-activation methods. All experiments were carried out in a controlled environment (37 °C and 50 ± 10% relative humidity). The temperature changes were recorded using a digital thermometer attached to a type-K thermocouple in contact with the dentin slice (indirect method) or in contact with the axial wall (dentin) of pulp chamber (direct method). The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Temperature changes were statistically higher for the matrix indirect method (2.56 ºC) than bovine teeth direct method (1.17ºC). The change temperature was statistically higher for the PAC (1.77 ºC) when compared to other photo-activation modes in bovine teeth direct method. The two methods of temperature evaluation were different, however indirect method detected the higher temperature increase. Higher energy density arising from the light curing units and polymerization techniques promoted higher temperature increase.

  13. Single-component and fast-curing epoxy resin for liquid composite molding processes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yiru; Liu Wangshuang; Qiu Yiping; Wei Yi

    2017-01-01

    Development of single-component and fast-curing epoxy resins is highly desired for many industry applications. In this work, we report an epoxy system based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 1-(2-cyanoethyl)-2-ethyl-4- methylimidazole (1C2E4MIM). The inductive effect of electron-withdrawing cyano group distinctly increases the latency of 1C2E4MIM without sacrificing the curing rate. The results of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) measu...

  14. Ion beam modification of metals: Compositional and microstructural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Was, Gary S.

    Ion implantation has become a highly developed tool for modifying the structure and properties of metals and alloys. In addition to direct implantation, a variety of other ion beam techniques such as ion beam mixing, ion beam assisted deposition and plasma source ion implantation have been used increasingly in recent years. The modifications constitute compositional and microstructural changes in the surface of the metal. This leads to alterations in physical properties (transport, optical, corrosion, oxidation), as well as mechanical properties (strength, hardness, wear resistance, fatigue resistance). The compositional changes brought about by ion bombardment are classified into recoil implantation, cascade mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, Gibbsian adsorption and sputtering which combine to produce an often complicated compositional variation within the implanted layer and often, well beyond. Microstructurally, the phases present are often altered from what is expected from equilibrium thermodynamics giving rise to order-disorder transformations, metastable (crystalline, amorphous or quasicrystalline) phase formation and growth, as well as densification, grain growth, formation of a preferred texture and the formation of a high density dislocation network. All these effects need to be understood before one can determine the effect of ion bombardment on the physical and mechanical properties of metals. This paper reviews the literature in terms of the compositional and microstructural changes induced by ion bombardment, whether by direct implantation, ion beam mixing or other forms of ion irradiation. The topics are introduced as well as reviewed, making this a more pedogogical approach as opposed to one which treats only recent developments. The aim is to provide the tools needed to understand the consequent changes in physical and mechanical properties.

  15. Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis in composite material beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Yonatan; London, Yosef; Preter, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    with optical fiber sensors. In this work, we report high-resolution distributed Brillouin sensing over standard fibers that are embedded in composite structures. A phase-coded, Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis (B-OCDA) protocol was employed, with spatial resolution of 2 cm and sensitivity of 1 °K......) estimating the stiffness and Young’s modulus of a composite beam; and (c) distributed strain measurements across the surfaces of a model wing of an unmanned aerial vehicle. The measurements are supported by the predictions of structural analysis calculations. The results illustrate the potential added values...

  16. Composite Beam Theory with Material Nonlinearities and Progressive Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fang

    Beam has historically found its broad applications. Nowadays, many engineering constructions still rely on this type of structure which could be made of anisotropic and heterogeneous materials. These applications motivate the development of beam theory in which the impact of material nonlinearities and damage on the global constitutive behavior has been a focus in recent years. Reliable predictions of these nonlinear beam responses depend on not only the quality of the material description but also a comprehensively generalized multiscale methodology which fills the theoretical gaps between the scales in an efficient yet high-fidelity manner. The conventional beam modeling methodologies which are built upon ad hoc assumptions are in lack of such reliability in need. Therefore, the focus of this dissertation is to create a reliable yet efficient method and the corresponding tool for composite beam modeling. A nonlinear beam theory is developed based on the Mechanics of Structure Genome (MSG) using the variational asymptotic method (VAM). The three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear continuum problem is rigorously reduced to a one-dimensional (1D) beam model and a two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional analysis featuring both geometric and material nonlinearities by exploiting the small geometric parameter which is an inherent geometric characteristic of the beam. The 2D nonlinear cross-sectional analysis utilizes the 3D material models to homogenize the beam cross-sectional constitutive responses considering the nonlinear elasticity and progressive damage. The results from such a homogenization are inputs as constitutive laws into the global nonlinear 1D beam analysis. The theoretical foundation is formulated without unnecessary kinematic assumptions. Curvilinear coordinates and vector calculus are utilized to build the 3D deformation gradient tensor, of which the components are formulated in terms of cross-sectional coordinates, generalized beam strains, unknown warping

  17. Effect of vulcanization temperature on curing characteristic, physical and mechanical properties of natural rubber/palygorskite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. C.; Yusoff, N. A. Md; Othman, N.; Mohamad Aini, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to determine the optimum vulcanization temperature on curing characteristic, mechanical and physical properties of natural rubber/palygorskite composites. Three variations of vulcanization temperature (140, 150 and 160°C) were conducted on the samples. Cation-exchanged method used to treat the palygorskite. Rheological measurements and mechanical testing (tear, tensile and fatique life) were conducted on the composites sample. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to reveal the dispersion of palygorskite in NR matrix. It was found that the scorch and cure time of NR/Palygorskite decrease with increasing of vulcanization temperature. The tensile strength and fatigue life was optimum at 140°C and slightly decreased with the increasing of vulcanization temperature. The SEM micrograph revealed the strength and weakness in the system. It can be concluded that the optimum properties of NR/Palygorskite composites were at 140°C of vulcanization temperature and most of the mechanical and physical properties were slightly decreased with the increasing of vulcanization temperature.

  18. Effect of light curing modes and ethanol immersion media on the susceptibility of a microhybrid composite resin to staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the susceptibility of a hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M ESPE to staining, when light cured in four different modes and immersed in two different media. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and polymerized according to the experimental groups (conventional - 550 mW/cm² / 30 seconds; soft start - 300mW/cm² / 10 seconds + 550 mW/cm² / 20 seconds; high intensity - 1060 mW/cm² - 10 seconds; pulse delay - 550 mW/cm² - 1 seconds + 60 seconds of waiting time + 550 mW/cm² - 20 seconds and immersed in one of two media (distilled water or absolute ethanol for 24h. Next, the specimens were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution for 12 hours. Afterwards, the specimens were washed and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA (4X2 and Tukey's test were performed on the data at 0.05 confidence level. Soft start showed the least staining, and was statistically different from the high intensity and pulse delay light curing modes (p0.05. There were no significant differences between the two immersion media (p>0.05. The soft start polymerization mode showed lower susceptibly of the composite resin to staining than high intensity and pulse delay, irrespective of the immersion medium.

  19. Relationship between cathepsin B activity and compositional parameters in dry-cured hams of normal and defective texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolari, G; Virgili, R; Schivazappa, C

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-eight Italian dry-cured hams were analysed for cathepsin B activity, proximate composition and proteolysis index and results were related to lean tissue texture, as assessed by an expert panel, in order to search for relationships between excessive softness, a major problem in the raw ham industry, and chemical parameters. Softness was found to be related to protein breakdown which, in turn, was linked with higher residual cathepsin B activity and, to a lesser extent, to lower salt content. Results suggest that the use of raw ham of controlled enzyme activity would improve the texture quality of the end product. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Degree of conversion and microhardness of TPO-containing resin-based composites cured by polywave and monowave LED units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Miletic, Vesna; Swift, Michael D; Bradley, Mark

    2012-07-01

    To determine the degree of conversion (DC) and Knoop microhardness (KHN) of resin-based composites (RBCs) containing trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) cured by polywave or monowave LED light-curing units (LCUs). Three groups (each n = 5) of Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Vit-l-escence (Ultradent) and Herculite XRV Ultra (Kerr) were prepared in Teflon moulds (5mm in diameter and 2mm thick) and cured with polywave Bluephase(®) G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), polywave Valo (Ultradent) or monowave Bluephase(®) (Ivoclar Vivadent; control) resulting in 9 groups. DC and KHN were determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy and Knoop microhardness, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the presence or absence of TPO in the three uncured materials. Data were statistically analysed using two-way and one-way ANOVA and DC and KHN were correlated using Pearson's correlation (α = 0.05). TPO was confirmed in Tetric EvoCeram and Vit-l-escence but not in Herculite XRV Ultra. All three LCUs produced comparable KHN for Tetric EvoCeram and Herculite XRV Ultra (p > 0.05). Both polywave LCUs resulted in significantly higher KHN for Vit-l-escence and higher DC in Tetric EvoCeram and Vit-l-escence than the monowave Bluephase(®) (p TPO-containing RBCs, but not in Herculite XRV Ultra. DC and KHN were linearly correlated in all three RBCs. Vit-l-escence showed the highest DC and KHN of the three materials tested. The use of polywave LEDs significantly improves both the DC and KHN of materials which contain TPO. This should be taken into account when curing bleached shades of RBCs even if the manufacturers do not indicate the presence of TPO in their materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  2. Influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of resin composites determined by Vickers hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Among the materials tested, the nanofilled and the nanohybrid resin composites were rather insensible to thickness variations. Miicrohybrid composites, instead, had features different from one another.

  3. Element free Galerkin formulation of composite beam with longitudinal slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Dzulkarnain; Mokhtaram, Mokhtazul Haizad [Department of Civil Engineering, Universiti Selangor, Bestari Jaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Badli, Mohd Iqbal; Yassin, Airil Y. Mohd [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Behaviour between two materials in composite beam is assumed partially interact when longitudinal slip at its interfacial surfaces is considered. Commonly analysed by the mesh-based formulation, this study used meshless formulation known as Element Free Galerkin (EFG) method in the beam partial interaction analysis, numerically. As meshless formulation implies that the problem domain is discretised only by nodes, the EFG method is based on Moving Least Square (MLS) approach for shape functions formulation with its weak form is developed using variational method. The essential boundary conditions are enforced by Langrange multipliers. The proposed EFG formulation gives comparable results, after been verified by analytical solution, thus signify its application in partial interaction problems. Based on numerical test results, the Cubic Spline and Quartic Spline weight functions yield better accuracy for the EFG formulation, compares to other proposed weight functions.

  4. Degree of conversion, depth of cure, and color stability of experimental dental composite formulated with camphorquinone and phenanthrenequinone photoinitiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo A C; Bertolo, Marcusv L; Cavalcante, Larissa M A; Pfeifer, Carmem; Schneider, Luis F S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the applicability of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) in experimental dental composites. Camphorquinone (CQ), PQ, ethyl 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDMAB) and diphenyliodonium salt (DPI) were employed. A mixture of 2,2-bis(4-[2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy]phenyl)-propane/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (60:40%) and silanated glass filler at 60% were used. A two-peak-based light-emitting diode (LED) was used. The photoinitiator absorption and the light emission spectra were determined by a Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Relative photon absorption (RPabs) was calculated. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis was used to determine the degree of conversion (DC). The optical properties were determined with a spectrophotometer. Depth of cure was assessed from adapted International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049. Results were analyzed with descriptive analysis, analysis of variance, and Tukey's test (α = 5%). PQ showed higher RPabs than CQ. Regarding the DC, CQ + EDMAB (control), CQ + EDMAB + DPI, PQ + DPI, and PQ + EDMAB + DPI produced statistically similar results. Groups formulated with CQ presented higher depth of cure. Only the group formulated with CQ + EDMAB presented satisfactory color stability (ΔE < 3.3). PQ presented higher RPabs than CQ and it was able to produce DC similar to CQ + EDMAB, when used with DPI. However, groups formulated with PQ produced lower depth of cure, greater yellowing, and less color stability than the traditional combination CQ and amine. Although research with novel photoinitiator systems should be encouraged, the traditional camphorquinone and amine pair remains as a reliable combination for the formulation of dental composites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Finite element analysis of composite concrete-timber beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. S. FORTI

    Full Text Available AbstractIn the search for sustainable construction, timber construction is gaining in popularity around the world. Sustainably harvested wood stores carbon dioxide, while reforestation absorbs yet more CO2. One technique involves the combination of a concrete slab and a timber beam, where the two materials are assembled by the use of flexible connectors. Composite structures provide reduced costs, environmental benefits, a better acoustic performance, when compared to timber structures, and maintain structural safety. Composite structures combine materials with different mechanical properties. Their mechanical performance depends on the efficiency of the connection, which is designed to transmit shear longitudinal forces between the two materials and to prevent vertical detachment. This study contributes with the implementation of a finite element formulation for stress and displacement determination of composite concrete-timber beams. The deduced stiffness matrix and load vector are presented along to numerical examples. Numerical examples are compared to the analytical equations available in Eurocode 5 and to experimental data found in the literature.

  6. Depth of Cure of Proximal Composite Restorations using a New Perforated Metal Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    DoD  or  the  USUHS.   Chair /Department  Head  Approval**   Name  (Last,  First,  Middle  Initial)    Motyka, Nancy, C...FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.mll "The author hereby certifies that the...buccal and lingual light curing, or a transparent (Composi-Tight 3D Clear matrix, Garrison Dental Solutions, Spring Lake, MI) sectional matrix system

  7. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface : A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Pers, N.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with

  8. Effect of light-curing unit and adhesive system on marginal adaptation of class v composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia-Casseli, Denise S; Faria-e-Silva, André L; Cavalcanti, Andréa N; Romani, Eliene A O N; Martins, Luis R M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units (LED or halogen) on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations performed with etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive. Class V cavities were prepared on bovine teeth with the gingival margin on dentin and the incisal margin on enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid resin composite using an etch-and-rinse (Single Bond 2--SB) or a self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond--CL). The light-activations were performed using halogen lamp (Optilux 501--QTH) or second-generation light-emitting diode (Radii-Cal--LED) (n = 10). After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed under scanning electronic microscopy with 500x of magnification. The greatest gap width at each margin was recorded. Data were submitted to Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (a = 0.05). SB and CL showed similar behavior of enamel margins when the light-activations were performed with QTH. The same was observed for dentin margins with LED. When the LED was used, higher gap measurements at enamel margins were observed with CL, while higher gap values in dentin were observed for SB within QTH. No significant difference between substrates was found when CL was used. However, SB had significantly higher gap measurements in dentin. The light-curing unit seems to affect the marginal adaptation of resin composite restorations. However this effect was dependent on the adhesive and the location of the margin.

  9. Degree of conversion and temperature increase of a composite resin light cured with an argon laser and blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, A. N. S.; Jacomassi, D. P.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-12-01

    Different light sources and power densities used on the photoactivation process may provide changes in the degree of conversion (DC%) and temperature ( T) of the composite resins. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the DC (%) and T (°C) of the microhybrid composite resin (Filtek™ Z-250, 3M/ESPE) photoactivated with one argon laser and one LED (light-emitting diode) with different power densities. For the KBr pellet technique, the composite resin was placed into a metallic mould (2-mm thickness, 4-mm diameter) and photoactivated as follows: a continuous argon laser (CW) and LED LCUs with power density values of 100, 400, 700, and 1000 mW/cm2 for 20 s. The measurements for DC (%) were made in a FTIR spectrometer Bomen (model MB 102, Quebec, Canada). Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra for both uncured and cured samples were analyzed using an accessory of the reflectance diffusion. The measurements were recorded in absorbance operating under the following conditions: 32 scans, 4 cm-1 resolution, 300 to 4000-cm-1 wavelength. The percentage of unreacted carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1638 cm-1) against an internal standard before and after the curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1608 cm-1). For T (°C), the samples were created in a metallic mould (2-mm thickness, 4-mm diameter) and photoactivated for 20 s. The thermocouple was attached to the multimeter allowing temperature readings. The DC (%) and T (°C) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test ( p units.

  10. General dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of resin-based composite restorations and light curing unit technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A; Turner, S

    2011-09-23

    Clinical successful use of resin-based composite restorations (RBCs) depends on knowledge of material and light curing unit (LCU) related factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate general dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of RBCs and LCU technology. Members of the Active Research Group of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) in England, Scotland and Wales engaged in primary dental care were sent a letter introducing the study and asking for their cooperation, followed by an email containing a link to the online survey questionnaire, hosted on Surveymonkey.com. The questionnaire enquired about current LCUs, and asked a series of questions on material science. Sixty-six percent of the 274 members contacted responded. Fifty-seven percent used LED units, 25% quartz tungsten halogen (QTH), and 1% plasma arc (missing: 17%). Thirty percent reported having access to a radiometer. Appropriate responses regarding the degree of conversion of composite and adhesive materials were given by 32% and 23% respectively, and 22% agreed that LED and QTH LCUs had comparable efficiency in polymerising composites. Thirty-three percent were aware that RBCs eluted substances that may have adverse local or systemic consequences. Fifty-eight percent stated that if polymerisation of RBC is slowed down, polymerisation stress will be lower, and 43% said that polymerisation shrinkage will be reduced if the degree of conversion is reduced. Knowledge (measured by appropriate responses to these questions) was not related to years since qualification (r=-0.05, n=168, p=0.53). The study suggests that dentists' knowledge of curing RBC restorations and LCUs is poor. This indicates that there is a need for training and guidance in this aspect of primary dental care.

  11. Degree of conversion and hardness of a silorane-based composite resin: effect of light-curing unit and depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, S A S; Silva, G C; Maria, D A; Campos, W R C; Magalhães, C S; Moreira, A N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different light-curing units and depths on the degree of conversion (DC) through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) of a silorane-based composite resin (Filtek LS, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) (LS). LS specimens mounted in a particular designed matrix were photoactivated by three light-cure units (LCUs) at depths of 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm. The DC was determined in a FTIR spectrometer with an attenuated total reflectance accessory. The KHN was measured in an automatic microhardness tester. The results were analyzed using the Friedman and Spearman statistical tests (α=0.05). There was no effect of LCUs on the DC (p=0.472) or KHN (p=0.174) for all of the studied depths. The highest DC and KHN means were found at 2-mm depth, which were not statistically different from 3-mm depth, but were higher than 4-mm and 5-mm depths (p=0.007). Spearman analysis found a positive linear correlation between the variables KHN and DC (r=0.858, p<0.000). The LCUs' effect was not verified. Values of DC and KHN for LS decreased with increasing depth. The highest values for both DC and KHN were obtained at depths of 2-3 mm.

  12. Effect of curing light emission spectrum on the nanohardness and elastic modulus of two bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Yaser; Watts, David C; Boyd, Daniel; Price, Richard B

    2016-04-01

    To determine the nanohardness and elastic moduli of two bulk-fill resin based composites (RBCs) at increasing depths from the surface and increasing distances laterally from the center after light curing. Two bulk-fill dental RBCs: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TECBF) and Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable (FBFF) were light cured in a metal mold with a 6mm diameter and a 10mm long semi-circular notch. The RBCs were photo-polymerized for 10s using a light emitting diode (LED) Bluephase Style curing light, with the original light probe that lacked the homogenizer. This light has two blue light and one violet light LED emitters. By changing the probe orientation over the mold, the light output from only two LEDs reached the RBC. Measurements were made using: (i) the light from one violet and one blue LED, and (ii) the light from the two blue LEDs. Five specimens of each RBC were made using each LED orientation (total 20 specimens). Specimens were then stored in the dark at 37°C for 24h. Fifty indents were made using an Agilent G200 nanoindentor down to 4mm from the surface and 2.5mm right and left of the centerline. The results were analyzed (alpha=0.05) using multiple paired-sample t-tests, ANOVA, Bonferroni post-hoc tests, and Pearson correlations. The elastic modulus and nanohardness varied according to the depth and the distance from the centerline. For TECBF, no significant difference was found between the spatial variations in the elastic modulus or hardness values when violet-blue or blue-blue LEDs were used. For FBFF, the elastic modulus and nanohardness on the side exposed to the violet emitter were significantly less than the side exposed to the blue emitter. A strong correlation between nanohardness and elastic modulus was found in all groups (r(2)=0.9512-0.9712). Resin polymerization was not uniform throughout the RBC. The nanohardness and elastic modulus across two RBC materials were found to decline differently according to the orientation of the violet and blue

  13. Influence of curing profile and fibre architecture on the fatigue resistance of composite materials for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fibre reinforced epoxy is found to be highly dependent on the manufacturing conditions, where a low manufacturing temperature, for the investigated wind turbine relevant composite material system, is found to improve the tension/tension fatigue life......-ray computer tomography. Thereby, it has been found during ex-situ fatigue studies, that the fatigue failure mechanism is highly influenced by transverse cracking in the so-called backing bundles which is present in order to ease the handling during the dry fabric layup during wind turbine blade manufacturing....... It is a failure mechanism which is judge to be highly influenced by the magnitude of the residual stresses exhibit in the matrix material and therefore also in the secondary oriented backing bundles. Using fibre Bragg grated optical fibres2; the build-up of the cure-induced strains in the fibre-reinforcement has...

  14. Influence of light-curing unit systems on shear bond strength and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fernandes Sassi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different photopolymerization (halogen, halogen soft-start and LED systems on shear bond strength (SBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. Forty Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins were prepared for microleakage assessment, and 160 enamel and dentin fragments were prepared for the SBS test, and divided into 4 groups. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests showed statistically significant difference in microleakage between the margins (p 0.05 neither between substrates nor among groups. It was concluded that Soft-Start technique with high intensity end-light influenced negatively the cervical marginal sealing, but the light-curing systems did not influence adhesion.

  15. Impact of Material Shade and Distance from Light Curing Unit Tip on the Depth of Polymerization of Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-E-Silva, André L; Fanger, Christopher; Nguyen, Lillian; Howerton, Demetri; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the composite shade and distance from the light-curing unit (LCU) tip on the irradiance reaching the bottom of composite disks and on the depth of polymerization. Composites of three shades (opaque - OXDC, bleach - BXL, and A2) were inserted into molds with 3-mm of thickness positioned over a spectrometer and photo-activated with the LCU (Bluephase) tip placed at 0 or 1 cm from the composite surface. The mean irradiance reaching the bottom of composite was recorded during the entire photo-activation (30 s). Specimens (2 x 2 x 4 mm) were polymerized and used to map the degree of conversion achieved in different depths from irradiated surface. Specimens were sectioned into slices that were positioned over the platform of the infra-red microscope connected to the spectrometer to map the conversion. The conversion was measured in eight different depths every 500-µm. Increasing the distance of LCU tip reduced the irradiance only for A2. Interposing OXDC disks resulted in lowest values of irradiance and A2 the highest one. A tendency to decrease the conversion was observed towards the bottom of specimens for all experimental conditions, and the slope was more accentuated for OXDC. Differences among shades and distances from LCU tip were evident only beyond 1.5-2.0 mm of depth. In conclusion, both composite shade and distance from LCU tip might affect the light-transmission and depth of polymerization, while the effect of last was more pronounced.

  16. Wear behavior of light-cured resin composites with bimodal silica nanostructures as fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Bao, Shuang; Liu, Fengwei; Jiang, Xiaoze; Zhang, Qinghong; Sun, Bin; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-12-01

    To enhance wear behavior of resin composites, bimodal silica nanostructures including silica nanoparticles and silica nanoclusters were prepared and proposed as fillers. The silica nanoclusters, a combination of individually dispersed silica nanoparticles and their agglomerations, with size distribution of 0.07-2.70 μm, were fabricated by the coupling reaction between amino and epoxy functionalized silica nanoparticles, which were obtained by the surface modification of silica nanoparticles (~70 nm) using 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane (GPS) as coupling agents, respectively. Silica nanoparticles and nanoclusters were then silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) to prepare composites by mixing with bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA) and tri (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). Experimental composites with various filler compositions were prepared and their wear behaviors were assessed in this work. The results suggested that composites with increasing addition of silica nanoparticles in co-fillers possessed lower wear volume and smoother worn surface. Particularly, the composite 53:17 with the optimum weight ratio of silica nanoparticles and silica nanoclusters presented the excellent wear behavior with respect to that of the commercial Esthet-X, although the smallest wear volume was achieved by Z350 XT. The introduction of bimodal silica nanostructures as fillers might provide a new sight for the design of resin composites with significantly improved wear resistance. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  17. Energy-absorbing-beam design for composite aircraft subfloors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Huey D.; Kellas, Sotiris

    1993-01-01

    Data have been presented from the design support testing of composite energy absorbing (EA) aircraft subfloor structures. The focus of the current study is the design and testing of subfloor structural concepts that would limit the loads transmitted to occupants to less than 20 g at crush speeds of approximately 30 fps. The EA composite subfloor is being designed to replace an existing noncrashworthy metallic subfloor in a composite aircraft prior to a full-scale crash test. A sandwich spar construction of a sine wave beam was chosen for evaluation and was found to have excellent energy absorbing characteristics. The design objective of obtaining sustained crushing loads of the spar between 200-300 lbf/inch were achieved for potentially limiting occupants loads to around 20 g's. Stroke efficiency of up to 79 percent of the initial spar height under desired sustained crushing loads was obtained which is far greater than the level provided by metal structure. Additionally, a substantial residual spar stiffness was retained after impact, and the flange integrity, which is critical for seat retention, was maintained after crushing of the spars.

  18. Optimizing light-cured composite through variations in camphorquinone and butylhydroxytoluene concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    NASSAR, Hani; CHU, Tien-Min; PLATT, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of a free-radical polymerization inhibitor, butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), and a common photo-initiator, camphorquinone (CQ), to reduce polymerization stress in dental composite was investigated in this study. Samples were prepared by mixing Bis-GMA, UDMA, and TEGDMA at a 1:1:1 ratio (wt%), and silanized borosilicate glass fillers at 70 wt% were added to form the composite. Sixteen groups of resin composite were prepared using combinations of four CQ (0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) ...

  19. Micro-tensile bond strength of solely self-cured composite cement onto dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Thais Yumi Umeda; Santos, PH; De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate bonding effectiveness of a new experimental composite cement to dentin in terms of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) after 1week (‘immediate’) and 6month (‘aged’) artificial aging. Flat ground dentin of 32 human molars was prepared using 600-grit SiC paper. Selfmade composite blocks (Clearfil AP-X,Kuraray Noritake) were bonded to flat dentin surfaces using 4 composite cements: Exp. HPC100 (Kuraray Noritake), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem 2 and RelyX Ultimate ...

  20. Evaluation of effect of different disposable infection control barriers on light intensity of light-curing unit and microhardness of composite - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khode, Rajiv Tarachand; Shenoi, Pratima Ramakrishna; Kubde, Rajesh R; Makade, Chetana S; Wadekar, Kanchan D; Khode, Priyanka Tarachand

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated effect of infection control barriers on light intensity (LI) of light-curing unit (LCU) and microhardness of composite. Four different disposable barriers ( n = 30) were tested against the control. LI for each barrier was measured with Lux meter. One hundred and fifty Teflon molds were equally divided into five groups of thirty each. Composite was filled in bulk in these molds and cured without and with barrier. Microhardness was evaluated on top and bottom surface of composite specimen with microhardness testing machine and hardness ratio (HR) was derived. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey's honestly significant difference test, and paired t -test using SPSS version 18 software. All barriers had significantly reduced the baseline LI of LCU ( P glove pieces (LCGP) significantly reduced the microhardness of the composite ( P < 0.05). However, HR determined inadequate curing only with LCGP. Although entire tested barrier significantly reduced the LI; none, except LCGP markedly affected the degree of cure of the composite.

  1. Radiation-curing of acrylate composites including carbon fibres: A customized surface modification for improving mechanical performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Arnaud; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Ponsaud, Philippe; Kowandy, Christelle; Barczak, Mariusz; Defoort, Brigitte; Coqueret, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured acrylate-based composites reinforced with carbon-fibre with respect to the thermosettable analogues was investigated from the viewpoint of chemical interactions at the interface between the matrix and the carbon material. XPS analysis of representative commercial carbon fibres revealed the presence of a significant amount of chemical functions potentially exerting an adverse effect on the initiation and propagation of the free radical polymerization initiated under high energy radiation. The EB-induced polymerization of n-butyl acrylate as a simple model monomer was conducted in the presence of various aromatic additives exhibiting a strong inhibiting effect, whereas thiols efficiently sensitize the initiation mechanism and undergo transfer reactions. A method based on the surface modification of sized fibres by thiomalic acid is proposed for overcoming the localized inhibition phenomenon and for improving the mechanical properties of the resulting acrylate-based composites. - Highlights: • Surface functions of C-fibres are analyzed for their effect on radical reaction. • Irradiation of nBu-acrylate in presence of aromatic additives reveals inhibition. • Thiol groups sensitize the radiation-initiated polymerization of nBu-acrylate. • Modification of C-fibres with thiomalic acid enhances composite properties

  2. Long Out-time, Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the size of composite parts exceed that of even the largest autoclaves, new out-of-autoclave processes and materials are necessary to achieve the same level of...

  3. Long Out-time, Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the size of composite parts exceed that of even the largest autoclaves, new out-of-autoclave processes and materials are necessary to achieve the same level of...

  4. Long Out-time, Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the size of composite parts exceed that of even the largest autoclaves, new out-of-autoclave processes and materials are necessary to achieve the same level of...

  5. Nonlinear Vibrations of 3D Laminated Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stoykov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A model for 3D laminated composite beams, that is, beams that can vibrate in space and experience longitudinal and torsional deformations, is derived. The model is based on Timoshenko’s theory for bending and assumes that, under torsion, the cross section rotates as a rigid body but can deform longitudinally due to warping. The warping function, which is essential for correct torsional deformations, is computed preliminarily by the finite element method. Geometrical nonlinearity is taken into account by considering Green’s strain tensor. The equation of motion is derived by the principle of virtual work and discretized by the p-version finite element method. The laminates are assumed to be of orthotropic materials. The influence of the angle of orientation of the laminates on the natural frequencies and on the nonlinear modes of vibration is presented. It is shown that, due to asymmetric laminates, there exist bending-longitudinal and bending-torsional coupling in linear analysis. Dynamic responses in time domain are presented and couplings between transverse displacements and torsion are investigated.

  6. Composition and characterization of in situ usable light cured dental drug delivery hydrogel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakó, József; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kovácsné, Ildikó Bácskay; Borbíró, István; Bíró, Tamás; Borbély, János; Hegedűs, Csaba

    2013-03-01

    Biodegradable polymers are compatible, permeable and nontoxic, thus they can provide a useful tool for drug delivery or tissue engineering. These polymers can form hydrogels, which are suitable vehicles for different types of materials e.g. drugs, bioactive molecules or cells. In the case of dentistry, photopolymerization is an obvious method to obtain in situ useable devices which can provide a more efficient way of tailoring drug release. A hydrogel system was developed based on poly-gamma-glutamic acid that was modified with methacryloyl groups to achieve this purpose. The resulting new reactive structure was proved by NMR spectroscopy. The swelling ratio of this type of hydrogel has been found remarkable, over 300 % after 24 h, and it can release 5 ng/mm(2) metronidazole. The prepared hydrogels were nontoxic as viability, cytotoxicity tests and cell morphology investigations proved it. These results render this model system an excellent candidate for use as an in situ curing local drug delivery device. The new photoactive system can be utilized in the treatment of periodontal diseases or raising the effectiveness of drugs used only in the minimal effective dose.

  7. From Composition to Cure: A Systems Engineering Approach to Anticancer Drug Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2017-06-06

    The molecular complexity and heterogeneity of cancer has led to a persistent, and as yet unsolved, challenge to develop cures for this disease. The pharmaceutical industry focuses the bulk of its efforts on the development of new drugs, but an alternative approach is to improve the delivery of existing drugs with drug carriers that can manipulate when, where, and how a drug exerts its therapeutic effect. For the treatment of solid tumors, systemically delivered drug carriers face significant challenges that are imposed by the pathophysiological barriers that lie between their site of administration and their site of therapeutic action in the tumor. Furthermore, drug carriers face additional challenges in their translation from preclinical validation to clinical approval and adoption. Addressing this diverse network of challenges requires a systems engineering approach for the rational design of optimized carriers that have a realistic prospect for translation from the laboratory to the patient. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Numerical Analysis of the Resistance and Stiffness of the Aluminium and Concrete Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a numerical analysis of the resistance and stiffness of the aluminium and concrete composite beam is presented. Composite aluminium and concrete structures are quite new and they have not been thoroughly tested. Composite structures have a lot of advantages. The composite aluminium and concrete beam is more corrosion-resistant, fire-resistant and stiff than the aluminium beam. The contemporary idea of sustainable buildings relies on new solutions which are more environmentally friendly. Aluminium is lighter and more resistant to corrosion than steel, which is often used in composite structures.

  9. Radiation sources EB and UV curing machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes electron beam processors and related technologies for curing applications to facilitate those industrial personals who are trying to understand and evaluate the applicability and benefits of radiation curing to their products. 4 tabs., 10 figs

  10. Cantilever-beam dynamic modulus for wood composite products. Part 1, apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Turk; John F. Hunt; David J. Marr

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever-beam vibration-testing apparatus has been developed to provide a means of dynamic and non-destructive evaluation of modulus of elasticity for small samples of wood or wood-composite material. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam and then releases the beam into its natural first-mode vibration and records displacement as a...

  11. [Evaluation of porosity in the restorations of light-cured resin composite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-yi; Zhang, Wu; Lee, Sean; Roggenkamp, Clyde; Lu, Mei; Li, Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the consistency of resin composite and insertion techniques on the homogeneity of the Class I restorations. Standardized Class I cavities were prepared in polymethyl methyacrylate (PMMA) blocks and restored with three resin composites (Prodigy, Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric Ceram HB) using either a packing or an injection technique by six operators. Then the restorations were sectioned longitudinally and inspected for the presence of porosities and voids with microscope. The consistence of the three resins was tested using an area method. There is little porosity in original resin. After insertion, large numbers of porosities were observed in restorations, with Tetric EvoCeram presented much more porosities (1137.1 +/- 365.0 for packing and 566.1 +/- 206.4 for injection) than Prodigy (241.0 +/- 116.1, 195.8 +/- 28.7) and Tetric Ceram HB (193.1 +/- 35.8, 156.3 +/- 33.0). Tetric Ceram HB showed the highest consistency, followed by Tetric EvoCeram and Prodigy. No linear correlation was found between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. For Tetric EvoCeram, the restorations inserted with packing showed significant more porosity than that with injection. Contrastively, the restorations of Prodigy or Tetric Ceram HB presented no apparent difference for the two filling techniques. The porosity in restoration was primarily created during the insertion. There was no linear correlation between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. The porosity of composite resin is material-brand dependent. The influence of filling techniques on the porosity of restoration is depending on the composite used.

  12. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  13. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  14. Full in-vitro analyses of new-generation bulk fill dental composites cured by halogen light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Tuçe Hazal; Kantürk Figen, Aysel; Yılmaz Atalı, Pınar; Coşkuner Filiz, Bilge; Pişkin, Mehmet Burçin

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the full in-vitro analyses of new-generation bulk-fill dental composites cured by halogen light (HLG). Two types' four composites were studied: Surefill SDR (SDR) and Xtra Base (XB) as bulk-fill flowable materials; QuixFill (QF) and XtraFill (XF) as packable bulk-fill materials. Samples were prepared for each analysis and test by applying the same procedure, but with different diameters and thicknesses appropriate to the analysis and test requirements. Thermal properties were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis; the Vickers microhardness (VHN) was measured after 1, 7, 15 and 30days of storage in water. The degree of conversion values for the materials (DC, %) were immediately measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The surface morphology of the composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) analyses. The sorption and solubility measurements were also performed after 1, 7, 15 and 30days of storage in water. In addition to his, the data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, and both the Newman Keuls and Tukey multiple comparison tests. The statistical significance level was established at p<0.05. According to the ISO 4049 standards, all the tested materials showed acceptable water sorption and solubility, and a halogen light source was an option to polymerize bulk-fill, resin-based dental composites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rail Shear and Short Beam Shear Properties of Various 3-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    14 Fig. 9 Load vs. deflection curves from short beam shear experiments ..........17 Fig. 10 Short beam shear specimens cracking in tension on...Walter et al.17 Fig. 10 Short beam shear specimens cracking in tension on the bottom of the specimen Approved for public release; distribution is...unlimited. 19 Fig. 11 Short beam shear specimens cracking as viewed from the side While the 2-D base composite produced a widespread

  16. Optimizing light-cured composite through variations in camphorquinone and butylhydroxytoluene concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Hani; Chu, Tien-Min; Platt, Jeffrey

    2016-05-20

    The use of a free-radical polymerization inhibitor, butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), and a common photo-initiator, camphorquinone (CQ), to reduce polymerization stress in dental composite was investigated in this study. Samples were prepared by mixing Bis-GMA, UDMA, and TEGDMA at a 1:1:1 ratio (wt%), and silanized borosilicate glass fillers at 70 wt% were added to form the composite. Sixteen groups of resin composite were prepared using combinations of four CQ (0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) and four BHT (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) concentrations. For each group, six properties were tested, including flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), degree of conversion (DC), contraction stress (CS), stress rate, and gel point (GP). The effects of CQ and BHT combinations on each of these properties were evaluated using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's Protected Least Significant Differences test at the 5% significance level. Groups with low CQ and BHT showed moderate values for FS, FM, and CS with a 70% DC. Increasing the BHT concentration caused a decrease in CS and DC with an increase in GP values. Increasing the CQ content led to a steady increase in values for FS and FM. High CQ and BHT combinations showed the most promising values for mechanical properties with low stress values.

  17. Optimizing light-cured composite through variations in camphorquinone and butylhydroxytoluene concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani NASSAR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of a free-radical polymerization inhibitor, butylhydroxytoluene (BHT, and a common photo-initiator, camphorquinone (CQ, to reduce polymerization stress in dental composite was investigated in this study. Samples were prepared by mixing Bis-GMA, UDMA, and TEGDMA at a 1:1:1 ratio (wt%, and silanized borosilicate glass fillers at 70 wt% were added to form the composite. Sixteen groups of resin composite were prepared using combinations of four CQ (0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% and four BHT (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% concentrations. For each group, six properties were tested, including flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, degree of conversion (DC, contraction stress (CS, stress rate, and gel point (GP. The effects of CQ and BHT combinations on each of these properties were evaluated using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Fisher’s Protected Least Significant Differences test at the 5% significance level. Groups with low CQ and BHT showed moderate values for FS, FM, and CS with a 70% DC. Increasing the BHT concentration caused a decrease in CS and DC with an increase in GP values. Increasing the CQ content led to a steady increase in values for FS and FM. High CQ and BHT combinations showed the most promising values for mechanical properties with low stress values.

  18. The elution and breakdown behavior of constituents from various light-cured composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevkusic, Marija; Schuster, Lena; Rothmund, Lena; Dettinger, Katharina; Maier, Moritz; Hickel, Reinhard; Van Landhuyt, Kirsten L; Durner, Jürgen; Högg, Christof; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2014-06-01

    Constituents of dental composites can be released from dental fillings after polymerization. The aim of this study was to examine the time-related elution and breakdown of separable constituents of polymerized composites using deuterated solvents. Elution and breakdown of constituents were investigated with deuterated solvents methanol and water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of following composites for 180 days: Filtek™ Supreme XT, Filtek™ Supreme XT Flow, Tetric Ceram(®), Tetric Flow(®), Grandio(®), Grandio(®) Flow. Within 180 days no compounds were formed as the products of breakdown. 19 compounds were identified as elution products: Bis-EMA, TEGDMA, DDDMA, EGDMA, MAA, BPA, CQ, HQME, DMABEE, CSA, BL, TEG, BHT, TINP, TPP, TPSB, DEDHTP, DCHP, ß-PHEA. The highest concentration of Bis-EMA was measured for Tetric Flow(®) in deuterated methanol on day 90 at 36.993mmol/l and in deuterated water also on day 90 at 0.031mmol/l. The highest TEGDMA concentrations were measured for Grandio(®) Flow in deuterated methanol on day 60 at 1.322mmol/l and for Filtek™ Supreme XT Flow in deuterated water on day 3 at 0.689mmol/l. The highest BPA concentration was measured for Tetric Flow(®) in deuterated methanol on day 90 at 1.469mmol/l. The highest BPA concentration was measured for Grandio(®) in deuterated water on day 180 at 0.007mmol/l. Significance Examination of time-related elution indicates that various elution products (e.g. Bis-EMA, BPA) were only released in small quantities during the first 90 days, but in high quantities between day 90 and day 180. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural aspects of cold-formed steel section designed as U-shape composite beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggaff, Anis; Tahir, Mahmood Md.; Azimi, Mohammadamin; Alhajri, T. M.

    2017-11-01

    Composite beam construction usually associated with old-style Hot-Rolled Steel Section (HRSS) has proven to act much better in compare with Cold-Formed Steel Section (CFSS) sections due to thicker section. Due, it's getting popular to replace HRSS with CFSS in some aspects as a composite beam. The advantages such as lightweight, cost effective and easy to install have contributed to the apply CFSS as a preferred construction material for composite beam. There is a few technical data available regarding the application of the usage of CFSS as a composite system, despite the potentials use for residential and light-weight industrial constructions. This paper presents an experimental tests results which have been conducted using CFSS as composite beam. Composite action of CFSS arranged as double beam with Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) slab are integrated together with bolted shear connectors were used. A full-scale test comprised of 3 proposed composite beam specimens with bolted shear connector spaced at 300 mm interval of grade 8.8 was using single nut with washer on flange of CFS, cast to the slab and loaded until failed. The test show that the bolted shear connector yielded better capacity of ultimate strength and ultimate moment for the proposed composite beam. It can be concluded that, bolted shear connectors of 16 mm in diameter performed better than the other diameter size of bolted shear connectors.

  20. Strengthening Performance of PALF-Epoxy Composite Plate on Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Siew C.; Tong, Foo S.; Doh, Shu I.; Gimbun, Jolius; Ong, Huey R.; Serigar, Januar P.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effective strengthening potential of pineapple leaves fiber (PALF)-epoxy composite plate on reinforced concrete (RC) beam. At first the PALF is treated with alkali (NaOH) and its morphology is observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM). The composite plates made of PALF and epoxy with fiber loading ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 v/v was tested for its flexural behaviour. The composite was then used for external RC beam strengthening. The structural properties of RC beams were evaluated and all the beams were tested under four-point bending. It was found that the flexural strength increased as the fiber volume ratio increases. The maximum flexural strength (301.94 MPa) was obtained at the fiber volume ratio of 40%. The beam strengthened with PALF-epoxy composite plate has a 7% higher beam capacity compared to the control beam. Cracks formed at the edge of the plate of PALF-strengthened beams resulted in diagonal cracking. Result from this work shows that the PALF-epoxy composite plate has the potential to be used as external strengthening material for RC beam.

  1. Degree of conversion of micro-hybrid, nano-hybrid and Ormocer composites using LED and QTH light-curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Mostafa Fatemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC of three types of composite resins (micro-hybrid, nano-hybrid and Ormocer with different light curing units (LED LCU and QTH LCU in two depths.Materials and Methods: Three commercially available dental resin composites were used in this study: (Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein-A2 shade, (Tetric Evoceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein-A2 shade, (Ceram X, Dentsply, Germany-M2 shade. Specimens were divided into two groups, 5 specimens were photo-activated by QTH unit (Coltolux 75-Colten and the other five specimens were cured by LED (Demi-Kerr. Then each specimen was sectioned at the top surface and at 2-mm depth. The DC was measured by FT-IR(Bruker-tensor 27. The data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA test.Results: There was significant difference between tested composite resins (P<0.001. The results of top surfaces were significantly different from those observed at 2-mm depth (P<0.001. The type of curing unit affected the polymerization of Ceram X resin composite.Conclusion: This study showed a significant difference in the degree of conversion in different thicknesses within three groups of resin composites.

  2. Industrial application of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials

  3. Surface composition of biomedical components by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Materials used for replacement body parts must satisfy a number of requirements such as biocompatibility and mechanical ability to handle the task with regard to strength, wear and durability. When using a CVD coated carbon fibre reinforced carbon ball, the surface must be ion implanted with uniform dose of nitrogen ions in order to make it wear resistant. The mechanism by which the wear resistance is improved is one of radiation damage and the required dose of about 10 16 cm -2 can have a tolerance of about 20%. To implant a spherical surface requires manipulation of the sample within the beam and control system (either computer or manually operated) to enable uniform dose all the way from polar to equatorial regions on the surface. A manipulator has been designed and built for this purpose. In order to establish whether the dose is uniform, nuclear reaction analysis using the reaction 14 N(d,α) 12 C is an ideal method of profiling. By taking measurements at a number of points on the surface, the uniformity of nitrogen dose can be ascertained. It is concluded that both Rutherford Backscattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis can be used for rapid analysis of surface composition of carbon based materials used for replacement body components. 2 refs., 2 figs

  4. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  5. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  6. The potential of dielectric analysis as an on-line cure monitoring technique in the manufacture of advanced fibre reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlhagger, A.T.

    2002-02-01

    Composite manufacturing processes such as RTM, are being developed in the aerospace industry in order to promote and reduce the cost of advanced fibre reinforced composites. The aerospace industry has identified the need for a cure monitoring system to be utilised in this production, to improve the efficiency and reliability of processing. The system must be able to determine through-thickness properties of the composite, on-line and without affecting the integrity of the finished component. Literature has shown that a number of techniques are available but these do not address all of the requirements of industry. The most important process parameters in RTM are the resin flow, point of minimum viscosity, gelation and subsequent completion of cure. These 'key cure parameters' are often difficult to control accurately in the manufacturing environment. Although dielectric analysis has been around for many years, literature identified an urgent requirement for research on the interpretation of dielectric sensor data relating to these main process parameters. A dielectric laboratory instrument, operated in the parallel plate sensor configuration was utilised to simulate a standard RTM cure cycle. The important transitions in the resin, namely minimum viscosity, gelation, vitrification and completion of cure, were identified. The parallel plate dielectric technique was applied to composites containing conductive and non-conductive reinforcement fibres. The appropriate dielectric signals and frequency were determined based on the sensor configuration, insulating layer and resin/fabric type. Correlations have been demonstrated between dielectric results and other established thermal (DSC and. DMA) and mechanical test techniques (tensile, flexural and interlaminar shear). Test methods were designed and investigated to provide information to compare with dielectric data. The parallel plate configuration was used to investigate the effect of composite thickness variation on

  7. Mechanical Characterization of In and Out-of-Autoclave Cured Composite Panels for Large Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Lerch, Bradley A.; Wilmoth, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Two manufacturing demonstration panels (1/16th-arc-segments of 10 m diameter cylinder) were fabricated under the composites part of the Lightweight Space Structures and Materials program. Both panels were of sandwich construction with aluminum core and 8-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy facesheets. One of the panels was constructed with in-autoclave curable unidirectional prepreg (IM7/977-3) and the second with out-of-autoclave unidirectional prepreg (T40-800B/5320-1). Following NDE inspection, each panel was divided into a number of small specimens for material property characterization and a large (0.914 m wide by 1.524 m long) panel for a buckling study. Results from the small specimen tests were used to (a) assess the fabrication quality of each 1/16th arc segment panel and (b) to develop and/or verify basic material property inputs to Finite Element analysis models. The mechanical performance of the two material systems is assessed at the coupon level by comparing average measured properties such as flatwise tension, edgewise compression, and facesheet tension. The buckling response of the 0.914 m wide by 1.524 m long panel provided a comparison between the in- and out-of autoclave systems at a larger scale.

  8. Numerical simulation on behaviour of timber-concrete composite beams in fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hao; Hu, Xiamin; Zhang, Bing; Minli, Yao

    2017-08-01

    This paper established sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical models of timber--concrete composite (TCC) beams by finite element software ANSYS to investigate the fire resistance of TCC beam. Existing experimental results were used to verify the coupled thermal-mechanical model. The influencing parameters consisted of the width of timber beam, the thickness of the concrete slab and the timber board. Based on the numerical results, the effects of these parameters on fire resistance of TCC beams were investigated in detail. The results showed that modeling results agreed well with test results, and verified the reliability of the finite element model. The width of the timber beam had a significant influence on the fire resistance of TCC beams. The fire resistance of TCC beams would be enhanced by increasing the width of timber beam, the thickness of concrete slab and the timber board.

  9. Torsional Strengthening of RC Beams Using GFRP Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Paresh V.; Jariwala, Vishnu H.; Purohit, Sharadkumar P.

    2016-09-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer as an external reinforcement is used extensively for axial, flexural and shear strengthening in structural systems. The strengthening of members subjected to torsion is recently being explored. The loading mechanism of beams located at the perimeter of buildings which carry loads from slabs, joists and beams from one side of the member generates torsion that are transferred from the beams to the columns. In this work an experimental investigation on the improvement of the torsional resistance of reinforced concrete beams using Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) is presented. Total 24 RC beams have been cast in this work. Ten beams of dimension 150 mm × 150 mm × 1300 mm are subjected to pure torsion while fourteen beams of 150 mm × 150 mm × 1700 mm are subjected to combined torsion and bending. Two beams in each category are designated as control specimen and remaining beams are strengthened by GFRP wrapping of different configurations. Pure torsion on specimens is applied using specially fabricated support mechanism and universal testing machine. For applying combined torsion and bending a loading frame and test set up are fabricated. Measurements of angle of twist at regular interval of torque, torsion at first crack, and ultimate torque, are obtained for all specimens. Results of different wrapping configurations are compared for control and strengthened beams to suggest effective GFRP wrapping configuration.

  10. Experimental testing of a self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam using FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Hao, Qingduo; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    A new kind of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP)-concrete composite beam, which consists of a FRP box beam combined with a thin layer of concrete in the compression zone, was developed by using two embedded FBG sensors in the top and bottom flanges of FRP box beam at mid-span section along longitudinal direction, respectively. The flexural behavior of the proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam was experimentally studied in four-point bending. The longitudinal strains of the composite beam were recorded using the embedded FBG sensors as well as the surfacebonded electric resistance strain gauges. Test results indicate that the FBG sensors can faithfully record the longitudinal strain of the composite beam in tension at bottom flange of the FRP box beam or in compression at top flange over the entire load range, as compared with the surface-bonded strain gauges. The proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam can monitor its longitudinal strains in serviceability limit state as well as in strength limit state, and will has wide applications for long-term monitoring in civil engineering.

  11. Vibration Properties of a Steel-PMMA Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A steel-polymethyl methacrylate (steel-PMMA beam was fabricated to investigate the vibration properties of a one-dimensional phononic crystal structure. The experimental system included an excitation system, a signal acquisition system, and a data analysis and processing system. When an excitation signal was exerted on one end of the beam, the signals of six response points were collected with acceleration sensors. Subsequent signal analysis showed that the beam was attenuated in certain frequency ranges. The lumped mass method was then used to calculate the bandgap of the phononic crystal beam to analyze the vibration properties of a beam made of two different materials. The finite element method was also employed to simulate the vibration of the phononic crystal beam, and the simulation results were consistent with theoretical calculations. The existence of the bandgap was confirmed experimentally and theoretically, which allows for the potential applications of phononic crystals, including wave guiding and filtering, in integrated structures.

  12. Vibration Properties of a Steel-PMMA Composite Beam

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yuyang; Jin, Xiaoxiong

    2015-01-01

    A steel-polymethyl methacrylate (steel-PMMA) beam was fabricated to investigate the vibration properties of a one-dimensional phononic crystal structure. The experimental system included an excitation system, a signal acquisition system, and a data analysis and processing system. When an excitation signal was exerted on one end of the beam, the signals of six response points were collected with acceleration sensors. Subsequent signal analysis showed that the beam was attenuated in certain fre...

  13. The Effect of Bulk Depth and Irradiation Time on the Surface Hardness and Degree of Cure of Bulk-Fill Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahat F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: For many years, application of the composite restoration with a thickness less than 2 mm for achieving the minimum polymerization contraction and stress has been accepted as a principle. But through the recent development in dental material a group of resin based composites (RBCs called Bulk Fill is introduced whose producers claim the possibility of achieving a good restoration in bulks with depths of 4 or even 5 mm. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of irradiation times and bulk depths on the degree of cure (DC of a bulk fill composite and compare it with the universal type. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on two groups of dental RBCs including Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill and Tetric N Ceram Universal. The composite samples were prepared in Teflon moulds with a diameter of 5 mm and height of 2, 4 and 6 mm. Then, half of the samples in each depth were cured from the upper side of the mould for 20s by LED light curing unit. The irradiation time for other specimens was 40s. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water, the microhardness of the top and bottom of the samples was measured using a Future Tech (Japan- Model FM 700 Vickers hardness testing machine. Data were analyzed statistically using the one and multi way ANOVAand Tukey’s test (p = 0.050. Results: The DC of Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill in defined irradiation time and bulk depth was significantly more than the universal type (p < 0.001. Also, the DC of both composites studied was significantly (p < 0.001 reduced by increasing the bulk depths. Increasing the curing time from 20 to 40 seconds had a marginally significant effect (p ≤ 0.040 on the DC of both bulk fill and universal studied RBC samples. Conclusions: The DC of the investigated bulk fill composite was better than the universal type in all the irradiation times and bulk depths. The studied universal and bulk fill RBCs had an appropriate DC at the 2 and 4 mm bulk depths respectively and

  14. Cracking and Strain Analysis of Beams Reinforced with Composite Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Timinskas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of experimental and numerical modelling using two beams reinforced with GFRP bars. One beam was made of plain concrete while the other contained short steel fibres. The influence of steel fibres on deflection and cracking behaviour was studied. A comparative analysis of experimental results has shown that steel fibres significantly reduce deflections and average crack width of the beam. Moreover, an addition of steel fibres to the concrete mix led to a more ductile failure mode of the beam. Numerical analysis employing nonlinear finite element software ATENA has revealed that a good agreement between calculated and experimental results regarding an ordinary concrete GFRP reinforced beam can be obtained.

  15. Shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear and if ECC can partially or fully replace the conventional transverse steel reinforcement in beams. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the fibers affect the shear carrying capacity and deformation behavior of structural members if used either...... in combination with conventional transverse reinforcement or exclusively to provide shear resistance. The experimental investigation focuses on the influence of fibers on the shear caring capacity and the crack development in ECC beams subjected to shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short...... randomly distributed PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber beams with different stirrup spacing and reinforced concrete (RC) beams for comparison. Displacement and strain measurements taken using the ARAMIS photogrammetric data acquisition system by means of processing at high frame rate captured images of applied...

  16. Influence of light source and extended time of curing on microhardness and degree of conversion of different regions of a nanofilled composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; de Andrade, Kamila Menezes Guedes; da Cruz Alves, Louise Esther; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Mitsui, Fábio Hiroyuki Ogata

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light sources and curing time on the degree of conversion and microhardness of two surfaces within a nanofilled composite resin. Four experimental groups (n=10) were formed in accordance with the light source (quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH - 600mW/cm(2)), or light-emitting-diode (LED - 800mW/cm(2))) and the time of curing (20 s or 40 s). The specimens were prepared with a circular mould (5 mm ∅ and 2 mm thick), according to the respective protocol, and the Knoop microhardness and degree of conversion was measured at the top and the base of the specimens. The degree of conversion was evaluated by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results were analyzed by ANOVA two-way repeated measures and Tukey's test (α=,05). Both the degree of conversion and microhardness were higher at the top than at the bottom of the specimens. The QTH light source presented better values on the degree of conversion evaluation, but this result was not observed in the microhardness evaluation. Although forty seconds of curing promotes an increased level of microhardness, it did not influence the degree of conversion. It could be concluded that increasing the time of curing to 40 s promotes an increase in microhardness, but it does not influence the degree of conversion of a nanofilled composite resin. QTH promote better monomeric conversion; however, the microhardness values are similar to LED curing. For all situations tested, the bottom of the specimens presented lower results than the top.

  17. Buckling of composite beams with two enveloped delaminations: Lower and upper bounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlapalli, M.S.R. Pathi; Shu, Dongwei; Chai, Gin B.

    2008-01-01

    Lower and upper bounds of the buckling load of a composite beam with two enveloped delaminations are obtained from newly developed analytical models. The characteristic equation, governing the delamination buckling is derived by using Euler–Bernoulli beam and classical lamination theory, performing

  18. In-service performance evaluation and monitoring of a hybrid composite beam bridge system : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The hybrid composite beam (HCB) technology has been presented as a system for short and medium span beam bridges as an alternative to traditional materials such as concrete and steel. An HCB consists of a concrete tied arch encased in a fiber reinfor...

  19. Radiation cured epoxy acrylate composites based on graphene, graphite oxide and functionalized graphite oxide with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqiang; Bao, Chenlu; Song, Lei; Qian, Xiaodong; Yuan, Bihe; Hu, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Epoxy acrylate (EA) composites containing graphite oxide (GO), graphene and nitrogen-double bond functionalized graphite oxide (FGO) were fabricated using UV-radiation and electron beam radiation via in-situ polymerization. Graphene and FGO were homogenously dispersed in EA matrix and enhanced properties, including thermal stability, flame retardancy, electrical conductivity and reduced deleterious gas releasing in thermo decomposition were obtained. Microscale combustion colorimeter results illustrated improved flame retardancy; EA/FGO composites achieved a 29.7% reduction in total heat release (THR) when containing only 0.1% FGO and a 38.6% reduction in peak-heat release rate (PHRR) when containing 3% FGO. The onset decomposition temperatures were delayed and the maximum decomposition values were reduced, according to thermogravimetric analysis which indicated enhanced thermal stabilities. The electrical conductivity was increased by 6 orders of magnitude (3% graphene) and the deleterious gas released during the thermo decomposition was reduced with the addition of all the graphite samples. This study represented a new approach to functionalize GO with flame retardant elements and active curable double bond to achieve better dispersion of GO into polymer matrix to obtain nanocomposites and paved a way for achieving graphene-based materials with high-performance of graphene in enhancement of flame retardancy of polymers for practical applications.

  20. Volatile compounds and odor traits of dry-cured ham (Prosciutto crudo) irradiated by electron beam and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qiulian; Yan, Weiqiang; Yue, Ling; Chen, Zhijun; Wang, Haihong; Qi, Wenyuan; He, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Prosciutto crudo samples were irradiated at 0, 3 and 6 kGy by gamma rays (GR) and electron beam (EB), respectively. The odor scores and volatile compounds were examined after 7 days storage at 4 °C. Volatile compounds from samples without and with irradiation at 6 kGy were analyzed by GC-MS. Fifty-nine compounds were identified, including terpenes, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, alkanes, esters, aromatic hydrocarbons and acids. Both GR and EB irradiation resulted in formation of (Z)-7-Hexadecenal, cis-9-hexadecenal, tetradecane, E-9-tetradecen-1-ol formate, and losing of hexadecamethyl-heptasiloxane and decanoic acid-ethyl ester in hams. However, GR irradiation caused additional changes, such as formation of undecane and phthalic acid-2-cyclohexylethyl butyl ester, significantly higher level of 1-pentadecene, and losing of (E, E)-2,4-decadienal and octadecane. EB was shown to be better in maintaining ham's original odor than GR. Our results suggest that EB irradiation is a promising method for treatment of ready to eat hams as it exerts much less negative effect on the flavor of hams compared to GR irradiation.

  1. Real-time synchronous measurement of curing characteristics and polymerization stress in bone cements with a cantilever-beam based instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagummi, Sri Vikram; Landis, Forrest A.; Chiang, Martin Y. M.

    2018-03-01

    An instrumentation capable of simultaneously determining degree of conversion (DC), polymerization stress (PS), and polymerization exotherm (PE) in real time was introduced to self-curing bone cements. This comprises the combination of an in situ high-speed near-infrared spectrometer, a cantilever-beam instrument with compliance-variable feature, and a microprobe thermocouple. Two polymethylmethacrylate-based commercial bone cements, containing essentially the same raw materials but differ in their viscosity for orthopedic applications, were used to demonstrate the applicability of the instrumentation. The results show that for both the cements studied the final DC was marginally different, the final PS was different at the low compliance, the peak of the PE was similar, and their polymerization rates were significantly different. Systematic variation of instrumental compliance for testing reveals differences in the characteristics of PS profiles of both the cements. This emphasizes the importance of instrumental compliance in obtaining an accurate understanding of PS evaluation. Finally, the key advantage for the simultaneous measurements is that these polymerization properties can be correlated directly, thus providing higher measurement confidence and enables a more in-depth understanding of the network formation process.

  2. Light energy transmission and Vickers hardness ratio of bulk-fill resin based composites at different thicknesses cured by a dual-wave or a single-wave light curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Naaman, Reem Khalil; Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed

    2017-04-01

    To quantify light energy transmission through two bulk-fill resin-based composites and to measure the top to bottom surface Vickers hardness ratio (VHratio) of samples of various incremental thicknesses, using either a single-wave or dual-wave light curing unit (LCU). Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TECBF) and SonicFill (SF) were studied. Using MARC-RC, the irradiance delivered to the top surface of the samples 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm thick (n= 5 for each thickness) was adjusted to 800 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds (16 J/cm2) using either a single-wave, Bluephase or a dual-wave, Bluephase G2 LCUs. Light energy transmission through to the bottom surface of the specimens was measured at real time using MARC-RC. The Vickers hardness (VH) was determined using Vickers micro hardness tester and the VHratio was calculated. Data were analyzed using a general linear model in Minitab 16; α= 0.05. TECBF was more translucent than SF (Pcured with the dual-wave Bluephase G2). SF showed significantly higher VH ratio than TECBF at all different thickness levels (P 0.05). TECBF showed significantly greater VH ratio when cured with the single-wave Bluephase than when using the dual-wave Bluephase G2 (Plight energy through to the bottom surface and the VHratio are material dependent. Although TECBF is more translucent than SF, it showed lower VHratio compared to SF when cured with dual-wave Bluephase G2.

  3. Energy composition of high-energy neutral beams on the COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mitošinková, Klára; Stöckel, Jan; Varju, Jozef; Weinzettl, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2016), s. 419-423 ISSN 0029-5922. [Summer School of Plasma Diagnostics PhDiaFusion 2015: “Soft X-ray Diagnostics for Fusion Plasma”. Bezmiechowa, 16.06.2015-20.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021; GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * neutral beam injection (NBI) * Doppler effect * beam composition * beam composition Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2016 http://www.ichtj.waw.pl/nukleonikaa/?p=1256

  4. Study of improved resins for advanced supersonic technology composites. Part 1: Heteroaromatic polymers containing ether groups. Part 2: Curing chemistry of aromatic polymers and composite studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekoshi, T.; Hillig, W. B.; Mellinger, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Fourteen ether-containing, aromatic dianhydrides have been synthesized from N-phenyl-3 or 4-nitrophthalimide and various bisphenols. The process involves nucleophilic displacement of activated nitro groups with bisphenolate ions. Ether-containing dianhydrides were indefinitely stable in the presence of atmospheric moisture. One-step, high temperature solution polymerization of the ether-containing dianhydrides with m-phenylene diamine, 4,4'-oxydianiline and 1, 3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene afforded 42 polyetherimides. The polyetherimides were all soluble in m-cresol except two which were found to be crystalline. The glass transition temperatures of the polyetherimides ranged from 178 to 277 C. Soluble polybenzimidazopyrrolones containing ether groups were also prepared from the same ether-containing dianhydrides and aromatic tetraamines by one-step solution polymerization. Using low molecular weight polyetherimides, various thermoset resin systems were developed and tested as matrices for fiber-reinforced composites. The curing chemistry involving reaction of the phthalonitrile group and the o-diaminophenyl group was found to be generally applicable to crosslinking various aromatic polymers other than polyimides.

  5. Fatigue testing of wood-concrete composite beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Currently, wood-concrete composite structural members are usually applied in building structures. There are a relatively small number (in the low 100s) of known bridge applications involving wood-concrete composites. A problem with using these novel ...

  6. Effect of energy density on low-shrinkage composite resins: diode-pumped solid state laser versus quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young-Joon; Lee, Geun-Ho; Park, Jeong-Kil; Ro, Jung-Hoon; García-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of energy density on the polymerization of low-shrinkage composite resins. The number of photons needs to initiate the polymerization process can be controlled by light intensity and curing time through the form of energy density. For the study, two methacrylate-based (Premise [PR] and Venus Diamond [VE]) and one silorane-based (Filtek LS [LS]) composite resins were light cured using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) light-curing unit (LCU) and a 473 nm diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser. Degree of conversion (DC), microhardness, refractive index, and polymerization shrinkage were evaluated under different energy densities. Through the study, the feasibility of DPSS laser as a light source was tested as well. LS showed the highest DC and refractive index both on the top and bottom surfaces, and the least polymerization shrinkage among the tested specimens. For the same or similar energy density, QTH and DPSS showed insignificant DC difference (p>0.05). On the other hand, for microhardness, except for one case at the bottom surface, QTH and DPSS showed significant difference (punit.

  7. Preliminary experimental study on the electrical impedance analysis for in-situ monitoring of the curing of carbon/epoxy composite material for aeronautical and aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguerès, Philippe; Camps, Thierry; Viargues, Mathieu; Olivier, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    This paper concerns the electrical characterization of T700/M21 unidirectional composite materials using sensors developed specifically for this study. It proposes a reliable and reproducible protocol for the characterization of the material during curing. Prior to the characterization, an analysis was carried out to assess the impact of parasitic access elements (resistance of the electrode/fibre interface or of the feed wire), which was reduced to a minimum by appropriate dimensioning of the electrodes. A study of the electrical conduction in relation to the direction of the fibres made it possible to establish a suitable approach to homogenized measurement of the material. Thermo-electric coupling by self-heating was also evaluated, with a view to obtaining measurements that were not influenced by this phenomenon. Finally, the use of electrical impedance spectral analysis allowed in-situ monitoring of the curing process. The results obtained are compared with those of a rheological analysis of the same material. These results highlight the value of the proposed protocol and demonstrate that, with the aid of these sensors, complete automation of the manufacturing process of composite structures is feasible (optimization of the cure cycle by real-time automatic control).

  8. A unit-cell model of textile composite beams for predicting stiffness properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Marrey, Ramesh V.

    1993-01-01

    Flexural stiffness properties of a textile composite beam are obtained from a finite-element model of the unit cell. Three linearly independent deformations, namely, pure extension, pure bending and pure shear, are applied to the unit cell. The top and bottom surfaces of the beam are assumed to be traction free. Periodic boundary conditions on the lateral boundaries of the unit cell are enforced by multi-point constraint elements. From the forces acting on the unit cell, the flexural stiffness coefficients of the composite beam are obtained. The difficulties in determining the transverse shear stiffness are discussed, and a modified approach is presented. The methods are first verified by applying them to isotropic and bimaterial beams for which the results are known, and then illustrated for a simple plain-weave textile composite.

  9. Deployment Testing of Flexible Composite Hinges in Bi-Material Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Jonathan F.; Trease, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Composites have excellent properties for strength, thermal stability, and weight. However, they are traditionally highly rigid, and when used in deployable structures require hinges bonded to the composite material, which increases complexity and opportunities for failure. Recent research in composites has found by adding an elastomeric soft matrix, often silicone instead of an epoxy, the composite becomes flexible. This work explores the deployment repeatability of silicone matrix composite hinges which join rigid composite beams. The hinges were found to have sub-millimeter linear deployment repeatability, and sub-degree angular deployment repeatability. Also, an interesting relaxation effect was discovered, as a hinges deployment error would decrease with time.

  10. Modeled and Measured Dynamics of a Composite Beam with Periodically Varying Foam Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Schiller, Noah H.; Roberts Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a sandwich beam with carbon fiber composite facesheets and foam core with periodic variations in material properties are studied. The purpose of the study is to compare finite element predictions with experimental measurements on fabricated beam specimens. For the study, three beams were fabricated: one with a compliant foam core, a second with a stiffer core, and a third with the two cores alternating down the length of the beam to create a periodic variation in properties. This periodic variation produces a bandgap in the frequency domain where vibrational energy does not readily propagate down the length of the beam. Mode shapes and natural frequencies are compared, as well as frequency responses from point force input to velocity response at the opposite end of the beam.

  11. Determining shear modulus of thin wood composite materials using a cantilever beam vibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Haicheng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Shear modulus (G) of thin wood composite materials is one of several important indicators that characterizes mechanical properties. However, there is not an easy method to obtain this value. This study presents the use of a newly developed cantilever beam free vibration test apparatus to detect in-plane G of thin wood composite...

  12. Clinical long-term success of contemporary nano-filled resin composites in class I and II restorations cured by LED or halogen light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Torsten; Kranz, Stefan; Montag, Regina; Güntsch, Arndt; Völpel, Andrea; Mills, Robin; Jandt, Klaus; Sigusch, Bernd

    2017-10-28

    The use of LED light-curing units (LED LCUs) for polymerising resin-based composite restorations has become widespread throughout dentistry. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of clinical longitudinal studies that evaluate the comparative efficacy of LED-based polymerisation in direct posterior composite restorations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of class I and II resin composite restorations for two successful composite restorative materials cured with LED versus halogen LCUs. One hundred restorations were placed using the nano-filled composites Grandio® or Filtek™ Supremé. The following test groups were established: LED-Grandio® n = 23 (LG), LED-Filtek™ Supremé n = 21 (LS). As controls were used: Halogen-Grandio® n = 28 (HG), Halogen-Filtek™ Supremé n = 28 (HS). All restorations were evaluated according to the clinical criteria of the CPM index (C-criteria) at baseline and after 6, 12 and 36 months. After 12 and 36 months, there were no significant differences between restorations polymerised with LED or halogen light. At the end of the study, 97% of the restorations showed sufficient results regardless of the employed LCU or composite. Globally, after 36 months, 56% of all restorations were assessed with code 0 (excellent) and 41% with code 1 (acceptable). In detail, excellent results (code 0) among the criteria surface quality; marginal integrity and marginal discoloration were assigned in 72, 70 and 69%. For the current limitations in the clinical trial design, the results showed that LED-polymerisation is appropriate to ensure clinical success of direct posterior resin composite restorations in a range of 3 years. The choice of LCU has no significant influence on the clinical performance of posterior direct resin composite restorations within 3 years of wear.

  13. Comparative Effect of Self- or Dual-Curing on Polymerization Kinetics and Mechanical Properties in a Novel, Dental-Resin-Based Composite with Alkaline Filler. Running Title: Resin-Composites with Alkaline Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Ilie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental bulk-fill restorations with resin-composites (RBC are increasing in popularity, but doubts concerning insufficient curing in depth still disconcert clinicians. An alternative might be offered by modern dual-cured RBCs, which additionally provide bioactive properties. This study assessed the impact of additional light-curing on polymerization kinetics, the degree of conversion (DC and mechanical properties of a novel, dual-cured RBC with alkaline fillers. Since the bioactivity of a material often implies a release of compounds, the mechanical stability in simulated clinical environments was also evaluated. Polymerization kinetics and DC were assessed at 2- and 4-mm specimen depths in real-time up to one hour (n = 6. Incident and transmitted irradiance and radiant exposure were recorded at 2- and 4-mm depths. Micro-mechanical profiles (n = 6 were assessed in 100-µm steps along 6-mm deep specimens at 24 h post-polymerization. Flexural strength and modulus (n = 10 were determined up to three months of immersion in neutral (6.8 and acidic (4 pH conditions. DC variation in time was best described by a sigmoidal function (R2 > 0.98, revealing a retarded (3.4 ± 0.4 min initiation in C=C double bond conversion in self-cured versus dual-cured specimens. The setting reaction kinetic was identical at 2- and 4-mm depths for the self-cure mode. For the dual-cure mode, polymerization initiated at 2-mm depth instantly with light-irradiation, while being retarded (0.8 min at 4-mm depth. The material behaves similarly, irrespective of curing mode or depth, later than 11 min after mixing. Flexural strength and modulus was comparable to regular RBCs and maintained up to three months in both neutral and acidic conditions. Additional light-curing initially accelerates the polymerization kinetic and might help shorten the restauration procedure by hardening the material on demand, however with no effect on the final properties.

  14. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M. A.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2007-10-01

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing.

  15. Effect of activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and low-viscosity composite liners on bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and application of low-viscosity composite liners over self-primed dentin on bond strength (BS) of dentin-bonding agents (DBA). Three DBA (Single Bond; Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond), their respective resin cements (RelyX ARC and Panavia F) and two low-viscosity composites (Filtek Flow and Protect Liner F) were tested. After removing the buccal enamel surfaces of 25 bovine incisors, each flat dentin surface was sectioned longitudinally and divided into two similar parts. The dentin surfaces were wet-abraded with 600-grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 10 groups. Experimental groups comprised the use of DBA and their respective dual-cured resin cements, with or without light-activation of resin cements. The low-viscosity resin was used only for the self-etching systems, Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5mm high and 0.75mm diameter) were built on each bonded dentin surface, using a tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24h, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Light-activation of resin cements resulted in significantly higher BS for all DBA versus groups in which the resin cements were allowed to self-cure. The low-viscosity composite application increased the BS only for Prompt L-Pop. The bond strength of resin cements to dentin is reduced if light-activation is not employed. The use of a low-viscosity composite liner resulted in improved bond strength only for the single-step self-etching adhesive.

  16. Influence of cavity preparation, light-curing units, and composite filling on intrapulpal temperature increase in an in vitro tooth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S H; Roulet, J F; Heintze, S D; Park, S H

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of both the tooth substance and restorative filling materials on the increase in pulp chamber temperature when using light-curing units with different power densities. The tip of a temperature sensor was positioned on the pulpal dentinal wall of the buccal side of a maxillary premolar. Metal tubes were inserted in the palatal and buccal root of the tooth, one for water inflow and the other for water outflow. Polyethylene tubes were connected from the metal tubes to a pump to control the flow rate. For the unprepared tooth group (group 1), the tooth was light-cured from the buccal side using two light-curing units (three curing modes): the VIP Junior (QTH, BISCO, Schaumburg, IL, USA) and the Bluephase LED light-curing units (two modes: LEDlow and LEDhigh; Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein). The power densities of each light-curing unit for the LEDlow, QTH, and LEDhigh modes were 785 mW/cm(2), 891 mW/cm(2), and 1447 mW/cm(2), respectively. All light-curing units were activated for 60 seconds. For the prepared tooth group (group 2), a Class V cavity, 4.0 mm in width by 4.0 mm in height by 1.8 mm in depth in size, was prepared on the buccal surface of the same tooth for the temperature measurement. The light-curing and temperature measurements were performed using the same methods used in group 1. The cavity prepared in group 2 was filled with a resin composite (Tetric N Ceram A3 shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) (group 3) or a flowable composite (Tetric N Flow with A3 shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) (group 4). The light-curing and temperature measurements were performed for these groups using the same methods used for the other groups. The highest intrapulpal temperature (TMAX) was measured, and a comparison was conducted between the groups using two-way analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test at the 95% confidence level. The TMAX values were as follows: 38.4°C (group 1), 39.0°C (group 2), 39.8°C (group 3), and 40.3°C (group 4) for the

  17. Analysis and seismic tests of composite shear walls with CFST columns and steel plate deep beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Xu, Fangfang

    2013-12-01

    A composite shear wall concept based on concrete filled steel tube (CFST) columns and steel plate (SP) deep beams is proposed and examined in this study. The new wall is composed of three different energy dissipation elements: CFST columns; SP deep beams; and reinforced concrete (RC) strips. The RC strips are intended to allow the core structural elements — the CFST columns and SP deep beams — to work as a single structure to consume energy. Six specimens of different configurations were tested under cyclic loading. The resulting data are analyzed herein. In addition, numerical simulations of the stress and damage processes for each specimen were carried out, and simulations were completed for a range of location and span-height ratio variations for the SP beams. The simulations show good agreement with the test results. The core structure exhibits a ductile yielding mechanism characteristic of strong column-weak beam structures, hysteretic curves are plump and the composite shear wall exhibits several seismic defense lines. The deformation of the shear wall specimens with encased CFST column and SP deep beam design appears to be closer to that of entire shear walls. Establishing optimal design parameters for the configuration of SP deep beams is pivotal to the best seismic behavior of the wall. The new composite shear wall is therefore suitable for use in the seismic design of building structures.

  18. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  19. Composite structures of steel and concrete beams, slabs, columns, and frames for buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R P

    2008-01-01

    This book sets out the basic principles of composite construction with reference to beams, slabs, columns and frames, and their applications to building structures. It deals with the problems likely to arise in the design of composite members in buildings, and relates basic theory to the design approach of Eurocodes 2, 3 and 4.The new edition is based for the first time on the finalised Eurocode for steel/concrete composite structures.

  20. Relationship of Cure Temperature to Mechanical, Physical, and Dielectric Performance of PDMS Glass Composite for Electric Motor Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Becker, Kathleen; Williams, Tiffany S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Heimann, Paula J.; Ring, Andrew; Woodworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Achieving NASAs aggressive fuel burn and emission reduction for N-plus-3 aircraft will require hybrid electric propulsion system in which electric motors driven by either power generated from turbine or energy storage system will power the fan for propulsion. Motors designed for hybrid electric aircraft are expected to operate at medium to high voltages over long durations in a high altitude service environment. Such conditions have driven research toward the development of wire insulation with improved mechanical strength, thermal stability and increased breakdown voltage. The silicone class of materials has been considered for electric wire insulation due to its inherent thermal stability, dielectric strength and mechanical integrity. This paper evaluates the dependence of these properties on the cure conditions of a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) elastomer; where both cure temperature and base-to-catalyst ratio were varied. The PDMS elastomer was evaluated as a bulk material and an impregnation matrix within a lightweight glass veil support. The E-glass support was selected for mechanical stiffness and dielectric strength. This work has shown a correlation between cure conditions and material physical properties. Tensile strength increased with cure temperature whereas breakdown voltage tended to be independent of process variations. The results will be used to direct material formulation based on specific insulation requirements.

  1. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/ clay nano composites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, A.M.; Mansor Ahmad; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Rida Tajau; Wan Mohd Zin Wan Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/ clay nano composites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4 ' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5 % wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nano composites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nano clay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Angstrom, while the structure morphology of the nano composites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nano composites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nano composites was significantly increased by incorporation of nano clay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the T g was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nano composites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nano composites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA. (author)

  2. Comparison of Wood Composite Properties Using Cantilever-Beam Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Lujing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Wood-based composite panels generally are first tested out-of-plane in the primarypanel directionfollowed by the cross panel direction, but rarely edgewise. While most applications use wood-based composites in the flat-wise orientation and only need the out-of-plane properties, there are construction configurations where edgewise properties are needed for improved...

  3. Multi-material topology optimization of laminated composite beam cross sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Stolpe, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    , penalization, and filtering schemes have been extended to accommodate any number of anisotropic materials. The methodology is applied to the optimal design of several laminated composite beams with different cross sections. Solutions are presented for a minimum compliance (maximum stiffness) problem......This paper presents a novel framework for simultaneous optimization of topology and laminate properties in structural design of laminated composite beam cross sections. The structural response of the beam is evaluated using a beam finite element model comprising a cross section analysis tool which...... is suitable for the analysis of anisotropic and inhomogeneous sections of arbitrary geometry. The optimization framework is based on a multi-material topology optimization model in which the design variables represent the amount of the given materials in the cross section. Existing material interpolation...

  4. A Numerical Analysis of the Resistance and Stiffness of the Timber and Concrete Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szumigała Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a numerical analysis of the load capacity and stiffness of the composite timber and concrete beam. Timber and concrete structures are relatively new, they have not been thoroughly tested and they are rarely used because of technological constraints. One of the obstacles to using them is difficulty with finding a method which would allow successful cooperation between concrete and timber, which has been proposed by the authors of the present article. The modern idea of sustainable construction design requires the use of new more environmentally-friendly solutions. Wood as an ecological material is easily accessible, less energy-consuming, and under certain conditions more corrosion-resistant than steel. The analysis presented in the article showed that cooperation between a wooden beam and a concrete slab on profiled steel sheeting is possible. The analysed composite beam has a greater load capacity and stiffness than the wooden beam.

  5. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi, E-mail: paryanto-ds@yahoo.com; Sugiman,; Saputra, Yudhi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Mataram, Mataram, West Nusa Tenggara (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  6. Flexural Behavior of RC Members Using Externally Bonded Aluminum-Glass Fiber Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns improvement of flexural stiffness/strength of concrete members reinforced with externally bonded, aluminum-glass fiber composite (AGC beams. An experimental program, consisting of seven reinforced concrete slabs and seven reinforced concrete beams strengthened in flexure with AGC beams, was initiated under four-point bending in order to evaluate three parameters: the cross-sectional shape of the AGC beam, the glass fiber fabric array, and the installation of fasteners. The load-deflection response, strain distribution along the longitudinal axis of the beam, and associated failure modes of the tested specimens were recorded. It was observed that the AGC beam led to an increase of the initial cracking load, yielding load of the tension steels and peak load. On the other hand, the ductility of some specimens strengthened was reduced by more than 50%. The A-type AGC beam was more efficient in slab specimens than in beam specimens and the B-type was more suitable for beam specimens than for slabs.

  7. Effect of high intensity vs. soft-start halogen irradiation on light-cured resin-based composites. Part I. Temperature rise and polymerization shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Norbert; Markert, Tanja; Hugo, Burkard; Klaiber, Bernd

    2003-12-01

    To determine polymerization shrinkage kinetics and temperature rise of light-cured resin-based composites after high intensity vs. soft-start quartz tungsten halogen irradiation. Shrinkage kinetics was evaluated using the "deflecting disk technique", modified for simultaneous measurement of temperature within the resin-based composite using a thermocouple. Additional irradiations after 60 and 65 minutes allowed the determination of temperature rises caused by radiation or by reaction heat. Four hybrids (Filtek Z250, Herculite, Solitaire 2, Tetric Ceram), an inhomogeneously filled hybrid (InTen-S) and a microfill (Filtek A110, formerly Silux Plus) were cured using the quartz tungsten halogen units Astralis 10 and Optilux 501 in the high intensity (A10 HiPo: 10 seconds at 1300 mW/cm2; OL Boost: 10 seconds at 1140 mW/cm2) or soft-start modes (A10 Pulse: increase to 700 mW/cm2 within 10 seconds, three periods of 2 seconds at 1300 mW/cm2 alternating with two periods of 2 seconds at 700 mW/cm2; OL Ramp: exponential increase within 10 seconds, followed by 10 seconds at 1140 mW/cm2). The soft-start protocols produced less contraction, and polymerization shrinkage started later and progressed slower (or: more slowly), compared to high intensity irradiation [correction]. The lowest shrinkage was observed for InTen-S, followed by Filtek Z250 and A110, whereas Solitaire 2, Herculite and Tetric Ceram scored highest for this parameter. Temperature rise was caused more or less equally by radiation and by reaction heat and reached values of up to 28.9 degrees C relative to a baseline of 37 degrees C. For some combinations of curing modes and resin-based composites, less heat was generated by the soft-start protocols and by Optilux 501.

  8. Corrosion Protection Properties of Nano NH₂-Reduced Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Composite Coatings Formed by Self-Curing on Magnesium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Han, Yongqin; Bai, Ruiqin; Liu, Xin

    2018-07-01

    Nano NH2-reduced graphene oxide (NGO) and NGO/epoxy resin coatings were prepared, respectively. NGO/epoxy coating was successfully coated on magnesium alloy substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the composition and morphology of NGO and composite coatings. The effect of the content of NGO on the corrosion protection performance of coatings was evaluated with electrochemical measurements in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions. Tafel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed that an optimal addition amount of 0.3 wt.% NGO provided the superior corrosion protection properties. The composite coatings exhibited outstanding barrier properties against aggressive species compared to pure epoxy coating. The self-curing reaction of amine and epoxy radicals could produce the compact cross-linking reticular structure. This self-curing reaction was a nucleophilic addition, and amine radical preferred to bond the (b) site of graphene sheets due to the lowest Gibbs free energy. The cross-linking structure and some polar groups could act as a good reservoir for corrosive medium via absorption and fixation.

  9. The irradiation curing of coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, T.

    1974-01-01

    The electron beam irradiation curing of coatings has been technically feasible for over a decade. A brief description of the process is presented. The progress in this field has been astonishingly slow in comparison with the use of UV lamps as radiation source. The primary reason for this has been the great advantage in terms of capital cost of the UV curing lines and their ready adaptability to low or high production rates. A literature survey is given concerning basic and applied research in the electron curing area, patents, economics and existing installations around the world. (author)

  10. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum based epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visakh, P.M.; Nazarenko, O.B.; Sarath Chandran, C.; Melnikova, T.V.; Nazarenko, S.Yu.; Kim, J.-C.

    2017-01-01

    The epoxy resins are widely used in nuclear and aerospace industries. The certain properties of epoxy resins as well as the resistance to radiation can be improved by the incorporation of different fillers. This study examines the effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy composites filled with aluminum nanoparticles at percentage of 0.35 wt%. The epoxy composites were exposed to the irradiation doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy using electron beam generated by the linear electron accelerator ELU-4. The effects of the doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The results revealed that the studied epoxy composites showed good radiation resistance. The thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites increased with increasing the irradiation dose up to 100 kGy and decreased with further increasing the dose. - Highlights: • The effects of electron beam irradiation on aluminum/epoxy composites were studied. • Changes in thermal and mechanical properties were analyzed. • Irradiation improved the thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum/epoxy composites up to dose of 100 kGy. • The aluminum/epoxy composites appeared more stable to irradiation than the neat epoxy polymer.

  11. Composite optical vortices in noncollinear Laguerre–Gaussian beams and their propagation in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ke; Liu Pusheng; Lü Baida

    2008-01-01

    Taking two Laguerre—Gaussian beams with topological charge l = ± 1 as an example, this paper studies the composite optical vortices formed by two noncollinear Laguerre—Gaussian beams with different phases, amplitudes, waist widths, off-axis distances, and their propagation in free space. It is shown by detailed numerical illustrative examples that the number and location of composite vortices at the waist plane are variable by varying the relative phase β, amplitude ratio η, waist width ratio ζ, or off-axis distance ratio μ. The net topological charge l net is not always equal to the sum l sum of charges of the two component beams. The motion, creation and annihilation of composite vortices take place in the free-space propagation, and the net charge during the propagation remains unchanged and equals to the net charge at the waist plane

  12. The Use of Sprint Interface Element Delamination Simulation of Sandwich Composite Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Geng; Yan, Renjun

    2017-10-01

    Sandwich composite beams have been more and more used in various industries because of their excellent mechanical properties. However, the mismatched performance between face sheet and foam core always lead to such as cracks and damages in the core or face/core interface during the processes of manufacturing or service. Delamination damage at the adhesive interface is the most dangerous and could be one main source that the mechanical capability of the structure is serous degenerated. In this paper, a simple and natural model to evaluate the stiffness of the spring interface elements, which is based on the physics and the geometry of the adhesive layers, is proposed. In order to validate the model, cantilever beam bending test were conducted for marine sandwich composite I-beam. A good comparison has been found between predictions and experimental results, and results indicate that the spring interface element can provide an efficient model for the delamination simulation of sandwich composite structures.

  13. Optimum Design of Composite Corrugated Web Beams Using Hunting Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Erdal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years there has been sustainable development in the steel and composite construction technology. One of the recent additions to such developments is the I-girders with corrugated web beams. The use of these new generation beams results in a range of benefits, including flexible, free internal spaces and reduced foundation costs. Corrugated web beams are built-up girders with a thin-walled, corrugated web and wide plate flanges. The thin corrugated web affords a significant weight reduction of these beams, compared with hot-rolled or welded ones. In this paper, optimum design of corrugated composite beams is presented. A recent stochastic optimization algorithm coded that is based on hunting search is used for obtaining the solution of the design problem. In the optimisation process, besides the thickness of concrete slab and studs, web height and thickness, distance between the peaks of the two curves, the width and thickness of flange are considered as design variables. The design constraints are respectively implemented from BS EN1993-1:2005 (Annex-D, Eurocode 3 BS-8110 and DIN 18-800 Teil-1. Furthermore, these selections are also carried out such that the design limitations are satisfied and the weight of the composite corrugated web beam is the minimum.

  14. Maximum stiffness and minimum weight optimization of laminated composite beams using continuous fiber angles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Stolpe, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with identification of optimal fiber orientations and laminate thicknesses in maximum stiffness and minimum weight design of laminated composite beams. The structural response is evaluated using beam finite elements which correctly account for the influence of the fiber orientation...... and cross section geometry. The resulting finite element matrices are significantly smaller than those obtained using equivalent finite element models. This modeling approach is therefore an attractive alternative in computationally intensive applications at the conceptual design stage where the focus...... and laminate thicknesses in the design of slender laminated composite structures....

  15. Blue-Light Transmittance of Esthetic Monolithic CAD/CAM Materials With Respect to Their Composition, Thickness, and Curing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, B; Awad, D; Ilie, N

    2016-01-01

    Determining the amount of blue light (360-540nm) passing through nine monolithic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials depends on material thickness, initial irradiance, and the distance between the curing unit and the specimen's surface. A total of 180 specimens of two thicknesses (1 mm and 2 mm, n=10/subgroup) were fabricated from TelioCAD, VITA CAD-Temp (VCT), experimental nanocomposite, LAVA Ultimate (LU), VITA ENAMIC (VE), VITA MarkII (VM), IPS EmpressCAD (IEC), IPS e.maxCAD (IEM), and CELTRA DUO (CD). The irradiance passing through the CAD/CAM materials and thicknesses was measured using a light-emitting-diode curing unit with standard-power, high-power, and plasma modes by means of a USB4000 spectrometer. The curing unit was placed directly on the specimen's surface at 2- and 4-mm distances from the specimen's surface. Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis and one-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Scheffé test (pcuring unit was placed at 0 or 2 mm from the specimen's surface, and the irradiance passing through the specimens was lower at a distance of 4 mm.

  16. Energy composition of high-energy neutral beams on the COMPASS tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitosinkova Klara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS tokamak is equipped with two identical neutral beam injectors (NBI for additional plasma heating. They provide a beam of deuterium atoms with a power of up to ~(2 × 300 kW. We show that the neutral beam is not monoenergetic but contains several energy components. An accurate knowledge of the neutral beam power in each individual energy component is essential for a detailed description of the beam- -plasma interaction and better understanding of the NBI heating processes in the COMPASS tokamak. This paper describes the determination of individual energy components in the neutral beam from intensities of the Doppler-shifted Dα lines, which are measured by a high-resolution spectrometer viewing the neutral beam-line at the exit of NBI. Furthermore, the divergence of beamlets escaping single aperture of the last accelerating grid is deduced from the width of the Doppler-shifted lines. Recently, one of the NBI systems was modified by the removal of the Faraday copper shield from the ion source. The comparison of the beam composition and the beamlet divergence before and after this modification is also presented.

  17. Dynamic analysis of smart composite beams by using the frequency domain spectral element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il Wook; Lee, Usik [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    To excite or measure the dynamic responses of a laminated composite structure for the active controls of vibrations or noises, wafertype piezoelectric transducers are often bonded on the surface of the composite structure to form a multi layer smart composite structure. Thus, for such smart composite structures, it is very important to develop and use a very reliable mathematical and/or computational model for predicting accurate dynamic characteristics. In this paper, the axial-bending coupled equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived for two layer smart composite beams by using the Hamilton's principle with Lagrange multipliers. The spectral element model is then formulated in the frequency domain by using the variation approach. Through some numerical examples, the extremely high accuracy of the present spectral element model is verified by comparing with the solutions by the conventional finite element model provided in this paper. The effects of the lay up of composite laminates and surface bonded wafer type piezoelectric (PZT) layer on the dynamics and wave characteristics of smart composite beams are investigated. The effective constraint forces at the interface between the base beam and PZT layer are also investigated via Lagrange multipliers.

  18. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, M; Patel, D; Shashikiran, N D; Mallikarjuna, R M; Nalawade, T M; Reddy, H K

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250) presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Vitremer) was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  19. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bhalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. Materials and Methods : The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. Results and conclusion: It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250 presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Vitremer was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  20. Efficacy of Thermally Conditioned Sisal FRP Composite on the Shear Characteristics of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of commercially viable composites based on natural resources for a wide range of applications is on the rise. Efforts include new methods of production and the utilization of natural reinforcements to make biodegradable composites with lignocellulosic fibers, for various engineering applications. In this work, thermal conditioning of woven sisal fibre was carried out, followed by the development of woven sisal fibre reinforced polymer composite system, and its tensile and flexural behaviour was characterized. It was observed that thermal conditioning improved the tensile strength and the flexural strength of the woven sisal fibre composites, which were observed to bear superior values than those in the untreated ones. Then, the efficacy of woven sisal fibre reinforced polymer composite for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete beams was evaluated using two types of techniques: full and strip wrapping techniques. Detailed analysis of the load deflection behaviour and fracture study of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with woven sisal under shearing load were carried out, and it was concluded that woven sisal FRP strengthened beams, underwent very ductile nature of failure, without any delamination or debonding of sisal FRP, and also increased the shear strength and the first crack load of the reinforced concrete beams.

  1. Development of a wood-polymer composite by electron beam hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoda, Masao

    1974-01-01

    An incombustible wood-polymer composite (WPC) was studied. The dimensional stability was also tested. The comparison of conversion ratio was made between gamma-ray and electron beam and between a vinylidene chloride 100% impregnated beech composite and bulk. In the case of gamma-ray of low dose rate, the conversion ratio in the vinylidene chloride beech composite was lower than the bulk. In the case of electron beam, though dose rate was higher than that of gamma-ray, the conversion ratio was low, and was influenced by the moisture content of wood. The conversion ratio markedly decreased with the increase of the dose rate of electron beam. Roughly 50% polymer loading can be obtained when the dose rate of electron beam is low. In the case of gamma-ray, the effect of dimensional stability was approximately none with small polymer loading, whereas in the case of electron beam irradiation of moist wood, marked effect of dimensional stability was shown. Incombustibility effect was tested by burning a 150 mm long piece, in which three small pieces of 5 x 10 x 50 mm were connected with epoxy resin adhesive, with a Bunsen burner for 30 seconds. After the completion of burning, the long piece was separated back into three small pieces, and the char length, weight loss and after glow time were tested. The beech composite was expected to become incombustible at 40% polymer loading. The vinyl monomer solution of chlorinated aryl chloride oligomer can be easily hardened by electron beam irradiation. Addition of crosslinking agent such as trimethylol propane trimethracrylate prevents the dissolution of hardened methyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate by acetone. The electron beam hardening of aryl resin compound is possible, using benzen peroxide as a catalyst. Floor material can be produced by this process from low density, low price wood. (Iwakiri, K.)

  2. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  3. Finite element analysis of composite beam-to-column connection with cold-formed steel section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Muhammad; Saggaff, Anis; Tahir, Mahmood Md

    2017-11-01

    Cold-formed steel (CFS) sections are well known due to its lightweight and high structural performance which is very popular for building construction. Conventionally, they are used as purlins and side rails in the building envelopes of the industrial buildings. Recent research development on cold-formed steel has shown that the usage is expanded to the use in composite construction. This paper presents the modelling of the proposed composite connection of beam-to-column connection where cold-formed steel of lipped steel section is positioned back-to-back to perform as beam. Reinforcement bars is used to perform the composite action anchoring to the column and part of it is embedded into a slab. The results of the finite element and numerical analysis has showed good agreement. The results show that the proposed composite connection contributes to significant increase to the moment capacity.

  4. Vibration Analysis of Inclined Laminated Composite Beams under Moving Distributed Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bahmyari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of laminated composite beams subjected to distributed moving masses is investigated using the finite element method (FEM based on the both first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT and the classical beam theory (CLT. Six and ten degrees of freedom beam elements are used to discretize the CLT and FSDT equations of motion, respectively. The resulting spatially discretized beam governing equations including the effect of inertial, Coriolis, and centrifugal forces due to moving distributed mass are evaluated in time domain by applying Newmark’s scheme. The presented approach is first validated by studying its convergence behavior and comparing the results with those of existing solutions in the literature. Then, the effect of incline angle, mass, and velocity of moving body, layer orientation, load length, and inertial, Coriolis, and centrifugal forces due to the moving distributed mass and friction force between the beam and the moving distributed mass on the dynamic behavior of inclined laminated composite beams are investigated.

  5. Woven type smart soft composite beam with in-plane shape retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Renzhe; Han, Min-Woo; Lee, Gil-Yong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wire embedded composites (SMAECs) are widely used as morphing structures in small-size and high-output systems. However, conventional SMAECs cannot keep deformed shapes without additional energy. In this paper, a new kind of smart structure named the woven type smart soft composite (SSC) beam is introduced, which is not only capable of morphing, but also maintaining its deformed shape without additional energy. The woven type SSC beam consists of two parts: woven wires and matrix. The selected woven wires are nitinol (Ni–Ti) SMA wires and glass fibers, while the matrix part is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the woven type SSC beam in areas such as in-plane deformation, blocking force and repeatability, a beam-shape specimen is prepared of size 100 mm (length) × 8 mm (width) ×3 mm (thickness). The fabricated SSC beam achieved 21 mm deformation and 16 mm shape retention. Blocking force was measured using a dynamometer, and was about 60 mN. In the repeatability test, it recovered almost the same position when its cooling time was 90 s more. Consequently, the woven type SSC beam can be applied to bio-mimicking, soft morphing actuators, consuming less energy than traditional SMAECs. (paper)

  6. Vibration Analysis of Steel-Concrete Composite Box Beams considering Shear Lag and Slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wangbao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate dynamic characteristics of steel-concrete composite box beams, a longitudinal warping function of beam section considering self-balancing of axial forces is established. On the basis of Hamilton principle, governing differential equations of vibration and displacement boundary conditions are deduced by taking into account coupled influencing of shear lag, interface slip, and shear deformation. The proposed method shows an improvement over previous calculations. The central difference method is applied to solve the differential equations to obtain dynamic responses of composite beams subjected to arbitrarily distributed loads. The results from the proposed method are found to be in good agreement with those from ANSYS through numerical studies. Its validity is thus verified and meaningful conclusions for engineering design can be drawn as follows. There are obvious shear lag effects in the top concrete slab and bottom plate of steel beams under dynamic excitation. This shear lag increases with the increasing degree of shear connections. However, it has little impact on the period and deflection amplitude of vibration of composite box beams. The amplitude of deflection and strains in concrete slab reduce as the degree of shear connections increases. Nevertheless, the influence of shear connections on the period of vibration is not distinct.

  7. Evaluation of the Impact Resistance of Various Composite Sandwich Beams by Vibration Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shahdin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact resistance of different types of composite sandwich beams is evaluated by studying vibration response changes (natural frequency and damping ratio. This experimental works will help aerospace structural engineer in assess structural integrity using classification of impact resistance of various composite sandwich beams (entangled carbon and glass fibers, honeycomb and foam cores. Low velocity impacts are done below the barely visible impact damage (BVID limit in order to detect damage by vibration testing that is hardly visible on the surface. Experimental tests are done using both burst random and sine dwell testing in order to have a better confidence level on the extracted modal parameters. Results show that the entangled sandwich beams have a better resistance against impact as compared to classical core materials.

  8. Numerical Modelling Of The Strengthening Process Of Steel-Concrete Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szewczyk Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical modelling of strengthening a steel-concrete composite beam. The main assumption is that the strengthening is not the effect of the state of a failure of a structure, but it resulted from the need to increase the load-bearing capacity and stiffness of the structure (for example: due to a change in the use of the object. The expected solution is strengthening without the necessity to completely unload the structures (to reduce the scope of works, the cost of modernization and to shorten the time. The problem is presented on the example of a composite beam which was strengthened through welding a steel plate to the lower flange of the steel beam. The paper describes how energy parameters are used to evaluate the efficiency of structures’ strengthening and proposes an appropriate solution.

  9. Dynamic behavior of a rotating delaminated composite beam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan-Ali Jafari-Talookolaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE model is developed to study the free vibration of a rotating laminated composite beam with a single delamination. The rotary inertia and shear deformation effects, as well as the bending–extension, bending–twist and extension–twist coupling terms are taken into account in the FE model. Comparison between the numerical results of the present model and the results published in the literature verifies the validity of the present model. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as delamination size and location, fiber orientation, hub radius, material anisotropy and rotating speed, on the vibration of the beam are studied in detail. These results provide useful information in the study of the free vibration of rotating delaminated composite beams.

  10. Numerical analysis of composite steel-concrete beams in ambient temperature and in fire situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Martins Gonçalves

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three-dimensional numerical models of steel-concrete composite beams with full interaction (no slip between concrete slab and steel beam using a non-linear procedure. The threedimensional numerical models must be capable of predicting the response of composite beam at ambient temperature and in fire situation with accuracy. The computer program ABAQUS ® 6.3-1, based on Finite Element Method, was used to analyze the numerical modeling. The accuracy of the models is demonstrated through the results obtained, which are compared with the experimental results presented in other works. The reported results, when compared to experimental data, demonstrate that the numerical models elaborated with shell finite elements show better performance when compared to the results of the numerical models elaborated with solid finite elements.

  11. Phenomenological interpretation of the shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    loaded in shear. The experimental program consists of R/ECC beams with short (8 mm) randomly distributed Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) fiber and conventional Reinforced Concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison with varying shear reinforcement arrangements. Beams were loaded until failure while a Digital......This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). This study investigates and quantifies the effect of ECC's strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior on the shear capacity of beams...... Image Correlation (DIC) measurement technique was used to measure surface displacements and crack formation. The shear crack mechanisms of R/ECC are described in detail based on findings of DIC measurements and can be characterized by an opening and sliding of the cracks. Multiple micro-cracks developed...

  12. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, research on the replacement of synthetic fibers by natural fibers as reinforcement in thermoplastic composites has increased dramatically due to the advantages of natural fibers, such as low density, low cost, environmental appeal and recyclability. In the present work, the influence of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical properties of HDPE and HDPE/Brazil Nut Shell (Bertholletia excelsa) fiber compositive was investigated. The HDPE composite reinforced with 5% or 10%, by weight of Brazil nut shell fiber powder with particle sizes equal or smaller than 250 μm were obtained by extrusion, using a twin screw extruder. The materials were irradiated at 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated specimens tests samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis and the correlation between their properties was discussed. The results showed significant changes in HDPE mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties due to Brazil nut shell fibers addition and electron-beam irradiation. The surface of the cryo fractured composite samples irradiated showed important visual changes which suggest a better fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion, due to irradiation treatment. These results showed that it is possible to get interesting property gains by using waste from renewable sources instead of the traditional ones and electron-beam radiation treatment. (author)

  13. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B., E-mail: maiara.sferreira@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, research on the replacement of synthetic fibers by natural fibers as reinforcement in thermoplastic composites has increased dramatically due to the advantages of natural fibers, such as low density, low cost, environmental appeal and recyclability. In the present work, the influence of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical properties of HDPE and HDPE/Brazil Nut Shell (Bertholletia excelsa) fiber compositive was investigated. The HDPE composite reinforced with 5% or 10%, by weight of Brazil nut shell fiber powder with particle sizes equal or smaller than 250 μm were obtained by extrusion, using a twin screw extruder. The materials were irradiated at 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated specimens tests samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis and the correlation between their properties was discussed. The results showed significant changes in HDPE mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties due to Brazil nut shell fibers addition and electron-beam irradiation. The surface of the cryo fractured composite samples irradiated showed important visual changes which suggest a better fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion, due to irradiation treatment. These results showed that it is possible to get interesting property gains by using waste from renewable sources instead of the traditional ones and electron-beam radiation treatment. (author)

  14. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendrinsky, J.

    1987-04-01

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  15. Comparison of silorane and methacrylate-based composites on the polymerization heat generated with different light-curing units and dentin thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the temperature variation in the pulp chamber during photoactivation of two restorative composite resins (Filtek P90 silorane-based composite and Heliomolar methacrylate-based composite) with either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or light-emitting diodes (LED) light-curing unit (LCU) and using dentin thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm). Standardized cavities (2x2x2 mm) were prepared in 80 bovine incisors, which were randomly assigned to 8 groups according to the photoactivation method and dentin thickness. Filtek P90 and Heliomolar (both in shade A3) were used with their respective adhesive systems (P90 self-etch primer / P90 adhesive bond and Excite adhesive). All experiments were carried out in a controlled environment (37°C). The temperature variations (°C) were recorded using a digital thermometer attached to a K-type thermocouple. The results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). For composite/dentin thickness interaction, temperature increase was significantly higher in 0.5 mm dentin thickness (40.07°C) compared with 1.0 mm dentin thickness (39.61°C) for Filtek P90. For composite/LCU interaction, the temperature increase was significantly higher for Filtek P90 (39.21°C - QTH and 40.47°C - LED) compared with Heliomolar (38.40°C - QTH and 39.30°C - LED). The silorane-based composite promoted higher temperature increase in the pulp chamber than the methacrylate-based composite.

  16. Finite Element Investigation on Shear Lag in Composite Concrete-Steel Beams with Web Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafa'a Mahmood Abbas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, effective slab width for the composite beams is investigated with special emphasis on the effect of web openings. A three dimensional finite element analysis, by using finite element code ANSYS, is employed to investigate shear lag phenomenon and the resulting effective slab width adopted in the classical T-beam approach. According to case studies and comparison with limitations and rules stipulated by different standards and codes of practice it is found that web openings presence and panel proportion are the most critical factors affecting effective slab width, whereas concrete slab thickness and steel beam depth are less significant. The presence of web opening reduces effective slab width by about 21%. Concentrated load produces smaller effective slab width when compared with uniformly distributed and line loads. Generally, standard codes of practice overestimate effective slab width for concentrated load effect, while underestimate effective slab width for uniformly distributed and line load effect. Based on the data available, sets of empirical equations are developed to estimate the effective slab width in the composite beams with web openings to be used in the classical T-beam approach taking into account the key parameters investigated.

  17. Effect of Electrospun Nanofibers on the Short Beam Strength of Laminated Fiberglass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Dattaji K.

    High specific modulus and strength are the most desirable properties for the material used in structural applications. Composite materials exhibit these properties and over the last decade, their usage has increased significantly, particularly in automotive, defense, and aerospace applications. The major cause of failures in composite laminates is due to delaminations. Delamination in composite laminates can occur due to fatigue, low velocity impact and other loadings modes. Conventional methods like "through-the-thickness stitching" or "Z-Pinning" have limitations for improving flexural and interlaminar properties in woven composites due to the fact that while improving interlaminar properties, the presence of stitches or Z pins affects in-plane properties. This study investigates the flexural behavior of fiberglass composites interleaved with non-woven Tetra Ethyl Orthosilicate (TEOS) electrsopsun nanofibers (ENFs). TEOS ENFs were manufactured using an electrospinning technique and then sintered. Nanoengineered beams were fabricated by interleaving TEOS ENFs between the laminated fiberglass composites to improve the flexural properties. TEOS ENFs, resin film, and failed fiberglass laminated composites with and without nanofibers were characterized using SEM Imaging and ASTM standard testing methods. A hybrid composite was made by interleaving a non-woven sheet of TEOS ENFs between the fiberglass laminates with additional epoxy resin film and fabricated using the out of autoclave vacuum bagging method. Four commonly used stacking sequences of fiberglass laminates with and without nanofibers were used to study the progressive failure and deformation mechanics under flexural loadings. The experimental study has shown significant improvements in short beam strength and strain energy absorption in the nanoengineered laminated fiberglass composites before complete failure. The modes were investigated by performing detailed fractographic examination of failed specimens

  18. Reinforcing Effects of Calcium Silicate-based Cement and Dual Cure Composite Resin in Simulated Immature Teeth with an Open Apex: Anin vitroStudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Zhabuawala, Murtuza; R Nadig, Roopa; S Pai, Veena; Gowda, Yashwanth; M Aswathanarayana, Ranjini

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth with an apical plug of biodentine followed by composite resin vs total obturation with biodentine tested immediately and after 3 months of aging and also to find out the chemical composition of dentin in contact with these materials. Extracted human maxillary central incisors with simulated immature apex with radicular dentin thickness (RDT) of 1 to 1.5 mm selected and divided into three groups of 20 each. Group I (control)-4 mm biodentine apically and thermoplasticized gutta-percha. Group II-4 mm biodentine apically and composite resin. Group III-complete obturation with biodentine. About 10 samples from each group were tested immediately and remaining 10 stored in phosphate buffered solution (PBS) and tested after 3 months for fracture resistance and chemical analysis of dentin. No significant difference in fracture resistance between the groups was observed when tested immediately. After 3 months of aging, only biodentine group showed a significant reduction in fracture resistance with increased Ca/P ratio of root dentine. Biodentine group has shown drastic reduction in fracture resistance after 3 months of aging, and hence, cannot be recommended as a reinforcement material in immature teeth with thin dentin walls. How to cite this article: Zhabuawala MS, Nadig RR, Pai VS, Gowda Y, Aswathanarayana RM. Reinforcing Effects of Calcium Silicate-based Cement and Dual Cure Composite Resin in Simulated Immature Teeth with an Open Apex: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(4):351-357.

  19. Effect of a broad-spectrum LED curing light on the Knoop microhardness of four posterior resin based composites at 2, 4 and 6-mm depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALShaafi, Maan M; Haenel, Thomas; Sullivan, Braden; Labrie, Daniel; Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Price, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    To measure the Knoop microhardness at the bottom of four posterior resin-based composites (RBCs): Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent), SureFil SDR flow (DENTSPLY), SonicFill (Kerr), and x-tra fil (Voco). The RBCs were expressed into metal rings that were 2, 4, or 6-mm thick with a 4-mm internal diameter at 30°C. The uncured specimens were covered by a Mylar strip and a Bluephase 20i (Ivoclar Vivadent) polywave(®) LED light-curing unit was used in high power setting for 20s. The specimens were then removed and placed immediately on a Knoop microhardness-testing device and the microhardness was measured at 9 points across top and bottom surfaces of each specimen. Five specimens were made for each condition. As expected, for each RBC there was no significant difference in the microhardness values at the top of the 2, 4 and 6-mm thick specimens. SureFil SDR Flow was the softest resin, but was the only resin that had no significant difference between the KHN values at the bottom of the 2 and 4-mm (Mixed Model ANOVA pcure was evaluated when determining the depth of cure. SureFil SDR Flow was the softest material and, in accordance with manufacturer's instructions, this RBC should be overlaid with a conventional resin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of oxygen inhibition in two-step self-etch systems on surface free energy and dentin bond strength with a chemically cured resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ayumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Asaoka, Tetsui; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    We compared the surface free energies and dentin bond strengths of two-step self-etch systems with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The adhesives were applied to self-etching primer-treated dentin surfaces of bovine incisors, after which the teeth were light-irradiated and the oxygen-inhibited layer was left intact or removed with ethanol. We determined surface free energies (γS) and their components by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. We also measured the dentin bond strengths of chemically cured resin composite to the adhesives, with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer. For all surfaces, the estimated surface tension component, γS(LW), was relatively constant. The Lewis base (γS(-)) component decreased significantly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas the Lewis acid (γS(+)) component slightly increased. The dentin bond strengths of the two-step self-etch systems did not significantly differ in relation to the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer. Although the surface free energy of the adhesive was affected by the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer, no changes in dentin bond strength were detected.

  1. Nonlinear finite element modeling of concrete deep beams with openings strengthened with externally-bonded composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawileh, Rami A.; El-Maaddawy, Tamer A.; Naser, Mohannad Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 3D nonlinear FE model is developed of RC deep beams with web openings. ► We used cohesion elements to simulate bond. ► The developed FE model is suitable for analysis of such complex structures. -- Abstract: This paper aims to develop 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) models for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams containing web openings and strengthened in shear with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sheets. The web openings interrupted the natural load path either fully or partially. The FE models adopted realistic materials constitutive laws that account for the nonlinear behavior of materials. In the FE models, solid elements for concrete, multi-layer shell elements for CFRP and link elements for steel reinforcement were used to simulate the physical models. Special interface elements were implemented in the FE models to simulate the interfacial bond behavior between the concrete and CFRP composites. A comparison between the FE results and experimental data published in the literature demonstrated the validity of the computational models in capturing the structural response for both unstrengthened and CFRP-strengthened deep beams with openings. The developed FE models can serve as a numerical platform for performance prediction of RC deep beams with openings strengthened in shear with CFRP composites.

  2. Online monitoring method of degree of cure during non-isothermal microwave curing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongxi; Li, Yingguang; Li, Nanya; Hao, Xiaozhong

    2018-02-01

    Curing rate is the variation rate of degree of cure with time, which is a crucial issue in the curing process of composite structures since it has a significant influence on the generation of voids and residual stresses. In this paper, an online monitoring method of degree of cure was presented based on refractive index measurement. The influence of cure and temperature variation on the refractive index of composite was separated in real time with a step-temperature refractive index separation method. Non-isothermal microwave curing process of carbon fiber/epoxy composite was monitored, and the degree of cure was obtained with a low measurement error of ±1.5% compared with that determined by off-line DSC measurement. The online monitoring method is a promising technology for smart manufacturing of composite structures.

  3. Novel additives in radiation polymerisation processes. Significance of molecular weight data in their application to grafting, curing and composite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Mohajerani, S.; Viengkhou, V.; Loo-Teck NG

    1995-01-01

    The role of additives in accelerating rates of reaction has been investigated in the following related radiation polymerisation processes, i.e simple homopolymerisation, grafting, WPC formation and curing. Additives used include mineral acid, polyfunctional monomers, urea and thermal and photochemical initiators. Molecular weight analysis carried out on the polymers formed in the presence of the additives indicate that both chemical and physical processes are involved in the mechanism of the polymerisation reaction. Chemical processes (free radicals) lead to an enhancement in initial rate of polymerisation whilst the physical parameter involves partitioning of reagents during reaction. Both chemical and physical processes are shown to act in concert to influence both polymer yield and properties

  4. Dynamic testing of thin-walled composite box beams in a vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1989-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of thin-walled composite box beams are measured in a rotating environment in a 10-ft diameter vacuum chamber. Symmetric and antisymmetric layup beams are fabricated out of graphite/epoxy prepreg material using an autoclave molding technique. These are excited using piezoelectric ceramic elements and responses are measured using strain gages and accelerometers. First three natural modes are identified using spectrum analyzer over a range of rotational speeds up to 1000 rpm. Measured frequencies and mode shapes (displacement as well as strain) are correlated satisfactorily with calculated finite element results.

  5. Compositional tuning of yttrium iron garnet film properties by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sposito, Alberto; Stenning, Gavin B.G.; Gregory, Simon A.; Groot, Peter A.J. de; Eason, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of variation of composition on the properties of yttrium iron garnet films grown on yttrium aluminium garnet substrates by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth is used as a quality factor: a significant variation is noticed from changing composition, with an experimentally observed optimum at Y 3.5 Fe 4.5 O 12 . - Highlights: • Compositional tuning of materials is demonstrated via multi-pulsed laser deposition. • YIG (yttrium iron garnet) films with variable composition are prepared. • Variation of YIG properties with changing composition is investigated. • Growth dynamics of YIG is investigated to optimise FMR (ferromagnetic resonance). • FMR linewidth is minimised approximately at Y 3.5 Fe 4.5 O 12

  6. Compositional tuning of yttrium iron garnet film properties by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sposito, Alberto, E-mail: as11g10@orc.soton.ac.uk [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO171BJ (United Kingdom); Stenning, Gavin B.G.; Gregory, Simon A.; Groot, Peter A.J. de [Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO171BJ (United Kingdom); Eason, Robert W. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO171BJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    We report an investigation of the effects of variation of composition on the properties of yttrium iron garnet films grown on yttrium aluminium garnet substrates by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth is used as a quality factor: a significant variation is noticed from changing composition, with an experimentally observed optimum at Y{sub 3.5}Fe{sub 4.5}O{sub 12}. - Highlights: • Compositional tuning of materials is demonstrated via multi-pulsed laser deposition. • YIG (yttrium iron garnet) films with variable composition are prepared. • Variation of YIG properties with changing composition is investigated. • Growth dynamics of YIG is investigated to optimise FMR (ferromagnetic resonance). • FMR linewidth is minimised approximately at Y{sub 3.5}Fe{sub 4.5}O{sub 12}.

  7. Maximum natural frequencies of polymer composite micro-beams by optimum distribution of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokni, Hossein; Milani, Abbas S.; Seethaler, Rudolf J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Optimum distributions of MWCNTs within the polymer micro-beams are obtained. → Natural frequencies of nanocomposite beam enhance if its root portion is reinforced with CNTs. → Adding MWCNTs to pure polymer micro-beams has an insignificant effect on mode shapes. → Fundamental frequency value is improved by 12.6-15.9% for various boundary conditions. → New CNT dispersion equations are suggested based on the optimum CNT loading pattern. -- Abstract: Optimum distribution of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) within a polymer composite micro-beam is sought to achieve its highest natural frequencies given a weight percent (wt.%) of MWCNTs. To this end, the micro-beam is divided into ten segments which are perfectly bonded to their neighbors. Each segment is made of low-viscosity, thermosetting polyester epoxy/amine resin LY-5052 and is reinforced by MWCNTs. A computer program, written in the Python programming language, is compiled with ABAQUS to generate a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the micro-beam and subsequently to evaluate an optimum CNT distribution under various vibration modes and boundary conditions. The influence of uniform and optimum MWCNT distributions on the natural frequencies, mode shapes and equivalent stiffness of the micro-beams is investigated and the results are compared with those of the pure polymer micro-beam. Subsequently, after acquiring the optimum distribution of the MWCNTs, two new CNT dispersion functions are proposed for maximizing fundamental frequencies of the clamped-free and clamped-clamped micro-beams. The results of the FE analysis reveal that the optimal reinforcement distribution pattern significantly depends on vibration mode shapes, particularly the micro-beam curvature under each mode. It is observed that fundamental frequencies of clamped-free, clamped-guided and clamped-clamped micro-beams are enhanced up to 15.9%, 13.1% and 12.6%, respectively, by choosing optimum MWCNT

  8. Curing performance of a new-generation light-emitting diode dental curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Kim M; Hartung, Martin; Althoff, Olaf; Wastian, Christine; Mitra, Sumita B

    2004-10-01

    BACKGROUND; Recent technological advances have resulted in the marketing of high-powered, or HP, battery-operated light-emitting diode, or LED, dental curing lights. The authors examine the curing efficiency and peak polymerization temperature, or Tp, of a new HP LED curing light. The authors studied four visible light-curing, or VLC, units: HP LED (A), first-generation LED (B), conventional halogen (C) and high-intensity halogen (D). They determined the depth of cure, or DOC; adhesion; and Tp of three types of VLC resin-based composites after exposure to each light. The exposure times for units A and D were one-half those for units B and C. The power density of unit A was 1,000 milliwatts per square centimeter, which was comparable to that of unit D with turbo charge. The DOC and adhesion attained for all three resin-based composites after being light cured by unit A for a 10-second exposure time were equivalent to those after being light cured by unit D for a 10-second exposure time and to those after being light cured by units B and C for 20-second exposure times. The resin-based composites light cured by unit A attained significantly lower Tps than did those light cured by unit D at equivalent cure, or exposure, times and by unit C at twice the cure time. The authors found that Unit A effectively cured the resin-based composites at one-half the cure time of units B and C and at the same time as unit D, while maintaining low Tp. The battery-operated HP LED curing light might be an effective, time-saving alternative for clinicians to use in light curing resin-based composites.

  9. Curing efficiency of dual-cure resin cement under zirconia with two different light curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Pınar; Pak Tunc, Elif; Ongul, Deger; Turp, Volkan; Bultan, Ozgur; Karataslı, Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were prepared. For each group (n=12) resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED) or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT) light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96). The values of depth of cure (in mm) and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN) were evaluated for each specimen. The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (punit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (pLight curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  10. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  11. Coupled flexural-longitudinal vibration of delaminated composite beams with local stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekrényes, András

    2014-09-01

    A novel analytical model is developed to solve the problem of free vibration of delaminated composite beams. The beam with a single delamination was modelled by six equivalent single layers by establishing the kinematic continuity in the undelaminated portion of the system. In the delaminated region the layers were captured by the traditional theories. First, Timoshenko beam theory is applied to solve the problem, then by reducing the model, the corresponding Euler-Bernoulli solution is presented. Both the free and constrained models were considered. The most important aspect of the present analysis is that the beams of the delaminated region are subjected to normal forces, as well. That is the essential reason for leading to a coupled flexural-longitudinal vibration problem. It is also concluded that delamination buckling can take place if the normal force is compressive in one of the half-periods of the vibration and reaches a critical value. The problem was also investigated experimentally by modal hammer and sweep excitation tests on beams made of E-glass/polyester in order to measure the natural frequencies and mode shapes. The comparison of the analytical and experimental results indicates the importance of the independent rotations provided by Timoshenko beams over the simple beam theory. The delamination buckling of the beams was captured based on the static stability analysis in the first step. Further results show that the problem is more complex than it was thought before, e.g., some nonlinearity, time-dependent stiffness as well as parametric excitation aspects were discovered during the present analysis.

  12. Effect of different light-curing modes on degree of conversion, staining susceptibility and stain's retention using different beverages in a nanofilled composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Georgetto, Matheus Henrique; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Catelan, Anderson; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Figueroba, Sidney Raimundo; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2011-04-01

    It is unknown whether the staining pigment concentration would affect the color of composite resin and whether the absorption of the staining pigment is related to the degree of conversion (DC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units (LCUs) on DC, superficial staining (ΔE), and pigment concentration (PC) in a nanofilled composite resin (Z350, 3M ESPE) using different beverages. Specimens were polymerized for 20 seconds using four LCUs (N=50): quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH)--450 mW/cm(2); laser (LAS)--300 mW/cm(2); second-generation light-emitting diode (LED)-1100 mW/cm(2); and third generation LED--700 mW/cm(2). DC (%) was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Specimens concerning each group (N=10) were then immersed in one of the solutions (distilled water, red wine, whisky, coffee, and cola--40 min/day, for 40 days). Specimen's color was measured before and after exposure to solutions using a colorimeter (Commission Internacionale de I'Eclairaga L*a*b* color scale), and ΔE was calculated. Specimens were then prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis to measure PC. Data were submitted to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p=0.05). DC: QTH presented the lowest DC, with statistical differences for LAS, LED 2, and LED 3. Whisky and wine showed lower PC mean values than cola and coffee. No statistical difference was observed for LCUs regarding PC and all staining solutions, except cola. Whisky showed the highest values for ΔE regarding all LCUs. Wine showed statistically lower ΔE than whisky, with water presenting the lowest ΔE. LAS and QTH showed higher values than LED 2 concerning ΔE.   LCUs interfered with DC and altered the PC and ΔE of the composite resin submitted to different staining solutions. There was no correlation among DC, PC, and ΔE. Light-curing modes might interfere with staining susceptibility, stain's retention, and DC of a composite resin, compromising the clinical

  13. Concept selection of car bumper beam with developed hybrid bio-composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoodi, M.M.; Sapuan, S.M.; Ahmad, D.; Aidy, A.; Khalina, A.; Jonoobi, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We simulate the low impact test by Abaqus Ver16R9 using the same material model. → Six different weighted criteria were discussed to nominate the best concept. → Double Hat Profile showed the best concept to fulfil the defined PDS. → Geometric parameters may overcome the weak inherent properties of bio composite. → Toughened bio-composite material may employ in structural automotive components. -- Abstract: Application of natural fibre composites is going to increase in different areas caused by environmental, technical and economic advantages. However, their low mechanical properties have limited their particular application in automotive structural components. Hybridizations with other reinforcements or matrices can improve mechanical properties of natural fibre composite. Moreover, geometric optimizations have a significant role in structural strength improvement. This study focused on selecting the best geometrical bumper beam concept to fulfill the safety parameters of the defined product design specification (PDS). The mechanical properties of developed hybrid composite material were considered in different bumper beam concepts with the same frontal curvature, thickness, and overall dimensions. The low-speed impact test was simulated under the same conditions in Abaqus V16R9 software. Six weighted criteria, which were deflection, strain energy, mass, cost, easy manufacturing, and the rib possibility were analyzed to form an evaluation matrix. Topsis method was employed to select the best concept. It is concluded that double hat profile (DHP) with defined material model can be used for bumper beam of a small car. In addition, selected concept can be strengthened by adding reinforced ribs or increasing the thickness of the bumper beam to comply with the defined PDS.

  14. Do light cured ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants perform better than resin-composite sealants: a 4-year randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WeiWei; Chen, Xi; Fan, Ming-Wen; Mulder, Jan; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte C D N J M; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-05-01

    The hypotheses tested were: the cumulative survival rates of dentin caries lesion-free pits and fissures of ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants with light-curing (high-intensity LED) and glass-carbomer sealants are higher than those of conventional ART sealants and resin-composite sealants after 4 years. The randomized controlled clinical trial covered 405 children (mean age 8-years). Three dentists placed sealants in pits and fissures of high caries-risk children. Evaluation by two independent evaluators was conducted after 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 years. The Kaplan-Meier survival method, ANOVA and t-test were used in data analyses. 1304 first permanent molars were sealed. 12.3% of children and 15.4% of sealants dropped out. 46 re-exposed pits and fissures, 39 (occlusal) 7 (free smooth surfaces), in 42 children developed a dentin carious lesion. The cumulative survival of dentin caries lesion-free occlusal pits and fissures in ART plus LED group (98%) was statistically significantly higher than in the resin-composite group (96.4%) and in the glass-carbomer group (94.5%). The cumulative survival of dentin caries lesion-free occlusal pits and fissures in the glass-carbomer group was statistically significantly lower than that in the conventional ART group (97.3%). For the free smooth surfaces, there was no statistically significantly difference among the four sealant groups. Light-cured ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants prevented the occurrence of dentin cavities best. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of radiant exposure values using second and third generation light curing units on the degree of conversion of a lucirin-based resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Antonieta Oliveira Rodrigues de Faria CARDOSO

    Full Text Available Abstract Alternative photoinitiators with different absorption wavelengths have been used in resin composites (RCs, so it is crucial to evaluate the effectiveness of light-curing units (LCUs on these products. Objective Using Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR in vitro, the effects of varying radiant exposure (RE values generated by second and third generation LED LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and maximum rate of polymerization (Rpmax of an experimental Lucirin TPO-based RC were evaluated. Material and Methods 1 mm or 2 mm thick silicon molds were positioned on a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (ATR unit attached to an infrared spectroscope. The RC was inserted into the molds and exposed to varying REs (18, 36 and 56 J/cm2 using second (Radii Plus, SDI and third generation LED LCUs (Bluephase G2/Ivoclar Vivadent or a quartz tungsten based LCU (Optilux 501/SDS Kerr. FTIR spectra (n=7 were recorded for 10 min (1 spectrum/s, 16 scans/spectrum, resolution 4 cm-1 immediately after their application to the ATR. The DC was calculated using standard techniques for observing changes in aliphatic to aromatic peak ratios both prior to, and 10 min after curing, as well as during each 1 second interval. DC and Rpmax data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (p=0.05. Results No significant difference in DC or Rpmax was observed between the 1 mm or 2 mm thick specimens when RE values were delivered by Optilux 501 or when the 1 mm thick composites were exposed to light emitted by Bluephase G2, which in turn promoted a lower DC when 18 J/cm2 (13 s were delivered to the 2 mm thick specimens. Radii Plus promoted DC and Rpmax values close to zero under most conditions, while the delivery of 56 J/cm2 (40 s resulted in low DC values. Conclusions The third generation LCU provided an optimal polymerization of Lucirin TPO-based RC under most tested conditions, whereas the second generation LED-curing unit was useless

  16. Nanoscale EELS analysis of oxides: composition mapping, valence determination and beam damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, J [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States); Gilliss, S R [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States); Carter, C B [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States); Al-Sharab, J F [Ceramics and Materials Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08904 (United States); Cosandey, F [Ceramics and Materials Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08904 (United States); Anderson, I M [Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States); Kotula, P J [Materials Characterization Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2006-02-22

    Beam damage to ceria abrasive particles during EELS measurements with {approx}1 nm probes of {approx}1nA was negligible for typical analysis times (1-5 s). Ce{sup 3+} and tri-valent impurities reduce near-surface regions. Ce valence was measured from Ce M{sub 5}/M{sub 4} white line ratios. By defocusing a 1 nA probe to {approx}5 nm, beam damage to nanoscale MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel was sufficiently slowed to allow spectrum imaging measurements of composition variations. Recording spectrum lines in TEM mode can be attractive when dose-rate rather than dose is the limiting factor in beam damage. Multivariate statistical analysis of data from a CoO-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} interface has revealed an additional interface-related component.

  17. Nanoscale EELS analysis of oxides: composition mapping, valence determination and beam damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J; Gilliss, S R; Carter, C B; Al-Sharab, J F; Cosandey, F; Anderson, I M; Kotula, P J

    2006-01-01

    Beam damage to ceria abrasive particles during EELS measurements with ∼1 nm probes of ∼1nA was negligible for typical analysis times (1-5 s). Ce 3+ and tri-valent impurities reduce near-surface regions. Ce valence was measured from Ce M 5 /M 4 white line ratios. By defocusing a 1 nA probe to ∼5 nm, beam damage to nanoscale MgAl 2 O 4 spinel was sufficiently slowed to allow spectrum imaging measurements of composition variations. Recording spectrum lines in TEM mode can be attractive when dose-rate rather than dose is the limiting factor in beam damage. Multivariate statistical analysis of data from a CoO-Co 3 O 4 interface has revealed an additional interface-related component

  18. Compositional changes in industrial hemp biomass (Cannabis sativa L.) induced by electron beam irradiation Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Yong Joo; Shin, Soo-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical decomposition of industrial hemp biomass were evaluated at doses of 150, 300, and 450 kGy. The quantity of decomposed components was indirectly estimated by measuring changes in alkaline extraction. The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation doses resulted in larger amounts of alkaline extract. Carbohydrate compositional analysis using 1 H-NMR spectroscopy was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the polysaccharides of the industrial hemp. The xylose peak intensity in the NMR spectra decreased with increasing electron irradiation dose, indicating that xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose. -- Highlights: → The more severe degradation of structural components induced by higher irradiation. → Carbohydrate analysis was applied to quantitatively investigate changes in the industrial hemp. → Xylan was more sensitive to electron beam irradiation than cellulose.

  19. Dynamic analysis of composite beam with piezoelectric layers under thermo-mechanical load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toudehdehghan, A.; Rahman, M. M.; Nagi, Farrukh

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the control of composite beam vibrations with sensor and actuator connected layers is considered with consideration of the effect of thermal environment. The coupling relation between electrical field and mechanical deformation with uncoupled thermal impact are used. The mathematical model of shear deformation (Timoshenko’s theory) has been applied and basic equations for piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been proposed. The equation of motion for the beam structure is obtained by the Hamilton principle and analyzed by finite element method. The control algorithm is based on proportional velocity control. Hence, the purpose of this article is to investigate the direct and inverse effects of piezoelectric on control of simply supported beam vibration under uniform temperature.

  20. Digital-image-correlation-based experimental stress analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened using carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jeffrey; Kurtz, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The strengthening of reinforced concrete beams through the use of epoxy-bonded carbon composites has been widely researched in the United States since 1991. Despite the widespread attention of researchers, however, there are no reliable methods of predicting the failure of the repaired and strengthened beams by peeling of the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material from the parent concrete. To better understand peeling failure, several investigators have presented analytical work to predict the distribution of stresses along the interface between the FRP and the concrete. Several closed-form solutions can be found in the literature to predict the levels of shear stress present between the bonded composite plate and the parent concrete beam. However, there has been very little experimental verification of these analytical predictions because few experiments on large-scale beams have had sufficient instrumentation to facilitate the comparison. Some experiments have been presented1 in which electrical resistance strain gages were placed along the length of the carbon plate in order to deduce the interfacial shear stress using first differences. This method, though very crude, demonstrated that there are substantial differences between the distributions of interfacial shear stresses in actual repaired beams versus the analytical predictions. This paper presents a new test program in which large-scale carbon-fiber-strengthened reinforced concrete beams are load-tested to failure, while employing digital image correlation (DIC) to record the strains in the carbon fiber plate. Relying on the linear elasticity of carbon fiber, the interfacial shear can be determined and compared with the analytical predictions of the literature. The focus of this paper is the presentation of the experimental shear stress distributions and comparisons of these distributions with previous results available in the literature.

  1. UV/EB curing market in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmy, N.; Danu, S.

    1999-01-01

    The most application of UV curing of surface coating in Indonesia are on fancy plywood, furniture and wood flooring industry. Other application are on papers, printing ink/labelling, printed circuit board/PCB and dental materials. At present, application of EB curing coating is still in a pilot plant scale due to the high cost of production. Limited number of application of EB curing by using low energy electron beam machine are on wood panels, ceramics and marbles. This paper describes the market and the problem faced by the largest user of radiation curing systems such as the secondary process plywood, furniture and paper industries

  2. Facile, Low-Cost, UV-Curing Approach to Prepare Highly Conductive Composites for Flexible Electronics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucheng; Chen, Shilong; Wei, Yong; Liu, Konghua; Lin, Yong; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    We present a facile approach to prepare high-performance ultraviolet (UV)-curable polyurethane-acrylate-based flexible electrical conductive adhesive (PUA-FECA) for flexible electronics applications. PUA is employed as the polymer matrix so that the ECA is flexible and UV-curable at room temperature in just a few minutes. The effects of the PUA-FECA formulation and curing procedure on the electrical properties have been studied. Very low volume resistivity (5.08 × 10-4 Ω cm) is obtained by incorporating 70 wt.% microsized Ag-coated Cu flakes. Moreover, by simply standing the PUA-FECA paste for 4 h before exposure to UV light, the bulk resistivity of the PUA-FECA is dramatically decreased to 3.62 × 10-4 Ω cm. This can be attributed to rearrangement of Ag-coated Cu flakes in the matrix while standing. PUA-FECA also presents stable electrical conductivity during rolling and compression, excellent adhesion, and good processability, making it easily scalable to large-scale fabrication and enabling screen-printing on various low-cost flexible substrates such as office paper and polyethylene terephthalate film.

  3. The analysis of composite laminated beams using a 2D interpolating meshless technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, S. H. M.; Belinha, J.; Parente, M. P. L.; Natal Jorge, R. M.; de Sá, J. M. A. César; Ferreira, A. J. M.

    2018-02-01

    Laminated composite materials are widely implemented in several engineering constructions. For its relative light weight, these materials are suitable for aerospace, military, marine, and automotive structural applications. To obtain safe and economical structures, the modelling analysis accuracy is highly relevant. Since meshless methods in the recent years achieved a remarkable progress in computational mechanics, the present work uses one of the most flexible and stable interpolation meshless technique available in the literature—the Radial Point Interpolation Method (RPIM). Here, a 2D approach is considered to numerically analyse composite laminated beams. Both the meshless formulation and the equilibrium equations ruling the studied physical phenomenon are presented with detail. Several benchmark beam examples are studied and the results are compared with exact solutions available in the literature and the results obtained from a commercial finite element software. The results show the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed numeric technique.

  4. New green polymeric composites based on hemp and natural rubber processed by electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelescu, Maria-Daniela; Manaila, Elena; Craciun, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A new polymeric composite based on natural rubber reinforced with hemp has been processed by electron beam irradiation and characterized by several methods. The mechanical characteristics: gel fraction, crosslink density, water uptake, swelling parameters, and FTIR of natural rubber/hemp fiber composites have been investigated as a function of the hemp content and absorbed dose. Physical and mechanical properties present a significant improvement as a result of adding hemp fibres in blends. Our experiments showed that the hemp fibers have a reinforcing effect on natural rubber similar to mineral fillers (chalk, carbon black, silica). The crosslinking rates of samples, measured using the Flory-Rehner equation, increase as a result of the amount of hemp in blends and the electron beam irradiation dose increasing. The swelling parameters of samples significantly depend on the amount of hemp in blends, because the latter have hydrophilic characteristics.

  5. POLYMER COMPOSITE FILMS WITH SIZE-SELECTED METAL NANOPARTICLES FABRICATED BY CLUSTER BEAM TECHNIQUE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceynowa, F. A.; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Popok, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Formation of polymer films with size-selected silver and copper nanoparticles (NPs) is studied. Polymers are prepared by spin coating while NPs are fabricated and deposited utilizing a magnetron sputtering cluster apparatus. The particle embedding into the films is provided by thermal annealing...... after the deposition. The degree of immersion can be controlled by the annealing temperature and time. Together with control of cluster coverage the described approach represents an efficient method for the synthesis of thin polymer composite layers with either partially or fully embedded metal NPs....... Combining electron beam lithography, cluster beam deposition and thermal annealing allows to form ordered arrays of metal NPs on polymer films. Plasticity and flexibility of polymer host and specific properties added by coinage metal NPs open a way for different applications of such composite materials...

  6. Meshless Solution of the Problem on the Static Behavior of Thin and Thick Laminated Composite Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, S.; Kang, G. W.

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, the static behavior of laminated composite beams is analyzed using the meshless collocation method based on a thin-plate-spline radial basis function. In the approximation of a partial differential equation by using a radial basis function, the shape parameter has an important role in ensuring the numerical accuracy. The choice of a shape parameter in the thin plate spline radial basis function is easier than in other radial basis functions. The governing differential equations are derived based on Reddy's third-order shear deformation theory. Numerical results are obtained for symmetric cross-ply laminated composite beams with simple-simple and cantilever boundary conditions under a uniform load. The results found are compared with available published ones and demonstrate the accuracy of the present method.

  7. Lateral Torsional Buckling of Anisotropic Laminated Composite Beams Subjected to Various Loading and Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Habiburrahman

    Thin-walled structures are major components in many engineering applications. When a thin-walled slender beam is subjected to lateral loads, causing moments, the beam may buckle by a combined lateral bending and twisting of cross-section, which is called lateral-torsional buckling. A generalized analytical approach for lateral-torsional buckling of anisotropic laminated, thin-walled, rectangular cross-section composite beams under various loading conditions (namely, pure bending and concentrated load) and boundary conditions (namely, simply supported and cantilever) was developed using the classical laminated plate theory (CLPT), with all considered assumptions, as a basis for the constitutive equations. Buckling of such type of members has not been addressed in the literature. Closed form buckling expressions were derived in terms of the lateral, torsional and coupling stiffness coefficients of the overall composite. These coefficients were obtained through dimensional reduction by static condensation of the 6x6 constitutive matrix mapped into an effective 2x2 coupled weak axis bending-twisting relationship. The stability of the beam under different geometric and material parameters, like length/height ratio, ply thickness, and ply orientation, was investigated. The analytical formulas were verified against finite element buckling solutions using ABAQUS for different lamination orientations showing excellent accuracy.

  8. Physical properties of dual-cured luting-agents correlated to early no interfacial-gap incidence with composite inlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Masao; Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Watts, David C

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this investigation were to investigate dual-cured luting-agents as to whether their bond strength, dimensional change and flexural modulus influence no interfacial-gap incidence parameters of composite inlay restorations during the early stages. The correlations of interest were between: (a) their shear bond strength to dentin, (b) their dimensional change on setting, (c) their flexural modulus, and (d) no interfacial-gap incidence with indirect restorations. Seven dual-cured luting-agents, one self-adhesive resin cement, six resin cements and one resin-modified glass-ionomer for luting, were investigated with specimen sub-groups (n=10) for each property measured. The principal series of experiments were conducted in dentin cavities with interfacial polishing either immediately (3 min) after setting or after 1-day water-storage. After the finishing procedure, each tooth was sectioned in a buccolingual direction through the center of the restoration, and the presence or absence of interfacial-gaps was measured (and then summed for each cavity) at 14 points (each 0.5mm apart) along the composite inlay restoration interface (n=10 per group; total points measured=140), and was expressed by percentage of measured total points. The shear bond strengths to dentin, setting shrinkage-strain and flexural modulus were measured. To estimate the dimensional change of luting-agents, the maximum marginal gap-width and the opposing-width that occurred with luting-agents in a Teflon mold were measured. Moduli were measured in 3-point bending. For all composite inlay restorations, polished immediately after setting, an incidence of summed no-gaps of 69-88% was observed. For specimens polished after 1 day, a significantly (p0.05). There was a highly significant correlation between no interfacial-gap incidence and shear bond strength (r=0.702, p=0.002, n=16). As the dimensional change (shrinkage) within Teflon molds increased, the no interfacial-gap incidence of dentin

  9. Active Vibration damping of Smart composite beams based on system identification technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendine, Kouider; Satla, Zouaoui; Boukhoulda, Farouk Benallel; Nouari, Mohammed

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the active vibration control of a composite beam using piezoelectric actuator is investigated. The space state equation is determined using system identification technique based on the structure input output response provided by ANSYS APDL finite element package. The Linear Quadratic (LQG) control law is designed and integrated into ANSYS APDL to perform closed loop simulations. Numerical examples for different types of excitation loads are presented to test the efficiency and the accuracy of the proposed model.

  10. Effects of Structural Damage on Dynamic Behavior at Sandwich Composite Beams - Part I-Theoretical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufoi Marius

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper series presents an analysis regarding the dynamics of sandwich composite beams, embedded at one end, in order to highlight the effect of geometrical and material discontinuities upon the natural frequencies. In first part (Part I, analysis was performed with EulerBernoulli analytical method for determining the vibration modes and in second part (Part II, analysis was performed with numerical simulation in SolidWorks software for a five-layer composite. In the last section of the paper, an example is shown regarding how to interpret the obtained results.

  11. One-dimensional analysis of filamentary composite beam columns with thin-walled open sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Patrick K.-L.; Johnson, Eric R.

    1986-01-01

    Vlasov's one-dimensional structural theory for thin-walled open section bars was originally developed and used for metallic elements. The theory was recently extended to laminated bars fabricated from advanced composite materials. The purpose of this research is to provide a study and assessment of the extended theory. The focus is on flexural and torsional-flexural buckling of thin-walled, open section, laminated composite columns. Buckling loads are computed from the theory using a linear bifurcation analysis and a geometrically nonlinear beam column analysis by the finite element method. Results from the analyses are compared to available test data.

  12. Strengthening of RC beams with an innovative timber-FRP composite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, N.; Guadagnini, M.; Valluzzi, M. R.

    2008-05-01

    The results of a theoretical and experimental research project on the use of an innovative technique for strengthening concrete beams are presented. A spacer element is inserted between the tension side of a beam and the composite material to increase its lever arm and to enhance the over all stiffness of the strengthened beam. The main aim of this exploratory project was to increase the ultimate failure load of strengthened beam specimens, whilst guaranteeing acceptable over all deflections at the serviceability limit states. This resulted into a significant reduction in the amount of FPR required and in a better utilization of the materials employed. A preliminary theoretical study was carried out to investigate the effect of Young's modulus, failure strain, and thickness of the element to be used as a spacer in order to determine the best possible candidate material. Three tests on 2.5-m-long beams were carried out, and different anchorage techniques were used to try and prevent the debonding of the strengthening system. The results from this pilot study are very promising, as the strengthening system ensures an adequate initial stiffness along with an improved ultimate flexural capacity.

  13. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum based epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Sarath Chandran, C.; Melnikova, T. V.; Nazarenko, S. Yu.; Kim, J.-C.

    2017-07-01

    The epoxy resins are widely used in nuclear and aerospace industries. The certain properties of epoxy resins as well as the resistance to radiation can be improved by the incorporation of different fillers. This study examines the effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy composites filled with aluminum nanoparticles at percentage of 0.35 wt%. The epoxy composites were exposed to the irradiation doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy using electron beam generated by the linear electron accelerator ELU-4. The effects of the doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The results revealed that the studied epoxy composites showed good radiation resistance. The thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites increased with increasing the irradiation dose up to 100 kGy and decreased with further increasing the dose.

  14. Influence of electron beam Irradiation on PP/Piassava fiber composite prepared by melt extrusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Michelle G.; Ferreira, Maiara S.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Silva, Valquiria A.; Teixeira, Jaciele G.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2013-01-01

    In the latest years, the interest for the use of natural fibers in materials composites polymeric has increased significantly due to their environmental and technological advantages. Piassava fibers (Attalea funifera) have been used as reinforcement in the matrix of thermoplastic and thermoset polymers. In the present work (20%, in mass), piassava fibers with particle sizes equal or smaller than 250 μm were incorporated in the polypropylene matrix (PP) no irradiated and polypropylene matrix containing 10 % and 30 % of polypropylene treated by electron-beam radiation at 40 kGy (PP/PPi/Piassava). The composites PP/Piassava and PP/PPi/Piassava were prepared by using a twin screw extruder, followed by injection molding. The composite material samples obtained were treated by electron-beam radiation at 40 kGy, using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature, in presence of air. After irradiation treatment, the irradiated and non-irradiated specimens tests samples were submitted to thermo-mechanical tests, melt flow index (MFI), sol-gel analysis, X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  15. RETROFITTING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS USING FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (FRP COMPOSITES - A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam Aravind

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation and strengthening of old structures using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of Structural Engineering. During past two decades, much research has been carried out on shear and flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams using different types of fibre reinforced polymers and adhesives. Strengthening of old structures is necessary to obtain an expected life span. Life span of Reinforced Concrete (RC structures may be reduced due to many reasons, such as deterioration of concrete and development of surface cracks due to ingress of chemical agents, improper design and unexpected external lateral loads such as wind or seismic forces acting on a structure, which are also the reasons for failure of structural members. The superior properties of polymer composite materials like high corrosion resistance, high strength, high stiffness, excellent fatigue performance and good resistance to chemical attack etc., has motivated the researchers and practicing engineers to use the polymer composites in the field of rehabilitation of structures. This paper reviews fourteen articles on rehabilitation of reinforced concrete (RC beams. The paper reviews the different properties of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP and Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites and adhesives, influence of dimensions of beams and loading rate causing failure. The paper proposes an enhanced retrofitting technique for flexural members and to develop a new mathematical model.

  16. RETROFITTING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS USING FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (FRP COMPOSITES – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam Aravind

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation and strengthening of old structures using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of Structural Engineering. During past two decades, much research has been carried out on shear and flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete beams using different types of fibre reinforced polymers and adhesives. Strengthening of old structures is necessary to obtain an expected life span. Life span of Reinforced Concrete (RC structures may be reduced due to many reasons, such as deterioration of concrete and development of surface cracks due to ingress of chemical agents, improper design and unexpected external lateral loads such as wind or seismic forces acting on a structure, which are also the reasons for failure of structural members. The superior properties of polymer composite materials like high corrosion resistance, high strength, high stiffness, excellent fatigue performance and good resistance to chemical attack etc., has motivated the researchers and practicing engineers to use the polymer composites in the field of rehabilitation of structures. This paper reviews fourteen articles on rehabilitation of reinforced concrete (RC beams. The paper reviews the different properties of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP and Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP composites and adhesives, influence of dimensions of beams and loading rate causing failure. The paper proposes an enhanced retrofitting technique for flexural members and to develop a new mathematical model.

  17. Errors in body composition using fan beam DXA due to variation in fat distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, M.; Pocock, N. [St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Bone Densitometry; Noakes, K. [Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Department of Endocrinology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: DXA while primarily developed and used to determine bone Mineral Density (BMD) and Bone Mineral Content (BMC) can also be used to determine body composition. Fan Beam DXA instruments cause inherent magnification of scanned structures which can lead to significant errors in BMC and geometric measures. We have assessed the magnification effect of fan beam DXA on body composition with alteration of fat distribution in a laboratory model. The phantom consisted of an aluminium bar, water bath and 3 different quantities of animal fat. Scans were performed in triplicate using a Lunar Expert and an Hologic QDR 4500. The fat was positioned either at the same height as the aluminium spine or at a height of 28.5 cm. The results presented (mean of 3 scans) are for the Lunar Expert. The fat mass, % fat and total tissue mass were calculated for the fat at baseline and elevated positions. It is concluded that the use of fan beam DXA for body composition may lead to magnification errors secondary to variation in distribution of fat 1 tab.

  18. A Finite Difference Solution of a Simply Supported Beam of Orthotropic Composite Materials Using Displacement Potential Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Deb Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here an efficient displacement potential formulation based finite difference technique is used to solve the elastic field of a simply supported beam of orthotropic composite materials. A simply supported beam made of orthotropic composite material under uniformly distributed loading is considered and its elastic behaviors under such loading conditions are analyzed considering plane stress condition. The solutions of the problem satisfy the force equilibrium conditions as well as boundary conditions. For understanding the elastic behavior of a simply supported beam, the displacement and stress components of some important sections of the beam are shown graphically. Effects of different orthotropic composite materials on the solutions are also analyzed. Besides, at a particular section of the beam, the comparative analysis of the elastic field is carried out by using the FDM and FEM methods.

  19. A study of composite beam with shape memory alloy arbitrarily embedded under thermal and mechanical loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yin; Zhao Yapu

    2007-01-01

    The constitutive relations and kinematic assumptions on the composite beam with shape memory alloy (SMA) arbitrarily embedded are discussed and the results related to the different kinematic assumptions are compared. As the approach of mechanics of materials is to study the composite beam with the SMA layer embedded, the kinematic assumption is vital. In this paper, we systematically study the kinematic assumptions influence on the composite beam deflection and vibration characteristics. Based on the different kinematic assumptions, the equations of equilibrium/motion are different. Here three widely used kinematic assumptions are presented and the equations of equilibrium/motion are derived accordingly. As the three kinematic assumptions change from the simple to the complex one, the governing equations evolve from the linear to the nonlinear ones. For the nonlinear equations of equilibrium, the numerical solution is obtained by using Galerkin discretization method and Newton-Rhapson iteration method. The analysis on the numerical difficulty of using Galerkin method on the post-buckling analysis is presented. For the post-buckling analysis, finite element method is applied to avoid the difficulty due to the singularity occurred in Galerkin method. The natural frequencies of the composite beam with the nonlinear governing equation, which are obtained by directly linearizing the equations and locally linearizing the equations around each equilibrium, are compared. The influences of the SMA layer thickness and the shift from neutral axis on the deflection, buckling and post-buckling are also investigated. This paper presents a very general way to treat thermo-mechanical properties of the composite beam with SMA arbitrarily embedded. The governing equations for each kinematic assumption consist of a third order and a fourth order differential equation with a total of seven boundary conditions. Some previous studies on the SMA layer either ignore the thermal constraint

  20. A Comparison of gel point for a Glass/Epoxy Composite and a Neat Epoxy Material during Isothermal Curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens H.; Thomsen, Ole Thybo

    2014-01-01

    in bending stiffness, and vitrification is seen as a decrease in the bending stiffness rate. Often gel point predictions for composite materials are based on neat matrix measurements. However, the results presented in this article demonstrate that the gel point is affected by the presence of the fibre...

  1. Steel–CFRP Composite (CFRP Laminate Sandwiched between Mild Steel Strips) and It-s Behavior as Stirrup in Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Faris Abbas Jawad Uriayer; Mehtab Alam

    2013-01-01

    In this present study, experimental work was conducted to study the effectiveness of newly innovated steel-CFRP composite (CFRP laminates sandwiched between two steel strips) as stirrups. A total numbers of eight concrete beams were tested under four point loads. Each beam measured 1600 mm long, 160mm width and 240 mm depth. The beams were reinforced with different shear reinforcements; one without stirrups, one with steel stirrups and six with different types and numbers...

  2. Influence of light-exposure methods and depths of cavity on the microhardness of dual-cured core build-up resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi YOSHIDA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN of dual-cured core build-up resin composites (DCBRCs at 6 depths of cavity after 3 post-irradiation times by 4 light-exposure methods. Material and Methods: Five specimens each of DCBRCs (Clearfil DC Core Plus [DCP] and Unifil Core EM [UCE] were filled in acrylic resin blocks with a semi-cylindrical cavity and light-cured using an LED light unit (power density: 1,000 mW/cm2at the top surface by irradiation for 20 seconds (20 s, 40 seconds (40 s, bonding agent plus 20 seconds (B+20 s, or 40 seconds plus light irradiation of both sides of each acrylic resin block for 40 seconds each (120 s. KHN was measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days post-irradiation. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's compromise post-hoc test with a significance level of p0.05. In DCP, and not UCE, at 24 hours and 7 days post-irradiation, the B+20 s method showed significantly higher KHN at all depths of cavity, except the depth of 0.5 mm (p<0.05. Conclusion: KHN depends on the light-exposure method, use of bonding agent, depth of cavity, post-irradiation time, and material brand. Based on the microhardness behavior, DCBRCs are preferably prepared by the effective exposure method, when used for a greater depth of cavity.

  3. Effects of radiant exposure values using second and third generation light curing units on the degree of conversion of a lucirin-based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Kelly Antonieta Oliveira Rodrigues de Faria; Zarpellon, Driellen Christine; Madruga, Camila Ferreira Leite; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão

    2017-01-01

    Using Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) in vitro, the effects of varying radiant exposure (RE) values generated by second and third generation LED LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC) and maximum rate of polymerization (Rpmax) of an experimental Lucirin TPO-based RC were evaluated. 1 mm or 2 mm thick silicon molds were positioned on a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (ATR) unit attached to an infrared spectroscope. The RC was inserted into the molds and exposed to varying REs (18, 36 and 56 J/cm2) using second (Radii Plus, SDI) and third generation LED LCUs (Bluephase G2/Ivoclar Vivadent) or a quartz tungsten based LCU (Optilux 501/SDS Kerr). FTIR spectra (n=7) were recorded for 10 min (1 spectrum/s, 16 scans/spectrum, resolution 4 cm-1) immediately after their application to the ATR. The DC was calculated using standard techniques for observing changes in aliphatic to aromatic peak ratios both prior to, and 10 min after curing, as well as during each 1 second interval. DC and Rpmax data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p=0.05). No significant difference in DC or Rpmax was observed between the 1 mm or 2 mm thick specimens when RE values were delivered by Optilux 501 or when the 1 mm thick composites were exposed to light emitted by Bluephase G2, which in turn promoted a lower DC when 18 J/cm2 (13 s) were delivered to the 2 mm thick specimens. Radii Plus promoted DC and Rpmax values close to zero under most conditions, while the delivery of 56 J/cm2 (40 s) resulted in low DC values. The third generation LCU provided an optimal polymerization of Lucirin TPO-based RC under most tested conditions, whereas the second generation LED-curing unit was useless regardless of the RE.

  4. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of -11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  5. Testing of full-size reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP composites : experimental results and design methods verification(appendices)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    In 1997, a load rating of an historic reinforced concrete bridge in Oregon, Horsetail Creek Bridge, indicated substandard shear and moment capacities of the beams. As a result, the Bridge was strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer composites as a...

  6. Testing of full-size reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP composites : experimental results and design methods verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    In 1997, a load rating of an historic reinforced concrete bridge in Oregon, Horsetail Creek Bridge, indicated substandard shear and moment capacities of the beams. As a result, the Bridge was strengthened with fiber reinforced : polymer composites as...

  7. Cantilever Beam Static and Dynamic Response Comparison with Mid-Point Bending for Thin MDF composite Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Zhiren Guo; Feng Fu

    2013-01-01

    A new cantilever beam apparatus has been developed to measure static and vibrational properties of small and thin samples of wood or composite panels. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam, measures its static load, then releases it into its natural first mode of transverse vibration. Free vibrational tip displacements as a function of time...

  8. Elastic and transport properties of steam-cured pozzolanic-lime rock composites upon CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Dan; Vanorio, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the relationship between pozzolanic ash-lime reactions and the rock physics properties of the resulting rock microstructure is important for monitoring unrest conditions in volcanic-hydrothermal systems as well as devising concrete with enhanced performance. By mixing pozzolanic ash with lime, the ancient Romans incorporated these reactions in the production of concrete. Recently, it has been discovered that a fiber-reinforced, concrete-like rock is forming naturally in the depths of the Campi Flegrei volcanic-hydrothermal systems (Vanorio and Kanitpanyacharoen, 2015). We investigate the physico-chemical conditions contributing to undermine or enhance the laboratory measured properties of the subsurface rocks of volcanic-hydrothermal systems and, in turn, build upon those processes that the ancient Romans unwittingly exploited to create their famous concrete. We prepared samples by mixing the pozzolana volcanic ash, slaked lime, aggregates of Neapolitan Yellow tuff, and seawater from Campi Flegrei in the same ratios as the ancient Romans. To mimic the conditions of the caldera, we used mineral seawater from a well in the Campi Flegrei region rich in sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, potassium, and magnesium ions. The samples were cured by steam. We measured baseline properties of porosity, permeability, P-wave velocity, and S-wave velocity of the samples. P and S-wave velocities were used to derive bulk, shear, and Young's moduli. Subsequently, half of the samples were injected with CO2-rich aqueous solution and the changes in their microstructure and physical properties measured. One sample was subjected to rapid temperature changes to determine how porosity and permeability changed as a function of the number of thermal shocks. Exposure of CO2 to the concrete-like rock samples destabilized fibrous mineral forming and decreased the samples' ability to deform without breaking. We show that steam- and sulfur-alkaline- rich environments affect both

  9. Multifunctional curing agents and their use in improving strength of composites containing carbon fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautard, Frederic; Ozcan, Soydan

    2017-04-11

    A functionalized carbon fiber having covalently bound on its surface a sizing agent containing epoxy groups, at least some of which are engaged in covalent bonds with crosslinking molecules, wherein each of said crosslinking molecules possesses at least two epoxy-reactive groups and at least one free functional group reactive with functional groups of a polymer matrix in which the carbon fiber is to be incorporated, wherein at least a portion of said crosslinking molecules are engaged, via at least two of their epoxy-reactive groups, in crosslinking bonds between at least two epoxy groups of the sizing agent. Composites comprised of these functionalized carbon fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix are also described. Methods for producing the functionalized carbon fibers and composites thereof are also described.

  10. Proceedings of workshop on surface finishing by radiation curing technology: radiation curing for better finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This book compiled the paper presented at this workshop. The papers discussed are 1. Introduction to radiation curing, 2. Radiation sources -ultraviolet and electron beams, 3. UV/EB curing of surface coating - wood and nonwood substrates, 4. Development of EPOLA (epoxidised palm oil products acrylate) and its application, 5. Development of radiation-curable resin based natural rubber

  11. Plastic coating on paper by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ametani, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Mitsuaki; Sawai, Takeshi

    1984-01-01

    It has been known long since that the resin system of unsaturated polyester and vinylmonomer mixture cures by irradiation. Ford of USA for the first time industrialized the radiation curing reaction of resins for the coating of automobile parts. Thereafter, accompanying the development and technical advance of the low energy electron beam irradiation apparatus which is suitable to surface treatment such as coating and easy to handle and the development of resins, the electron beam curing method has become to be utilized for coating hardboard and wooden doors, coating automobile tire rims, adhering printing papers and others. The electron beam curing method has advantage such as energy conservation, resource saving and little pollution because solvent is not used, high production rate and small floor space. In glossing industry, for the purpose of developing the techniques to apply electron beam curing method to glazed paper production, the selection of the composition of resins suitable to glazed papers, the irradiating condition and the properties of cured films were examined. The films withstanding bending can be obtained at low dose with urethane group, ester group or the combination of monomers. (Kako, I.)

  12. Experimental studies on active vibration control of a smart composite beam using a PID controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanović, Miroslav M; Lukić, Nebojša S; Ilić, Slobodan S; Simonović, Aleksandar M; Zorić, Nemanja D; Stupar, Slobodan N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental verification of the active vibration control of a smart cantilever composite beam using a PID controller. In order to prevent negative occurrences in the derivative and integral terms in a PID controller, first-order low-pass filters are implemented in the derivative action and in the feedback of the integral action. The proposed application setup consists of a composite cantilever beam with a fiber-reinforced piezoelectric actuator and strain gage sensors. The beam is modeled using a finite element method based on third-order shear deformation theory. The experiment considers vibration control under periodic excitation and an initial static deflection. A control algorithm was implemented on a PIC32MX440F256H microcontroller. Experimental results corresponding to the proposed PID controller are compared with corresponding results using proportional (P) control, proportional–integral (PI) control and proportional–derivative (PD) control. Experimental results indicate that the proposed PID controller provides 8.93% more damping compared to a PD controller, 14.41% more damping compared to a PI controller and 19.04% more damping compared to a P controller in the case of vibration under periodic excitation. In the case of free vibration control, the proposed PID controller shows better performance (settling time 1.2 s) compared to the PD controller (settling time 1.5 s) and PI controller (settling time 2.5 s). (paper)

  13. An evaluation of the sandwich beam compression test method for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The sandwich beam in a four-point bending compressive test method for advanced composites is evaluated. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio were obtained for graphite/polyimide beam specimens tested at 117 K, room temperature, and 589 K. Tensile elastic properties obtained from the specimens were assumed to be equal to the compressive elastic properties and were used in the analysis. Strain gages were used to record strain data. A three-dimensional finite-element model was used to examine the effects of the honeycomb core on measured composite mechanical properties. Results of the analysis led to the following conclusions: (1) a near uniaxial compressive stress state existed in the top cover and essentially all the compressive load was carried by the top cover; (2) laminate orientation, test temperature, and type of honeycomb core material were shown to affect the type of beam failure; and (3) the test method can be used to obtain compressive elastic constants over the temperature range 117 to 589 K.

  14. Near Surface Mounted Composites for Flexural Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing structural components require strengthening after a certain period of time due to increases in service loads, errors in design, mechanical damage, and the need to extend the service period. Externally-bonded reinforcement (EBR and near-surface mounted (NSM reinforcement are two preferred strengthening approach. This paper presents a NSM technique incorporating NSM composites, namely steel and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP bars, as reinforcement. Experimental and analytical studies carried out to explore the performance of reinforced concrete (RC members strengthened with the NSM composites. Analytical models were developed in predicting the maximum crack spacing and width, concrete cover separation failure loads, and deflection. A four-point bending test was applied on beams strengthened with different types and ratios of NSM reinforcement. The failure characteristics, yield, and ultimate capacities, deflection, strain, and cracking behavior of the beams were evaluated based on the experimental output. The test results indicate an increase in the cracking load of 69% and an increase in the ultimate load of 92% compared with the control beam. The predicted result from the analytical model shows good agreement with the experimental result, which ensures the competent implementation of the present NSM-steel and CFRP technique.

  15. Initial fracture resistance and curing temperature rise of ten contemporary resin-based composites with increasing radiant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, A; El-Mahy, W; Stewardson, D; Addison, O; Palin, W

    2013-05-01

    The principal objective of this study was to determine whether the bulk fracture resistance of ten light activated composites varied over a clinically realistic range of radiant exposures between 5 and 40 J/cm(2). Ten operators were tested for clinically simulated radiant exposure delivery from a Bluephase(®) (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) LED light to an occlusal cavity floor in tooth 27 in a mannequin head using a MARC(®)-Patient Simulator (Bluelight Analytics Inc., Halifax, NS) device. Notch disc test samples were prepared to determine the torque resistance to fracture (T) of the composites. Samples were irradiated with the same monowave Bluephase(®) light for 10s, 20s or 40s at distances of 0mm or 7 mm. After 24h, storage samples were fractured in a universal testing machine and torque to failure was derived. Radiant exposure delivered in the clinical simulation ranged from 14.3% to 69.4% of maximum mean radiant exposure deliverable at 0mm in a MARC(®)-Resin Calibrator (Bluelight Analytics Inc., Halifax, NS) test device. Mean torque to failure increased significantly (Pradiant exposure for 8 out of 10 products. The micro-fine hybrid composite Gradia Direct anterior (GC) had the lowest mean (S.D.) T between 10.3 (1.8)N/mm and 13.7 (2.2)N/mm over the tested radiant exposure range. Three heavily filled materials Majesty Posterior, Clearfil APX and Clearfil Photo-Posterior (Kuraray) had mean T values in excess of 25 N/mm following 40 J/cm(2) radiant exposure. Mean T for Z100 (3MESPE) and Esthet-X (Dentsply) increased by 10% and 91% respectively over the tested range of radiant exposures. Individual products require different levels of radiant exposure to optimize their fracture resistance. Light activated composites vary in the rate at which they attain optimal fracture resistance. Unless the clinician accurately controls all the variables associated with energy delivery, there is no way of predicting that acceptable fracture resistance will be

  16. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  17. Assessment of changes in color and color parameters of light-cured composite resin after alternative polymerization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Bulbul, Mehmet; Ertas, Ertan; Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Usumez, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    To examine the amount of change in color and color parameters of a composite resin (Filtek P60) polymerized by five different polymerization methods. A Teflon mold (6mm in diameter, 2mm in height) was used to prepare the composite resin discs (n=10). G1: Polymerization with inlay oven; G2: Polymerization with HQTH and autoclave; G3: Polymerization with LED and autoclave; G4: Polymerization with HQTH; G5: Polymerization with LED. Colorimetric values of the specimens before and after polymerization were measured using a spectrophotometer. The CIE L*a*b color system was used for the determination of color difference. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data for significant differences. Tukey's HSD test and paired two-tailed tests were used to perform multiple comparisons (α=.05). There were no significant differences in total color change (ΔE*ab) among the polymerization groups (P>.05). However, the lowest color change (ΔE*ab) value was 3.3 in LED and autoclave; the highest color change (ΔE*ab) value was 4.6 in HQTH. For all groups, CIE L*, C*ab and a*values decreased after polymerization (PComposite resin material showed color changes above the clinically accepted value in all study groups (ΔE*ab⩾3.3). All specimens became darker during investigation (ΔL*< 0). Specimens polymerized with inlay oven presented the highest Δb* values which means less yellow color in specimens.

  18. Effect of elemental composition of ion beam on the phase formation and surface strengthening of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdienko, K.I.; Avdienko, A.A.; Kovalenko, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    The investigation results are reported on the influence of ion beam element composition on phase formation, wear resistance and microhardness of surface layers of titanium alloys VT-4 and VT-16 as well as stainless steel 12Kh18N10T implanted with nitrogen, oxygen and boron. It is stated that ion implantation into structural materials results in surface hardening and is directly dependent on element composition of implanted ion beam. The presence of oxygen in boron or nitrogen ion beams prevents the formation of boride and nitride phases thus decreasing a hardening effect [ru

  19. Numerical studies of shear damped composite beams using a constrained damping layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, R.F.; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2008-01-01

    Composite beams containing one or more damping layers are studied numerically. The work is based on a semi-analytical model using a Timoshenko beam theory and a full 2D finite element model. The material system analysed, is inspired by a train wagon suspension system used in a EUREKA project Sigma......!1841. For the material system, the study shows that the effect of the damping layer is strongly influenced by the presence of a stiff constraining layer, that enforces large shear strain amplitudes. The thickness of the damping rubber layer itself has only a minor influence on the overall damping....... In addition, a large influence of ill positioned cuts in the damping layer is observed....

  20. Relation between in-vitro wear and nanomechanical properties of commercial light-cured dental composites coated with surface sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Santos Jr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the correlation between the in-vitro wear resistance and the nanomechanical properties of dental sealants commercially available. Mechanical properties, namely hardness (H and elastic modulus (E, were assessed by nanoindentation technique. The coated samples presented lower H and E values than the Z250 composite resin substrate. Such measurements were used to calculate H/E ratios. Wear tests were carried out in water by using a pin-on-plate apparatus. Scars formed on the samples were qualitatively examined by optical microscopy, while their wear depths were measured by contact profilometry. Based on the findings, an empirical correlation between the wear depths and H/E was obtained. A high H/E ratio was associated to surfaces with enhanced wear resistance. For the tribological conditions here employed, the H/E ratio could be, therefore, considered a useful parameter for ranking the in-vitro wear of dental sealants.

  1. Experimental vs. analytical modal analysis of a composite circumferentially asymmetric stiffness box beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalski, Jarosław; Kowalczuk, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical vs. experimental modal analysis of a composite thin-walled beam featuring a circumfer-entially asymmetric stiffness (CAS) profile characteristics. The adopted lamination scheme results in the complex elastic deformation modes exhibiting mutual coupling of flapwise bending, transverse shear and torsion. The analytical model used in this study is based on the authors previous research and takes into account most classical and non-classical effects specific for thin-walled composite structures. The theoretical outcomes are compared to experimental ones obtained by two different test methods, namely an impact hammer test and a laser vibrometer test. In this second experiment the macro fibre composite (MFC) patch actuators have been used to excite the system. For comparative purposes two different transducer types providing different excitation load have been examined. The performed analytical and laboratory experiments demonstrate extremely high consistent findings irrespective of the means of excitation. Therefore, the laser-based motion analysis system combined with piezo-actuator excitation may be considered as a feasible and accurate method for static and dynamic experiments on systems exhibiting complex deformation modes. These include also highly flexible structures where the deformations can not be measured by conventional contact methods e.g. due to the influence of an accelerometer mass. The discussed laser-based motion measuring technique can also be used in future modal analysis experiments on rotating beams.

  2. Development of APDL program for analysis of composite material multicell beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.M.; Pasha, M.; Ahmed, M.N.; Munir, A.

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of finite elements and comparison of ANSYS with MSC Patran Nastran, for analysis of composite material multicell beams, is the main idea of this paper. The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool of modeling and simulation in development, processing, production and application of modern hi-tech materials and structures for reliable design. Multicell beams have important industrial applications in the automotive and aerospace sectors. ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL) is an important language in parametric modeling and analysis of structures with simple to complex geometry. Its major advantage is virtual prototyping which can be used to analyze and compare different materials. This work introduces core techniques required for APDL using the case study of composite multicell beams subjected to constrained torsional loading. The published results using MSC NASTRAN have been verified using ANSYS and the corresponding arising issues and notes are the focus of this research study. The details of geometry, material and boundary conditions have been explained in order to construct Finite Element (FE) model. This FE model was simulated several times in ANSYS by the authors using various options of APDL language. A step-wise flowchart was used to detect and reduce problems in iterations of analysis in APDL programming. Results of FEA largely depend on FE model and software used. These issues become prominent while trying to verify results of MSC NASTRAN with ANSYS. The author has introduced three error criteria to select an equivalent finite element of one FEA package (ANSYS) for an equivalent element of other FEA package (MSC NASTRAN). These criteria are the relative error criterion, the absolute error criterion and the combined error criterion. The results from this research provide an insight into finite elements for reliability in design of composite materials. The practical milestones for research to develop FE model and APDL programs related

  3. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates

  4. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  5. Numerical modeling and experimental testing of the DCB laminated composite beams with mechanical couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborski, Sylwester; Rzeczkowski, Jakub

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical analysis of the DCB test configuration together with the data reduction scheme described in the ASTM D 5528 Standard for determination of the mode I fracture toughness in case of the laminated composites with mechanical couplings. Numerical analysis based on the FEM approach was performed with the Abaqus software exploiting the VCCT technique. The experiments on the DCB beams made of coupled laminates were also performed. The results show, that the distribution of the Strain Energy Release Rate can be asymmetric. A need for appropriate data reduction schemes has been revealed.

  6. Radiation induced synthesis of gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles using high-energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kojima, Takao; Taniguci, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of gold and iron oxide were synthesized in aqueous solution systems by using a high-energy electron beam. The electron irradiation induces radiation-chemical reaction to form metallic gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles. Surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles are almost fully coated with fine gold nanoparticles. The size of these gold nanoparticles depended on the concentrations of gold ions, polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in the solutions before the irradiation.

  7. Analysis of Composite Steel-concrete Beams Exposed to Fire using OpenSees

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jian; Li, Guo-Qiang; Usmani, Asif

    2015-01-01

    OpenSees is an open-source object-oriented software framework developed at UC Berekeley. The OpenSees framework has been recently extended to deal with structural behaviour under fire conditions. This paper summaries the key work done for this extension and focuses on the validation and application of the developed OpenSees to study the behaviour of composite steel-concrete beams under fire conditions. The performance of the developed OpenSees are verified by four mechanical tests and two fir...

  8. Investigation the interaction between the pulsed ultraviolet laser beams and PEDOT:PSS/graphene composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng, E-mail: tsengsf@itrc.narl.org.tw [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Chung, Chien-Kai [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chang, Tien-Li [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 10610, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • This research aims to investigate the interaction between pulsed ultraviolet laser beams and transparent PEDOT:PSS/graphene composite films. • The laser ablated microstructure on film surfaces provides the electrical isolation. • The surface roughness, microhardness, spectrum and cross-sectional view of PEDOT:PSS/graphene composite film were measured and analyzed. • The focused UV laser beam was irradiated along line patterns with an overlapping rate of 60%. • The applied laser fluences much over the ablation thresholds of 1.27 J/cm{sup 2} to 3.82 J/cm{sup 2}. - Abstract: This research aims to investigate the interaction between pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser beams and transparent PEDOT:PSS/graphene composite films. The laser ablated microstructure on film surfaces provides the electrical isolation and prevents the electrical contact from each location for the projected capacitive touch screen. Before the laser processing, the surface roughness, microhardness, spectrum and cross-sectional view of PEDOT:PSS/graphene composite film were measured by an atomic force microscope, a nanoindenter, a spectrometer and a scanning electron microscope, respectively. The focused UV laser beam was irradiated along line patterns with an overlapping rate of 60% and the applied laser fluences much over the ablation thresholds of 1.27 J/cm{sup 2} to 3.82 J/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology, three-dimensional topography, and cross-sectional profile of isolated lines and electrode structures after laser microstructuring were measured by a confocal laser scanning microscope. By increasing the laser fluence from 1.27 J/cm{sup 2} to 3.82 J/cm{sup 2}, the ablated line widths and depths increased from 12.17 ± 0.24 μm to 21 ± 0.37 μm and from 190 ± 9 nm to 227 ± 15 nm, respectively. Moreover, the ablated lines of microstructuring electrodes had a clear an