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Sample records for beam ct evaluation

  1. Evaluation of pixel value of dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT number derived from medical CT (MDCT) is effective for evaluating the quality of bone. On the other hand, in dental cone beam CT (CBCT), it is questionable whether the pixel value of the CBCT reflects the quality of bone. To investigate this matter, we prepared a dry skull with gypsum markers attached at different positions, scanned by MDCT and CBCT, and compared the CT number or pixel value between gypsum markers. Sixteen gypsum markers were attached on labial and buccal sites of maxillary and mandibular bone of a dry skull. They were scanned by a MDCT and three dental CBCT devices. The CT numbers or pixel values of gypsum markers measured by CT devices were examined, and their position and CT device dependencies were compared and discussed. In the case of MDCT, the average CT number and standard deviation of 16 markers was 2,011±79. In the case of CBCT, pixel value was 2,815±305. The pixel value changed significantly by a slight change in position of the dry skull. Similar results were obtained for other CBCT devices. These results are considered to be due mainly to the scattered beams in the CBCT. The incident beam extends conically-shaped in the CBCT and there is much beam scattering depending on the position of the measured object, causing pixel values to deviate. Flat panel detector equipped in the CBCT is not effective to defend scattered beam on the edges of the detector. An effective device such as a collimator to eliminate beam scattering or software to compensate for beam scattering needs to be developed. (author)

  2. Radiographic evaluation of dentigerous cyst with cone beam CT

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    Park, Yong Chan; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [School of Dentisity, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to accurately analyze the radiographic characteristics of dentigerous cyst (DC) with multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty eight radiographically and histopathologically proven cases of DCs were analyzed with panoramic radiograph and CBCT, retrospectively. The radiographic CT pattern, symmetry of radiolucency around the unerupted tooth crown, ratio of long length to short length, degree of cortical bone alternation, effects on adjacent tooth, and cyst size were analyzed. Relative frequencies of these radiographic features were evaluated. In order to compare the CBCT features of DC with those of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), 9 cases of OKCs were analyzed with the same method radiographically. DCs consisted of thirty unilocular cases (79.0%), seven lobulated cases (18.4%) and one multilocular case (2.6%). Eight were asymmetric (21.0%) and thirty were symmetric (79.0%). Maxillary DC showed rounder shape than mandibular DC (L/S ratio; maxilla 1.32, mandible 1.67). Alternations of lingual cortical bone (14 cases, 48.2%) were more frequent than those of buccal side (7 cases, 24.1%). CBCT images of DC showed definite root resorption and bucco-lingual tooth displacement. These findings were hardly observed on panoramic radiographs of DCs. Comparison of CBCT features of DC with those of OKC showed several different features. CBCT images of DC showed various characteristic radiographic features. Therefore, CBCT can be helpful for the diagnosis of DC radiographically.

  3. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri.matenine.1@ulaval.ca; Mascolo-Fortin, Julia, E-mail: julia.mascolo-fortin.1@ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Goussard, Yves, E-mail: yves.goussard@polymtl.ca [Département de génie électrique/Institut de génie biomédical, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Després, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.despres@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique and Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  4. Performance evaluation of the backprojection filtered (BPF) algorithm in circular fan-beam and cone-beam CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article we introduce an exact backprojecfion filtered (BPF) type reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam scans based on Zou and Pan's work. The algorithm can reconstruct images using only the projection data passing through the parallel PI-line segments in reduced scans. Computer simulations and practical experiments are carried out to evaluate this algorithm. The BPF algorithm has a higher computational efficiency than the famous FDK algorithm. The BPF algorithm is evaluated using the practical CT projection data on a 450 keV X-ray CT system with a flat-panel detector (FPD). From the practical experiments, we get the spatial resolution of this CT system. The algorithm could achieve the spatial resolution of 2.4 lp/mm and satisfies the practical applications in industrial CT inspection.

  5. Evaluation of tilted cone-beam CT orbits in the development of a dedicated hybrid mammotomograph

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    Madhav, P; Crotty, D J; Tornai, M P [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); McKinley, R L [Zumatek Incorporated, Chapel Hill, NC 27519 (United States)], E-mail: priti.madhav@duke.edu

    2009-06-21

    A compact dedicated 3D breast SPECT-CT (mammotomography) system is currently under development. In its initial prototype, the cone-beam CT sub-system is restricted to a fixed-tilt circular rotation around the patient's pendant breast. This study evaluated stationary-tilt angles for the CT sub-system that will enable maximal volumetric sampling and viewing of the breast and chest wall. Images of geometric/anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired using various fixed-tilt circular and 3D sinusoidal trajectories. The iteratively reconstructed images showed more distortion and attenuation coefficient inaccuracy from tilted cone-beam orbits than from the complex trajectory. Additionally, line profiles illustrated cupping artifacts in planes distal to the central plane of the tilted cone-beam, otherwise not apparent for images acquired with complex trajectories. This indicates that undersampled cone-beam data may be an additional cause of cupping artifacts. High-frequency objects could be distinguished for all trajectories, but their shapes and locations were corrupted by out-of-plane frequency information. Although more acrylic balls were visualized with a fixed-tilt and nearly flat cone-beam at the posterior of the breast, 3D complex trajectories have less distortion and more complete sampling throughout the reconstruction volume. While complex trajectories would ideally be preferred, negatively fixed-tilt source-detector configuration demonstrates minimally distorted patient images.

  6. Evaluation of tilted cone-beam CT orbits in the development of a dedicated hybrid mammotomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact dedicated 3D breast SPECT-CT (mammotomography) system is currently under development. In its initial prototype, the cone-beam CT sub-system is restricted to a fixed-tilt circular rotation around the patient's pendant breast. This study evaluated stationary-tilt angles for the CT sub-system that will enable maximal volumetric sampling and viewing of the breast and chest wall. Images of geometric/anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired using various fixed-tilt circular and 3D sinusoidal trajectories. The iteratively reconstructed images showed more distortion and attenuation coefficient inaccuracy from tilted cone-beam orbits than from the complex trajectory. Additionally, line profiles illustrated cupping artifacts in planes distal to the central plane of the tilted cone-beam, otherwise not apparent for images acquired with complex trajectories. This indicates that undersampled cone-beam data may be an additional cause of cupping artifacts. High-frequency objects could be distinguished for all trajectories, but their shapes and locations were corrupted by out-of-plane frequency information. Although more acrylic balls were visualized with a fixed-tilt and nearly flat cone-beam at the posterior of the breast, 3D complex trajectories have less distortion and more complete sampling throughout the reconstruction volume. While complex trajectories would ideally be preferred, negatively fixed-tilt source-detector configuration demonstrates minimally distorted patient images.

  7. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  8. Three dimensional evaluation of impacted mesiodens using dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to analyze the position, pattern of impacted mesiodens, and their relationship to the adjacent teeth using Dental cone-beam CT. Sixty-two dental cone-beam CT images with 81 impacted mesiodenses were selected from about 2,298 cone-beam CT images at Chonnam National University Dental Hospital from June 2006 to March 2009. The position, pattern, shape of impacted mesiodenses and their complications were analyzed in cone-beam CT including 3D images. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.9 : 1. Most of the mesiodenses (87.7%) were located at palatal side to the incisors. 79% of the mesiodenses were conical in shape. 60.5% of the mesiodenses were inverted, 21% normal erupting direction, and 18.5% transverse direction. The complications due to the presence of mesiodenses were none in 43.5%, diastema in 19.4%, tooth displacement in 17.7%, delayed eruption or impaction in 12.9%, tooth rotation in 4.8%, and dentigerous cyst in 1.7%. Dental cone-beam CT images with 3D provided 3-dimensional perception of mesiodens to the neighboring teeth. This results would be helpful for management of the impacted mesiodens.

  9. Three dimensional evaluation of impacted mesiodens using dental cone beam CT

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    Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    This study was performed to analyze the position, pattern of impacted mesiodens, and their relationship to the adjacent teeth using Dental cone-beam CT. Sixty-two dental cone-beam CT images with 81 impacted mesiodenses were selected from about 2,298 cone-beam CT images at Chonnam National University Dental Hospital from June 2006 to March 2009. The position, pattern, shape of impacted mesiodenses and their complications were analyzed in cone-beam CT including 3D images. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.9 : 1. Most of the mesiodenses (87.7%) were located at palatal side to the incisors. 79% of the mesiodenses were conical in shape. 60.5% of the mesiodenses were inverted, 21% normal erupting direction, and 18.5% transverse direction. The complications due to the presence of mesiodenses were none in 43.5%, diastema in 19.4%, tooth displacement in 17.7%, delayed eruption or impaction in 12.9%, tooth rotation in 4.8%, and dentigerous cyst in 1.7%. Dental cone-beam CT images with 3D provided 3-dimensional perception of mesiodens to the neighboring teeth. This results would be helpful for management of the impacted mesiodens.

  10. Comparative evaluation of cone-beam CT equipment with micro-CT in the visualization of root canal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence Tamas Szabo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare three different cone-beam CT (CBCT instruments used in dental clinical practice with micro-CT as gold standard. Three female monkeys’ (Macaca fascicularis skulls were selected and scanned by the tested CBCT-s. The most apical visible root canal level on the CBCT images was used as reference level (RL. After the image acquisition by CBCT-s dental jaw sections were scanned by micro-CT at a resolution of 17 μm. Out of the left second and third molars 25 root canals were selected and analysed by three observers at RL and following cross sectional parameters were determined: area of the lumen, major and minor diameters, aspect ratio and mean thickness. Results suggest that only high resolution CBCT instruments allow dentists detecting the full length of the root canal.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE AUTOMATIC IMAGE REGISTRATION FEATURES OF A KV CONE-BEAM CT IMAGING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    JANVARY, Zsolt Levente; JANSEN, Nicolas; MATHOT, Michel; Lenaerts, Eric; Martinive, Philippe; Coucke, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the clinical implementation of a kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) volumetric imaging system for new Elekta Synergy linear accelerators, the automatic image registration (IR) system of the XVI Software was studied. We examined the effect of the variability of matching parameters of the software on the results of the patient position errors.

  12. Evaluation of imaging performance of megavoltage cone-beam CT over an extended period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A linear accelerator vendor and the AAPM TG-142 report propose that quality assurance testing for image-guided devices such megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) be conducted on a monthly basis. In clinical settings, however, unpredictable errors such as image artifacts can occur even when quality assurance results performed at this frequency are within tolerance limits. Here, we evaluated the imaging performance of MV-CBCT on a weekly basis for ∼1 year using a Siemens ONCOR machine with a 6-MV X-ray and an image-quality phantom. Image acquisition was undertaken using 15 monitor units. Geometric distortion was evaluated with beads evenly distributed in the phantom, and the results were compared with the expected position in three dimensions. Image-quality characteristics of the system were measured and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, including image noise and uniformity, low-contrast resolution, high-contrast resolution and spatial resolution. All evaluations were performed 100 times each. For geometric distortion, deviation between the measured and expected values was within the tolerance limit of 2 mm. However, a subtle systematic error was found which meant that the phantom was rotated slightly in a clockwise manner, possibly due to geometry calibration of the MV-CBCT system. Regarding image noise and uniformity, two incidents over tolerance occurred in 100 measurements. This phenomenon disappeared after dose calibration of beam output for MV-CBCT. In contrast, all results for low-contrast resolution, high-contrast resolution and spatial resolution were within their respective tolerances. (author)

  13. Evaluation of on-board imager cone beam CT hounsfield units for treatment planning using rigid image registration

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamathu Rafic; Paul Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the on-board imager cone beam CT (OBI-CBCT) Hounsfield units (HUs) for treatment planning. Materials and Methods: The HU-electron density (eD) calibration for CBCT, the CATphan504 phantom was used, and the CBCT HU (HU CBCT ) consistency was studied by analyzing the CBCT images of Rando phantom and compared with planning CT. The latter study was also performed on CBCT images of 10 H&N patients. For comparison, the structures contoured and treatment plans generated on C...

  14. Evaluation of robustness of maximum likelihood cone-beam CT reconstruction with total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stsepankou, D.; Arns, A.; Ng, S. K.; Zygmanski, P.; Hesser, J.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate an iterative maximum likelihood (ML) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction with total variation (TV) regularization with respect to the robustness of the algorithm due to data inconsistencies. Three different and (for clinical application) typical classes of errors are considered for simulated phantom and measured projection data: quantum noise, defect detector pixels and projection matrix errors. To quantify those errors we apply error measures like mean square error, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and streak indicator. These measures are derived from linear signal theory and generalized and applied for nonlinear signal reconstruction. For quality check, we focus on resolution and CT-number linearity based on a Catphan phantom. All comparisons are made versus the clinical standard, the filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In our results, we confirm and substantially extend previous results on iterative reconstruction such as massive undersampling of the number of projections. Errors of projection matrix parameters of up to 1° projection angle deviations are still in the tolerance level. Single defect pixels exhibit ring artifacts for each method. However using defect pixel compensation, allows up to 40% of defect pixels for passing the standard clinical quality check. Further, the iterative algorithm is extraordinarily robust in the low photon regime (down to 0.05 mAs) when compared to FPB, allowing for extremely low-dose image acquisitions, a substantial issue when considering daily CBCT imaging for position correction in radiotherapy. We conclude that the ML method studied herein is robust under clinical quality assurance conditions. Consequently, low-dose regime imaging, especially for daily patient localization in radiation therapy is possible without change of the current hardware of the imaging system.

  15. Evaluation of on-board kV cone beam CT (CBCT)-based dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Schreibmann, Eduard; Li, Tianfang; Wang, Chuang; Xing, Lei

    2007-02-01

    On-board CBCT images are used to generate patient geometric models to assist patient setup. The image data can also, potentially, be used for dose reconstruction in combination with the fluence maps from treatment plan. Here we evaluate the achievable accuracy in using a kV CBCT for dose calculation. Relative electron density as a function of HU was obtained for both planning CT (pCT) and CBCT using a Catphan-600 calibration phantom. The CBCT calibration stability was monitored weekly for 8 consecutive weeks. A clinical treatment planning system was employed for pCT- and CBCT-based dose calculations and subsequent comparisons. Phantom and patient studies were carried out. In the former study, both Catphan-600 and pelvic phantoms were employed to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the full-fan and half-fan scanning modes. To evaluate the dosimetric influence of motion artefacts commonly seen in CBCT images, the Catphan-600 phantom was scanned with and without cyclic motion using the pCT and CBCT scanners. The doses computed based on the four sets of CT images (pCT and CBCT with/without motion) were compared quantitatively. The patient studies included a lung case and three prostate cases. The lung case was employed to further assess the adverse effect of intra-scan organ motion. Unlike the phantom study, the pCT of a patient is generally acquired at the time of simulation and the anatomy may be different from that of CBCT acquired at the time of treatment delivery because of organ deformation. To tackle the problem, we introduced a set of modified CBCT images (mCBCT) for each patient, which possesses the geometric information of the CBCT but the electronic density distribution mapped from the pCT with the help of a BSpline deformable image registration software. In the patient study, the dose computed with the mCBCT was used as a surrogate of the 'ground truth'. We found that the CBCT electron density calibration curve differs moderately from that of pCT. No

  16. Evaluation of on-board imager cone beam CT hounsfield units for treatment planning using rigid image registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamathu Rafic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the on-board imager cone beam CT (OBI-CBCT Hounsfield units (HUs for treatment planning. Materials and Methods: The HU-electron density (eD calibration for CBCT, the CATphan504 phantom was used, and the CBCT HU (HU CBCT consistency was studied by analyzing the CBCT images of Rando phantom and compared with planning CT. The latter study was also performed on CBCT images of 10 H&N patients. For comparison, the structures contoured and treatment plans generated on CT were transferred on to the CBCT after registration. The treatment plans were compared using gamma (g index analysis and the plan comparison dose volume histograms (DVH PlanComp . Results: Although the HU-eD calibration curves of both the planning CT and CBCT were found to be linear, differences in mean HU values were found in the region of interest (ROI corresponding to Acrylic, Derlin, and Teflon, viz., 144 ± 11 HU, 193 ± 5 HU, and 257 ± 7 HU respectively. For all the cases, the consistency and reproducibility of HU CBCT values for low density medium agreed the HU CT except at regions of high density. Overall g-evaluation showed more than 94% pixels pass rate and DVH results showed small difference in the DVH PlanComp, Rando, and large differences in DVH PlanComp, patient for structures contoured at peripheral regions (PV of CBCT images. Conclusions: We conclude that the pixel-to-pixel HU corrections for entire range of eD are not necessary for OBI-CBCT images. Application of local correction in the high-density and penumbral regions would facilitate the use of CBCT images for routine treatment planning.

  17. Cone Beam Micro-CT System for Small Animal Imaging and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype cone-beam micro-CT system for small animal imaging has been developed by our group recently, which consists of a microfocus X-ray source, a three-dimensional programmable stage with object holder, and a flat-panel X-ray detector. It has a large field of view (FOV, which can acquire the whole body imaging of a normal-size mouse in a single scan which usually takes about several minutes or tens of minutes. FDK method is adopted for 3D reconstruction with Graphics Processing Unit (GPU acceleration. In order to reconstruct images with high spatial resolution and low artifacts, raw data preprocessing and geometry calibration are implemented before reconstruction. A method which utilizes a wire phantom to estimate the residual horizontal offset of the detector is proposed, and 1D point spread function is used to assess the performance of geometric calibration quantitatively. System spatial resolution, image uniformity and noise, and low contrast resolution have been studied. Mouse images with and without contrast agent are illuminated in this paper. Experimental results show that the system is suitable for small animal imaging and is adequate to provide high-resolution anatomic information for bioluminescence tomography to build a dual modality system.

  18. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT system (Somatom Sensation 16) using 13 different scan protocols. Visibility of 11 anatomical structures and overall image noise were compared between CBCT and MSCT. Five independent observers reviewed the CBCT and the MSCT images in the three orthographic planes (axial, sagittal and coronal) and assessed image quality on a five-point scale. Results: Significant differences were found in the visibility of the different anatomical structures and image noise level between MSCT and CBCT and among the five CBCT systems (p = 0.0001). Delicate structures such as trabecular bone and periodontal ligament were significantly less visible and more variable among the systems in comparison with other anatomical structures (p = 0.0001). Visibility of relatively large structures such as mandibular canal and mental foramen was satisfactory for all devices. The Accuitomo system was superior to MSCT and all other CBCT systems in depicting anatomical structures while MSCT was superior to all other CBCT systems in terms of reduced image noise. Conclusions: CBCT image quality is comparable or even superior to MSCT even though some variability exists among the different CBCT systems in depicting delicate structures. Considering the low radiation dose and high-resolution imaging, CBCT could be beneficial for dentomaxillofacial radiology.

  19. Respiratory-triggered electron beam CT with integrated spirometry for evaluation of dynamic airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Welch, Mike; Szold, Oded; Levine, Michael; Aberle, Denise R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose is to integrate time-attenuation curves from Electron-Beam CT with flow-time curves from spirometry in the analysis of airflow obstruction. A pressure-sensitive switch was connected between a spirometer mouthpiece and a modified EBCT scanner keyboard. The onset of expiratory flow causes pressure changes which simultaneously trigger EBCT and spirometric acquisitions. Subjects performed a forced expiratory maneuver, during which EBCT images of the lung were obtained every 500 ms using 130 kVp, 630 mA, 100 ms scan time and 3 mm collimation. From EBCT images, time-attenuation curves were generated for each of three zones (non-dependent, middle and dependent lung) using small ROIs (12 mm2) placed over approximately the same anatomic regions of lung. The resulting time- attenuation curves and flow-time curves were then superimposed. Two normal subjects, two subjects with emphysema and three lung transplant subjects have been studied to date. In normal subjects, lung attenuation increases steadily during the first 4 - 6 seconds of expiration, whereas in patients with emphysema, lung attenuation was relatively constant over the course of expiration. Lung transplant subjects show both of these characteristics--normal characteristics for the transplant lung and emphysematous characteristics for the native lung. Lung transplant subjects may also demonstrate some dynamics between transplant and diseased lung. Respiratory-triggered EBCT can be used to simultaneously acquire time-attenuation and flow-time data. This has been used to characterize dynamic airflow patterns in patients with respiratory disease.

  20. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT)

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    Liang Xin, E-mail: Xin.Liang@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University (China); Jacobs, Reinhilde, E-mail: Reinhilde.Jacobs@uz.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Hassan, Bassam, E-mail: b.hassan@acta.n [Department of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li Limin, E-mail: Limin.Li@uz.kuleuven.b [Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Special Dental Care, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Pauwels@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Corpas, Livia, E-mail: LiviaCorpas@gmail.co [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Souza, Paulo Couto, E-mail: Paulo.CoutoSouza@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Wendy, E-mail: wendy.martens@uhasselt.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasselt, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Shahbazian, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahbazian@student.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Alonso, Arie, E-mail: ariel.alonso@uhasselt.b [Department of Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics, Universiteit Hasselt (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT system (Somatom Sensation 16) using 13 different scan protocols. Visibility of 11 anatomical structures and overall image noise were compared between CBCT and MSCT. Five independent observers reviewed the CBCT and the MSCT images in the three orthographic planes (axial, sagittal and coronal) and assessed image quality on a five-point scale. Results: Significant differences were found in the visibility of the different anatomical structures and image noise level between MSCT and CBCT and among the five CBCT systems (p = 0.0001). Delicate structures such as trabecular bone and periodontal ligament were significantly less visible and more variable among the systems in comparison with other anatomical structures (p = 0.0001). Visibility of relatively large structures such as mandibular canal and mental foramen was satisfactory for all devices. The Accuitomo system was superior to MSCT and all other CBCT systems in depicting anatomical structures while MSCT was superior to all other CBCT systems in terms of reduced image noise. Conclusions: CBCT image quality is comparable or even superior to MSCT even though some variability exists among the different CBCT systems in depicting delicate structures. Considering the low radiation dose and high-resolution imaging, CBCT could be beneficial for dentomaxillofacial radiology.

  1. Evaluation of the linearity characteristic of the cone-beam CT fixed on the Varian 23EX linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the CT number linearity of the cone-beam CT (CBCT) images at the different spatial locations in the scanning area. Methods: The Catphan 504 phantom at the different locations are scanned repeatedly using the CBCT on the Varian 23EX linear accelerator. The phantom is located the isocenter point, eccentric 3 cm, eccentric 6 cm, and different points on the z-axis successively on the accelerator. The scanned mode is the standard head mode. The reconstructive thickness is 2.5 cm. The different densities inserts of CTP 4.4 module on the different locations are measured via Eclips treatment planning system (TPS) and computed by Matlab 7.0 and the CT linear fitting are then processed. In order to understand better the linear distribution along with the value of CT in the spatial distribution the results are compared with the fan-beam CT. Results: Phantom studies show that: CBCT has good linearity performance not only under the standard header (body) of the scanning conditions, but also on such locations including the cross-sectional, the sagittal, the coronal plane and the eccentric position (R2>0.953). Bowtie filtration device dose not change the CT linearity but changes the value of CT. Conclusions: The linearity of X-ray CBCT on the Varian linear accelerator is favorable. CBCT will be used in the TPS dose calculation via further correction of the CT value. (authors)

  2. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  3. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality

  4. Morphology of bone defects in patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Cone beam x-ray CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orthodontic treatment planning of the cleft lip and palate vary according to the morphology of the alveolar bone and palatal bone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the three-dimensional anatomy of the alveolar and palatal bone in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Thirty-three nonsyndromic consecutive patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate were treated by the cleft palate team at Showa University. Each patient had lip and palate surgeries at Showa University. Cone beam CT radiographs (CB MercuRay, Hitachi) were taken prior to secondary bone grafting, and were classified according to the method of Kita et al. 1997. Cone beam CT radiographs showed multiple types of alveolar and palatal bone morphology, and focused on special types described in the method of Kita et al. It was most frequently found that bone defects in the alveolar crest showed similar patterns in both buccal and palatal aspect, and the buccal bone defect in the nasal floor was larger than the palatal bone defect in the nasal floor. In 80% of the patients, the palatal bone defect showed similar patterns in both anterior and posterior aspects, and the anterior palatal bone defect was smaller than the posterior palatal bone defect. In addition, inadequate bone bridges were frequently found at the cleft site. It is suggested that patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate have various types of alveolar and palatal bone morphology, and are required to take three-dimensional radiographic X-rays prior to any orthodontic treatment. (author)

  5. A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

  6. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S., E-mail: magerasg@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  7. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  8. Evaluation of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters for cone-beam CT imaging of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassillis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and dose were characterized for a new CBCT system developed for point-of-care imaging of the head, with potential application to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and stroke. A detector performance model was extended to include the effects of detector readout gain on electronic digitization noise. The noise performance for high-gain (HG), low-gain (LG), and dual-gain (DG) detector readout was evaluated, and the benefit associated with HG mode in regions free from detector saturation was quantified. Such benefit could be realized (without detector saturation) either via DG mode or by incorporation of a bowtie filter. Therefore, three bowtie filters were investigated that varied in thickness and curvature. A polyenergetic gain correction method was developed to equalize the detector response between the flood-field and projection data in the presence of a bowtie. The effect of bowtie filters on dose, scatter-to-primary ratio, contrast, and noise was quantified in phantom studies, and results were compared to a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to characterize x-ray scatter and dose distributions in the head. Imaging in DG mode improved the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by ~15% compared to LG mode at a dose (D 0, measured at the center of a 16 cm CTDI phantom) of 19 mGy. MC dose calculations agreed with CTDI measurements and showed that bowtie filters reduce peripheral dose by as much as 50% at the same central dose. Bowtie filters were found to increase the CNR per unit square-root dose near the center of the image by ~5–20% depending on bowtie thickness, but reduced CNR in the periphery by ~10–40%. Images acquired at equal CTDIw with and without a bowtie demonstrated a 24% increase in CNR at the center of an anthropomorphic head phantom. Combining a thick bowtie filter with a short arc (180°  +  fan angle) scan

  9. Evaluation study of the sinus lift technique in combination with autologous bone augmentation in dogs' frontal sinus. Limited cone beam CT image and histopathological analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Tatsuo [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-08-01

    The posterior area of the maxilla has often been considered inadequate for the insertion of dental implants due to insufficient height of the alveolar bone by atrophic reduction and the maxillary sinus expansion. This anatomic problem may be resolved with augmentation of the floor of the maxillary sinus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of sinus lift and grafting with the iliac crest bone performed in the dog frontal sinus as a model of the human maxillary sinus. Time course evaluations of bone volume after insertion of implants were performed by the limited cone beam CT (Ortho-CT), histopathological study and NIH-image digital analysis. New bone formation was identified as early as 2 weeks after the implant insertion. The bone volume was increased continuously until 13th week. High-density bone was found in the cervix of the implant after 26 weeks. However, the bone was lost at apex area of the implant and air cavity of the frontal sinus expanded. Ortho-CT findings showed good correlation with histopathological course of the lesion and bone volume identified by the NIH image analysis. The results revealed first time whole course of the bone remodeling after implant insertion into the frontal sinus of a dog. The data also provide an appropriate timing of the implant prosthesis and promise usefulness of the Ortho-CT in planning efficient implant treatment. (author)

  10. Evaluation study of the sinus lift technique in combination with autologous bone augmentation in dogs' frontal sinus. Limited cone beam CT image and histopathological analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The posterior area of the maxilla has often been considered inadequate for the insertion of dental implants due to insufficient height of the alveolar bone by atrophic reduction and the maxillary sinus expansion. This anatomic problem may be resolved with augmentation of the floor of the maxillary sinus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of sinus lift and grafting with the iliac crest bone performed in the dog frontal sinus as a model of the human maxillary sinus. Time course evaluations of bone volume after insertion of implants were performed by the limited cone beam CT (Ortho-CT), histopathological study and NIH-image digital analysis. New bone formation was identified as early as 2 weeks after the implant insertion. The bone volume was increased continuously until 13th week. High-density bone was found in the cervix of the implant after 26 weeks. However, the bone was lost at apex area of the implant and air cavity of the frontal sinus expanded. Ortho-CT findings showed good correlation with histopathological course of the lesion and bone volume identified by the NIH image analysis. The results revealed first time whole course of the bone remodeling after implant insertion into the frontal sinus of a dog. The data also provide an appropriate timing of the implant prosthesis and promise usefulness of the Ortho-CT in planning efficient implant treatment. (author)

  11. Dynamic Bowtie for Fan-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Fenglin; Cong, Wenxiang; Hsieh, Scott; Pelc, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A bowtie is a filter used to shape an x-ray beam and equalize its flux reaching different detector channels. For development of spectral CT with energy-discriminative photon-counting (EDPC) detectors, here we propose and evaluate a dynamic bowtie for performance optimization based on a patient model or a scout scan. Our dynamic bowtie modifies an x-ray beam intensity profile by mechanical rotation and adaptive adjustment of the x-ray source flux. First, a mathematical model for dynamic bowtie filtering is established for an elliptical section in fan-beam geometry, and the contour of the optimal bowtie is derived. Then, numerical simulation is performed to compare the performance of the dynamic bowtie in the cases of an ideal phantom and a realistic cross-section relative to the counterparts without any bowtie and with a fixed bowtie respectively. Our dynamic bowtie can equalize the expected numbers of photons in the case of an ideal phantom. In practical cases, our dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dy...

  12. Evaluation of patient dose in imaging using a cone-beam CT dosimetry by X-ray films for radiotherapeutic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A limited cone-beam X-ray CT (3DX multi-image micro CT; 3DX-FPD) is widely used in dentistry because it provides a lower cost, smaller size, and higher spatial resolution than a CT for medicine. Our recent research suggested that the patient dose of 3DX-FPD was less than 7/10 of that of CT, and it was several to 10 times more than that of dental or panoramic radiography. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution from 3DX-FPD and to estimate the influence of dose by positioning of the region of interest. Dosimetry of the organs and the tissues was performed using an anthropomorphic Alderson Rando phantom and X-ray films for measurement of radiotherapeutic dose. Measurements of dose distribution were performed using a cylinder-type tank of water made of acrylic resin imitating the head and X-ray films. The results are summarized as follows: The dose was higher as the ratio of the air region included in the region of interest increased. The dose distribution was not homogeneous and the dose was highest in the skin region. The dose was higher for several seconds after the beginning of exposure. It was concluded that patient positioning, as well as exposure conditions including the size of the exposure field and tube current, could greatly influence the patient dose in 3DX-FPD. In addition, it is necessary to consider the influence of image quality for the treatment of dental implants. (author)

  13. Evaluation of image quality for different kV cone-beam CT acquisition and reconstruction methods in the head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elstroem, Ulrik V.; Muren, Ludvig P. (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: ulrielst@rm.dk; Petersen, Joergen B. B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Grau, Cai (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the image quality obtained in a standard QA phantom with both clinical and non-clinical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition modes for the head and neck (HN) region as a step towards CBCT-based treatment planning. The impact of deteriorated Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy was investigated by comparing results from clinical CBCT image reconstructions to those obtained from a pre-clinical scatter correction algorithm. Methods. Five different CBCT acquisition modes on a clinical system for kV CBCT-guided radiotherapy were investigated. Image reconstruction was performed in both standard clinical software and with an experimental reconstruction algorithm with improved beam hardening and scatter correction. Using the Catphan 504 phantom, quantitative measures of HU uniformity, HU verification and linearity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution using modulation transfer function (MTF) estimation were assessed. To benchmark the CBCT image properties, comparison to standard HN protocols on conventional CT scanners was performed by similar measures. Results. The HU uniformity within a water-equivalent homogeneous region was considerably improved using experimental vs. standard reconstruction, by factors of two for partial scans and four for full scans. Similarly, the amount of capping/cupping artifact was reduced by more than 1.5%. With mode and reconstruction specific HU calibration using seven inhomogeneity inserts comparable HU linearity was observed. CNR was on average 5% higher for experimental reconstruction (scaled with the square-root of dose between modes for both reconstruction methods). Conclusions. Judged on parameters affecting the common diagnostic image properties, improved beam hardening and scatter correction diminishes the difference between CBCT and CT image quality considerably. In the pursuit of CBCT-based treatment adaptation, dedicated imaging protocols may be required

  14. Performance evaluation and optimization of BM4D-AV denoising algorithm for cone-beam CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuidong; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhang, Dinghua; Zhang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The broadening application of cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in medical diagnostics and nondestructive testing, necessitates advanced denoising algorithms for its 3D images. The block-matching and four dimensional filtering algorithm with adaptive variance (BM4D-AV) is applied to the 3D image denoising in this research. To optimize it, the key filtering parameters of the BM4D-AV algorithm are assessed firstly based on the simulated CBCT images and a table of optimized filtering parameters is obtained. Then, considering the complexity of the noise in realistic CBCT images, possible noise standard deviations in BM4D-AV are evaluated to attain the chosen principle for the realistic denoising. The results of corresponding experiments demonstrate that the BM4D-AV algorithm with optimized parameters presents excellent denosing effect on the realistic 3D CBCT images.

  15. Tracker-on-C for cone-beam CT-guided surgery: evaluation of geometric accuracy and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Otake, Y.; Uneri, A.; Schafer, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Nithiananthan, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Khanna, A. J.; Reh, D. D.; Gallia, G. L.; Taylor, R. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional surgical tracking configurations carry a variety of limitations in line-of-sight, geometric accuracy, and mismatch with the surgeon's perspective (for video augmentation). With increasing utilization of mobile C-arms, particularly those allowing cone-beam CT (CBCT), there is opportunity to better integrate surgical trackers at bedside to address such limitations. This paper describes a tracker configuration in which the tracker is mounted directly on the Carm. To maintain registration within a dynamic coordinate system, a reference marker visible across the full C-arm rotation is implemented, and the "Tracker-on-C" configuration is shown to provide improved target registration error (TRE) over a conventional in-room setup - (0.9+/-0.4) mm vs (1.9+/-0.7) mm, respectively. The system also can generate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the perspective of a tracked tool ("x-ray flashlight"), the tracker, or the C-arm ("virtual fluoroscopy"), with geometric accuracy in virtual fluoroscopy of (0.4+/-0.2) mm. Using a video-based tracker, planning data and DRRs can be superimposed on the video scene from a natural perspective over the surgical field, with geometric accuracy (0.8+/-0.3) pixels for planning data overlay and (0.6+/-0.4) pixels for DRR overlay across all C-arm angles. The field-of-view of fluoroscopy or CBCT can also be overlaid on real-time video ("Virtual Field Light") to assist C-arm positioning. The fixed transformation between the x-ray image and tracker facilitated quick, accurate intraoperative registration. The workflow and precision associated with a variety of realistic surgical tasks were significantly improved using the Tracker-on-C - for example, nearly a factor of 2 reduction in time required for C-arm positioning, reduction or elimination of dose in "hunting" for a specific fluoroscopic view, and confident placement of the x-ray FOV on the surgical target. The proposed configuration streamlines the integration of C

  16. Electron beam CT versus 16-slice spiral CT: how accurately can we measure coronary artery calcium volume?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how accurately CAC volume we can be measured using electron beam computed tomography (CT) and 16-slice spiral CT. CAC models with known volume attached to a cardiac phantom were scanned. The error of measurement, variability between measured and real volumes, and inter-scan measurement variability were obtained. For spiral CT, seven different parameters were included: (1) slice thickness (0.625 mm, 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm), (2) retrospective spiral electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated or prospective axial ECG-triggering, (3) overlapping or non-overlapping. The error of measurement was 15% on electron beam CT and 8-20% on spiral CT. CAC volumes were underestimated in 92% and overestimated in 8% of the electron beam CT scans. Volumes were underestimated in 79%, correct in 5% and overestimated in 16% of the spiral CT scans. The best measurement and the least variability was observed on 0.625-mm retrospective spiral ECG-gated CT (error of 8%), a significant result (t-test: P<0.01) when compared with electron beam CT. CAC volume measurement on CT scanners may be significantly different and often underestimates the real volume of CAC. For precise evaluation of CAC volume, thin-slice retrospective spiral ECG-gated scan using a spiral CT scanner is desirable. (orig.)

  17. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver [Department of Physics, Queen' s University (United Kingdom); Schreiner, L John [Medical Physics Department, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tim.Olding@krcc.on.ca

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  18. Comparison of CT numbers between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the CT numbers on 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) images with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT) image using CT phantom and to develop linear regressive equations using CT numbers to material density for all the CT scanner each. Mini CT phantom comprised of five 1 inch thick cylindrical models with 1.125 inches diameter of materials with different densities (polyethylene, polystyrene, plastic water, nylon and acrylic) was used. It was scanned in 3 CBCTs (i-CAT, Alphard VEGA, Implagraphy SC) and 1 MDCT (Somatom Emotion). The images were saved as DICOM format and CT numbers were measured using OnDemand 3D. CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images were compared and linear regression analysis was performed for the density, ρ(g/cm3), as the dependent variable in terms of the CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were smaller than those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image (p<0.05). Linear relationship on a range of materials used for this study were ρ=0.001 H+1.07 with R2 value of 0.999 for Somatom Emotion, ρ=0.002 H+1.09 with R2 value of 0.991 for Alphard VEGA, ρ=0.001 H+1.43 with R2 value of 0.980 for i-CAT and ρ=0.001 H+1.30 with R2 value of 0.975 for Implagraphy. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were not same as those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image. The linear regressive equations to determine the density from the CT numbers with very high correlation coefficient were obtained on three CBCT and MDCT scan.

  19. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose

  20. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  1. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  2. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  3. SU-E-J-106: The Use of Deformable Image Registration with Cone-Beam CT for a Better Evaluation of Cumulative Dose to Organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The knowledge of dose accumulation in the patient tissues in radiotherapy helps in determining the treatment outcomes. This project aims at providing a workflow to map cumulative doses that takes into account interfraction organ motion without the need for manual re-contouring. Methods: Five prostate cancer patients were studied. Each patient had a planning CT (pCT) and 5 to 13 CBCT scans. On each series, a physician contoured the prostate, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles and the intestine. First, a deformable image registration (DIR) of the pCTs onto the daily CBCTs yielded registered CTs (rCT) . This rCT combined the accurate CT numbers of the pCT with the daily anatomy of the CBCT. Second, the original plans (220 cGy per fraction for 25 fractions) were copied on the rCT for dose re-calculation. Third, the DIR software Elastix was used to find the inverse transform from the rCT to the pCT. This transformation was then applied to the rCT dose grid to map the dose voxels back to their pCT location. Finally, the sum of these deformed dose grids for each patient was applied on the pCT to calculate the actual dose delivered to organs. Results: The discrepancy between the planned D98 and D2 and these indices re-calculated on the rCT, are, on average, of −1 ± 1 cGy and 1 ± 2 cGy per fraction, respectively. For fractions with large anatomical motion, the D98 discrepancy on the re-calculated dose grid mapped onto the pCT can raise to −17 ± 4 cGy. The obtained cumulative dose distributions illustrate the same behavior. Conclusion: This approach allowed the evaluation of cumulative doses to organs with the help of uncontoured daily CBCT scans. With this workflow, the easy evaluation of doses delivered for EBRT treatments could ultimately lead to a better follow-up of prostate cancer patients

  4. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose

  5. Comprehensive Evaluations of Cone-beam CT dose in Image-guided Radiation Therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, Davide; Silvestri, Chiara; Graves, Yan J; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is fo...

  6. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amit, Guy [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  7. Reduction of CT beam hardening artefacts of ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer by variation of the tantalum content: evaluation in a standardized aortic endoleak phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treitl, Karla M.; Scherr, Michael; Foerth, Monika; Braun, Franziska; Maxien, Daniel; Treitl, Marcus [Hospitals of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2014-10-16

    Our aim was to develop an aortic stent graft phantom to simulate endoleak treatment and to find a tantalum content (TC) of ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer that causes fewer computed tomography (CT) beam hardening artefacts, but still allows for fluoroscopic visualization. Ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer specimens of different TC (10-50 %, and 100 %) were injected in an aortic phantom bearing a stent graft and endoleak cavities with simulated re-perfusion. Fluoroscopic visibility of the ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer specimens was analyzed. In addition, six radiologists analyzed endoleak visibility, and artefact intensity of ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer in CT. Reduction of TC significantly decreased CT artefact intensity of ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer and increased visibility of endoleak re-perfusion (p < 0.000). It also significantly decreased fluoroscopic visibility of ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer (R = 0.883, p ≤ 0.01), and increased the active embolic volumes prior to visualization (Δ ≥ 40 μl). Ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer specimens with a TC of 45-50 % exhibited reasonable visibility, a low active embolic volume and a tolerable CT artefact intensity. The developed aortic stent graft phantom allows for a reproducible simulation of embolization of endoleaks. The data suggest a reduction of the TC of ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer to 45 -50 % of the original, to interfere less with diagnostic imaging in follow-up CT examinations, while still allowing for fluoroscopic visualization. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of technical quality and periapical health of root-filled teeth by using cone-beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Gülsüm NUR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aimed to assess the quality of root fillings, coronal restorations, complications of all root-filled teeth and their association with apical periodontitis (AP detected by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT images from an adult Turkish subpopulation. Material and Methods The sample for this study consisted of 242 patients (aging from 15 to 72 years with 522 endodontically treated teeth that were assessed for technical quality of the root canal filling and periapical status of the teeth. Additionally, the apical status of each root-filled tooth was assessed according to the gender, dental arch, tooth type and age classification, undetected canals, instrument fracture, root fracture, apical resorption, apical lesion, furcation lesion and type and quality of the coronal structure. Statistical analysis was performed using percentages and chi-square test. Results The success rate of the root canal treatment was of 54.4%. The success rates of adequate and inadequate root canal treatment were not significantly different (p>0.05. Apical periodontitis was found in 228 (45.6% teeth treated for root canals. Higher prevalence of AP was found in patients aging from 20 to 29 years [64 (27% teeth] and in anterior (canines and incisors teeth [97 (41% teeth]. Conclusions The technical quality of root canal filling performed by dental practitioners in a Turkish subpopulation was consistent with a high prevalence of AP. The probable reasons for this failure are multifactorial, and there may be a need for improved undergraduate education and postgraduate courses to improve the clinical skills of dental practitioners in endodontics.

  9. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6±0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4±0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8±0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2±4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  10. Noise power properties of a cone-beam CT system for breast cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L.C.; Huang, Shih-Ying; Packard, Nathan J.; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The noise power properties of a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for breast cancer detection were investigated. Uniform polyethylene cylinders of various diameters were scanned under different system acquisition conditions. Noise power spectra were calculated from difference data generated by subtraction between two identical scans. Multidimensional noise power spectra (NPS) were used as the metric to evaluate the noise properties of the breast CT (bCT) under different syst...

  11. Development of a cone-beam CT system for radiological technologist education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radiological technologists, it is very important to understand the principle of computed tomography (CT) and CT artifacts derived from mechanical and electrical failure. In this study, a CT system for educating radiological technologists was developed. The system consisted of a cone-beam CT scanner and educational software. The cone-beam CT scanner has a simple structure, using a micro-focus X-ray tube and an indirect-conversion flat panel detector. For the educational software, we developed various educational functions of image reconstruction and reconstruction parameters as well as CT artifacts. In the experiments, the capabilities of the system were evaluated using an acrylic phantom. We verified that the system produced the expected results. (author)

  12. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42±19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  13. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    proposed algorithm to be segmentation-free (sf). This deformation leads to a nonlinear accentuation of higher CT-values. The original volume and the gray value deformed volume are monochromatically forward projected. The two projection sets are then monomially combined and reconstructed to generate sets of basis volumes which are used for correction. This is done by maximization of the image flatness due to adding additionally a weighted sum of these basis images. sfEBHC is evaluated on polychromatic simulations, phantom measurements, and patient data. The raw data sets were acquired by a dual source spiral CT scanner, a digital volume tomograph, and a dual source micro CT. Different phantom and patient data were used to illustrate the performance and wide range of usability of sfEBHC across different scanning scenarios. The artifact correction capabilities are compared to EBHC. Results: All investigated cases show equal or improved image quality compared to the standard EBHC approach. The artifact correction is capable of correcting beam hardening artifacts for different scan parameters and scan scenarios. Conclusions: sfEBHC generates beam hardening-reduced images and is furthermore capable of dealing with images which are affected by high noise and strong artifacts. The algorithm can be used to recover structures which are hardly visible inside the beam hardening-affected regions

  14. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schüller, Sören; Sawall, Stefan [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Stannigel, Kai; Hülsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich [Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Fabrikstraße 31, 64625 Bensheim (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz.de [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    proposed algorithm to be segmentation-free (sf). This deformation leads to a nonlinear accentuation of higher CT-values. The original volume and the gray value deformed volume are monochromatically forward projected. The two projection sets are then monomially combined and reconstructed to generate sets of basis volumes which are used for correction. This is done by maximization of the image flatness due to adding additionally a weighted sum of these basis images. sfEBHC is evaluated on polychromatic simulations, phantom measurements, and patient data. The raw data sets were acquired by a dual source spiral CT scanner, a digital volume tomograph, and a dual source micro CT. Different phantom and patient data were used to illustrate the performance and wide range of usability of sfEBHC across different scanning scenarios. The artifact correction capabilities are compared to EBHC. Results: All investigated cases show equal or improved image quality compared to the standard EBHC approach. The artifact correction is capable of correcting beam hardening artifacts for different scan parameters and scan scenarios. Conclusions: sfEBHC generates beam hardening-reduced images and is furthermore capable of dealing with images which are affected by high noise and strong artifacts. The algorithm can be used to recover structures which are hardly visible inside the beam hardening-affected regions.

  15. CT to Cone-beam CT Deformable Registration With Simultaneous Intensity Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Xin; Gu, Xuejun; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT-CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called Deformation with Intensity Simultaneously Corrected (DISC), to deal with CT-CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the orig...

  16. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L2) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  17. CT to cone-beam CT deformable registration with simultaneous intensity correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT–CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called deformation with intensity simultaneously corrected (DISC), to deal with CT–CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the original demons algorithm by performing an adaptive intensity correction step on the CBCT image at every iteration step of the demons registration. Specifically, the intensity correction of a voxel in CBCT is achieved by matching the first and the second moments of the voxel intensities inside a patch around the voxel with those on the CT image. It is expected that such a strategy can remove artifacts in the CBCT image, as well as ensuring the intensity consistency between the two modalities. DISC is implemented on computer graphics processing units in compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming environment. The performance of DISC is evaluated on a simulated patient case and six clinical head-and-neck cancer patient data. It is found that DISC is robust against the CBCT artifacts and intensity inconsistency and significantly improves the registration accuracy when compared with the original demons. (paper)

  18. Expectation maximization reconstruction for circular orbit cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baoyu

    2008-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using a series of X-ray measurements taken from different angles around the object. It has been widely applied in diagnostic medicine and industrial non-destructive testing. Traditional CT reconstructions are limited by many kinds of artifacts, and they give dissatisfactory image. To reduce image noise and artifacts, we propose a statistical iterative approach for cone-beam CT reconstruction. First the theory of maximum likelihood estimation is extended to X-ray scan, and an expectation-maximization (EM) formula is deduced for direct reconstruction of circular orbit cone-beam CT. Then the EM formula is implemented in cone-beam geometry for artifact reduction. EM algorithm is a feasible iterative method, which is based on the statistical properties of Poisson distribution. It can provide good quality reconstructions after a few iterations for cone-beam CT. In the end, experimental results with computer simulated data and real CT data are presented to verify our method is effective.

  19. Extracting respiratory signals from thoracic cone beam CT projections

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Wotao; Pan, Tinsu; Ahmad, Moiz; Mou, Xuanqin; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Patient respiratory signal associated with the cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is important for lung cancer radiotherapy. In contrast to monitoring an external surrogate of respiration, such signal can be extracted directly from the CBCT projections. In this paper, we propose a novel local principle component analysis (LPCA) method to extract the respiratory signal by distinguishing the respiration motion-induced content change from the gantry rotation-induced content change in the CBCT projections. The LPCA method is evaluated by comparing with three state-of-the-art projection-based methods, namely, the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method, the intensity analysis (IA) method, and the Fourier-transform based phase analysis (FT-p) method. The clinical CBCT projection data of eight patients, acquired under various clinical scenarios, were used to investigate the performance of each method. We found that the proposed LPCA method has demonstrated the best overall performance for cases tested and thus is a promising tech...

  20. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors

  1. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnelli, A; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors.

  2. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters

    OpenAIRE

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiogr...

  3. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xin, E-mail: Xin.Liang@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University (China); Lambrichts, Ivo, E-mail: Ivo.Lambrichts@uhasselt.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Histology and Electron Microscopy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasselt, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sun Yi, E-mail: Sunyihello@hotmail.co [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Denis, Kathleen, E-mail: kathleen.denis@groept.b [Department of Industrial Sciences and Techology-Engineering (IWT), XIOS Hogeschool Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Hassan, Bassam, E-mail: b.hassan@acta.n [Department of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li Limin, E-mail: Limin.Li@uz.kuleuven.b [Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Special Dental Care, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Pauwels@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, Reinhilde, E-mail: Reinhilde.Jacobs@uz.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  4. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  5. Image characteristics of cone beam computed tomography using a CT performance phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the characteristics of (widely used) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Images were obtained with CT performance phantoms (The American Association of Physicists in Medicine; AAPM). CT phantom as the destination by using PSR 9000N TM dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and i-CAT CBCT (Imaging Science International Inc., USA) that have different kinds of detectors and field of view, and compared these images with the CT number for linear attenuation, contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. CT number of both PSR 9000N TM dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT did not conform to the base value of CT performance phantom. The contrast of i-CAT CBCT is higher than that of PSR 9000N TM dental CT system. Both contrasts were increased according to thickness of cross section. Spatial resolution and shapes of reappearance was possible up to 0.6 mm in PSR 9000N TM dental CT system and up to 1.0 mm in i-CAT CBCT. Low contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity revealed low level at PSR 9000N TM dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution, however, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity was the inferiority of image characteristics

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of a 320 detector row CT scanner unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologic improvements in Multislice scanners include the increment in the X-ray beam width. Some new CT scanners are equipped with a 320 detector row which allows a longitudinal coverage of 160 mm and a total of 640 slices for a single rotation. When such parameters are used the length of the traditional pencil chamber (10 cm) is no more appropriate to measure the standard weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) value. Dosimetric measurements were performed on a 640 slices Toshiba Aquilion One CT scanner using common instrumentation available in Medical Physics Departments. For the measurements in air, two different ionization chambers were completely exposed to the beam. Dosimeters showed an acceptable agreement in the measurements. To evaluate the actual shape of the dose profile strips of Gafchromic XRQA film were used. Films were previously calibrated on site. From the graphic response of the scanned film it is possible to evaluate the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the dose profile which represent the actual beam width. Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and Dose Length Product (DLP) need to be changed when the beam width of the CT scanner is over 100 mm. To perform dose evaluation with the conventional instrumentation, two parameters should be considered: the average absorbed dose and the actual beam width. To measure the average absorbed dose, the conventional ionization chamber can be used. For the measurement of the width of the dose profile, Gafchromic XRQA film seemed to be suitable

  7. Cone-beam CT of the internal carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Derek E.; Naik, Sandeep; Habets, Damiaan F.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2002-05-01

    The gold standard for NASCET-type stenosis measurements is currently 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In this paper, we evaluate the efficacy of 3D cone-beam, Volumetric Subtraction Angiography (VSA) for assessing internal carotid artery stenosis, by comparison with conventional DSA. VSA perspective maximum intensity projections (MIPs) and DSAs were assessed separately for NASCET-type, minimum stenosis measurements. Although virtually any viewing angle of the VSA was possible, the minimum stenosis grades were not significantly higher than that of the DSAs. Our study of 38 arteries yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (using a clinically relevant 60% stenosis threshold). Measurements from three neuroradiologists provided an average stenosis grade of 75 +/- 6% and 76 +/- 7% for the DSA and VSA respectively. A paired student t-test indicated a 98% confidence of no statistical difference in the means. Thus, VSA provides gold standard 3D information about carotid lumen geometry. While not intended to supplant noninvasive techniques during routine clinical diagnosis, it does provide a 3D reference standard for research investigations. Additionally, cone-beam CT can provide quantification of calcification around the carotid bifurcation.

  8. Cone beam CT findings of retromolar canals: Report of cases and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retromolar canal is an anatomical variation in the mandible. As it includes the neurovascular bundle, local anesthetic insufficiency can occur, and an injury of the retromolar canal during dental surgery in the mandible may result in excessive bleeding, paresthesia, and traumatic neuroma. Using imaging analysis software, we evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images of two Korean patients who presented with retromolar canals. Retromolar canals were detectable on the sagittal and cross-sectional images of cone-beam CT, but not on the panoramic radiographs of the patients. Therefore, the clinician should pay particular attention to the identification of retromolar canals by preoperative radiographic examination, and additional cone beam CT scanning would be recommended.

  9. Cone beam CT findings of retromolar canals: Report of cases and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Dental Hygiene, Eulji University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A retromolar canal is an anatomical variation in the mandible. As it includes the neurovascular bundle, local anesthetic insufficiency can occur, and an injury of the retromolar canal during dental surgery in the mandible may result in excessive bleeding, paresthesia, and traumatic neuroma. Using imaging analysis software, we evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images of two Korean patients who presented with retromolar canals. Retromolar canals were detectable on the sagittal and cross-sectional images of cone-beam CT, but not on the panoramic radiographs of the patients. Therefore, the clinician should pay particular attention to the identification of retromolar canals by preoperative radiographic examination, and additional cone beam CT scanning would be recommended.

  10. Beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2015-03-01

    Beam hardening, which is caused by spectrum polychromatism of the X-ray beam, may result in various artifacts in the reconstructed image and degrade image quality. The artifacts would be further aggravated for the sparse-view reconstruction due to insufficient sampling data. Considering the advantages of the total-variation (TV) minimization in CT reconstruction with sparse-view data, in this paper, we propose a beam hardening correction method for sparse-view CT reconstruction based on Brabant's modeling. In this correction model for beam hardening, the attenuation coefficient of each voxel at the effective energy is modeled and estimated linearly, and can be applied in an iterative framework, such as simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). By integrating the correction model into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), the TV minimization can recover images when only a limited number of projections are available. The proposed method does not need prior information about the beam spectrum. Preliminary validation using Monte Carlo simulations indicates that the proposed method can provide better reconstructed images from sparse-view projection data, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by beam hardening. With appropriate modeling of other degrading effects such as photon scattering, the proposed framework may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  11. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhanli, E-mail: huzhanli1983@gmail.com [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Xia, Dan, E-mail: dan.xia@siat.ac.cn [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination. -- Highlights: ► BPF algorithm was applied by using dental CT for the first time. ► A method was developed for estimation of projection region before CT scanning. ► Roughly predict the total radiation dose before CT scans. ► Potential reduce imaging radiation dose, scatter, and scanning time.

  12. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination. -- Highlights: ► BPF algorithm was applied by using dental CT for the first time. ► A method was developed for estimation of projection region before CT scanning. ► Roughly predict the total radiation dose before CT scans. ► Potential reduce imaging radiation dose, scatter, and scanning time

  13. CT evaluation of acetabular dysplasta in adults.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate methods of measurement by CT and their clinical significance for acetabular dysplasia(AD) in adults. Methods: CT imaging was examined and measured in 33 adult patients with AD, compared with the normal control group of 210 adults. Results: This study showed the results of AD patients

  14. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs

  15. Complicated pleural tuberculosis in children: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To describe the CT features of complicated pleural tuberculosis in children and to define the use of CT in children with pleural tuberculosis. Materials and methods. The CT findings in 11 children with complicated pleural tuberculosis were retrospectively analysed. CT was performed to evaluate persistent pleural thickening (n = 6) or a mass-like lesion (n = 5) detected on plain radiographs. Chest radiographs and medical records were reviewed to determine whether additional information provided by CT had altered clinical management. Results. On CT, more than one location was involved in five patients (45 %) and in two patients (18 %) the entire pleural spaces were involved. Pleural thickening was seen in all 11 patients and enhancement after administration of contrast medium occurred in ten patients (91 %). Low-density fluid collections were seen in nine patients (82 %) and in two, CT revealed fluid collections within calcified pleural lesions. In five patients with mass-like lesions on plain radiographs, CT showed a low-density pleural mass with peripheral enhancement in four and a calcified pleural mass with fluid collection in one. CT demonstrated parenchymal abnormalities on the same side as pleural lesions in all 11 patients and hilar or mediastinal adenopathy in four. Four patients (36 %) underwent surgery because of fluid within a calcified fibrothorax (n = 3) and chest wall tuberculosis (n = 1) that were seen only on CT. Conclusions. The CT features of complicated pleural tuberculosis in children were pleural thickening, enhancement and fluid collection with associated parenchymal abnormalities and lymphadenopathy. In the evaluation of children with pleural tuberculosis, CT can be useful for demonstrating fluid within a calcified fibrothorax or chest wall involvement, which usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.)

  16. CT evaluation of maxillary sinus aspergillosis: morphological patterns on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to classify the involving patterns of maxillary sinus aspergillosis on CT that will be an important guidance for functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and to evaluate CT findings of each pattern. We reviewed CT findings of 37 cases of maxillary sinus aspergillosis which were confirmed pathologically. These were classified into three patterns according to the location: the maxillary pattern(I), the infundibular pattern(II), and combined pattern(III). All cases were correlated with FESS findings. We also evaluated CT density, presence of contrast enhancement and calcifications, and surrounding bony changes of each pattern. The combined pattern was most commonly seen in 24 of 37 cases (64.9%). The maxillary pattern was identified in 8 (21.6%), with 5 (13.5%) cases demonstrating the infundibular pattern. These patterns were consistent with FESS findings. Calcifications were seen in 28 cases (75.7%). 31 cases (83.3%) revealed hypodensity and 16 cases among them showed peripheral enhancement. Central high density with peripheral low density rim was shown in 25% (2/8) of the maxillary pattern and 12.5% (3/24) of combined pattern. Surrounding bony changes were noted mainly in infundibular pattern and combined pattern. Erosion of uncinate process showed all cases of both patterns. Erosion or elevation of ethmomaxillary plate was seen in 3 of 5 cases of infundibular pattern and all cases of the combined pattern. CT findings of maxillary sinus aspergillosis can be classified into 3 patterns according to their distribution. These classification could be helpful for planning FESS approach. Calcifications are the most characteristic findings of maxillary sinus aspergillosis whereas CT density or enhancement pattern do not contribute to diagnosis

  17. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People' s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  18. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  19. CT evaluation of thymus in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between myasthenia gravis and the thymus was well establish and myasthenia gravis occurs in the presence of thymic hyperplasia or thymoma or occasionally in histologically normal thymus. Since not every patients with myasthenia gravis is a candidate for thymectomy, unless a thymoma is present, the differentiation of normal and hyperplastic thymus from thymoma becomes important. Authors reviewed retrospectively clinical records and chest CT scans of 18 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent thymectomy during recent 5 years, to evaluate the role of CT scan. The results were as follows. 1 Of total 18 cases, 5 cases had normal thymus, 6 cases had thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases had benign thymoma and 3 cases had malignant thymoma. 2. Of 5 cases of normal thymus, no false positive cases were noted in CT scan. 3. Of 6 cases of thymic hyperplasia, CT findings were normal except 1 cases of thickened left thymic lobe. 4. Of 7 cases of thymoma, no false negative cases were noted in CT scan. 5. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval shaped, discrete, slightly enhancing soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum. 6. CT findings of malignant thymoma were lobulated contoured, infiltrative, soft tissue mass lesion in anterior mediastinum with calcifications, pleural tumor implants, and SVC compression. CT yielded valuable information on differential diagnosis of thymoma, thymic hyperplasia and normal thymus. Also CT was a highly sensitive method in the detection of thymoma and determining the extent and invasiveness

  20. CT evaluation of thymus in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Guk Hee [Insung Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Eun Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    The relationship between myasthenia gravis and the thymus was well establish and myasthenia gravis occurs in the presence of thymic hyperplasia or thymoma or occasionally in histologically normal thymus. Since not every patients with myasthenia gravis is a candidate for thymectomy, unless a thymoma is present, the differentiation of normal and hyperplastic thymus from thymoma becomes important. Authors reviewed retrospectively clinical records and chest CT scans of 18 patients with myasthenia gravis who underwent thymectomy during recent 5 years, to evaluate the role of CT scan. The results were as follows. 1 Of total 18 cases, 5 cases had normal thymus, 6 cases had thymic hyperplasia, 4 cases had benign thymoma and 3 cases had malignant thymoma. 2. Of 5 cases of normal thymus, no false positive cases were noted in CT scan. 3. Of 6 cases of thymic hyperplasia, CT findings were normal except 1 cases of thickened left thymic lobe. 4. Of 7 cases of thymoma, no false negative cases were noted in CT scan. 5. CT findings of benign thymoma were round or oval shaped, discrete, slightly enhancing soft tissue mass in anterior mediastinum. 6. CT findings of malignant thymoma were lobulated contoured, infiltrative, soft tissue mass lesion in anterior mediastinum with calcifications, pleural tumor implants, and SVC compression. CT yielded valuable information on differential diagnosis of thymoma, thymic hyperplasia and normal thymus. Also CT was a highly sensitive method in the detection of thymoma and determining the extent and invasiveness.

  1. Quality control and patient dosimetry in dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the initial experience in performing quality control and patient dose measurements in a cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanner (ILUMATM Ultra, IMTEC Imaging, USA) for oral and maxillofacial radiology. The X-ray tube and the generator were tested first, including the kVp accuracy and precision, and the half-value layer (HVL). The following tests specific for panoramic dental systems were also performed: tube output, beam size and beam alignment to the detector. The tests specific for CT included measurements of noise and CT numbers in water and in air, as well as the homogeneity of CT numbers. The most appropriate dose quantity was found to be the air kerma-area product (KAP) measured with a KAP-metre installed at the tube exit. KAP values were found to vary from 110 to 185 μGy m2 for available adult protocols and to be 54 μGy m2 for the paediatric protocol. The effective dose calculated with the software PCXMC (STUK (Finland)) was 0.05 mSv for children and 0.09-0.16 mSv for adults. (authors)

  2. SU-E-J-46: Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Six Degree of Freedom Robotic Couch Using ConeBeam CT Images of the Isocal Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q; Driewer, J; Wang, S; Li, S; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Zhen, W; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Thompson, R; Zhou, S; Enke, C [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The accuracy of Varian PerfectPitch six degree of freedom (DOF) robotic couch was examined using Varian Isocal phantom and cone-beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods CBCT images of the Isocal phantom were taken at different pitch and roll angles. The pitch and roll angles were varied from 357 to 3 degrees in one degree increments by input from service console, generating a total of 49 combinations with couch angle (yaw) zero. The center positions of the 16 tungsten carbide BBs contained in the Isocal were determined with in-house image processing software. Expected BBs positions at different rotation angles were determined mathematically by applying a combined translation/rotation operator to BB positions at zero pitch and roll values. A least square method was used to minimize the difference between the expected BB positions and their measured positions. In this way rotation angles were obtained and compared with input values from the console. Results A total of 49 CBCT images with voxel sizes 0.51 mm × 0.51 mm × 1 mm were used in analysis. Among the 49 calculations, the maximum rotation angle differences were 0.1 degree, 0.15 degree, and 0.09 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The mean ± standard-deviation angle differences were 0.028±0.001 degree, −0.043±0.003 degree, and −0.009±0.001 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The maximum isocenter shifts were 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.4 mm in x, y, z direction respectively following IEC6127 convention. The mean isocenter shifts were 0.07±0.02 mm, −0.05±0.06 mm, and −0.12±0.02 mm in x, y and z directions. Conclusion The accuracy of the Varian PerfectPitch six DOF couch was studied with CBCTs of the Isocal phantom. The rotational errors were less than 0.15 degree and isocenter shifts were less than 0.5 mm in any direction. This accuracy is sufficient for stereotactic radiotherapy clinical applications.

  3. SU-E-J-46: Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Six Degree of Freedom Robotic Couch Using ConeBeam CT Images of the Isocal Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose The accuracy of Varian PerfectPitch six degree of freedom (DOF) robotic couch was examined using Varian Isocal phantom and cone-beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods CBCT images of the Isocal phantom were taken at different pitch and roll angles. The pitch and roll angles were varied from 357 to 3 degrees in one degree increments by input from service console, generating a total of 49 combinations with couch angle (yaw) zero. The center positions of the 16 tungsten carbide BBs contained in the Isocal were determined with in-house image processing software. Expected BBs positions at different rotation angles were determined mathematically by applying a combined translation/rotation operator to BB positions at zero pitch and roll values. A least square method was used to minimize the difference between the expected BB positions and their measured positions. In this way rotation angles were obtained and compared with input values from the console. Results A total of 49 CBCT images with voxel sizes 0.51 mm × 0.51 mm × 1 mm were used in analysis. Among the 49 calculations, the maximum rotation angle differences were 0.1 degree, 0.15 degree, and 0.09 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The mean ± standard-deviation angle differences were 0.028±0.001 degree, −0.043±0.003 degree, and −0.009±0.001 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The maximum isocenter shifts were 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.4 mm in x, y, z direction respectively following IEC6127 convention. The mean isocenter shifts were 0.07±0.02 mm, −0.05±0.06 mm, and −0.12±0.02 mm in x, y and z directions. Conclusion The accuracy of the Varian PerfectPitch six DOF couch was studied with CBCTs of the Isocal phantom. The rotational errors were less than 0.15 degree and isocenter shifts were less than 0.5 mm in any direction. This accuracy is sufficient for stereotactic radiotherapy clinical applications

  4. WE-D-9A-02: Automated Landmark-Guided CT to Cone-Beam CT Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The anatomical changes that occur between the simulation CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) are investigated using an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm with simultaneous intensity correction. LDIR was designed to be accurate in the presence of tissue intensity mismatch and heavy noise contamination. Method: An auto-landmark generation algorithm was used in conjunction with a local small volume (LSV) gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and planning CT. The LSVs offsets were used to perform an initial deformation, generate landmarks, and correct local intensity mismatch. The landmarks act as stabilizing controlpoints in the Demons objective function. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm was evaluated on one synthetic case with ground truth and data of ten head and neck cancer patients. The deformation vector field (DVF) accuracy was accessed using a synthetic case. The Root mean square error of the 3D canny edge (RMSECE), mutual information (MI), and feature similarity index metric (FSIM) were used to access the accuracy of LDIR on the patient data. The quality of the corresponding deformed contours was verified by an attending physician. Results: The resulting 90 percentile DVF error for the synthetic case was within 5.63mm for the original demons algorithm, 2.84mm for intensity correction alone, 2.45mm using controlpoints without intensity correction, and 1.48 mm for the LDIR algorithm. For the five patients the mean RMSECE of the original CT, Demons deformed CT, intensity corrected Demons CT, control-point stabilized deformed CT, and LDIR CT was 0.24, 0.26, 0.20, 0.20, and 0.16 respectively. Conclusion: LDIR is accurate in the presence of multimodal intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination. Since LDIR is GPU based it can be implemented with minimal additional strain on clinical resources. This project has been supported by a CPRIT individual investigator award RP11032

  5. The application of cone-beam CT in the aging of bone calluses: a new perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, A; Amadasi, A; Gaudio, D; Gibelli, D; Borgonovo, S; Di Giancamillo, M; Cattaneo, C

    2013-11-01

    In the forensic and anthropological fields, the assessment of the age of a bone callus can be crucial for a correct analysis of injuries in the skeleton. To our knowledge, the studies which have focused on this topic are mainly clinical and still leave much to be desired for forensic purposes, particularly in looking for better methods for aging calluses in view of criminalistic applications. This study aims at evaluating the aid cone-beam CT can give in the investigation of the inner structure of fractures and calluses, thus acquiring a better knowledge of the process of bone remodeling. A total of 13 fractures (three without callus formation and ten with visible callus) of known age from cadavers were subjected to radiological investigations with digital radiography (DR) (conventional radiography) and cone-beam CT with the major aim of investigating the differences between DR and tomographic images when studying the inner and outer structures of bone healing. Results showed how with cone-beam CT the structure of the callus is clearly visible with higher specificity and definition and much more information on mineralization in different sections and planes. These results could lay the foundation for new perspectives on bone callus evaluation and aging with cone-beam CT, a user-friendly and skillful technique which in some instances can also be used extensively on the living (e.g., in cases of child abuse) with reduced exposition to radiation. PMID:23389391

  6. Evaluation strategies in CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    uncertainty. This investigation includes measurements of two industrial items, an aluminum pipe connector and a plastic toggle, a hearing aid component. These are measured using a commercial CT scanner. Traceability is transferred using tactile and optical coordinate measuring machines, which are used to...

  7. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich [Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany and Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Oral Surgery (and Oral Radiology), University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of

  8. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, “Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,” Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242–3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, “A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,” Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695–1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the

  9. Cone beam CT in radiology; DVT in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, Florian [ALB FILS KLINIKEN GmbH, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2013-06-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a cross-sectional X-ray modality using an imaging system with cone-beam geometry. Unlike CT, the data set is acquired in a single circulation of a C-arm shaped tube-detector unit. Image characteristics vs. exposure dose ratio is similar to conventional CT, but varies widely depending on the CBVT device and the selected settings, and is limited to low dose/high noise applications. Up to now, only few data is available to estimate the clinical value of CBCT. Nevertheless, the use of CBCT is increasing drastically in the recent years, especially in the dental and ENT diagnostic field. For this reason the European Commission recently published guidelines concerning the clinical application of CBCT. These guidelines, as well as clinically relevant technical features of CBCT and examples of the most frequent dental applications are presented in the following article. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of cone-beam CT-guided and CT fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of lung nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotolo, Nicola; Imperatori, Andrea; Arlant, Veronica; Dominioni, Lorenzo [Insubria University, Center for Thoracic Surgery, Varese (Italy); Floridi, Chiara; Fontana, Federico; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangini, Monica; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [Insubria University, Radiology Department, Varese (Italy); Novario, Raffaele [Insubria University, Medical Physics Department, Varese (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided and CT fluoroscopy (fluoro-CT)-guided technique for transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB) of lung nodules. The hospital records of 319 consecutive patients undergoing 324 TNBs of lung nodules in a single radiology unit in 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The newly introduced CBCT technology was used to biopsy 123 nodules; 201 nodules were biopsied by conventional fluoro-CT-guided technique. We assessed the performance of the two biopsy systems for diagnosis of malignancy and the radiation exposure. Nodules biopsied by CBCT-guided and by fluoro-CT-guided technique had similar characteristics: size, 20 ± 6.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) vs. 20 ± 6.8 mm (p = 0.845); depth from pleura, 15 ± 15 mm vs. 15 ± 16 mm (p = 0.595); malignant, 60 % vs. 66 % (p = 0.378). After a learning period, the newly introduced CBCT-guided biopsy system and the conventional fluoro-CT-guided system showed similar sensitivity (95 % and 92 %), specificity (100 % and 100 %), accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy (96 % and 94 %), and delivered non-significantly different median effective doses [11.1 mSv (95 % CI 8.9-16.0) vs. 14.5 mSv (95 % CI 9.5-18.1); p = 0.330]. The CBCT-guided and fluoro-CT-guided systems for lung nodule biopsy are similar in terms of diagnostic performance and effective dose, and may be alternatively used to optimize the available technological resources. (orig.)

  11. Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction may have a clinically apparent or occult cause. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 36 patients with peripheral facial nerve dysfunction to obtain information on the location of the suspected lesion and the number, sequence, and type of radiographic evaluations performed. Inadequate clinical evaluations before computed tomography (CT) was done and unnecessary CT examinations were also noted. They have suggested a practical clinical and radiographic scheme to evaluate progressive peripheral facial dysfunction with no apparent cause. If this scheme is applied, unnecessary radiologic tests and delays in diagnosis and treatment may be avoided

  12. Clinical evaluation of serial CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic CT of abdominal organs was performed in a few cases, and movement of contrast medium in abdominal organs, the capacity of abdominal dynamic CT to visualize vascular cavity less than middle size, and the evaluation of abdominal dynamic CT in the diagnosis of malignant tumor were reported. After 50 ml of 60% meglumine iotalamate was injected into cubital vein in 15 seconds (3.3 ml/sec.), it was clarified by the first scan after the injection that contrast medium enough to visualize vascular cavity of 2 mm in diameter existed in vessels. That is, SOMATOM SD can visualize the intravascular phase of the contrast by the first or the second scan after the injection. Abdominal dynamic CT was very useful for the diagnosis of abdominal malignant tumor. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo Men; Jian-Rong Dai; Ming-Hui Li; Xin-Yuan Chen; Ke Zhang; Yuan Tian; Peng Huang; Ying-Jie Xu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned ...

  14. Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical i...

  15. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H and N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2–3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our

  16. Assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms using a cone-beam CT system. An experimental phantom study and an initial clinical evaluation before and after stent-graft treatment in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to conduct a quantitative analysis of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images using a phantom, and then to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CBCT in the assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) before and after stent-grafting, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. The phantom used in this study was a rectangular plate made of an acrylic resin, which contained eight through-holes to mimic blood vessels. Each columnar cavity was filled with contrast media and the diameter of each was then measured using a cone-beam multiplanar reformation/curved planar reformation (CB-MPR/CPR) technique, and the results were compared with the corresponding results obtained by actual measurement. In the clinical assessment, nine patients with AAA (consisting only of males with an average age of 68 years old: 56-80) were enrolled. The clinical qualitative analysis of CBCT consisted of: for the pre-operative state, the shape of the aortic aneurysm, the relationship between the aneurysm and the aortic branches, and for the post-operative state, the shape of the stent and any endoleakage present. The clinical quantitative analysis of CBCT included, for the aneurysm, its inflection angle, its maximum diameter, the diameter of the proximal and distal necks, and the distance of these two necks from specific reference points. The quantitative analysis using the phantom showed no significant differences between the results based on CB-MPR/CPR and those obtained by actual measurement. In the clinical qualitative analysis three-dimensional CBCT (3D-CBCT) depicted the anatomical relationship between the aneurysm and the aortic branches well, an accomplishment that was not possible by conventional angiography. Cone-beam maximum intensity projection (CB-MIP) was as good in tracing the migration and deformation of the stent following endovascular intervention as plain radiograms and conventional angiograms. CB-MPR/CPR enabled us to obtain any cross-sectional image of the

  17. Geometric Parameters Estimation and Calibration in Cone-Beam Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of Computed Tomography (CT images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scanner geometry. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate and calibrate the misalignments before image acquisition. In this paper, a Two-Piece-Ball (TPB phantom is used to estimate a set of parameters that describe the geometry of a cone-beam CT system. Only multiple projections of the TPB phantom at one position are required, which can avoid the rotation errors when acquiring multi-angle projections. Also, a corresponding algorithm is derived. The performance of the method is evaluated through simulation and experimental data. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is valid and easy to implement. Furthermore, the experimental results from the Micro-CT system demonstrate the ability to reduce artifacts and improve image quality through geometric parameter calibration.

  18. CT to Cone-beam CT Deformable Registration With Simultaneous Intensity Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT-CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called Deformation with Intensity Simultaneously Corrected (DISC), to deal with CT-CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the original demons algorithm by performing an adaptive intensity correction step on the CBCT image at every iteration step of the demons registration. Specifically, the intensity correction of a voxel in CBCT is achieved by matching the first and the second moments of the voxel intensities inside a patch around the voxel with those on the CT image. It is expected that such a strategy can remove artifacts in the CBCT image, as well as ensuring the intensity consistency between the two modalities. DISC is implemented on computer g...

  19. Demons deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT using an iterative intensity matching approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A method of intensity-based deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images is described, in which intensity correction occurs simultaneously within the iterative registration process. The method preserves the speed and simplicity of the popular Demons algorithm while providing robustness and accuracy in the presence of large mismatch between CT and CBCT voxel values (''intensity''). Methods: A variant of the Demons algorithm was developed in which an estimate of the relationship between CT and CBCT intensity values for specific materials in the image is computed at each iteration based on the set of currently overlapping voxels. This tissue-specific intensity correction is then used to estimate the registration output for that iteration and the process is repeated. The robustness of the method was tested in CBCT images of a cadaveric head exhibiting a broad range of simulated intensity variations associated with x-ray scatter, object truncation, and/or errors in the reconstruction algorithm. The accuracy of CT-CBCT registration was also measured in six real cases, exhibiting deformations ranging from simple to complex during surgery or radiotherapy guided by a CBCT-capable C-arm or linear accelerator, respectively. Results: The iterative intensity matching approach was robust against all levels of intensity variation examined, including spatially varying errors in voxel value of a factor of 2 or more, as can be encountered in cases of high x-ray scatter. Registration accuracy without intensity matching degraded severely with increasing magnitude of intensity error and introduced image distortion. A single histogram match performed prior to registration alleviated some of these effects but was also prone to image distortion and was quantifiably less robust and accurate than the iterative approach. Within the six case registration accuracy study, iterative intensity matching Demons reduced mean TRE to (2.5±2.8) mm compared to (3.5±3.0) mm

  20. SU-D-207-06: Clinical Validations of Shading Correction for Cone-Beam CT Using Planning CT as a Prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Current cone-beam CT (CBCT) images contain severe shading artifacts mainly due to scatter, hindering their quantitative use in current radiation therapy. We have previously proposed an effective shading correction method for CBCT using planning CT (pCT) as prior knowledge. In this work, we investigate the method robustness via statistical analyses on studies of a large patient group and compare the performance with that of a state-of-the-art method implemented on the current commercial radiation therapy machine -- the Varian Truebeam system. Methods: Since radiotherapy patients routinely undergo multiple-detector CT (MDCT) scans in the planning procedure, we use the high-quality pCT as “free” prior knowledge for CBCT image improvement. The CBCT image with no correction is first spatially registered with the pCT. Primary CBCT projections are estimated via forward projections of the registered image. The low frequency errors in the projections, which stem from mainly scatter, are estimated by filtering the difference between original line integral and the estimated scatter projections. The corrected CBCT image is then reconstructed from the scatter corrected projections. The proposed method is evaluated on 40 cancer patients. Results: On all patient images, we compare errors on CT number, spatial non-uniformity (SNU) and image contrast, using pCT as the ground truth. T-tests show that our algorithm improves over the Varian method on CBCT accuracies of CT number and SNU with 90% confident. The average CT number error is reduced from 54.8 HU on the Varian method to 40.9 HU, and the SNU error is reduced from 7.7% to 3.8%. There is no obvious improvement on image contrast. Conclusion: Large-group patient studies show that the proposed pCT-based algorithm outperforms the Varian method of the Truebeam system on CBCT shading correction, by providing CBCT images with higher CT number accuracy and greater image uniformity

  1. SU-D-207-06: Clinical Validations of Shading Correction for Cone-Beam CT Using Planning CT as a Prior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, T; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Wei, J [Landauer Medical Physics, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Current cone-beam CT (CBCT) images contain severe shading artifacts mainly due to scatter, hindering their quantitative use in current radiation therapy. We have previously proposed an effective shading correction method for CBCT using planning CT (pCT) as prior knowledge. In this work, we investigate the method robustness via statistical analyses on studies of a large patient group and compare the performance with that of a state-of-the-art method implemented on the current commercial radiation therapy machine -- the Varian Truebeam system. Methods: Since radiotherapy patients routinely undergo multiple-detector CT (MDCT) scans in the planning procedure, we use the high-quality pCT as “free” prior knowledge for CBCT image improvement. The CBCT image with no correction is first spatially registered with the pCT. Primary CBCT projections are estimated via forward projections of the registered image. The low frequency errors in the projections, which stem from mainly scatter, are estimated by filtering the difference between original line integral and the estimated scatter projections. The corrected CBCT image is then reconstructed from the scatter corrected projections. The proposed method is evaluated on 40 cancer patients. Results: On all patient images, we compare errors on CT number, spatial non-uniformity (SNU) and image contrast, using pCT as the ground truth. T-tests show that our algorithm improves over the Varian method on CBCT accuracies of CT number and SNU with 90% confident. The average CT number error is reduced from 54.8 HU on the Varian method to 40.9 HU, and the SNU error is reduced from 7.7% to 3.8%. There is no obvious improvement on image contrast. Conclusion: Large-group patient studies show that the proposed pCT-based algorithm outperforms the Varian method of the Truebeam system on CBCT shading correction, by providing CBCT images with higher CT number accuracy and greater image uniformity.

  2. SU-E-J-135: Feasibility of Using Quantitative Cone Beam CT for Proton Adaptive Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scatter corrected cone beam CT (CBCT) for proton adaptive planning. Methods: Phantom study was used to evaluate the CT number difference between the planning CT (pCT), quantitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units using adaptive scatter kernel superposition (ASKS) technique, and raw CBCT (rCBCT). After confirming the CT number accuracy, prostate patients, each with a pCT and several sets of weekly CBCT, were investigated for this study. Spot scanning proton treatment plans were independently generated on pCT, qCBCT and rCBCT. The treatment plans were then recalculated on all images. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters and gamma analysis were used to compare between dose distributions. Results: Phantom study suggested that Hounsfield unit accuracy for different materials are within 20 HU for qCBCT and over 250 HU for rCBCT. For prostate patients, proton dose could be calculated accurately on qCBCT but not on rCBCT. When the original plan was recalculated on qCBCT, tumor coverage was maintained when anatomy was consistent with pCT. However, large dose variance was observed when patient anatomy change. Adaptive plan using qCBCT was able to recover tumor coverage and reduce dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: It is feasible to use qu antitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units for proton dose calculation and adaptive planning in proton therapy. Partly supported by Varian Medical Systems

  3. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T-H [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec.1, Jianguo N.Rd, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan (China); Liang, C-H [Agfa Healthcare Systems Taiwan Co., Ltd., 6F, 237 Sung Chiang Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Wu, J-K [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, No.7 Chung San South Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Lien, C-Y [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Huang, Y-H [Department of Medical Imaing and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, No. 8, Yida Rd., Yanchao Township, Kaohsiung County 82445, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2009-07-15

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT

  4. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  5. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Y.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Jan, M.L. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.D. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K.S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.K. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fufrank@iner.gov.tw

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET'' (registered) R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of 'cupping' in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  6. Dose calculation accuracy using cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huaiqun; Dong, Hang

    2009-10-01

    This study is to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy using Varian's cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy. We first calibrated the Hounsfield Unit (HU) to electron density (ED) for CBCT using a mini CT QC phantom embedded into an IMRT QA phantom. We then used a Catphan 500 with an annulus around it to check the calibration. The combined CT QC and IMRT phantom provided correct HU calibration, but not Catphan with an annulus. For the latter, not only was the Teflon an incorrect substitute for bone, but the inserts were also too small to provide correct HUs for air and bone. For the former, three different scan ranges (6 cm, 12 cm and 20.8 cm) were used to investigate the HU dependence on the amount of scatter. To evaluate the dose calculation accuracy, CBCT and plan-CT for a pelvic phantom were acquired and registered. The single field plan, 3D conformal and IMRT plans were created on both CT sets. Without inhomogeneity correction, the two CT generated nearly the same plan. With inhomogeneity correction, the dosimetric difference between the two CT was mainly from the HU calibration difference. The dosimetric difference for 6 MV was found to be the largest for the single lateral field plan (maximum 6.7%), less for the 3D conformal plan (maximum 3.3%) and the least for the IMRT plan (maximum 2.5%). Differences for 18 MV were generally 1-2% less. For a single lateral field, calibration with 20.8 cm achieved the minimum dosimetric difference. For 3D and IMRT plans, calibration with a 12 cm range resulted in better accuracy. Because Catphan is the standard QA phantom for the on-board imager (OBI) device, we specifically recommend not using it for the HU calibration of CBCT.

  7. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  8. Evaluation of setup accuracy for NSCLC patients; studying the impact of different types of cone-beam CT matches based on whole thorax, columna vertebralis, and GTV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, W.; Baker, M.; Hedman, Mattias;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to evaluate the patient setup accuracy by investigating the impact of different types of CBCT matches, performed with 3 (translations only) or 6 (including rotations) degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The purpose is also to calculate and compare CTV to PTV margins based...

  9. The Validity of the Panoramic Radiography in Evaluating the Topographic Relationship between Mandibular Canal and Impacted Third Molars in Comparison with Cone Beam CT-scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Ebrahimifard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the validity of panoramic radiography with CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography in the assessment of the relationship between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 80 mandibular third molars were extracted from 48 patients. On the panoramic radiography (PR there was a close relationship between the root tooth and mandibular canal in all the teeth. The teeth were classified on the basis of six radiographic markers in panoramic radiographs (superimposition, root opacity/darkening of the roots, root deflection, diversion of the canal, interruption of the cortical border of the canal and narrowing of the canal. Then, the relationship between the markers and presence or absence of contact is CBCT was investigated. Results: The superimposition marker in the interrupted group and group with intact border was significantly higher than the group with no cortical border. The interruption of the cortical border of the canal and increased radiolucency marker were significantly higher in no-cortical border group than the other two groups. As to the other three markers (diversion of the canal, narrowing of the canal and root diversion due to the low frequency in the 80 teeth, the findings were presented in a descriptive manner.Conclusion: Presence or absence of a radiological sign in panoramic radiography will not properly predict the existence of a close relationship with third molar and it is suggested that in case of tooth-canal overlapping either as a superimposition or as other aforesaid markers, the patient should be referred for CBCT assessment regarding the additional and useful information provided by CBCT.

  10. Orthogonal-rotating tetrahedral scanning for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ivan B.; Wang, Ge

    2012-10-01

    In this article, a cone-beam CT scanning mode is designed assuming four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite to each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. Several scanning schemes are proposed which consist of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired. Similar scanning schemes based on other regular or irregular polyhedra and various rotation speeds are also discussed.

  11. Evaluation of setup accuracy for NSCLC patients; studying the impact of different types of cone-beam CT matches based on whole thorax, columna vertebralis, and GTV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, W.; Baker, M.; Hedman, Mattias;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to evaluate the patient setup accuracy by investigating the impact of different types of CBCT matches, performed with 3 (translations only) or 6 (including rotations) degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The purpose is also to calculate and compare CTV to PTV margins based on......D kV CV setups, the translational shifts were within [-3, 2] mm for all three directions. Corresponding values for the6 DOF/non-IGRT CV and the 6 DOF/non-IGRT ST matches were [-5, 8] mm. Furthermore, 80% of all setups were within +/- 2 degrees for pitch-, roll- and yaw-rotations, and none exceeded 5...

  12. Point spread function modeling and images restoration for cone-beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Yikai; Xu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has the notable features such as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection images degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed firstly. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the...

  13. A simple optical cone beam CT set-up for gel 'readout'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, B P; Visalatchi, S; Brindha, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore India 632 004 (India)

    2004-01-01

    In this study we have attempted to setup a simple optical cone beam CT using the geometry used by Wolodzko et al and Jordan et al using an Intel webcam. This approach of recording transmission images of the gel is the inverse of x-ray cone beam CT if you consider only the rays, which contribute to image formation. This simple optical cone beam CT could be setup with minimum cost and could be used to demonstrate the principle of optical CT for teaching and if further investigated could be a potential optical readout device for gel dosimetry.

  14. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. AlJehani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014, PubMed (using medical subject headings, and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels.

  15. A comparative study for spatial resolution and subjective image characteristics of a multi-slice CT and a cone-beam CT for dental use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Multi-slice CT (MSCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are widely used in dental practice. This study compared the spatial resolution of these CT systems to elucidate which CT modalities should be selected for various clinical cases. Materials and methods: As MSCT and CBCT apparatuses, Somatom Sensation 64 and 3D Accuitomo instruments, respectively, were used. As an objective evaluation of spatial resolution of these CT systems, modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis was performed employing an over-sampling method. The results of MTF analysis were confirmed with a line-pair test using CATPHAN. As a subjective evaluation, a microstructure visualization ability study was performed using a Jcl:SD rat and a head CT phantom. Results: MTF analysis showed that for the in-plane direction, the z-axis ultrahigh resolution mode (zUHR) of the Sensation 64 and 3D Accuitomo instruments had higher spatial resolutions than the conventional mode (64x) of the Sensation 64, but for the longitudinal direction, the 3D Accuitomo had clearly higher spatial resolution than either mode of the Sensation 64. A line-pair test study and microstructure visualization ability studies confirmed the results for MTF analysis. However, images of the rat and the CT phantom revealed that the 3D Accuitomo demonstrated the failure to visualize the soft tissues along with aliasing and beam-hardening artifacts, which were not observed in the Sensation 64. Conclusions: This study successfully applied spatial resolution analysis using MSCT and CBCT systems in a comparative manner. These findings could help in deciding which CT modality should be selected for various clinical cases.

  16. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications. PMID:25805884

  17. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications. (authors)

  18. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  19. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  20. An experimental study on the influence of scatter and beam hardening in x-ray CT for dimensional metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, J. J.; Malcolm, A. A.; McBride, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Scattered radiation and beam hardening introduce artefacts that degrade the quality of data in x-ray computed tomography (CT). It is unclear how these artefacts influence dimensional measurements evaluated from CT data. Understanding and quantifying the influence of these artefacts on dimensional measurements is required to evaluate the uncertainty of CT-based dimensional measurements. In this work the influence of scatter and beam hardening on dimensional measurements is investigated using the beam stop array scatter correction method and spectrum pre-filtration for the measurement of an object with internal and external cylindrical dimensional features. Scatter and beam hardening are found to influence dimensional measurements when evaluated using the ISO50 surface determination method. On the other hand, a gradient-based surface determination method is found to be robust to the influence of artefacts and leads to more accurate dimensional measurements than those evaluated using the ISO50 method. In addition to these observations the GUM method for evaluating standard measurement uncertainties is applied and the standard measurement uncertainty due to scatter and beam hardening is estimated.

  1. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  2. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored

  3. Simulation of mechanical misalignments in a cone-beam micro-CT system

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal-Migallón, I.; Abella, Mónica; Sisniega, Alejandro; Vaquero, Juan José; Desco, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    X-ray CT images usually show artefacts due not only to physical effects -e.g., beam hardening-, but also to misalignments that remain after mechanical calibration. These artefacts become particularly noticeable in the case of high spatial resolution systems and in hybrid systems, such as PETCT, SPECT-CT scanners, which rely on a correct registration of emission and CT data. Hence, slight mechanical misalignments affect the quality of the CT images and any attenuation correction metho...

  4. CT evaluation of anastomotic aneurysms following vascular reconstructive procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite improved surgical techniques, anastomotic aneurysms continue to complicate vascular reconstructive procedures. The role of CT in this condition has not been previously emphasized. Twenty-one patients with 31 anastomotic aneurysms following aortofemoral or aortoiliac graft placement were evaluated by CT and angiography and four by CT alone. CT contributed significant addiitional information affecting the surgical approach to the lesion in six patients. CT was superior in defining local complications, the longitudinal extent of the aneurysms, and in demonstrating mural thrombus, which occurred at 13 anastomoses. CT should be performed in conjunction with angiography in the evaluation of this condition

  5. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D-bar100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D-bar100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D-bar100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D-bar100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate

  6. Cone Beam CT: radiation protection aspects and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology related to Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) give three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic results. It allows to give to the patient doses much lower than traditional TC technique. This type of equipment, introduced relatively recently, is rapidly spreading in the field of Radiology and in particular dental and maxillofacial and is meant to be used more and more frequently in clinical practice and in the coming years there will be an increase of radiological examinations performed with this technique. In January 2012 the ANPEQ formed, within the Permanent Commission's technical aspects of radiation protection-health ' the Working Party ' Cone Beam CT ' with the intention to draw up an operating report that provide guidelines for radiological protection of the operators and of the population, in full respect of the relevant operating areas by other operators, such as physicists, doctors etc. In the course of work it is proved the opportunity to share what worked with other associations dealing with radiation protection, AIFM (Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica), AIRP (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione), AIRM (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione Medica), organising a joint Conference on CBCT which was held at pisa on March 1, 2013. This report collects most of the contributions presented by individual speakers who participated in the Conference, by then state of the art in this innovative method.

  7. Evaluation of Registration Methods on Thoracic CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, K.; van Ginneken, B.; Reinhardt, J.;

    2011-01-01

    method and the evaluation is independent, using the same criteria for all participants. All results are published on the EMPIRE10 website (http://empire10.isi.uu.nl). The challenge remains ongoing and open to new participants. Full results from 24 algorithms have been published at the time of writing......EMPIRE10 (Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image REgistration 2010) is a public platform for fair and meaningful comparison of registration algorithms which are applied to a database of intra-patient thoracic CT image pairs. Evaluation of non-rigid registration techniques is a non trivial task....... This article details the organisation of the challenge, the data and evaluation methods and the outcome of the initial launch with 20 algorithms. The gain in knowledge and future work are discussed....

  8. Assessment of protocols in cone beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beam using effective dose and P{sub ka}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, W. O.; Linhares de O, M. V. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The cone beam CT is an emerging technology in dental radiology with significant differences the point of view of design technology between the various manufacturers on the world market. This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using TLDs and air kerma - area product (P{sub ka}) as kerma index. Measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain the image the maxilla-mandible in equipment Gendex GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm x 8.5 cm - maxilla / mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm x 8.5 cm - maxillary / mandible). Was used LiF dosimeters (TLD 100) inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom manufactured by Radiology Support Devices. For all protocols evaluated the value of P{sub ka} using a meter Diamentor E2 and PTW system Radcal Rapidose. The results obtained for Effective Dose / P{sub ka} these measurements were separated by protocol image. Protocol [GX1]: 44.5 μSv/478 mGy cm{sup 2}; protocol [GX2]: 54.8 μSv/507 mGy cm{sup 2}. These values indicate that the relationship between the diameter of the image acquired in the protocol [GX1] and the diameter of the image in the protocol [GX2] is equal to 1.65, the Effective Dose for the first protocol has lower value at 18%. P{sub ka} values reveal very similar results between the two protocols, although, common sense leads to the interpretation that imaging protocols with field of view (Fov) of large diameters imply high values of effective dose when compared to small diameters. However, in this particular case, this is not true due to the asymmetrical beam technology. Conclude that for the cases where the scanner uses asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients with respect to the use of symmetrical beam and / or to Fov images with a smaller diameter. (Author)

  9. Assessment of protocols in cone beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beam using effective dose and Pka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cone beam CT is an emerging technology in dental radiology with significant differences the point of view of design technology between the various manufacturers on the world market. This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using TLDs and air kerma - area product (Pka) as kerma index. Measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain the image the maxilla-mandible in equipment Gendex GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm x 8.5 cm - maxilla / mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm x 8.5 cm - maxillary / mandible). Was used LiF dosimeters (TLD 100) inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom manufactured by Radiology Support Devices. For all protocols evaluated the value of Pka using a meter Diamentor E2 and PTW system Radcal Rapidose. The results obtained for Effective Dose / Pka these measurements were separated by protocol image. Protocol [GX1]: 44.5 μSv/478 mGy cm2; protocol [GX2]: 54.8 μSv/507 mGy cm2. These values indicate that the relationship between the diameter of the image acquired in the protocol [GX1] and the diameter of the image in the protocol [GX2] is equal to 1.65, the Effective Dose for the first protocol has lower value at 18%. Pka values reveal very similar results between the two protocols, although, common sense leads to the interpretation that imaging protocols with field of view (Fov) of large diameters imply high values of effective dose when compared to small diameters. However, in this particular case, this is not true due to the asymmetrical beam technology. Conclude that for the cases where the scanner uses asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients with respect to the use of symmetrical beam and / or to Fov images with a smaller diameter. (Author)

  10. Helical cardiac cone beam CT reconstruction with large area detectors: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively gated cardiac volume CT imaging has become feasible with the introduction of heart rate adaptive cardiac CT reconstruction algorithms. The development in detector technology and the rapid introduction of multi-row detectors has demanded reconstruction schemes which account for the cone geometry. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, the idea of approximate helical cone beam CT has been extended to be used with retrospective gating, enabling heart rate adaptive cardiac cone beam reconstruction. In this contribution, the ECR technique is evaluated for systems with an increased number of detector rows, which leads to larger cone angles. A simulation study has been carried out based on a 4D cardiac phantom consisting of a thorax model and a dynamic heart insert. Images have been reconstructed for different detector set-ups. Reconstruction assessment functions have been calculated for the detector set-ups employing different rotation times, relative pitches and heart rates. With the increased volume coverage of large area detector systems, low-pitch scans become feasible without resulting in extensive scan times, inhibiting single breath hold acquisitions. ECR delivers promising image results when being applied to systems with larger cone angles

  11. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  12. CT in the evaluation of spine trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of computed tomography has had a major impact on the diagnostic approach to the spine trauma patient. The high resolution of new generation CT equipment allows definitive evaluation of bony disruption within the spinal column. Multiplanar image reformation permits three-dimensional assessment of the injury, optimizes patient comfort and safety, and minimizes the time necessary for the diagnosis. Water-soluble contrast can be used to expand greatly the utility of computed tomography. Utilizing the cervical puncture approach, small doses of contrast can be instilled in the subarachnoid space with the patient supine and semi-upright on a tiltable gurney. Such contrast enhancement can provide additional information in acutely traumatized patients with neurologic deficits. Dynamic sequence scanning with automatic table incrementation permits thorough evaluation of severe spinal trauma in less than 15 minutes following patient transfer onto the scanning couch. Because of its many advantages, CT has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in the evaluation of spinal injury when plain films and/or clinical data indicate the need for further diagnostic measures

  13. Arthrographic examination for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by limited cone beam X-CT for dental use (Ortho-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TMJ arthrography has been performed with a surgical X-ray television system (fluoroscope) and a tomographic apparatus for patients with disturbance of opening of the mouth. Limited cone beam X-CT for dental use (Ortho-CT) developed by Arai et al. is small and very effective for the small maxillofacial area. We performed TMJ arthrography by using Ortho-CT for TMD patients, and obtained good results, compared with those of MRI. Objects were 13 joints in 12 patients diagnosed as having TMD. As a result, there was a high percentage of agreement with figure and position of the articular disk and it was certain that Ortho-CT had the accuracy similar to that of MRI, because there was no statistically significant difference. We conclude that Ortho-CT is very effective for TMJ arthrography. (author)

  14. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  15. Passive breath gating equipment for cone beam CT-guided RapidArc gastric cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To report preliminary results of passive breath gating (PBG) equipment for cone-beam CT image-guided gated RapidArc gastric cancer treatments. Material and methods: Home-developed PBG equipment integrated with the real-time position management system (RPM) for passive patient breath hold was used in CT simulation, online partial breath hold (PBH) CBCT acquisition, and breath-hold gating (BHG) RapidArc delivery. The treatment was discontinuously delivered with beam on during BH and beam off for free breathing (FB). Pretreatment verification PBH CBCT was obtained with the PBG-RPM system. Additionally, the reproducibility of the gating accuracy was evaluated. Results: A total of 375 fractions of breath-hold gating RapidArc treatments were successfully delivered and 233 PBH CBCTs were available for analysis. The PBH CBCT images were acquired with 2–3 breath holds and 1–2 FB breaks. The imaging time was the same for PBH CBCT and conventional FB CBCT (60 s). Compared to FB CBCT, the motion artifacts seen in PBH CBCT images were remarkably reduced. The average BHG RapidArc delivery time was 103 s for one 270-degree arc and 269 s for two full arcs. Conclusions: The PBG-RPM based PBH CBCT verification and BHG RapidArc delivery was successfully implemented clinically. The BHG RapidArc treatment was accomplished using a conventional RapidArc machine with high delivery efficiency

  16. Predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy to cone-beam CT guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Ji; Han, Young Min; Jin, Gong Yong; Song, Ji Soo [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. From January 2011 to December 2012, we retrospectively identified 38 patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB with solid pulmonary lesions, and 76 patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were matched to the patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB for age, sex, and lesion location. We evaluated predicting factors such as, long-axis diameter, short-axis diameter, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion affecting conversion from fluoroscopy guided PTNB to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Pearson χ{sup 2} test, Fisher exact test, and independent t test were used in statistical analyses; in addition, we also used receiver operating characteristics curve to find the proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were 2.70 ± 1.57 cm, 3.40 ± 1.92 cm, 3.06 ± 1.81 cm, and 35.67 ± 15.70 Hounsfield unit (HU), respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.60 ± 1.30 cm, 2.20 ± 1.45 cm, 1.91 ± 1.99 cm, and 18.32 ± 23.11 HU, respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value showed a significantly different mean value between the 2 groups (p = 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, p < 0.001, respectively). Odd ratios of CT attenuation value and short-axis diameter of the solid pulmonary lesion were 0.952 and 0.618, respectively. Proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.65 cm (sensitivity 68.4%, specificity 71.1%) in short-axis diameter and 29.50 HU (sensitivity 65.8%, specificity 65

  17. Predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy to cone-beam CT guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. From January 2011 to December 2012, we retrospectively identified 38 patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB with solid pulmonary lesions, and 76 patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were matched to the patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB for age, sex, and lesion location. We evaluated predicting factors such as, long-axis diameter, short-axis diameter, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion affecting conversion from fluoroscopy guided PTNB to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Pearson χ2 test, Fisher exact test, and independent t test were used in statistical analyses; in addition, we also used receiver operating characteristics curve to find the proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were 2.70 ± 1.57 cm, 3.40 ± 1.92 cm, 3.06 ± 1.81 cm, and 35.67 ± 15.70 Hounsfield unit (HU), respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.60 ± 1.30 cm, 2.20 ± 1.45 cm, 1.91 ± 1.99 cm, and 18.32 ± 23.11 HU, respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value showed a significantly different mean value between the 2 groups (p = 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, p < 0.001, respectively). Odd ratios of CT attenuation value and short-axis diameter of the solid pulmonary lesion were 0.952 and 0.618, respectively. Proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.65 cm (sensitivity 68.4%, specificity 71.1%) in short-axis diameter and 29.50 HU (sensitivity 65.8%, specificity 65.8%) in

  18. Images of the middle and inner ear using limited-cone-beam 3D X-ray CT (Ortho-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the high quality images of middle and inner ear obtained using limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT (Ortho-CT) developed by authors. We have developed and reported about principle and images of Ortho-CT. This system is small three-dimensional X-ray CT which is remodeled from the multi-functional tomographic machine for dental use (ScanoraTM, Soredex Co., Helsinki, Finland). The patient who is examined can sit down on the chair of the system and his head is fixed. X-ray sensor used is 4 inches imaging intensifier (I.I.). The size of X-ray beam is 32 mm high and 40 mm width at rotational center. The exposure conditions are consisted of 85 kVp, 10 mA, adder filter 1 mm Cu and 3 mm Al. The exposure time is 17 seconds. The 512 projection images from 360 degree are recorded on the personal computer (Pentium II 333 MHz Intel, USA). CT images are reconstructed from the projection images. The reconstruction time is about 7 minutes using personal computer system (Pentium III 550 MHz, Intel, USA). The voxel is ortho-cubic figure (each side of size: 0.136 mm). The figure of imaging area is cylinder type (32 mm high, 38 mm diameter). In this study, the middle and inner ear of a volunteer (61-years-old male) was examined with this system to evaluate its performance. The images obtained were very high quality. Therefore the images of the auditory ossicles and inner ear can be very useful for the diagnosis of small bone destruction by the pathosis. We developed limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT. The images of inner ear and auditory ossicles were shown with a very high quality using this system. The system is expected to be applied for clinical use to the diagnosis of the ear disease. (author)

  19. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  20. Fast cone-beam CT reconstruction with CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to large in computation and transmission of cone-beam CT 3D reconstruction algorithm, it is impossible to meet the requirements of 3D image reconstruction in real-time, rapid and accurate by the means of using CPU only. The paper advances a method, without learning graphics API, to achieve the fast computing of algorithm by using graphics processor which has strong operation capability and large memory bandwidth. The method uses the kind of GPU based on CUDA, through new programming model, accelerating the filtering and backprojection by the Stream Processor Unit (SPU) in GPU, to achieve the FDK algorithm speed-up. Compared with the means using CPU only, the method is simpler in development than before. Experiment show that the image of 5123 volume can be completed with 32bit floating-point in less than one minute, and the transmission time between the GPU and computer is less than one second. The experiment shows that the method gets a faster performance and good quality comparing with the method using CPU. (authors)

  1. Characterization of scatter radiation in cone beam CT mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bob; Glick, Stephen J.; Groiselle, Corinne

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam CT mammography (CBCTM) is an emerging breast imaging technology and is currently under intensive investigation [1-3]. One of the major challenges in CBCTM is to understand the characteristics of scatter radiation and to find ways to reduce or correct its degrading effects. Since the breast shape, geometry and image formation process are significantly different from conventional mammography, all system components and parameters such as target/filter combination, kVp range, source to image distance, detector design etc. should be examined and optimized. In optimizing CBCTM systems, it is important to have knowledge of how different imaging parameters affect the recorded scatter within the image. In this study, a GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation package (GATE) was used to investigate the scatter magnitude and its" distribution in CBCTM. The influences of different air gaps, kVp settings, breast sizes and breast composition on the scatter primary ratio (SPR) and scatter profiles were examined. In general, the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) is strongly dependent on the breast size and air gap, and is only moderately dependent on the kVp setting and breast composition. These results may be used for optimization of CBCTM systems, as well as for developing scatter correction methods.

  2. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  3. Use of cone-beam CT and live 3-D needle guidance to facilitate percutaneous nephrostomy and nephrolithotripsy access in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaining access into non-dilated renal collecting systems for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy, particularly in patients with prohibitive body habitus and/or scoliosis, is often challenging using conventional techniques. To evaluate the feasibility of cone-beam CT for percutaneous nephrostomy placement for subsequent percutaneous nephrolithotripsy in children and adolescents. A retrospective review of percutaneous nephrostomy revealed use of cone-beam CT and 3-D guidance in 12 percutaneous nephrostomy procedures for 9 patients between 2006 and 2015. All cone-beam CT-guided percutaneous nephrostomies were for pre-lithotripsy access and all 12 were placed in non-dilated collecting systems. Technical success was 100%. There were no complications. Cone-beam CT with 3-D guidance is a technically feasible technique for percutaneous nephrostomy in children and adolescents, specifically for nephrolithotripsy access in non-dilated collecting systems. (orig.)

  4. Use of cone-beam CT and live 3-D needle guidance to facilitate percutaneous nephrostomy and nephrolithotripsy access in children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, C.M. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kukreja, Kamlesh [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Singewald, Timothy; Johnson, Neil D.; Racadio, John M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Minevich, Eugene; Reddy, Pramod [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Urology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Gaining access into non-dilated renal collecting systems for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy, particularly in patients with prohibitive body habitus and/or scoliosis, is often challenging using conventional techniques. To evaluate the feasibility of cone-beam CT for percutaneous nephrostomy placement for subsequent percutaneous nephrolithotripsy in children and adolescents. A retrospective review of percutaneous nephrostomy revealed use of cone-beam CT and 3-D guidance in 12 percutaneous nephrostomy procedures for 9 patients between 2006 and 2015. All cone-beam CT-guided percutaneous nephrostomies were for pre-lithotripsy access and all 12 were placed in non-dilated collecting systems. Technical success was 100%. There were no complications. Cone-beam CT with 3-D guidance is a technically feasible technique for percutaneous nephrostomy in children and adolescents, specifically for nephrolithotripsy access in non-dilated collecting systems. (orig.)

  5. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federale de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Batista, W. O. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E.; Lara, P. A., E-mail: mrs2206@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  6. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  7. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, M., E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  8. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  9. CT evaluation of the metastatic liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT figures of the metastatic liver tumor after contrast enhancement were retrospectively evaluated in 197 cases. Internal structures of the liver tumor were classified to 5 patterns, homogeneous, decrescent, stepwise, central high and mottled types. Many of the colon and gall-bladder cancer showed decrescent type, and ovarian cancer showed homogeneous type. Many of the adenocarcinoma presented decrescent type and many of the squamous cell, small cell and large cell carcinoma presented homogeneous type. Stepwise type was found more frequently in well differentiated adenocarcinoma than poorly differentiated one. Central high type was detected in 9 cases, due to marked fibrotic change. Table sliding rapid sequence method was used in 36 cases. This method is useful for detection of the hepatic tumors and discrimination between metastatic tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  10. Review of recent developments in cone-beam CT reconstruction algorithms for long-object problem:

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Zeng; Zhiqiang Chen

    2004-01-01

    Long-object problem and short-object problem both deal with reconstruction problems with truncated conebeam CT projections acquired with a helical path. They have significantly less practical limitations than original exact cone-beam CT reconstruction algorithms which the cone-beam must cover the whole object. The short-object problem can be defined as reconstruction of the whole object having a finite support in the axial direction with helical scan extends a little bit above and below the o...

  11. Deformable image registration for contour propagation from CT to cone-beam CT scans in radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. Daily organ motion occurring during the course of radiotherapy in the pelvic region leads to uncertainties in the doses delivered to the tumour and the organs at risk. Motion patterns include both volume and shape changes, calling for deformable image registration (DIR), in approaches involving dose accumulation and adaptation. In this study, we tested the performance of a DIR application for contour propagation from the treatment planning computed tomography (pCT) to repeat cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) for a set of prostate cancer patients. Material and methods. The prostate, rectum and bladder were delineated in the pCT and in six to eight repeat CBCTs for each of five patients. The pCT contours were propagated onto the corresponding CBCT using the Multi-modality Image Registration and Segmentation application, resulting in 36 registrations. Prior to the DIR, a rigid registration was performed. The algorithm used for the DIR was based on a 'demons' algorithm and the performance of it was examined quantitatively using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and qualitatively as visual slice-by-slice scoring by a radiation oncologist grading the deviations in shape and/or distance relative to the anatomy. Results. The average DSC (range) for the DIR over all scans and patients was 0.80 (0.65-0.87) for prostate, 0.77 (0.63-0.87) for rectum and 0.73 (0.34-0.91) for bladder, while the corresponding DSCs for the rigid registrations were 0.77 (0.65-0.86), 0.71 (0.55-0.82) and 0.64 (0.33-0.87). The percentage of propagated contours of good/acceptable quality was 45% for prostate; 20% for rectum and 33% for bladder. For the bladder, there was an association between the average DSC and the different scores of the qualitative evaluation. Conclusions. DIR improved the performance of pelvic organ contour propagation from the pCT to CBCTs as compared to rigid registration only. Still, a large fraction of the propagated rectum and bladder contours were

  12. An efficient CT-simulation procedure for breast treatment using tangent beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose:Breast treatment planning using CT-simulations provides a number of advantages, but presents several unique problems. One concern is the ability to evaluate coverage of the external target volume, since CT scanners cannot provide field light projections on skin. Another is whether treatment portals can be marked on a patient as in a regular simulation, so that the usual level of setup accuracy can be achieved without additional effort at the treatment unit. Finally, the planning procedure must be performed with efficiency, so that it could be used routinely for most or all patients. To address these issues, we report our CT-simulation procedure for breast treatment using tangent beams, which includes, all in one session, CT data acquisition, field determination, external target volume evaluation, and the marking of treatment portals on the patient. Methods and Materials: A General Electric CT scanner and a virtual simulation software package 'Advantage-Sim' were used to perform the simulations. We have developed two tools to assist the simulation process. One is a digitization system consisting of multimedia software interacting with a sonic digitizer that can capture the coordinates of a point in space with the standard deviation of 1.4 mm. Given the planned beam geometry, the system can establish a virtual beam projection on the patient's body in real space, so that for any digitized point on the skin, its position relative to the field can be calculated and shown in a beam's eye view display. With convenient audio and visual signals, the system allows one to see if any skin area of concern is included in the field with sufficient margin, or to rapidly locate field borders or marking points by cruising the digitizer probe on patient skin. The accuracy of the system has been studied by using a breast phantom. The other is a breast planning software tool which augments the virtual simulation software to speed up the generation of tangent beam pairs

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in the assessment of mandibular invasion of lower gingival carcinoma: Comparison with conventional panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in assessing mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma and compare it with that of panoramic radiography. Patients and methods: Fifty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower gingiva who were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT before surgery were included in this study. Five radiologists used a 6-point rating scale to independently evaluate cone-beam CT and panoramic images for the presence or absence of alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement by tumor. Using the histopathogical findings as the gold standard, we calculated and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value) and the sensitivity and specificity of the two imaging modalities. Results: In evaluations of both alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement, the mean Az value for cone-beam CT (0.918 and 0.977, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (0.793 and 0.872, respectively). The mean sensitivity for cone-beam CT (89% and 99%, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (73% and 56%, respectively). There was no significant difference in the mean specificity. While cone-beam CT could provide high-resolution three-dimensional images, the image quality around the alveolar crest was often hampered by severe dental artifacts and image noise, resulting in difficulties in detecting subtle alveolar invasion. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT was significantly superior to panoramic radiography in evaluating mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma. Its diagnostic value in detecting subtle alveolar invasion, however, may be limited by severe dental artifacts and image noise.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in the assessment of mandibular invasion of lower gingival carcinoma: Comparison with conventional panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momin, Mohammad A. [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: momin.orad@tmd.ac.jp; Okochi, Kiyoshi [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: kiyoshi.orad@tmd.ac.jp; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: hiro.orad@tmd.ac.jp; Imaizumi, Akiko [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: ima.orad@tmd.ac.jp; Omura, Ken [Oral Surgery, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: omura.osur@tmd.ac.jp; Amagasa, Teruo [Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: t-amagasa.mfs@tmd.ac.jp; Okada, Norihiko [Diagnostic Oral Pathology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: nokd.opth@tmd.ac.jp; Ohbayashi, Naoto [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: nao.orad@tmd.ac.jp; Kurabayashi, Tohru [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)], E-mail: kura.orad@tmd.ac.jp

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam CT in assessing mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma and compare it with that of panoramic radiography. Patients and methods: Fifty patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lower gingiva who were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT before surgery were included in this study. Five radiologists used a 6-point rating scale to independently evaluate cone-beam CT and panoramic images for the presence or absence of alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement by tumor. Using the histopathogical findings as the gold standard, we calculated and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value) and the sensitivity and specificity of the two imaging modalities. Results: In evaluations of both alveolar bone and mandibular canal involvement, the mean Az value for cone-beam CT (0.918 and 0.977, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (0.793 and 0.872, respectively). The mean sensitivity for cone-beam CT (89% and 99%, respectively) was significantly higher than that for panoramic radiography (73% and 56%, respectively). There was no significant difference in the mean specificity. While cone-beam CT could provide high-resolution three-dimensional images, the image quality around the alveolar crest was often hampered by severe dental artifacts and image noise, resulting in difficulties in detecting subtle alveolar invasion. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT was significantly superior to panoramic radiography in evaluating mandibular invasion by lower gingival carcinoma. Its diagnostic value in detecting subtle alveolar invasion, however, may be limited by severe dental artifacts and image noise.

  15. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation

  16. Dose optimisation for intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT in paediatric spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Asger Greval [Region of Northern Jutland, Department of X-ray Physics, Broenderslev (Denmark); Eiskjaer, Soeren; Kaspersen, Jon [Aalborg University Hospital, The Spinal Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2012-08-15

    During surgery for spinal deformities, accurate placement of pedicle screws may be guided by intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate paediatric imaging protocols aiming to reduce the radiation dose in line with the ALARA principle. Using O-arm registered (Medtronic, Inc.), three paediatric phantoms were employed to measure CTDI{sub w} doses with default and lowered exposure settings. Images from 126 scans were evaluated by two spinal surgeons and scores were compared (Kappa statistics). Effective doses were calculated. The recommended new low-dose 3-D spine protocols were then used in 15 children. The lowest acceptable exposure as judged by image quality for intraoperative use was 70 kVp/40 mAs, 70 kVp/80 mAs and 80 kVp/40 mAs for the 1-, 5- and 12-year-old-equivalent phantoms respectively (kappa = 0,70). Optimised dose settings reduced CTDI{sub w} doses 89-93%. The effective dose was 0.5 mSv (91-94,5% reduction). The optimised protocols were used clinically without problems. Radiation doses for intraoperative 3-D CT using a cone-beam flat-detector scanner could be reduced at least 89% compared to manufacturer settings and still be used to safely navigate pedicle screws. (orig.)

  17. CT evaluation of tarsometatarsal fracture-dislocation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fracture-dislocation in the tarsometatarsal region (Lisfranc) may be subtle and difficult to recognize on standard radiographic projections. Computed tomography (CT) was used to study the normal anatomy of the forefoot and to evaluate three patients with suspected tarsometatarsal fracture dislocation. The advantages of CT in the evaluation of forefoot trauma are emphasized

  18. CT evaluation of tarsometatarsal fracture-dislocation injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goiney, R.C.; Connell, D.G.; Nichols, D.M.

    1985-05-01

    Fracture-dislocation in the tarsometatarsal region (Lisfranc) may be subtle and difficult to recognize on standard radiographic projections. Computed tomography (CT) was used to study the normal anatomy of the forefoot and to evaluate three patients with suspected tarsometatarsal fracture dislocation. The advantages of CT in the evaluation of forefoot trauma are emphasized.

  19. CT evaluation of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The educational objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This article reviews the key imaging findings at CT in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. After reading this article, the reader should have an improved awareness of the condition, its imaging features, and the CT imaging features associated with surgically accessible disease.

  20. Evaluation of effectiveness of CT diagnosis for cervical tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of cervical tumors by visual examination and/or by palpation is limited practically due to the pathological peculiarity of the focal site. One of the efficient diagnostic probes is computed tomography (called CT), a generally applied methodology that aids diagnosis and decision regarding the type of treatment. Many cases of cervical tumor have been detected by utilizing CT method. However, sufficiently effective methodology and procedures for CT diagnoses have not been established, and further studies are necessary. Out of 85 clinical cases treated and examined by CT scanning from 1991 to 1993 in our cancer ward, 71 cases with a cervical tumor recognized at the first medical palpation were evaluated and we concluded the following: CT diagnosis is effective for differentiating the sites where abnormalities occur. CT diagnosis is useful/effective for detecting focal extension of cervical tumors. CT values allow tumors to be diagnosed qualitatively in some cases. PN (+) and (-) showed significant limbic morphological differences. (author)

  1. Using condition and usefulness of dental cone-beam CT in endodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the condition and usefulness of the dental cone-beam CT (3DX) in clinical endodontic treatments. Images from 55 examinations of 49 patients obtained using 3DX during an 11-month period were evaluated retrospectively to identify the usefulness of this modality compared with periapical or panoramic radiographs. The main indication for using of 3DX was diagnosis of root fracture in 65% of the examinations, second was the presence and expansion of periapical lesion in 22%, and third was to detect the canal system or root abnormality in 13%. The 3DX visualizes bony anatomical structures precisely and detects the presence and expansion of periapical lesions and the canal system of each root of mulirooted teeth that cannot easily be observed by intraoral radiography or panoramic radiography. The results of this study suggest that 3DX is a useful and reliable tool for endodontic treatments. (author)

  2. CT evaluation of the normal pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct coronal computed tomography with 1.5mm contiguous scanning was done in total 95 cases, who had no clinical evidence of pituitary and hypothalamic disease. The evaluation of pituitary height, width, upper surface contour and density was done and the pituitary stalk was also evaluated. The results as follow : 1. Total 95 cases were 45 males and 50 females. 2. The average height of normal pituitary gland was 5.72 ± 1.44 mm in female and 5.37 ± 1.17 mm in male. There was no significant difference of pituitary height between male and female (ρ > 0.1). 3. The pituitary height was decreased according to the increased age both in male and female except prepubertal age. 4. The group between 15-30 year old age showed significantly increased pituitary height comparing to the remained age group both in male and female (ρ 0.1). 8. The focal low density of normal pituitary gland was noted in only 8.4% and its size was always below 3mm. 9. The pituitary stalk can be seen in 94.7% by direct coronal CT scanning and it was located at the midline. The width of pituitary stalk was always smaller than internal carotid artery and basilar artery. 10. There were no significant difference in pituitary height and width according to the menopause or the marriage

  3. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  4. Sonography in evaluation of gallbladder carcinoma: comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 35 patients with gallbladder carcinoma were studied by sonography and/or computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the relative accuracy of the methods. The preoperative diagnosis was made correctly by sonography in 70% and by CT in 61%. Sonography was slightly superior to CT in diagnosing the primary tumor but this is not statistically significant. Seventeen tumors (49%) were massive type, three(9%) were thickened wall type and 15(42%) were intraluminal type. Diagnostic accuracy of sonography for each type was 33%, 78% and 73% respectively. Associated findings were direct invasion of the liver by tumor (66%), lymphadenopathy(60%), dilatation of biliary tree (37%) and gallstones (31%). Sonography was superior to CT in identifying the direct invasion into the liver and detecting gallstones whilst CT was superior to sonography in detecting lymphadenopathy. On the basis of our result, we believe that sonography and CT are complementary examinations in the evaluation of carcinoma of the gallbladder

  5. Impact of planning CT slice thickness on the accuracy of automatic target registration using the on-board cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated relationship between planning CT slice thickness and the accuracy of automatic target registration using cone-beam CT (CBCT). Planning CT images were acquired with reconstructed slice thickness of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 mm for three different phantoms: Penta-Guide phantom, acrylic ball phantom, and pelvic phantom. After correctly placing the phantom at the isocenter using an in-room laser, we purposely displaced it by moving the treatment couch and then obtained CBCT images. Registration between the planning CT and the CBCT was performed using automatic target registration software, and the registration errors were recorded for each planning CT data set with different slice thickness. The respective average and standard deviation of errors for 10 mm slice thickness CT in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions (n=15 data sets) were: 0.7±0.2 mm, 0.8±0.2 mm, and 0.2±0.2 mm for the Penta-Guide phantom; 0.5±0.4 mm, 0.6±0.3 mm, and 0.4±0.3 mm for the acrylic ball phantom and 0.6±0.2 mm, 0.9±0.2 mm, and 0.2±0.2 mm for the pelvic phantom. We found that the mean registration errors were always less than 1 mm regardless of the slice thickness tested. The results suggest that there is no obvious correlation between the planning CT slice thickness and the registration errors. (author)

  6. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, M.A., E-mail: M.Bahri@ulg.ac.be [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A. [Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Salmon, E.; Luxen, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Seret, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); ULg-Liege University, Experimental Medical Imaging, Liege (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described . The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm{sup -1} corresponding to 114 {mu}m resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm{sup -1}) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R{sup 2}>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  7. Cone-beam CT imagine registration of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the influencing factors of cone-beam CT (CBCT) imagine registration in lung cancer. Methods: From Mar. 2007 to Dec. 2007, 20 patients with lung cancer were treated with IGRT. The imagines of CBCT were collected from 6 to 19 fractions during the patients' radiotherapy. To compare the difference of set-up errors between the two groups according to the distance from the lesion in lung to the centrum. At the same time, CBCT imagines from the first, middle and the last fraction of these patients' radiotherapy were registrated in bone and grey methods by four doctors. The difference of set-up errors between different doctors and registrated methods were compared. Results: The mean values of set-up errors were <2 mm in the two groups without significant difference (x : -1.31 mm vs 0.10 mm (t=0.07, P=0.554); y : 1.24 mm vs 1.37 mm (t=0.05, P=0.652); z : -1.88 mm vs -1.26 mm (t= -0.12, P=0.321)). The mean values of set-up errors were <1.3 mm in four doctors and registrated methods without significant difference, for bone registration, x : -0. 05 mm, -0.01 mm, 0.05 mm, -0.12 mm and -1.31 mm ( F=-0.01, P=0.887); y : 0.56 mm, 0.35 mm, 0.51 mm and 0.43 mm (F= -0.01, P=0.880); z : -1.16 mm, -1.20 mm, -0.88 mm and -1.03 mm (F= -0.04, P=0.555), for grey registration, x : -0.32 mm, -0.341 mm, -0.395 mm and - 0.37 mm(F=-0.01, P=0.874); y : 0.34 mm, 0.54 mm, -0.04 mm and 0.27 mm (F= -0.03, P=0.622); x : -1.12 mm, -1.15 mm, -1.13 mm and -1.04 mm (F=0.00, P=0.812). Conclusions: With the same registrated box and imagine quality, the location of the lesions in lung, registered methods and different doctors are not the influencing factors for CBCT imagine registration. (authors)

  8. Comparison of fan-beam, cone-beam, and spiral scan reconstruction in x-ray micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2001-06-01

    We developed and tested reconstruction software packages for different algorithms: fan-beam, cone-beam (Feldkamp) and spiral (helical) scans. All algorithms were applied to different simulations as well as to the real datasets from the commercial micro-CT instruments. From the results of testing a number of strong and weak points at different approaches was found. Several examples from the different application areas (bone microstructure, industrial applications) show typical reconstruction artifacts with different algorithms.

  9. CT of anorectal malformation - a postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the progress in the field of surgical treatment of anorectal malformations, faecal incontinence is, in variable degrees, still an unpleasant and frequent postoperative sequela. Postoperative CT demonstrate the location of the pulled-through intestine, including whether it had been correctly placed through the levator ani and in the spincteric muscular complex. In our nine patients we discovered a correlation between the CT findings and the clinical picture. The cases of incontinence whether associated with sacral anomalies or not were characterized either by marked hypoplasia of musculature or by the pull-through having missed the sphincteric musculature. CT scans could be of use in planning further surgery. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy

  11. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  12. Commissioning and clinical implementation of a mega-voltage cone beam CT system for treatment localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement in conformal radiotherapy techniques with steep dose gradients has allowed for the delivery of higher doses to a tumor volume while maintaining the sparing of surrounding normal tissue. In this situation, verification of patient setup and evaluation of internal organ motion just prior to radiation delivery is a crucial step. To this end, several volumetric image-guided techniques have been developed for patient localization, such as the Siemens MVision mega-voltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT) system. In this work, the commissioning and clinical implementation of the MVision system is presented. The geometry and gain calibration procedures for the system are described, and guidelines for quality assurance procedures are provided. Different MV-CBCT clinical protocols, ranging from daily to weekly image-guidance, which includes image acquisition, reconstruction, registration with planning CT, and treatment couch offsets corrections, were commissioned. The image quality characteristics of the MVision system were measured and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, including the image noise and uniformity, low-contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. Furthermore, the image reconstruction and registration software was evaluated. Data show that a 2 cm large object with 1% electron density contrast can be detected with the MVision system with 10 cGy at isocenter and that the registration software is accurate within 2 mm in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions

  13. Evaluation of Marfan syndrome: MR imaging versus CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with Marfan, syndrome underwent both CT and MR imaging. MR imaging were interpreted in blinded fashion and then compared with CT scans MR imaging was found to be equivalent to CT in the detection of aortic, dural, and hip abnormalities in patients not operated on. MR imaging was superior to CT in the evaluation of postoperative patients because the artifact produced by Bjork-Shirley or St. Jude valves precludes adequate evaluation of the aortic root on CT while producing only a small inferior field distortion (a ''pseudo-ventricular septal defect'') on MR imaging. The absence of radiation exposure is another major advantage of MR imaging in this relatively young population requiring serial studies. The authors conclude that MR imaging is the modality of choice for the evaluation and follow-up of patients with Marfan syndrome and offers an appropriate means of screening their kindred

  14. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T. Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D.; Purnima, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2009-04-01

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm × 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0° and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between ±6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  15. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, T Hannah Mary; Purnima, S; Ravindran, B Paul [Department of Radiotherapy, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Devakumar, D [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)], E-mail: paul@cmcvellore.ac.in

    2009-04-07

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm x 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0{sup 0} and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between {+-}6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  16. Metal Artifact Reduction for Polychromatic X-ray CT Based on a Beam-Hardening Corrector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Hwang, Dosik; Seo, Jin Keun

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method to correct beam hardening artifacts caused by the presence of metal in polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) without degrading the intact anatomical images. Metal artifacts due to beam-hardening, which are a consequence of X-ray beam polychromaticity, are becoming an increasingly important issue affecting CT scanning as medical implants become more common in a generally aging population. The associated higher-order beam-hardening factors can be corrected via analysis of the mismatch between measured sinogram data and the ideal forward projectors in CT reconstruction by considering the known geometry of high-attenuation objects. Without prior knowledge of the spectrum parameters or energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the proposed correction allows the background CT image (i.e., the image before its corruption by metal artifacts) to be extracted from the uncorrected CT image. Computer simulations and phantom experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method to alleviate beam hardening artifacts. PMID:26390451

  17. Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

  18. A Model-Based Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone Beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profiles for a set of CBCT data in either image domain or projection domain. A denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signals is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations using thorax and abdomen phantoms with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental Catphan phantom data, and in vivo human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU in either projection domain or image domain. For the MC thorax phantom study, four components segmentation yield the best results, while the results of three components segmentation are still acceptable. For the Catphan phantom data, the mean value over all pixels in the residual image is...

  19. Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

  20. Magnitude and clinical relevance of translational and rotational patient setup errors: A cone-beam CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish volume imaging using an on-board cone-beam CT (CB-CT) scanner for evaluation of three-dimensional patient setup errors. Methods and Materials: The data from 24 patients were included in this study, and the setup errors using 209 CB-CT studies and 148 electronic portal images were analyzed and compared. The effect of rotational errors alone, translational errors alone, and combined rotational and translational errors on target coverage and sparing of organs at risk was investigated. Results: Translational setup errors using the CB-CT scanner and an electronic portal imaging device differed 2o were recorded in 3.7% of pelvic tumors, 26.4% of thoracic tumors, and 12.4% of head-and-neck tumors; the corresponding maximal rotational errors were 5o, 8o, and 6o. No correlation between the magnitude of translational and rotational setup errors was observed. For patients with elongated target volumes and sharp dose gradients to adjacent organs at risk, both translational and rotational errors resulted in considerably decreased target coverage and highly increased doses to the organs at risk compared with the initial treatment plan. Conclusions: The CB-CT scanner has been successfully established for the evaluation of patient setup errors, and its feasibility in day-to-day clinical practice has been demonstrated. Our results have indicated that rotational errors are of clinical significance for selected patients receiving high-precision radiotherapy

  1. Shading correction algorithm for improvement of cone-beam CT images in radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, T. E.; Moore, C. J.; Rowbottom, C G; Mackay, R. I.; Williams, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) images have recently become an established modality for treatment verification in radiotherapy. However, identification of soft-tissue structures and the calculation of dose distributions based on CBCT images is often obstructed by image artefacts and poor consistency of density calibration. A robust method for voxel-by-voxel enhancement of CBCT images using a priori knowledge from the planning CT scan has been developed and implemented. CBCT scans were enhanced using a lo...

  2. Suppression of the CT Beam Hardening Streak Artifact Using Predictive Correction on Detector Data

    OpenAIRE

    Stowe, John G.; Curran, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to develop an automated program incorporating a predictive artifact correction technique (PACT) to correct for the signal deviations from metal beam hardening artifacts in Computed Tomography (CT) detector raw data. Thin-slice sequential CT scans were performed on a dosimetry head phantom using a Somatom Sensation 16 scanner to establish a ground truth image. Metal pins were then affixed to either side of the phantom at the three and nine o'clock positions to c...

  3. Single-slice rebinning method for helical cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noo, F; Defrise, M; Clackdoyle, R

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, we present reconstruction results from helical cone-beam CT data, obtained using a simple and fast algorithm, which we call the CB-SSRB algorithm. This algorithm combines the single-slice rebinning method of PET imaging with the weighting schemes of spiral CT algorithms. The reconstruction is approximate but can be performed using 2D multislice fan-beam filtered backprojection. The quality of the results is surprisingly good, and far exceeds what one might expect, even when the pitch of the helix is large. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using standard spiral CT reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. PMID:10070801

  4. Single-slice rebinning method for helical cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present reconstruction results from helical cone-beam CT data, obtained using a simple and fast algorithm, which we call the CB-SSRB algorithm. This algorithm combines the single-slice rebinning method of PET imaging with the weighting schemes of spiral CT algorithms. The reconstruction is approximate but can be performed using 2D multislice fan-beam filtered backprojection. The quality of the results is surprisingly good, and far exceeds what one might expect, even when the pitch of the helix is large. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using standard spiral CT reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. (author)

  5. Effect of beam hardening on transmural myocardial perfusion quantification in myocardial CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of subendocardial ischemia exhibiting an abnormal transmural perfusion gradient (TPG) may help identify ischemic conditions due to micro-vascular dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of beam hardening (BH) artifacts on TPG quantification using myocardial CT perfusion (CTP). We used a prototype spectral detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare) to acquire dynamic myocardial CTP scans in a porcine ischemia model with partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery guided by pressure wire-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. Conventional 120 kVp and 70 keV projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed from the same projection data and used to compute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using the Johnson-Wilson model. Under moderate LAD occlusion (FFR~0.7), we used three 5 mm short axis slices and divided the myocardium into three LAD segments and three remote segments. For each slice and each segment, we characterized TPG as the mean "endo-to-epi" transmural flow ratio (TFR). BH-induced hypoenhancement on the ischemic anterior wall at 120 kVp resulted in significantly lower mean TFR value as compared to the 70 keV TFR value (0.29+/-0.01 vs. 0.55+/-0.01 pimages resulted in falsely reduced MBF measurements even under non-ischemic conditions.

  6. Evaluation of diseases of the aorta with ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast CT offers several advantages over standard CT for imaging of various congenital and acquired diseases of the aorta. Scan acquisition rates of 50 msec permit evaluation of the entire aorta following a single peripheral intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium. Pathologic aortic flow patterns may also be defined using an ECG triggered ''flow'' mode, adding another dimension to CT evaluation of the aorta. The papers shows examples of a variety of aortic diseases, including coarctation, Marfan syndrome, atherosclerotic aneurysm, dissection, and postoperative abnormalities. The advantages of the modality are stressed

  7. Point spread function modeling and images restoration for cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hua; Shi, Yikai; Xu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has the notable features such as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection images degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed firstly. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection images restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection images restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasib...

  8. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kui-Dong; Shi, Yi-Kai; Xu, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China (2012ZX04007021), Young Scientists Fund of National Natural Science Foundation of China (51105315), Natural Science Basic Research Program of Shaanxi Province of China (2013JM7003) and Northwestern Polytechnical University Foundation for Fundamental Research (JC20120226, 3102014KYJD022)

  9. A new volumetric CT machine for dental imaging based on the cone-beam technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzo, P. [Dept. of Medical Physics, University Hospital, Verona (Italy); Procacci, C.; Tacconi, A.; Tinazzi Martini, P.; Bergamo Andreis, I.A. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Verona (Italy)

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a new type of volumetric CT which uses the cone-beam technique instead of traditional fan-beam technique. The machine is dedicated to the dento-maxillo-facial imaging, particularly for planning in the field of implantology. The main characteristics of the unit are presented with reference to the technical parameters as well as the software performance. Images obtained are reported as various 2D sections of a volume reconstruction. Also, measurements of the geometric accuracy and the radiation dose absorbed by the patient are obtained using specific phantoms. Absorbed dose is compared with that given off by spiral CT. Geometric accuracy, evaluated with reference to various reconstruction modalities and different spatial orientations, is 0.8-1 % for width measurements and 2.2 % for height measurements. Radiation dose absorbed during the scan shows different profiles in central and peripheral axes. As regards the maximum value of the central profile, dose from the new unit is approximately one sixth that of traditional spiral CT. The new system appears to be very promising in dento-maxillo-facial imaging and, due to the good ratio between performance and low cost, together with low radiation dose, very interesting in view of large-scale use of the CT technique in such diagnostic applications. (orig.) With 10 figs., 3 tabs., 15 refs.

  10. CT based treatment planning system of proton beam therapy for ocular melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Takashi E-mail: tnakano@med.gunma-u.ac.jp; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Furukawa, Shigeo; Shibayama, Kouichi; Sato, Sinichiro; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Morita, Shinroku; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-09-01

    A computed tomography (CT) based treatment planning system of proton beam therapy was established specially for ocular melanoma treatment. A technique of collimated proton beams with maximum energy of 70 MeV are applied for treatment for ocular melanoma. The vertical proton beam line has a range modulator for spreading beams out, a multi-leaf collimator, an aperture, light beam localizer, field light, and X-ray verification system. The treatment planning program includes; eye model, selecting the best direction of gaze, designing the shape of aperture, determining the proton range and range modulation necessary to encompass the target volume, and indicating the relative positions of the eyes, beam center and creation of beam aperture. Tumor contours are extracted from CT/MRI images of 1 mm thickness by assistant by various information of fundus photography and ultrasonography. The CT image-based treatment system for ocular melanoma is useful for Japanese patients as having thick choroid membrane in terms of dose sparing to skin and normal organs in the eye. The characteristics of the system and merits/demerits were reported.

  11. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance

  12. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselikas, Lambros, E-mail: lambros.tselikas@gmail.com; Joskin, Julien, E-mail: j.joskin@gmail.com [Gustave Roussy, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Roquet, Florian, E-mail: florianroquet@hotmail.com [Gustave Roussy, Biostatistics Department (France); Farouil, Geoffroy, E-mail: g.farouil@gmail.com [Gustave Roussy, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Dreuil, Serge, E-mail: serge.dreuil@gustaveroussy.fr [Gustave Roussy, Medical Physics Department (France); Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Teriitehau, Christophe, E-mail: cteriitehau@me.com [Gustave Roussy, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Auperin, Anne, E-mail: anne.auperin@gustaveroussy.fr [Gustave Roussy, Biostatistics Department (France); Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: thierry.debaere@gustaveroussy.fr; Deschamps, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.deschamps@gustaveroussy.fr [Gustave Roussy, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  13. Evaluation of severity by whole body CT in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of severity in acute pancreatitis is still controversial. We studied about thirteen cases of acute pancreatitis and calculated CT score using findings of early whole body CT scanning within forty eight hours after initial symptoms. Simultaneously we calculated clinical score too. CT score was constituted by ten points (changes limitted in pancreas itself, extension of inflammation and extrapancreatic fluid collection etc.). And clinical score was constituted by eight clinical symptoms and fourteen laboratory findings in fatal pancreatitis reported in Japan. From these studies, we conclude that early CT scanning is more useful for objective determination of severity and therapy (surgical or medical) in acute pancreatitis than clinical findings. So we made new classification of severity in acute pancreatitis by CT score as follows: severe (6=: medical therapy). (author)

  14. Evaluation of CT dose and image quality in Recife, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to perform a dosimetry study of six CT scanners located in Recife, Brazil, and to evaluate the image quality of these equipments. In this work, the volume CT air kerma index (CVOL) and the air kerma length product (PKL,CT) were estimated. These quantities were calculated using normalized weighted air kerma ind ices in CT standard dosimetry phantoms (nCW), supplied by the ImPACT group for several CT scanners, and the scanning parameters of 15 adult examinations of the head, chest, abdomen and abdomen and pelvis of each institution. The image quality tests were performed using the phantom and accreditation protocol from the American College of Radiology (ACR). The results showed a wide variation of air kerma values for the six evaluated institutions. The CVOL values for head scans varied between 11 and 59 mGy and the PKL,CT, from 49 to 545 mGy.cm The chest examinations presented CVOL values varying from 6 to 15 mGy, and PKL,CT values between 120 and 466 mGy.cm. For abdominal scans, the estimated CVOL values varied between 5 and 14 mGy, and the PKL,CT values varied from 96 to 425 mGy.cm. The wide variation of air kerma between different centres is related to the type of scanner and also to the scanning protocol. The results also showed that, although the CVOL and PKL,CT values are compatible to the European reference levels, the image quality did not attend all ACR CT accreditation requirements. (author)

  15. Radiation Exposure of Patients by Cone Beam CT during Endobronchial Navigation - A Phantom Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Vogl, Thomas; Darwiche, Kaid; Goldberg, Eugene; Huang, Haidong; Simoff, Michael; Li, Qiang; Browning, Robert; Freitag, Lutz; Turner, J. Francis; Pivert, Patrick Le; Yarmus, Lonny; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Cone Beam Computed Tomography imaging has become increasingly important in many fields of interventional therapies. Objective: Lung navigation study which is an uncommon soft tissue approach. Methods: As no effective organ radiation dose levels were available for this kind of Cone Beam Computed Tomography application we simulated in our DynaCT (Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany) suite 2 measurements including 3D acquisition and again for 3D acquisition and 4 endobronchial navigation m...

  16. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  ‑180 to  ‑7 for adipose tissue (AT), ‑6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051–65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303–11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1–12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM

  17. C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Transthoracic Lung Core Needle Biopsy as a Standard Diagnostic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaconi, Marta; Pagni, Fabio; Vacirca, Francesco; Leni, Davide; Corso, Rocco; Cortinovis, Diego; Bidoli, Paolo; Bono, Francesca; Cuttin, Maria S.; Valente, Maria G.; Pesci, Alberto; Bedini, Vittorio A.; Leone, Biagio E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic lung core needle biopsy (CNB) is a safe and accurate procedure for the evaluation of patients with pulmonary nodules. This article will focus on the clinical features related to CNB in terms of diagnostic performance and complication rate. Moreover, the concept of categorizing pathological diagnosis into 4 categories, which could be used for clinical management, follow-up, and quality assurance is also introduced. We retrospectively collected data regarding 375 C-arm cone-beam CT-guided CNBs from January 2010 and June 2014. Clinical and radiological variables were evaluated in terms of success or failure rate. Pathological reports were inserted in 4 homogenous groups (nondiagnostic-L1, benign-L2, malignant not otherwise specified-L3, and malignant with specific histotype-L4), defining for each category a hierarchy of suggested actions. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value and accuracy for patients subjected to CNBs were of 96.8%, 100%, 100%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Roughly 75% of our samples were diagnosed as malignant, with 60% lung adenocarcinoma diagnoses. Molecular analyses were performed on 85 malignant samples to verify applicability of targeted therapy. The rate of “nondiagnostic” samples was 12%. C-arm cone-beam CT-guided transthoracic lung CNB can represent the gold standard for the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A clinical and pathological multidisciplinary evaluation of CNBs was needed in terms of integration of radiological, histological, and oncological data. This approach provided exceptional performances in terms of specificity, positive and negative predictive values; sensitivity in our series was lower compared with other large studies, probably due to the application of strong criteria of adequacy for CNBs (L1 class rate). The satisfactory rate of collected material was evaluated not only in terms of merely diagnostic

  18. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation.

  19. CT and MR imaging in the evaluation of leptomeningeal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the manifestations of leptomeningeal metastases on CT and MR imaging, and evaluate the diagnostic significance of both modalities for this disease. Methods: Clinical and neuroradiological data of 21 cases with leptomeningeal metastases were retrospectively reviewed. In this series, 16 patients were studied by CT and 7 patients by MRI, 2 patients by both CT and MRI. Results: Abnormal enhancement of pia and subarachnoid space, appearing as diffuse pattern in 10 cases, nodular pattern in 8 cases and mixed pattern with diffuse plus nodules in 3 cases, were visualized by CE-CT and Gd-MRI. Diffuse enhancement followed the convolutions of gyri and surface of brainstem, and extended into cerebral cisterns and sulci. the foci appeared as enhanced nodules 0.2-3.0 cm in diameter and 1 or more in number. Nodules with infiltration of cerebral parenchymal were found in 4 patients. In 86% of all cases, diffuse or nodular foci occurred in basilar systems and adjacent cerebellar and cerebral sulci. There were 4 cases associated with ependymal nodular enhancement and 10 cases with widened irregular tentorial enhancement. Intracerebral metastases in 9 cases and hydrocephalus in 13 cases were found in this series. Conclusions: CE-CT and Gd-MRI are had significant clinical diagnostic value for leptomeningeal metastases, Gd-MRI is superior to CE-CT. Because of the limitation in the evaluation of leptomeningeal invasion by neoplasms on CT and MRI, definitive diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastases depends on combination of clinical and imaging data

  20. CT evaluation of choriocarcinoma with brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that the computed tomography(CT) is an essential part not only in screening primary brain tumors, but also in staging known malignancy. This paper reports various CT findings demonstrated in 12 cases of choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis. The CT findings such as the number, location and density of the metastatic lesions, the degree of brain edema, mass effect and effect of contrast enhancement are reviewed as well as the episode of stroke syndrome and survival duration after neurologic symptom attacks. The results were as follows: 1. The of these cases showed solitary metastatic lesion and remaining 2 cases were multiple lesions. 2. One was isodense density and the others were hemorrhagic increased density by CT. 3. All of these showed mass effect to the surrounding structures along with moderate to marked brain edema. 4. The position of the metastatic lesion were located at the supratentorially in all cases. Most of them were at the unilateral frontal or parietal area or both of them. One which noted multiple metastatic foci showed at the bilateral occipital regions. 5. Nine cases showed ring enhancement after contrast infusion. One which noted isodense density on the noninfusion scan showed also ring enhancement after contrast infusion. 6. Nine cases showed positive stroke syndrome. One of them was performed emergency craniotomy. The remaining 3 cases noted progressive neurologic symptoms. 7. Two cases were noted only brain metastasis but the others also had various degree of pulmonary metastasis and 2 of latter had hepatic metastasis, too. 8. Most of the cases were treated with CHAMOCA regimen, and one of them was taken whole brain irradiation (3000 rads/2 weeks). Another on case revealed marked regression of not only metastatic brain lesion but the pulmonary lesion after the 8th course of CHAMOCA regimen and still alive for over 460 days

  1. CT evaluation of choriocarcinoma with brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sei Chul; Kim, Choon Yul; Kwon, Hyung Chul; Bahk, Young Whee; Kim, Seung Jo [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    It is well established that the computed tomography(CT) is an essential part not only in screening primary brain tumors, but also in staging known malignancy. This paper reports various CT findings demonstrated in 12 cases of choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis. The CT findings such as the number, location and density of the metastatic lesions, the degree of brain edema, mass effect and effect of contrast enhancement are reviewed as well as the episode of stroke syndrome and survival duration after neurologic symptom attacks. The results were as follows: 1. The of these cases showed solitary metastatic lesion and remaining 2 cases were multiple lesions. 2. One was isodense density and the others were hemorrhagic increased density by CT. 3. All of these showed mass effect to the surrounding structures along with moderate to marked brain edema. 4. The position of the metastatic lesion were located at the supratentorially in all cases. Most of them were at the unilateral frontal or parietal area or both of them. One which noted multiple metastatic foci showed at the bilateral occipital regions. 5. Nine cases showed ring enhancement after contrast infusion. One which noted isodense density on the noninfusion scan showed also ring enhancement after contrast infusion. 6. Nine cases showed positive stroke syndrome. One of them was performed emergency craniotomy. The remaining 3 cases noted progressive neurologic symptoms. 7. Two cases were noted only brain metastasis but the others also had various degree of pulmonary metastasis and 2 of latter had hepatic metastasis, too. 8. Most of the cases were treated with CHAMOCA regimen, and one of them was taken whole brain irradiation (3000 rads/2 weeks). Another on case revealed marked regression of not only metastatic brain lesion but the pulmonary lesion after the 8th course of CHAMOCA regimen and still alive for over 460 days.

  2. CT EVALUATION OF AZYGOESOPHAGEAL RECESS IN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulamani Sahoo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Azygoesophageal recess (AER is right posterior mediastinal recess . Knowledge of normal radiologic appearance and manifestations of disease in AER can facilitate the detection and diagnosis of many intrathoracic diseases ranging from infective processes to tumors involving mediastinum, lung/pleura, lymphatic system, upper gastrointestinal system (esophagus & stomach & cardio - vascular system. Aim of this study was to investigate various intrathoracic pathologies, altering the configuration of AER on CT in adults & to find out any significance with various disease processes. This study was carried out in CT center, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Krishna Institute of medical sciences, Karad from October 2012 - September 2014. CT thorax of 156 patients was studied for configuration of AER irrespective of pathology. In this study , configuration of AER was altered in descending order with pathologies belonging to following systems: Respiratory system (Lung parenchyma pathologies causing volume loss of right lower lobe particularly Koch’s , UIP , Malignancy , Pleural pathologies (Secondary more common than Primary >Lymphatic system(secondary subcarinal lymph node more common than Primary Lymphoma >Cardio - vascular system(Cardiomegaly particularly Left atrial enlargement >Gastrointestinal system ( hiatus herni a & esophageal Cancer > Mediastinum ( Koch’s of dorsal spine with paraspinal abscess.

  3. Development of CCD-based optical computed tomography and comparison with single-beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports on the development of CCD-based optical computed tomography (CT) CT-s2. A commercially available 10× fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUSTM-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used for comparison. NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was used to validate the performance of CT-s2. The gamma pass rate can reach 96.00% when using a 3% dose difference and 3 mm dose-to-agreement criteria. The results of CT-s2 are as good as those of the single-beam optical-CT scanner, but the scanning time of CT-s2 is only one-tenth of that of the single-beam optical-CT scanner

  4. An electron beam treatment planning system based on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report on the computerization of the electron beam treatment planning system at the Cancer Institute Hospital. The computer aided calculation of electron beam dose distributions utilizes table look-up and interpolation of measured central axis depth doses and off-center ratios (OCR). Inhomogeneity correction is applied by the absorption equivalent thickness (AET) method. When OCR is expressed as a function of x-L instead of x/L, OCR is nearly independent of field size and shape, where x is the distance of the point from the central axis and L is half width. (author)

  5. Simulation-aided investigation of beam hardening induced errors in CT dimensional metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Ye; Kiekens, Kim; Welkenhuyzen, Frank;

    2013-01-01

    Industrial X-ray CT systems are increasingly used as dimensional measuring machines. However, micron level accuracy is not always achievable yet. The measurement accuracy is influenced by many factors, such as workpiece properties, X-ray settings, beam hardening and calibration methods [1-4]. Since...

  6. A new algorithm for geometric self-calibration in cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric misalignment leads to severe artifacts in computed tomography (CT). We suggest a general theory for identification of unknown geometric parameters in cone-beam CT and derive a new computational algorithm to obtain the geometric parameters directly from the scan data. In contrast to many existing approaches, our method requires no dedicated calibration devices and allows us to calibrate the system using an arbitrary phantom or even the patient data. The theory is based on the formalism of the consistency conditions for linear integral operators; the algorithm makes use of the quadratic optimization of the consistency conditions. In the practice, the suggested approach can be viewed as a new concept of 'self-calibration', where the user does not need to be aware of the calibration procedure and plays no role in it, which can be a great advantage in applications of cone-beam CT in interventional radiology and radiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. X-CT evaluation of the severity of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some patients with acute pancreatitis, some experience life-threatening complications. Although there are reports of the assessment of the severity of the disease, mainly based on clinical signs and laboratory findings, pertinent criteria remain elusive. As little information is available concerning the degree or extent of pancreatic lesions; it is difficult to predict the severity and outcome. I examined 74 patients with acute pancreatitis, using computed tomography (CT). The severity was evaluated by means of a CT-score consisting of ten points on the CT findings, in the early stage of the acute pancreatitis. The following results were obtained. 1) Infiltration into the retroperitoneal space such as anterior pararenal space was observed by CT earlier and more frequently than were changes within the pancreas parenchyma. 2) Heterogeneous density of the pancreas and involvement of the posterior pararenal space were more significant and frequently in the severe group than in the moderate or mild group. 3) CT observations made 48 hours after the onset were the most adequate for evaluating the severity in case of acute pancreatitis. 4) After evaluating the severity by the CT-score, the 74 patients were grouped into 3: mild in 46, moderate in 22 and severe in 6 patients. The CT-score revealed a significantly greater specifity and accuracy than did the clinical score, Forell's, Ranson's, or the criteria submitted by a committee for the study of this disease appointed by the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. I propose that an evaluation of the severity by CT-score obtained about 48 hours after the onset of symptoms is useful for predicting the prognosis and for designing proper treatment. (author)

  8. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis

  9. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. CT evaluation of the brain abscess: Comparison of CT and pathologic findings of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to correlate the CT and histopathologic findings of abscess wall. The CT findings of 12 patients with pathologically proven brain abscess were retrospectively analyzed with particular attention to the thickness, smoothness and uniformity of enhancing abscess wall, and the results were correlated with histopathologic findings. Two patients with acute cerebritis showed an isodense ring on non-contrast CT(NCCT),but a true capsule formation could not be identified at pathologic examination. Six other patients with isodense ring on NCCT consisted of early to late cerebritis(3 cases), late cerebritis to early calsule(1 case), early capsule(1 case), and late capsule(1 case). These 6 cases showed ring enhancement on contrast enhanced CT(CECT) and true capsule formation pathologically. There was no isodense ring on NCCT in the remaining four patients. They consisted of early to late cerebeitis(2 cases), late cerebritis(1 case), and late cerebritis to early capsule formation(1 case). These also showed ring enhancement on CECT and true capsule formation pathologically. We found that it is different to predict the exact stage of brain abscess on preoperative CT findings. It is suggested that clinical findings and sequential dynamic CT may provide more detailed information for evaluation of abscess staging

  11. CT evaluation of the brain abscess: Comparison of CT and pathologic findings of brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeoung Mi; Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ji Yang; Yim, Neung Jae; Song, Ik Hoon; Kim, Byung Heon [Massan Koryo General Hospital, Massan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    This study was undertaken to correlate the CT and histopathologic findings of abscess wall. The CT findings of 12 patients with pathologically proven brain abscess were retrospectively analyzed with particular attention to the thickness, smoothness and uniformity of enhancing abscess wall, and the results were correlated with histopathologic findings. Two patients with acute cerebritis showed an isodense ring on non-contrast CT(NCCT),but a true capsule formation could not be identified at pathologic examination. Six other patients with isodense ring on NCCT consisted of early to late cerebritis(3 cases), late cerebritis to early calsule(1 case), early capsule(1 case), and late capsule(1 case). These 6 cases showed ring enhancement on contrast enhanced CT(CECT) and true capsule formation pathologically. There was no isodense ring on NCCT in the remaining four patients. They consisted of early to late cerebeitis(2 cases), late cerebritis(1 case), and late cerebritis to early capsule formation(1 case). These also showed ring enhancement on CECT and true capsule formation pathologically. We found that it is different to predict the exact stage of brain abscess on preoperative CT findings. It is suggested that clinical findings and sequential dynamic CT may provide more detailed information for evaluation of abscess staging.

  12. Improved Scatter Correction in X-Ray Cone Beam CT with Moving Beam Stop Array Using Johns' Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Tang, Shaojie; Xu, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an improved scatter correction with moving beam stop array (BSA) for x-ray cone beam (CB) CT is proposed. Firstly, correlation between neighboring CB views is deduced based on John's Equation. Then, correlation-based algorithm is presented to complement the incomplete views by using the redundancy (over-determined information) in CB projections. Finally, combining the algorithm with scatter correction method using moving BSA, where part of primary radiation is blocked and incomplete projections are acquired, an improved correction method is proposed. Effectiveness and robustness is validated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with EGSnrc on humanoid phantom.

  13. A new strategy for online adaptive prostate radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfractional organ motion and patient positioning errors during prostate radiotherapy can have deleterious clinical consequences. It has become clinical practice to re-position the patient with image-guided translational position correction before each treatment to compensate for those errors. However, tilt errors can only be corrected with table corrections in six degrees of freedom or ''full'' adaptive treatment planning strategies. Organ shape deformations can only be corrected by ''full'' plan adaptation. This study evaluates the potential of instant treatment plan adaptation (fast isodose line adaptation with real-time dose manipulating tools) based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to further improve treatment quality. Using in-house software, CBCTs were modified to approximate a correct density calibration. To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions based on CBCTs were compared with dose distributions calculated on conventional planning CTs (PCT) for four datasets (one inhomogeneous phantom, three patient datasets). To determine the potential dosimetric benefit of a ''full'' plan adaptation over translational position correction, dose distributions were re-optimized using graphical ''online'' dose modification tools for three additional patients' CT-datasets with a substantially distended rectum while the original plans have been created with an empty rectum (single treatment fraction estimates). Absolute dose deviations of up to 51% in comparison to the PCT were observed when uncorrected CBCTs were used for replanning. After density calibration of the CBCTs, 97% of the dose deviations were ≤3% (gamma index: 3%/3 mm). Translational position correction restored the PTV dose (D95) to 73% of the corresponding dose of the reference plan. After plan adaptation, larger improvements of dose restoration to 95% were observed. Additionally, the rectal dose (D30) was further decreased by 42 percentage points (mean of three patient datasets). An accurate dose

  14. SU-E-J-99: Reconstruction of Cone Beam CT Image Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Exit Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the possibility of obtaining an image of the treated volume during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with exit beams. Method: Using a Varian Clinac 21EX and MVCT detector the following three sets of detector projection data were obtained for cone beam CT reconstruction with and without a Catphan 504 phantom. 1) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 open beam with 3 MUs, 2) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 MLC closed beam with 14 MUs. 3) 137 projection images from a test RapicArc QA plan. All projection images were obtained in ‘integrated image’ mode. We used OSCaR code to reconstruct the cone beam CT images. No attempts were made to reduce scatter or artifacts. Results: With projection set 1) we obtained a good quality MV CBCT image by optimizing the reconstruction parameters. Using projection set 2) we were not able to obtain a CBCT image of the phantom, which was determined to be due to the variation of interleaf leakage with gantry angle. From projection set 3), we were able to obtain a weak but meaningful signal in the image, especially in the target area where open beam signals were dominant. This finding suggests that one might be able to acquire CBCT images with rough body shape and some details inside the irradiated target area. Conclusion: Obtaining patient images using the VMAT exit beam is challenging but possible. We were able to determine sources of image degradation such as gantry angle dependent interleaf leakage and beams with a large scatter component. We are actively working on improving image quality

  15. Implementation of single-breath-hold cone beam CT guided hypofraction radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the feasibility of active breath control (ABC), the lung tumor reproducibility and the rationale for single-breath-hold cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided hypofraction radiotherapy. Single-breath-hold CBCT images were acquired using ABC in a cohort of 83 lung cancer patients (95 tumors) treated with hypofraction radiotherapy. For all alignments between the reference CT and CBCT images (including the pre-correction, post-correction and post-treatment CBCT images), the tumor reproducibility was evaluated via online manual alignment of the tumors, and the vertebral bone uncertainties were evaluated via offline manual alignment of the vertebral bones. The difference between the tumor reproducibility and the vertebral bone uncertainty represents the change in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone. The relative tumor positions along the coronal, sagittal and transverse axes were measured based on the reference CT image. The correlations between the vertebral bone uncertainty, the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility were evaluated using the Pearson correlations. Pre-correction, the systematic/random errors of tumor reproducibility were 4.5/2.6 (medial-lateral, ML), 5.1/4.8 (cranial-caudal, CC) and 4.0/3.6 mm (anterior-posterior, AP). These errors were significantly decreased to within 3 mm, both post-correction and post-treatment. The corresponding PTV margins were 4.7 (ML), 7.4 (CC) and 5.4 (AP) mm. The changes in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone displayed systematic/random errors of 2.2/2.0 (ML), 4.1/4.4 (CC) and 3.1/3.3 (AP) mm. The uncertainty of the vertebral bone significantly correlated to the reproducibility of the tumor position (P < 0.05), except in the CC direction post-treatment. However, no significant correlation was detected between the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility (P > 0.05). Using ABC for single-breath-hold CBCT guidance is an

  16. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: r.cazzato@unicampus.it; Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit, E-mail: j.battistuzzi@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: vittoriocatena@gmail.com [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte, E-mail: b.zobel@unicampus.it [Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Italy); Schena, Emiliano, E-mail: e.schena@unicampus.it [Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentations, Biomedical Engineering Laboratory (Italy); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France)

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  17. Metal artefact reduction for a dental cone beam CT image using image segmentation and backprojection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Due to low dose delivery and fast scanning, the dental Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is the latest technology being implanted for a range of dental imaging. The presence of metallic objects including amalgam or gold fillings in the mouth produces an intuitive image for human jaws. The feasibility of a fast and accurate approach for metal artefact reduction for dental CBCT is investigated. The current study investigates the metal artefact reduction using image segmentation and modification of several sinigrams. In order to reduce metal effects such as beam hardening, streak artefact and intense noises, the application of several algorithms is evaluated. The proposed method includes three stages: preprocessing, reconstruction and post-processing. In the pre-processing stage, in order to reduce the noise level, several phase and frequency filters were applied. At the second stage, based on the specific sinogram achieved for each segment, spline interpolation and weighting backprojection filters were applied to reconstruct the original image. A three-dimensional filter was then applied on reconstructed images, to improve the image quality. Results showed that compared to other available filters, standard frequency filters have a significant influence in the preprocessing stage (ΔHU = 48 ± 6). In addition, with the streak artefact, the probability of beam hardening artefact increases. t e post-processing stage, the application of three-dimensional filters improves the quality of reconstructed images (See Fig. I). Conclusion The proposed method reduces metal artefacts especially where there are more than one metal implanted in the region of interest.

  18. Simulation-aided investigation of beam hardening induced errors in CT dimensional metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Ye; Kiekens, Kim; Welkenhuyzen, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems are being increasingly used as dimensional measuring machines. However, micron level accuracy is not always achievable, as of yet. The measurement accuracy is influenced by many factors, such as the workpiece properties, x-ray voltage, filter, beam...... the surrounding stepped cylinder. Accuracy as well as the effect on the uncertainty determination is discussed. The results are compared with simulations using monochromatic beams in order to have a benchmark which excludes beam hardening effects and x-ray scattering. Furthermore, based on the above...

  19. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  20. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30–50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ∼4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ∼3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ∼7 to 49.7 HU, in good

  1. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens

  2. Detection and quantification of coronary artery calcification with electron-beam and conventional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify patients with increased risk of having coronary artery disease (CAD), electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) was used for years for quantifying calcifications of the coronary arteries. The first direct comparison between EBCT and conventional CT was performed to determine the reliability of widely available conventional CT for the assessment of the coronary calcium score. Fifty male patients with suspected CAD were investigated with both modalities, EBCT and conventional 500-ms non-spiral partial scan CT. Scoring of the coronary calcification was performed according to the Agatston method. Forty-two of these patients underwent coronary angiography for the assessment of significant luminal narrowing. The correlation coefficient of the score values of both modalities was highly significant (r = 0.982, p < 0.001). The variability between the two modalities was 42 %. Mean calcium score in patients with significant coronary luminal narrowing (n = 37) was 1104 ± 1089 with EBCT and 1229 ± 1327 with conventional CT. In patients without luminal narrowing (n = 5) mean calcium score was 73 ± 57 with EBCT and 26 ± 35 with conventional CT. Although images of the heart from conventional CT may suffer from cardiac motion artifacts, conventional CT has the potential to identify patients with CAD with accuracy similar to EBCT. (orig.)

  3. Comparison between beam-stop and beam-hole array scatter correction techniques for industrial X-ray cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoerner, K., E-mail: karsten.schoerner.ext@siemens.co [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 81739 Muenchen (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Goldammer, M.; Stephan, J. [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 81739 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Research highlights: {yields} We propose a scatter correction method employing a beam-hole array. {yields} Beam-hole and beam-stop array techniques are compared in respect of geometric and scattering properties. {yields} The beam-hole array method reduces overall scattering compared to a beam-stop array. {yields} Application of the beam-hole array method is successfully demonstrated for a CT of ceramic specimen. -- Abstract: In industrial X-ray cone-beam computed tomography, the inspection of large-scale samples is important because of increasing demands on their quality and long-term mechanical resilience. Large-scale samples, for example made of aluminum or iron, are strongly scattering X-rays. Scattered radiation leads to artifacts such as cupping, streaks, and a reduction in contrast in the reconstructed CT-volume. We propose a scatter correction method based on sampling primary signals by employing a beam-hole array (BHA). In this indirect method, a scatter estimate is calculated by subtraction of the sampled primary signal from the total signal, the latter taken from an image where the BHA is absent. This technique is considered complementary to the better known beam-stop array (BSA) method. The two scatter estimation methods are compared here with respect to geometric effects, scatter-to-total ratio and practicability. Scatter estimation with the BHA method yields more accurate scatter estimates in off-centered regions, and a lower scatter-to-total ratio in critical image regions where the primary signal is very low. Scatter correction with the proposed BHA method is then applied to a ceramic specimen from power generation technologies. In the reconstructed CT volume, cupping almost completely vanishes and contrast is enhanced significantly.

  4. Motion tolerant iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Goto, Taiga; Hirokawa, Koichi; Miyazaki, Osamu [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Chiba-ken (Japan). CT System Div.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new advanced iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT. The features of this algorithm are: (a) it uses separable paraboloidal surrogate (SPS) technique as a foundation for reconstruction to reduce noise and cone-beam artifact, (b) it uses a view weight in the back-projection process to reduce motion artifact. To confirm the improvement of our proposed algorithm over other existing algorithm, such as Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) or SPS algorithm, we compared the motion artifact reduction, image noise reduction (standard deviation of CT number), and cone-beam artifact reduction on simulated and clinical data set. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm dramatically reduces motion artifacts compared with the SPS algorithm, and decreases image noise compared with the FDK algorithm. In addition, the proposed algorithm potentially improves time resolution of iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  5. Correction of scatter in megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, L. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany). E-mail: lothar.spies at philips.com; Ebert, M.; Groh, B.A.; Hesse, B.M.; Bortfeld, T. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The role of scatter in a cone-beam computed tomography system using the therapeutic beam of a medical linear accelerator and a commercial electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is investigated. A scatter correction method is presented which is based on a superposition of Monte Carlo generated scatter kernels. The kernels are adapted to both the spectral response of the EPID and the dimensions of the phantom being scanned. The method is part of a calibration procedure which converts the measured transmission data acquired for each projection angle into water-equivalent thicknesses. Tomographic reconstruction of the projections then yields an estimate of the electron density distribution of the phantom. It is found that scatter produces cupping artefacts in the reconstructed tomograms. Furthermore, reconstructed electron densities deviate greatly (by about 30%) from their expected values. The scatter correction method removes the cupping artefacts and decreases the deviations from 30% down to about 8%. (author)

  6. Reduced Circular Sinusoidal Cone-beam CT for Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    XIA, DAN; Cho, Seungryong; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in industrial, nondestructive testing applications not to mention in medical applications. Circular scanning configuration is widely used for its mechanical simplicity and for readily available and efficient reconstruction algorithms based on the Feldkamp algorithm. However, due to the lack of data sufficiency, circular CBCT does not guarantee image accuracy, and is not free from image artifacts related to the cone-angle and axial v...

  7. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo [EB Tech, Co., Ltd., 550 Yongsan-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  8. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  9. The CT evaluation of cephalic and cervical adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the CT manifestations of cephalic and cervical adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Methods: Thirty-three cases of ACC were analyzed retrospectively. Of all cases, 22 cases underwent operation and 11 cases received radiotherapy. The manifestations of CT were evaluated and compared with the clinical and pathologic results. Results: Tumors originated from parotid gland (5 cases), floor of mouth (5 cases), nasal cavity and nasopharynx (5 cases), tongue (4 cases), palate (3 cases), tracheas (3 cases), submandibular gland (2 cases), tonsilla (2 cases), maxillary sinus (2 cases), and cheek (2 cases), respectively. The CT manifestations included: (1)ethmoid density in 21 cases, partial ethmoid density in 5 cases. (2)the morphology of ACC was irregular and the growth of the tumor was amorphous in 17 cases, and the margin of the tumor was vague in 20 cases. (3)ACC often grew along the nerve with infiltration, which caused destruction of the skull base in 5 cases and atrophy of mastication muscles and/or buccinator in 3 cases. Conclusion: (1)The characteristics of cephalic and cervical adenoid cystic carcinoma on CT scans were ethmoid density, infiltrated growth, growing along the nerve with infiltration, and submucous growth. Among them, the most important manifestation, which could lead to the histologic diagnosis on CT, was ethmoid density. (2)The range of ACC was usually underestimated on CT. (3)The manifestation of tumor growth along the nerve could be apparently displayed on MRI

  10. CT diagnosis in the evaluation of vertebral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic capability of the CT scan of the vertebral trauma and a comparison with the results of a routine roentgenogram and tomogram were studied in 11 patients. In total, there were 15 fractured vertebrae: 3 in the upper cervical, 3 in the lower cervical, and 9 in the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar vertebrae. In the detailed evaluation of the vertebral fractures, CT provided more information than plain films in all 15 fractured vertebrae, with a better visualization of the spinal bony details, particularly at the upper cervical, thoracic, and thoraco-lumbar levels, where the interpretation of the spinal abnormalities is usually difficult because of adjacent structures such as the skull and thorax. Only CT was able to demonstrate impingements on the vertebral canal by bony fragments. Post-traumatic syringomyelia was incidentally demonstrated in one patient on a plain CT. In 6 patients, conventional tomography was done, but no additional information with regard to spinal instability and spinal-cord compression was obtained. The usage of sagittal tomography was also limited, because it required a change in the patient's position, which might worsen the neurological deficits. On the other hand, a plain roentgenogram and conventional tomography were superior in the evaluation of spinal malalignment and fractures running horizontally. In summary, both plain roentgenograms and CT images provided detailed information about vertebral injury, whereas conventional tomography is judged to be inferior and not always necessary. Based on these results, our new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches using CT for the vertebral injuries were presented. (author)

  11. Pelvic CT for the prognostic evaluation of anorectal malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anatomical patterns of anorectal malformations have so far been studied according to the principles which inspire Pena's technique for the surgical treatment of anorectal anomalies. Thus, the diagnostic study of anorectal malformation has by the authors been considered a work of classification, but of identification. Among the diagnostic procedures in use in author's Institute, preoperative CT of pelvis is performed to assess the presence and to define the development of muscular sphincteric structure towards prognostic evaluation of continence, the major long-term goal. Seven patients, aged 1-30 months, with anorectal anomalies were studied with preoperative CT of the pelvis. CT scans showed well-developed sphinteric muscles in 3 patients (2 with recto-ureteral and 1 with recto-vestibular fistulas), poorly-developed muscular structure in 3 patients (with recto-vaginal, cloacal and prostatic fistulas), absence of muscular structure in 1 case (with recto-vesical fistula). CT findings were always confirmed at surgery, except for the case with rectal-vesical malformation where CT scans did not allow to identify the thin sphinteric musculature. The authors believe preoperative CT of the pelvis, together with clinical and radiological examinations, to be a valid mean in the prognostic evaluation of continence

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of the detection of bone change using panoramic TMJ projection. Comparative study with limited cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panoramic temporoman joint (TMJ) projection is one of the alternative methods of conventional radiography, such as transcranial projection, for diagnosing temporomandibular joint disorder. There have been a few reports describing the diagnostic ability of this method. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of detecting bone change with panoramic TMJ projection. Fifty TMJs in 25 patients were examined. All TMJs were examined by panoramic TMJ projection (Hyper XF) and limited cone-beam CT (3D Accuitomo FPD; 3DX). Two observers evaluated the presence of bone change in the TMJ region using panoramic TMJ projection. One other observer evaluated the limited cone-beam CT for the presence and the pattern of bone changes in the TMJ region as the gold standard. Panoramic TMJ findings were evaluated with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the panoramic TMJ projection were 0.86, 0.76, and 0.82, respectively. These results and those of previous reports on other radiographic methods for TMJ suggest that panoramic TMJ projection is a useful method of screening for bone change due to TMJ disorder. (author)

  13. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Wang, A. S.; Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation ({ D} = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear ({ S} = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons

  14. Deformable image registration with local rigidity constraints for cone-beam CT-guided spine surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided spine surgery (IGSS) is associated with reduced co-morbidity and improved surgical outcome. However, precise localization of target anatomy and adjacent nerves and vessels relative to planning information (e.g., device trajectories) can be challenged by anatomical deformation. Rigid registration alone fails to account for deformation associated with changes in spine curvature, and conventional deformable registration fails to account for rigidity of the vertebrae, causing unrealistic distortions in the registered image that can confound high-precision surgery. We developed and evaluated a deformable registration method capable of preserving rigidity of bones while resolving the deformation of surrounding soft tissue. The method aligns preoperative CT to intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) using free-form deformation (FFD) with constraints on rigid body motion imposed according to a simple intensity threshold of bone intensities. The constraints enforced three properties of a rigid transformation—namely, constraints on affinity (AC), orthogonality (OC), and properness (PC). The method also incorporated an injectivity constraint (IC) to preserve topology. Physical experiments involving phantoms, an ovine spine, and a human cadaver as well as digital simulations were performed to evaluate the sensitivity to registration parameters, preservation of rigid body morphology, and overall registration accuracy of constrained FFD in comparison to conventional unconstrained FFD (uFFD) and Demons registration. FFD with orthogonality and injectivity constraints (denoted FFD+OC+IC) demonstrated improved performance compared to uFFD and Demons. Affinity and properness constraints offered little or no additional improvement. The FFD+OC+IC method preserved rigid body morphology at near-ideal values of zero dilatation (D = 0.05, compared to 0.39 and 0.56 for uFFD and Demons, respectively) and shear (S = 0.08, compared to 0.36 and 0.44 for uFFD and Demons, respectively

  15. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  16. Clinical usefulness of c-arm cone-beam CT inpercutaneous drainage of inaccessible abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young Ho; Choi, Young Ho; Woo, Hyun Sik; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Bo Yun [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) in drainage of inaccessible abscesses. To identify the trajectory of the needle or guide wire, CBCT was performed on 21 patients having an inaccessible abscess. CBCT was repeated until proper targeting of the abscess was achieved, before the insertion of a large bore catheter. The etiology, location of the abscess, causes of inaccessibility, radiation dose, technical and clinical success rates of drainage, and any complications confronted, were evaluated. A total of 29 CBCTs were performed for 21 abscesses. Postoperative and non-postoperative abscesses were 9 (42.9%) and 12 (57.1%) in number, respectively. Direct puncture was performed in 18 cases. In 3 cases, the surgical drain or the fistula opening was used as an access route. The causes of inaccessibility were narrow safe window due to adjacent or overlying organs (n = 9), irregularly dispersed abscess (n = 7), deep location with poor sonographic visualization (n = 4), and remote location of the abscess from surgical drain (n = 1). Technical and clinical successes were 95.5% and 100%, respectively. Cumulative air kerma and dose-area product were 21.62 ± 5.41 mGy and 9179.87 ± 2337.70 mGycm2, respectively. There were no procedure related complications. CBCT is a useful technique for identifying the needle and guide wire during drainage of inaccessible abscess.

  17. Marker-free lung tumor trajectory estimation from a cone beam CT sinogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Liang Jian; Yan Di, E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2010-05-07

    An algorithm was developed to estimate the 3D lung tumor position using the projection data forming a cone beam CT sinogram and a template registration method. A pre-existing respiration-correlated CT image was used to generate templates of the target, which were then registered to the individual cone beam CT projections, and estimates of the target position were made for each projection. The registration search region was constrained based on knowledge of the mean tumor position during the cone beam CT scan acquisition. Several template registration algorithms were compared, including correlation coefficient and robust methods such as block correlation, robust correlation coefficient and robust gradient correlation. Robust registration metrics were found to be less sensitive to occlusions such as overlying tissue and the treatment couch. The mean accuracy of the position estimation was 1.4 mm in phantom with a robust registration algorithm. In two research subjects with peripheral tumors, the mean position and mean target excursion were estimated to within 2.0 mm compared to the results obtained with a '4D' registration of 4D image volumes.

  18. Marker-free lung tumor trajectory estimation from a cone beam CT sinogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2010-05-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate the 3D lung tumor position using the projection data forming a cone beam CT sinogram and a template registration method. A pre-existing respiration-correlated CT image was used to generate templates of the target, which were then registered to the individual cone beam CT projections, and estimates of the target position were made for each projection. The registration search region was constrained based on knowledge of the mean tumor position during the cone beam CT scan acquisition. Several template registration algorithms were compared, including correlation coefficient and robust methods such as block correlation, robust correlation coefficient and robust gradient correlation. Robust registration metrics were found to be less sensitive to occlusions such as overlying tissue and the treatment couch. The mean accuracy of the position estimation was 1.4 mm in phantom with a robust registration algorithm. In two research subjects with peripheral tumors, the mean position and mean target excursion were estimated to within 2.0 mm compared to the results obtained with a '4D' registration of 4D image volumes.

  19. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' -IRCCS, 70013 Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy) and Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy) and Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]. E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Federle, Michael P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ambrosini, Roberta [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Lagalla, Roberto [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, Valerie [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92118 Clichy (France)

    2007-01-15

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

  20. Reconstruction-plane-dependent weighted FDK algorithm for cone beam volumetric CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang

    2005-04-01

    The original FDK algorithm has been extensively employed in medical and industrial imaging applications. With an increased cone angle, cone beam (CB) artifacts in images reconstructed by the original FDK algorithm deteriorate, since the circular trajectory does not satisfy the so-called data sufficiency condition (DSC). A few "circular plus" trajectories have been proposed in the past to reduce CB artifacts by meeting the DSC. However, the circular trajectory has distinct advantages over other scanning trajectories in practical CT imaging, such as cardiac, vascular and perfusion applications. In addition to looking into the DSC, another insight into the CB artifacts of the original FDK algorithm is the inconsistency between conjugate rays that are 180° apart in view angle. The inconsistence between conjugate rays is pixel dependent, i.e., it varies dramatically over pixels within the image plane to be reconstructed. However, the original FDK algorithm treats all conjugate rays equally, resulting in CB artifacts that can be avoided if appropriate view weighting strategy is exercised. In this paper, a modified FDK algorithm is proposed, along with an experimental evaluation and verification, in which the helical body phantom and a humanoid head phantom scanned by a volumetric CT (64 x 0.625 mm) are utilized. Without extra trajectories supplemental to the circular trajectory, the modified FDK algorithm applies reconstruction-plane-dependent view weighting on projection data before 3D backprojection, which reduces the inconsistency between conjugate rays by suppressing the contribution of one of the conjugate rays with a larger cone angle. Both computer-simulated and real phantom studies show that, up to a moderate cone angle, the CB artifacts can be substantially suppressed by the modified FDK algorithm, while advantages of the original FDK algorithm, such as the filtered backprojection algorithm structure, 1D ramp filtering, and data manipulation efficiency, can be

  1. Regularization design for high-quality cone-beam CT of intracranial hemorrhage using statistical reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with pathologies such as hemorrhagic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Multi-detector CT is the current front-line imaging modality for detecting ICH (fresh blood contrast 40-80 HU, down to 1 mm). Flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) offers a potential alternative with a smaller scanner footprint, greater portability, and lower cost potentially well suited to deployment at the point of care outside standard diagnostic radiology and emergency room settings. Previous studies have suggested reliable detection of ICH down to 3 mm in CBCT using high-fidelity artifact correction and penalized weighted least-squared (PWLS) image reconstruction with a post-artifact-correction noise model. However, ICH reconstructed by traditional image regularization exhibits nonuniform spatial resolution and noise due to interaction between the statistical weights and regularization, which potentially degrades the detectability of ICH. In this work, we propose three regularization methods designed to overcome these challenges. The first two compute spatially varying certainty for uniform spatial resolution and noise, respectively. The third computes spatially varying regularization strength to achieve uniform "detectability," combining both spatial resolution and noise in a manner analogous to a delta-function detection task. Experiments were conducted on a CBCT test-bench, and image quality was evaluated for simulated ICH in different regions of an anthropomorphic head. The first two methods improved the uniformity in spatial resolution and noise compared to traditional regularization. The third exhibited the highest uniformity in detectability among all methods and best overall image quality. The proposed regularization provides a valuable means to achieve uniform image quality in CBCT of ICH and is being incorporated in a CBCT prototype for ICH imaging.

  2. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  3. Intra-fractional uncertainties in cone-beam CT based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of pulmonary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intra-fractional variability of tumor position and breathing motion was evaluated in cone-beam CT (CB-CT) based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of pulmonary tumors. Materials and methods: Twenty-four patients (27 lesions: prim. NSCLC n = 6; metastases n = 21) were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) (one to eight fractions). Prior to every treatment fraction (n = 66) and immediately after treatment a CB-CT was acquired. Patient motion, absolute drift and drift of the tumor relative to the bony anatomy were measured. Tumor motion was investigated based on the density distribution in the CB-CT. Results: Absolute intra-fractional drift (3D vector) of the tumor position was 2.8 mm ± 1.6 mm (mean ± SD), maximum 7.2 mm. Poor correlation between patient motion and absolute tumor drift was observed. Changes of the tumor position due to patient motion and due to drifts independently from the bony anatomy were of similar magnitude with 2.1 mm ± 1.4 mm and 2.3 mm ± 1.6 mm, respectively. No systematic increase or decrease of breathing motion was seen. The intra-fractional change of breathing motion was more than 2 mm and 3 mm in 39% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fractional tumor position and breathing motion were stable. In IGRT of pulmonary tumors we suggest an ITV-to-PTV margin of 5 mm to compensate intra-fractional changes

  4. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  5. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  6. Quantitative CT of lung in healthy Koreans: evaluation with PULMO-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirometric gating quantitative CT, PULMO-CT, is an objective method for the measurement of pulmonary parenchymal attenuation at a constant level of inspiration. In order to obtain a normal value for quantitative CT of the lung, the authors therefore used PULMO-CT to evaluate the lung density of healthy Koreans with different respiratory status. Twenty healthy Korean volunteers, 18 men and 2 women, ranging in age from 24 to 27 years and with normal chest radiography, were evaluated using the PULMO-CT option of Somatom Plus(Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Spirometric gating HRCT images, at levels of 50% and 20% of vital capacity, were obtained at the level of the tracheal carina and at 5cm above and below this point. The images were analyzed by semiautomatic programs and the results were evaluated using the Student t-test. The mean attenuation value of lung parenchyma at 50% of vital capacity was -791HU ± 27.1 and at 20% was -700HU ± 42.9. The difference in lung attenuation was 91HU and was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The for 58.9% of participants, the highest reading for of lung attenuation at 50% of vital capacity was between -899HU and -800HU, and for 20.3% of participants, this reading was between -799HU and -700HU. At 20% of vital capacity, the largest proportion of participants (43.8%) had a reading of between -799HU and -700HY ; the reading of 35.2% was higher than -699HU. Respiratory status significantly affects the quantitative accessment of pulmonary parenchyma ; in order to determine, during quantitative HRCT, the parameters of a pathologic condition, lung parenchyma of differing respiratory status must be evaluated

  7. Volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41x41 cm2 flat-panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2001-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based upon large-area flat-panel imager (FPI) technology is a flexible and adaptable technology that offers large field-of-view (FOV), high spatial resolution, and soft-tissue imaging. The imaging performance of FPI-based cone-beam CT has been evaluated on a computer-controlled bench-top system using an early prototype FPI with a small FOV (20.5 X 20.5 cm2). These investigations demonstrate the potential of this exciting technology. In this report, imaging performance is evaluated using a production grade large-area FPI (41 X 41 cm2) for which the manufacturer has achieved a significant reduction in additive noise. This reduction in additive noise results in a substantial improvement in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at low exposures. The spatial resolution over the increased FOV of the cone-beam CT system is evaluated by imaging a fine steel wire placed at various locations within the volume of reconstruction. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system demonstrates spatial frequency pass beyond 1 mm-1 (10% modulation) with a slight degradation at points off the source plane. In addition to investigations of imaging performance, progress has also been made in the integration of this technology with a medical linear accelerator for on-line image-guided radiation therapy. Unlike the bench-top system, this implementation must contend with significant geometric non-idealities caused by gravity-induced flex of the x-ray tube and FPI support assemblies. A method of characterizing and correcting these non-idealities has been developed. Images of an anthropomorphic head phantom qualitatively demonstrate the excellent spatial resolution and large FOV achievable with the cone-beam approach in the clinical implementation.

  8. Dynamic bowtie filter for cone-beam/multi-slice CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Liu

    Full Text Available A pre-patient attenuator ("bowtie filter" or "bowtie" is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV. The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection.

  9. X-ray CT evaluation of pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Koichi; Izumi, Takateru; Kitaichi, Masanori and others

    1987-08-01

    We evaluated high resolution CT in 60 patients with histologically diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis and, also, studied the relationship between CT and findings in open lung biopsy specimens in 2 cases. The CT findings were as follows: (1) thickening of bronchial wall shadows (27 out of 60 cases, 45.0 %), (2) irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows (39 cases, 65.0 %), (3) small or large nodular shadows (24 cases, 40.0 %), (4) local volume loss (14 cases, 23.3 %), (5) slightly increased density of localized lung field areas (24 cases, 40.0 %), (6) pleural or subpleural involvement (27 cases, 45.0 %), (7) lymph node enlargement (59 cases, 98.3 %). X-ray CT in 7 patients revealed no evidence of lung field involvement in patients with histologicall confirmed epithelioid cell granuloma in transbronchial lung biopsy specimens. Lesions located within vessels or in the vascular wall, perivascular sheath or alveoli surrounding blood vessels might cause pulmonary vascular shadows to appear swollen on CT. In a comparative study, we found irregular dilatation of pulmonary vascular shadows corresponding to granulomas in the connective tissue sheath of blood vessels. Also, thickening of bronchial wall shadows corresponded to granulomas in and around the bronchial wall. From the point of histopathological view epithelioid cell granulomas in the bronchovascular sheath were most marked in sarcoidosis, and they apperaed on CT as an irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows and thickening of the bronchial wall. On the other hand, we reported that collapse of alveoli and fibrosis surrounding blood vessels could cause irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows on CT in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Such shadows were seen on CT in both sarcoidosis and IPF but the mechanism of their appearance differed. (J.P.N.).

  10. X-ray CT evaluation of pulmonary involvements of sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated high resolution CT in 60 patients with histologically diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis and, also, studied the relationship between CT and findings in open lung biopsy specimens in 2 cases. The CT findings were as follows: (1) thickening of bronchial wall shadows (27 out of 60 cases, 45.0 %), (2) irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows (39 cases, 65.0 %), (3) small or large nodular shadows (24 cases, 40.0 %), (4) local volume loss (14 cases, 23.3 %), (5) slightly increased density of localized lung field areas (24 cases, 40.0 %), (6) pleural or subpleural involvement (27 cases, 45.0 %), (7) lymph node enlargement (59 cases, 98.3 %). X-ray CT in 7 patients revealed no evidence of lung field involvement in patients with histologicall confirmed epithelioid cell granuloma in transbronchial lung biopsy specimens. Lesions located within vessels or in the vascular wall, perivascular sheath or alveoli surrounding blood vessels might cause pulmonary vascular shadows to appear swollen on CT. In a comparative study, we found irregular dilatation of pulmonary vascular shadows corresponding to granulomas in the connective tissue sheath of blood vessels. Also, thickening of bronchial wall shadows corresponded to granulomas in and around the bronchial wall. From the point of histopathological view epithelioid cell granulomas in the bronchovascular sheath were most marked in sarcoidosis, and they apperaed on CT as an irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows and thickening of the bronchial wall. On the other hand, we reported that collapse of alveoli and fibrosis surrounding blood vessels could cause irregular enlargement of pulmonary vascular shadows on CT in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Such shadows were seen on CT in both sarcoidosis and IPF but the mechanism of their appearance differed. (J.P.N.)

  11. The effect of scan parameters on cone beam CT trabecular bone microstructural measurements of the human mandible

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, N; Parsa, A.; Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P; Aartman, I.H.A.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different cone beam CT scan parameters on trabecular bone microstructure measurements. A human mandibular cadaver was scanned using a cone beam CT (3D Accuitomo 170; J.Morita, Kyota, Japan). 20 cone beam CT images were obtained using 5 different fields of view (4X4 cm, 6x6 cm, 8X8 cm, 10x10 cm and 10X5 cm), 2 types of rotation steps (180 degrees and 360 degrees) and 2 scanning resolutions (standard and high). Image analysis software...

  12. Evaluation of the goodness of the matching to daily control of the coincidence between the radiation isocenter and cone beam CT; Evaluacion de la bondad del Matching para control diario de la coincidencia entre el isocentro de radiacion y el Cone Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huertas Martinez, C. A.; Gomez-Tejedor Alonso, S.; Garcia Castejon, M. A.; Penedo Cobos, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The current IGRT techniques allow to correct the position of the patient during the treatment to match it with the position that we have planned. So these corrections are accurate, the isocenter of the team's image must match the accelerator radiation isocenter. This paper evaluates the validity by measuring the coincidence with the tool matching of the software team iViewGT of portal image. (Author)

  13. Self-calibration of a cone-beam micro-CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more frequent. For proper reconstruction, the geometry of the CBCT systems must be known. While the system can be designed to reduce errors in the geometry, calibration measurements must still be performed and corrections applied. Investigators have proposed techniques using calibration objects for system calibration. In this study, the authors present methods to calibrate a rotary-stage CB micro-CT (CBμCT) system using only the images acquired of the object to be reconstructed, i.e., without the use of calibration objects. Projection images are acquired using a CBμCT system constructed in the authors' laboratories. Dark- and flat-field corrections are performed. Exposure variations are detected and quantified using analysis of image regions with an unobstructed view of the x-ray source. Translations that occur during the acquisition in the horizontal direction are detected, quantified, and corrected based on sinogram analysis. The axis of rotation is determined using registration of antiposed projection images. These techniques were evaluated using data obtained with calibration objects and phantoms. The physical geometric axis of rotation is determined and aligned with the rotational axis (assumed to be the center of the detector plane) used in the reconstruction process. The parameters describing this axis agree to within 0.1 mm and 0.3 deg with those determined using other techniques. Blurring due to residual calibration errors has a point-spread function in the reconstructed planes with a full-width-at-half-maximum of less than 125 μm in a tangential direction and essentially zero in the radial direction for the rotating object. The authors have used this approach on over 100 acquisitions over the past 2 years and have regularly obtained high-quality reconstructions, i.e., without artifacts and no detectable blurring of the reconstructed objects. This self-calibrating approach not only obviates

  14. Feasibility study on effect and stability of adaptive radiotherapy on kilovoltage cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the stability of CT to density curve of kilovoltage cone-beam computerized tomography (kV CBCT) imaging modality over the period of six months. We also, investigated the viability of using image value to density table (IVDT) generated at different time, for adaptive radiotherapy treatment planning. The consequences of target volume change and the efficacy of kV CBCT for adaptive planning issues is investigated. Standard electron density phantom was used to establish CT to electron density calibrations curve. The CT to density curve for the CBCT images were observed for the period of six months. The kV CBCT scans used for adaptive planning was acquired with an on-board imager system mounted on a “Trilogy” linear accelerator. kV CBCT images were acquired for daily setup registration. The effect of variations in CT to density curve was studied on two clinical cases: prostate and lung. The soft tissue contouring is superior in kV CBCT scans in comparison to mega voltage CT (MVCT) scans. The CT to density curve for the CBCT images was found steady over six months. Due to difficulty in attaining the reproducibility in daily setup for the prostate treatment, there is a day-to-day difference in dose to the rectum and bladder. There is no need for generating a new CT to density curve for the adaptive planning on the kV CBCT images. Also, it is viable to perform the adaptive planning to check the dose to target and organ at risk (OAR) without performing a new kV CT scan, which will reduce the dose to the patient

  15. Evaluation of web-based instruction for anatomical interpretation in maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Al-Rawi; R. Jacobs; B.A. Hassan; G. Sanderink; W.C. Scarfe

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based instruction in the interpretation of anatomy in images acquired with maxillofacial cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: An interactive web-based education course for the interpretation of craniofacial CBCT images was recently developed at our institu

  16. Segmentation of cone-beam CT using a hidden Markov random field with informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, M.; Hargrave, C.; Harden, F.; Mengersen, K.

    2014-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has enormous potential to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). To assist radiotherapists in interpreting these images, we use a Bayesian statistical model to label each voxel according to its tissue type. The rich sources of prior information in IGRT are incorporated into a hidden Markov random field model of the 3D image lattice. Tissue densities in the reference CT scan are estimated using inverse regression and then rescaled to approximate the corresponding CBCT intensity values. The treatment planning contours are combined with published studies of physiological variability to produce a spatial prior distribution for changes in the size, shape and position of the tumour volume and organs at risk. The voxel labels are estimated using iterated conditional modes. The accuracy of the method has been evaluated using 27 CBCT scans of an electron density phantom. The mean voxel-wise misclassification rate was 6.2%, with Dice similarity coefficient of 0.73 for liver, muscle, breast and adipose tissue. By incorporating prior information, we are able to successfully segment CBCT images. This could be a viable approach for automated, online image analysis in radiotherapy.

  17. Virtual colonoscopy with electron beam CT: correlation with barium enema, colonoscopy and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To perform virtual colonoscopy using electron beam tomography(EBT) in patients in whom a colonic mass was present, and to compare the results with those obtained using barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Materials and Methods : Ten patients in whom colonic masses were diagnosed by either barium enema or colonoscopy were involved in this study. There were nine cases of adenocarcinoma and one of tubulovillous adenoma. Using EBT preoperative abdominopelvic CT scans were performed. Axial scans were then three-dimensionally reconstructed to produce virtual colonoscopic images and were compared with barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Virtual colonoscopic images of the masses were classified as either 1)polyploid, 2)sessile,3)fungating, or 4)annular constrictive. We also determined whether ulcers were present within the lesions and whether there was obstruction. Results : After virtual colonoscopy, two lesions were classified as polyploid, one as sessile, five as fungating and two as annular constrictive. Virtual colonoscopic images showed good correlation with the findings of barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. Three of six ulcerative lesions were observed on colonoscopy; in seven adenocarcinomas with partial or total luminal obstruction, virtual colonoscopy visualized the colon beyond the obstructed sites. In one case, barium contrast failed to pass through the obstructed portion and in six cases, the colonoscope similarly failed. Conclusion : Virtual colonoscopies correlated well with barium enema, colonoscopy and gross pathologic specimens. They provide three dimensional images of colonic masses and are helpful for the evaluation of obstructive lesions

  18. Electron-beam CT coronary angiography in the patients with high heart rate arrhythmia or pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To report the clinical applicability of coronary angiography for patients with high heart rate, arrhythmia or cardiac pacing using the new-generation of electron-beam CT (e-Speed). Methods: EBCT (GE e-Speed) coronary angiography was performed in 36 eases (male 27, female 9, mean age 58), including the heart rate more than 90 bpm in 20 patients, frequent ectopic beats in 11 cases, implantation of cardiac pacemaker in 4 patients and the unacceptable MSCT image quality due to variability of interscan heart rate (from 82 bpm to 104 bpm) in 1 case. After volume data set was acquired using spiral mode with prospective ECG-gating, the reconstructions of MIP, CPR, VR and Cine were performed. The VR quality was evaluated using a five-point scale. Results: The quality of coronary imaging in all of 36 cases were acceptable. The total visualization rate of coronary artery branches was 80.0%. Left main, left anterior artery and right coronary artery were visualized in all patients and in 94.3% of all cases circumflex artery were visible. Conclusion: EBCT (e-Speed) is applicable in noninvasive coronary angiography for patients with high heart rate, arrhythmia or implanted cardiac pacemaker', and this examination can obtain satisfied diagnosis. (authors)

  19. Segmentation of cone-beam CT using a hidden Markov random field with informative priors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has enormous potential to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). To assist radiotherapists in interpreting these images, we use a Bayesian statistical model to label each voxel according to its tissue type. The rich sources of prior information in IGRT are incorporated into a hidden Markov random field model of the 3D image lattice. Tissue densities in the reference CT scan are estimated using inverse regression and then rescaled to approximate the corresponding CBCT intensity values. The treatment planning contours are combined with published studies of physiological variability to produce a spatial prior distribution for changes in the size, shape and position of the tumour volume and organs at risk. The voxel labels are estimated using iterated conditional modes. The accuracy of the method has been evaluated using 27 CBCT scans of an electron density phantom. The mean voxel-wise misclassification rate was 6.2%, with Dice similarity coefficient of 0.73 for liver, muscle, breast and adipose tissue. By incorporating prior information, we are able to successfully segment CBCT images. This could be a viable approach for automated, online image analysis in radiotherapy.

  20. Performance evaluation and dosimetry of CT IGRT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a UK national health service programme of evaluating medical equipment to inform local and national purchasing decisions, a technical evaluation has been carried out on x-ray CT-based IGRT systems. This was carried out between 2008-2009 and reported recently. Three x-ray volumetric systems from different manufacturers were evaluated at ten radiation oncology centres. The basic technical protocol is available, as is the report summarising the outcomes. The systems included are Elekta Synergy v4.2, Tomotherapy HiArt v 3.2 and Varian OBI v 1.5. The work is currently being further extended outside the programme with more clinically realistic phantoms and tests. The objective of the technical evaluation was to test each system to assess its capability in delivering accurate image guidance and, where possible, to test parameters on more than one example of each system to assess variability. Tests were carried out to measure - image quality in a range of conditions, using the Catphan 504 phantom and analysis either on the system itself or a consistent independent approach, such as IQWorks. Parameters considered include contrast-to-noise, HU accuracy, axial plane resolution, MTF, slice sensitivity, uniformity and spatial integrity. Pseudo-clinical image quality was assessed using the Virtually Human Male Pelvic (VHMP) phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, Virginia), where images were obtained for visual inspection; - imaging dose, using CTDI and Farmer chambers in doubled up pairs of CTDI phantoms for a range of scanner settings and clinical protocols; - IGRT geometric accuracy, including: - Registration of imaging volume to treatment isocentre for the kV systems, ie where the source and associated geometry is not the same as the treatment beams, using the Modus Pentaguide Qasar phantom (Modus, Ontario, Canada); - Image-shift-verify tests to verify the ability of the system to correct for patient misalignment to within a required tolerance. This used the Pentaguide phantom in

  1. Cone-beam CT in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a low dose technique recently made available for extremity examinations, in detecting scaphoid fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as gold standard for scaphoid fractures. A total of 95 patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture were examined with radiography and CBCT in the acute setting. A negative CBCT exam was followed by an MRI within 2 weeks. When a scaphoid fracture was detected on MRI a new CBCT was performed. Radiography depicted seven scaphoid fractures, all of which were also seen with CBCT. CBCT detected another four scaphoid fractures. With MRI another five scaphoid fractures were identified that were not seen with radiography or with CBCT. These were also not visible on the reexamination CBCT. Sensitivity for radiography was 44, 95 % confidence interval 21-69 %, and for CBCT 69 %, 95 % confidence interval 41-88 % (p = 0.12). Several non-scaphoid fractures in the carpal region were identified, radiography and CBCT depicted 7 and 34, respectively (p < 0.0001). CBCT is a superior alternative to radiography, entailing more accurate diagnoses of carpal region fractures, and thereby requiring fewer follow-up MRI examinations. However, CBCT cannot be used to exclude scaphoid fractures, since MRI identified additional occult scaphoid fractures. (orig.)

  2. Cone-beam CT in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, Rolf; Lapidus, Gunilla; Baecklund, Jenny [Capio St Goeran' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpil, Mikael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-02-15

    This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a low dose technique recently made available for extremity examinations, in detecting scaphoid fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as gold standard for scaphoid fractures. A total of 95 patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture were examined with radiography and CBCT in the acute setting. A negative CBCT exam was followed by an MRI within 2 weeks. When a scaphoid fracture was detected on MRI a new CBCT was performed. Radiography depicted seven scaphoid fractures, all of which were also seen with CBCT. CBCT detected another four scaphoid fractures. With MRI another five scaphoid fractures were identified that were not seen with radiography or with CBCT. These were also not visible on the reexamination CBCT. Sensitivity for radiography was 44, 95 % confidence interval 21-69 %, and for CBCT 69 %, 95 % confidence interval 41-88 % (p = 0.12). Several non-scaphoid fractures in the carpal region were identified, radiography and CBCT depicted 7 and 34, respectively (p < 0.0001). CBCT is a superior alternative to radiography, entailing more accurate diagnoses of carpal region fractures, and thereby requiring fewer follow-up MRI examinations. However, CBCT cannot be used to exclude scaphoid fractures, since MRI identified additional occult scaphoid fractures. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of Deep Vein Thrombosis with Multidetector Row CT after Orthopedic Arthroplasty: a Prospective Study for Comparison with Doppler Sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study evaluated the ability of indirect 16-row multidetector CT venography, in comparison with Doppler sonography, to detect deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee replacement. Sixty-two patients had undergone orthopedic replacement surgery on a total of 30 hip joints and 54 knee joints. The CT venography (scan delay time: 180 seconds; slice thickness/increment: 2/1.5 mm) and Doppler sonography were performed 8 to 40 days after surgery. We measured the z-axis length of the beam hardening artifact that degraded the image quality so that the presence of deep vein thrombosis couldn't be evaluated on the axial CT images. The incidence and location of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed. The diagnostic performance of the CT venograms was evaluated and compared with that of Doppler sonography as a standard of reference. The z-axis length (mean±standard deviation) of the beam hardening artifact was 4.5±0.8 cm in the arthroplastic knees and 3.9±2.9 cm in the arthroplastic hips. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in the popliteal or calf veins on Doppler sonography in 30 (48%) of the 62 patients. The CT venography has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 90%, 97%, 96%, 91% and 94%, respectively. The ability of CT venography to detect DVT was comparable to that of Doppler sonography despite of beam hardening artifact. Therefore, CT venography is feasible to use as an alternative modality for evaluating postarthroplasty patients

  4. Evaluation of Deep Vein Thrombosis with Multidetector Row CT after Orthopedic Arthroplasty: a Prospective Study for Comparison with Doppler Sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Yong Sun; Kim, Won Hong [Inha University, College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Chul Hi [Gachon University, Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    This prospective study evaluated the ability of indirect 16-row multidetector CT venography, in comparison with Doppler sonography, to detect deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee replacement. Sixty-two patients had undergone orthopedic replacement surgery on a total of 30 hip joints and 54 knee joints. The CT venography (scan delay time: 180 seconds; slice thickness/increment: 2/1.5 mm) and Doppler sonography were performed 8 to 40 days after surgery. We measured the z-axis length of the beam hardening artifact that degraded the image quality so that the presence of deep vein thrombosis couldn't be evaluated on the axial CT images. The incidence and location of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed. The diagnostic performance of the CT venograms was evaluated and compared with that of Doppler sonography as a standard of reference. The z-axis length (mean{+-}standard deviation) of the beam hardening artifact was 4.5{+-}0.8 cm in the arthroplastic knees and 3.9{+-}2.9 cm in the arthroplastic hips. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in the popliteal or calf veins on Doppler sonography in 30 (48%) of the 62 patients. The CT venography has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 90%, 97%, 96%, 91% and 94%, respectively. The ability of CT venography to detect DVT was comparable to that of Doppler sonography despite of beam hardening artifact. Therefore, CT venography is feasible to use as an alternative modality for evaluating postarthroplasty patients.

  5. Accurate image reconstruction from few-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-01-01

    In practical applications of tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction due to under-sampling and insufficient data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from few views would enable rapid scanning with a reduced x-ray dose delivered to the patient. Limited-angle problems are also of practical significance in CT. In this work, we develop and investigate an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the minimization of the image total variation (TV) that applies to divergent-beam CT. Numerical demonstrations of our TV algorithm are performed with various insufficient data problems in fan-beam CT. The TV algorithm can be generalized to cone-beam CT as well as other tomographic imaging modalities.

  6. Feasibility study on effect and stability of adaptive radiotherapy on kilovoltage cone beam CT:

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2011-01-01

    Background We have analyzed the stability of CT to density curve of kilovoltage cone-beam computerized tomography (kV CBCT) imaging modality over the period of six months. We also, investigated the viability of using image value to density table (IVDT) generated at different time, for adaptive radiotherapy treatment planning. The consequences of target volume change and the efficacy of kV CBCT for adaptive planning issues is investigated. Materials and methods. Standard electron density phant...

  7. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapong Aootaphao; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S.; Jartuwat Rajruangrabin; Chalinee Thanasupsombat; Tanapon Srivongsa; Pairash Thajchayapong

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter ...

  8. Dental cone beam CT image quality possibly reduced by patient movement

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, K.; O'Connor, S.; Heath, N

    2013-01-01

    Patient artefacts in dental cone beam CT scans can happen for various reasons. These range from artefacts from metal restorations to movement. An audit was carried out in the Glasgow Dental Hospital analysing how many scans showed signs of “motion artefact”, and then to assess if there was any correlation between patient age and movement artefacts. Specific age demographics were then analysed to see if these cohorts were at a higher risk of “movement artefacts”.

  9. Dacryocystography using cone beam CT in patients with lacrimal drainage system obstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tschopp, Markus; Bornstein, Michael M.; Sendi, Pedram; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Goldblum, David

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the usefulness of cone beam CT (CBCT) for dacryocystography (DCG) using either direct syringing or passive application of contrast medium. METHODS Ten consecutive patients with epiphora who had CBCT-DCG in a sitting position were retrospectively analyzed. CBCT-DCGs were performed using 2 techniques: direct syringing with contrast medium or using the passive technique, where patients received 3 drops of contrast medium into the conjunctival sac before CBCT-DCG. Cl...

  10. Robust methods for automatic image-to-world registration in cone-beam CT interventional guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, H; Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time surgical navigation relies on accurate image-to-world registration to align the coordinate systems of the image and patient. Conventional manual registration can present a workflow bottleneck and is prone to manual error and intraoperator variability. This work reports alternative means of automatic image-to-world registration, each method involving an automatic registration marker (ARM) used in conjunction with C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). The first involves a Known-Model re...

  11. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    OpenAIRE

    Xing Zhao; Jing-jing Hu; Peng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed...

  12. The effect of cone beam CT (CBCT) on therapeutic decision-making in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mota de Almeida, F. J.; Knutsson, K; Flygare, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to assess to what extent cone beam CT (CBCT) used in accordance with current European Commission guidelines in a normal clinical setting has an impact on therapeutic decisions in a population referred for endodontic problems. Methods: The study includes data of consecutively examined patients collected from October 2011 to December 2012. From 2 different endodontic specialist clinics, 57 patients were referred for a CBCT examination using criteria in accordance with cu...

  13. PET-CT in the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 44-year-old woman underwent two PET-CT scans for the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer. A radical left mastectomy with axillary dissection (1 of 43 nodes positive) followed by chemotherapy, was performed in 1998. She represented in October 2003 with a left supraclavicular fossa mass. This was confirmed to be recurrent breast cancer on FNAB. She was considered for a radical neck dissection and the surgeon requested a PET scan. Other imaging at this time included a normal bone scan and CT brain. CT neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed soft tissue thickening in the left lower neck. The PET-CT scan showed multiple glucose avid lesions in the sternum, mediastinum and neck lymph nodes as well as a small lesion in the proximal left femur consistent with extensive metastatic disease. Surgery was cancelled and Femara chemotherapy commenced. Femara was stopped in March 2004 and the patient began alternative therapies. In October 2004 she presented to her surgeon with new back and chest pain. CT of the neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed a soft tissue mass in the upper sternum and a lymph node at the base of the neck highly suspicious for metastatic disease. There were also 2 suspicious lung nodules and a lesion in the proximal left femur reported as an osteoid osteoma. Wholebody PET-CT scans were performed on a Siemens LSO Biograph, 60mins after the injection of 350Mbq of Fl 8-Fag, with arms at the patient's side and head in the field-of-view. On both occasions the patient had to pay for the scan. On the 2004 PET-CT scan, the CT brain revealed multiple hyperdense lesions consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. In addition, there were innumerable glucose avid foci involving viscera, nodes and skeleton consistent with disseminated disease. Our case illustrates: (i) the value of PET in the management of metastatic breast cancer; (ii) the improved accuracy of PET-CT in delineating sites of disease; (iii) the issues of head movement in PET-CT and. (iv) the problem with lack of

  14. Direct sagittal CT scanning in the evaluation of craniofacial disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This exhibit describes the technique and the application of direct sagittal CT scanning in the evaluation of the craniofacial structures. Significant improved diagnostic and clinical results have been achieved by obtaining direct sagittal CT scans, using a General Electric 9800 scanner with an added new head holder developed at the institution. The method proved extremely valuable for studying temporal bone, temporomandibular joint, orbit, pterygomaxillary fossa, ethmoid-sphenoid complex and craniocervical junction. Selected cases in which the sagittal imaging provided most useful information are illustrated

  15. Combined Fluoroscopy- and CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Biopsy Using a C-Arm Cone-Beam CT System: Comparison with Fluoroscopy-Guided Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Joo Yeon; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Lim, Soo Mee [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy (FC-TNB) using a cone beam CT system in comparison to fluoroscopy-guided TNB (F-TNB). We retrospectively evaluated 74 FC-TNB cases (group A) and 97 F-TNB cases (group B) to compare their respective diagnostic accuracies according to the size and depth of the lesion, as well as complications, procedure time, and radiation dose. The sensitivity for malignancy and diagnostic accuracy for small (< 30 mm in size) and deep ({>=} 50 mm in depth) lesions were higher in group A (91% and 94%, 92% and 94%) than in group B (73% and 81%, 84% and 88%), however not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Concerning lesions {>=} 30 mm in size and < 50 mm in depth, both groups displayed similar results (group A, 91% and 92%, 80% and 87%: group B, 90% and 92%, 86% and 90%). Pneumothorax occurred 26% of the time in group A and 14% for group B. The mean procedure time and patient skin dose were significantly higher in group A (13.6 {+-} 4.0 minutes, 157.1 {+-} 76.5 mGy) than in group B (9.0 {+-} 3.5 minutes, 21.9 {+-} 15.2 mGy) (p < 0.05). Combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided TNB allows the biopsy of small (< 30 mm) and deep lesions ({>=} 50 mm) with high diagnostic accuracy and short procedure times, whereas F-TNB is still a useful method for large and superficial lesions with a low radiation dose

  16. Automatic segmentation of maxillofacial cysts in cone beam CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Fatemeh; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaeizadeh; Otake, Yoshito; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    Accurate segmentation of cysts and tumors is an essential step for diagnosis, monitoring and planning therapeutic intervention. This task is usually done manually, however manual identification and segmentation is tedious. In this paper, an automatic method based on asymmetry analysis is proposed which is general enough to segment various types of jaw cysts. The key observation underlying this approach is that normal head and face structure is roughly symmetric with respect to midsagittal plane: the left part and the right part can be divided equally by an axis of symmetry. Cysts and tumors typically disturb this symmetry. The proposed approach consists of three main steps as follows: At first, diffusion filtering is used for preprocessing and symmetric axis is detected. Then, each image is divided into two parts. In the second stage, free form deformation (FFD) is used to correct slight displacement of corresponding pixels of the left part and a reflected copy of the right part. In the final stage, intensity differences are analyzed and a number of constraints are enforced to remove false positive regions. The proposed method has been validated on 97 Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) sets containing various jaw cysts which were collected from various image acquisition centers. Validation is performed using three similarity indicators (Jaccard index, Dice's coefficient and Hausdorff distance). The mean Dice's coefficient of 0.83, 0.87 and 0.80 is achieved for Radicular, Dentigerous and KCOT classes, respectively. For most of the experiments done, we achieved high true positive (TP). This means that a large number of cyst pixels are correctly classified. Quantitative results of automatic segmentation show that the proposed method is more effective than one of the recent methods in the literature. PMID:27035862

  17. Spiral CT in the evaluation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates prospectively the clinical utility of spiral CT when studying lesions of the neck. Twenty-one patients with suspected neck lesions were evaluated by using spiral studies in 18 intravenous contrast material was administered with an automatic power injector. Patients performed a puffed-cheek maneuver during the studies and were instructed not to swallow. Two readers evaluated the studies for soft-tissue detail, vascular opacification, pharyngeal distention, and swallowing-respiratory artifact. Scores of 1(poor) to 3 (excellent) were assigned to each examination in each category. Scanning times ranged from 24 to 36 seconds. Though the image quality was slightly less than that obtained with conventional CT techniques, the soft-tissue detail scores averaged 2.7. The rapid scanning times minimized respiratory-swallowing artifacts permitted pharyngeal distention, optimizing evaluation of the valleculae and pyriform sinuses; and allowed adequate vascular opacification by using contrast material volumes of 50-100mL

  18. Comparison of effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dae Kyo; Lee, Sang Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). An MDCT with low dose technique was also compared with them. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 25 organ sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. The mandible of the phantom was exposed using 2 different types of MDCT units (Somatom Sensation 10 for standard-dose MDCT, Somatom Emotion 6 for low-dose MDCT) and 3 different CBCT units (AZ3000CT, Implagraphy, and Kavo 3D eXaM). The radiation absorbed dose was measured and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP 2007 report. The effective dose was the highest for Somatom Sensation 10 (425.84 {mu}Sv), followed by AZ3000CT (332.4 {mu}Sv), Somatom Emotion 6 (199.38 {mu}Sv), and 3D eXaM (111.6 {mu}Sv); it was the lowest for Implagraphy (83.09 {mu}Sv). The CBCT showed significant variation in dose level with different device. The effective doses of MDCTs were not significantly different from those of CBCTs for imaging of mandible. The effective dose of MDCT could be markedly decreased by using the low-dose technique.

  19. Comparison of effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare the effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). An MDCT with low dose technique was also compared with them. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 25 organ sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. The mandible of the phantom was exposed using 2 different types of MDCT units (Somatom Sensation 10 for standard-dose MDCT, Somatom Emotion 6 for low-dose MDCT) and 3 different CBCT units (AZ3000CT, Implagraphy, and Kavo 3D eXaM). The radiation absorbed dose was measured and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP 2007 report. The effective dose was the highest for Somatom Sensation 10 (425.84 μSv), followed by AZ3000CT (332.4 μSv), Somatom Emotion 6 (199.38 μSv), and 3D eXaM (111.6 μSv); it was the lowest for Implagraphy (83.09 μSv). The CBCT showed significant variation in dose level with different device. The effective doses of MDCTs were not significantly different from those of CBCTs for imaging of mandible. The effective dose of MDCT could be markedly decreased by using the low-dose technique.

  20. Development of a CT based radiation treatment planning system for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An external beam radiation treatment planning system based on CT images has been developed. The main functions built in this system are as follows: (1) Three dimensional dose calculations based on the tissue-air ratio (TAR) and off-center axis ratio (OCR) method for rectangular fields and on the scatter-air ratio (SAR) method for irregularly shaped fields, (2) Inhomogeneity corrections by pixel-by-pixel and inhomogeneity region methods utilizing the CT numbers, (3) Display of isodose distributions superimposed on the CT images, (4) Measurement of point-to-point vertical and horizontal distances on the CT images using a light pen, (5) Automatic calculation and drawing of an irradiation field shape from target volumes delineated on the CT images, (6) Dose distribution analysis program such as calculation of statistical values of dose in a target volume, and of integral dose and dose spectrum in any region(s) of interest. Examples of plans and initial verification results are discussed. (author)

  1. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  2. Plastinated fetus: 3D CT scan (VRT) evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpi Tiwari; Nandlal, B; N M Shama Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The intent of this study was to evaluate the effect of plastination on the morphology and structure of stored organs, to find out how much accuracy a plastinated specimen has, and to look into the changes that occurred because of plastination. Materials and Methods: A human fetus of gestational age 24 weeks was plastinated, and 3D CT scan evaluation of the fetus was done. Results: The results showed normal, well-defined, clearly identifiable organs, with no alteration in morp...

  3. CT diagnosis in the evaluation of vertebral trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emori, Takumi; Kadoya, Satoru; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ito, Shotaro; Kwak, Ryungchan

    1984-12-01

    The diagnostic capability of the CT scan of the vertebral trauma and a comparison with the results of a routine roentgenogram and tomogram were studied in 11 patients. In total, there were 15 fractured vertebrae: 3 in the upper cervical, 3 in the lower cervical, and 9 in the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar vertebrae. In the detailed evaluation of the vertebral fractures, CT provided more information than plain films in all 15 fractured vertebrae, with a better visualization of the spinal bony details, particularly at the upper cervical, thoracic, and thoraco-lumbar levels, where the interpretation of the spinal abnormalities is usually difficult because of adjacent structures such as the skull and thorax. Only CT was able to demonstrate impingements on the vertebral canal by bony fragments. Post-traumatic syringomyelia was incidentally demonstrated in one patient on a plain CT. In 6 patients, conventional tomography was done, but no additional information with regard to spinal instability and spinal-cord compression was obtained. The usage of sagittal tomography was also limited, because it required a change in the patient's position, which might worsen the neurological deficits. On the other hand, a plain roentgenogram and conventional tomography were superior in the evaluation of spinal malalignment and fractures running horizontally. In summary, both plain roentgenograms and CT images provided detailed information about vertebral injury, whereas conventional tomography is judged to be inferior and not always necessary. Based on these results, our new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches using CT for the vertebral injuries were presented.

  4. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  5. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto;

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five ...

  6. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold

  7. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, λ = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, λ = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGETM dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to ∼40% in magnitude. The flask registration

  8. Dosimetric accuracy of the cone-beam CT-based treatment planning of the Vero system: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Prasetio, Heru; Kallis, Karoline; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report an investigation on the accuracy of dose calculation based on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the nonbowtie filter kV imaging system of the Vero linear accelerator. Different sets of materials and tube voltages were employed to generate the Hounsfield unit lookup tables (HLUTs) for both CBCT and fan-beam CT (FBCT) systems. The HLUTs were then implemented for the dose calculation in a treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric evaluation was carried out on an in-house-developed cube phantom that consists of water-equivalent slabs and inhomogeneity inserts. Two independent dosimeters positioned in the cube phantom were used in this study for point-dose and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution measurements. The differences of HLUTs from various materials and tube voltages in both CT systems resulted in differences in dose calculation accuracy. We found that the higher the tube voltage used to obtain CT images, the better the point-dose calculation and the gamma passing rate of the 2D dose distribution agree to the values determined in the TPS. Moreover, the insert materials that are not tissue-equivalent led to higher dose-calculation inaccuracy. There were negligible differences in dosimetric evaluation between the CBCT- and FBCT-based treatment planning if the HLUTs were generated using the tissue-equivalent materials. In this study, the CBCT images of the Vero system from a complex inhomogeneity phantom can be applied for the TPS dose calculation if the system is calibrated using tissue-equivalent materials scanned at high tube voltage (i.e., 120 kV). PMID:27455496

  9. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bernard L., E-mail: bernard.jones@ucdenver.edu; Westerly, David; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. The authors developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. The accuracies of the proposed methods were evaluated by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories in phantom-simulated clinical scenarios using abdominal tumor volumes. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square trajectory errors averaged 3.8% ± 1.1% of the marker amplitude. Dosimetric calculations using Phase methods were more accurate, with mean absolute error less than 0.5%, and with error less than 1% in the highest-noise trajectory. MC-based trajectories prevent the overestimation of dose, but when viewed in an absolute sense, add a small amount of dosimetric error (<0.1%). Conclusions: Marker trajectory and target dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a method to evaluate highly mobile tumors using ordinary CBCT data, and could facilitate better strategies to mitigate or compensate for motion during

  10. Dosimetric comparison of stereotactic body radiotherapy using 4D CT and multiphase CT images for treatment planning of lung cancer: Evaluation of the impact on daily dose coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of using 4D CT and multiphase (helical) CT images for treatment planning target definition and the daily target coverage in hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Materials and methods: For 10 consecutive patients treated with SBRT, a set of 4D CT images and three sets of multiphase helical CT scans, taken during free-breathing, end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold, were obtained. Three separate planning target volumes (PTVs) were created from these image sets. A PTV4D was created from the maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed 4D images by adding a 3 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV). A PTV3CT was created by generating ITV from gross target volumes (GTVs) contoured from the three multiphase images. Finally, a third conventional PTV (denoted PTVconv) was created by adding 5 mm in the axial direction and 10 mm in the longitudinal direction to the GTV (in this work, GTV = CTV = clinical target volume) generated from free-breathing helical CT scans. Treatment planning was performed based on PTV4D (denoted as Plan-1), and the plan was adopted for PTV3CT and PTVconv to form Plan-2 and Plan-3, respectively, by superimposing 'Plan-1' onto the helical free-breathing CT data set using modified beam apertures that conformed to either PTV3CT or PTVconv. We first studied the impact of PTV design on treatment planning by evaluating the dosimetry of the three PTVs under the three plans, respectively. Then we examined the effect of the PTV designs on the daily target coverage by utilizing pre-treatment localization CT (CT-on-rails) images for daily GTV contouring and dose recalculation. The changes in the dose parameters of D95 and D99 (the dose received by 95% and 99% of the target volume, respectively), and the Vp (the volume receiving the prescription dose) of the daily GTVs were compared under the three plans before and after setup error correction. Results: For all

  11. Automatic prostate localization on cone-beam CT scans for high precision image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Previously, we developed an automatic three-dimensional gray-value registration (GR) method for fast prostate localization that could be used during online or offline image-guided radiotherapy. The method was tested on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. In this study, the performance of the algorithm to localize the prostate on cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans acquired on the treatment machine was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Five to 17 CBCT scans of 32 prostate cancer patients (332 scans in total) were used. For 18 patients (190 CBCT scans), the CBCT scans were acquired with a collimated field of view (FOV) (craniocaudal). This procedure improved the image quality considerably. The prostate (i.e., prostate plus seminal vesicles) in each CBCT scan was registered to the prostate in the planning CT scan by automatic 3D gray-value registration (normal GR) starting from a registration on the bony anatomy. When these failed, registrations were repeated with a fixed rotation point locked at the prostate apex (fixed apex GR). Registrations were visually assessed in 3D by one observer with the help of an expansion (by 3.6 mm) of the delineated prostate contours of the planning CT scan. The percentage of successfully registered cases was determined from the combined normal and fixed apex GR assessment results. The error in gray-value registration for both registration methods was determined from the position of one clearly defined calcification in the prostate gland (9 patients, 71 successful registrations). Results: The percentage of successfully registered CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV was about 10% higher than for CBCT scans that were acquired with an uncollimated FOV. For CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV, the percentage of successfully registered cases improved from 65%, when only normal GR was applied, to 83% when the results of normal and fixed apex GR were combined. Gray-value registration mainly failed (or

  12. Assessment of protocols in cone-beam CT with symmetric and asymmetric beams usingeffective dose and air kerma-area product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to evaluate and compare protocols with similar purposes in a cone beam CT scanner using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and the air kerma-area product (PKA) as the kerma index. The measurements were performed on two protocols used to obtain an image of the maxilla–mandible using the equipment GENDEX GXCB 500: Protocol [GX1] extended diameter and asymmetric beam (14 cm×8.5 cm-maxilla/mandible) and protocol [GX2] symmetrical beam (8.5 cm×8.5 cm-maxillary/mandible). LiF dosimeters inserted into a female anthropomorphic phantom were used. For both protocols, the value of PKA was evaluated using a PTW Diamentor E2 meter and the multimeter Radcal Rapidose system. The results obtained for the effective dose/PKA were separated by protocol image. [GX1]: 44.5 µSv/478 mGy cm2; [GX2]: 54.8 µSv/507 mGy cm2. Although the ratio of the diameters (14 cm/8.5 cm)=1.65, the ratio of effective dose values (44.5 µSv/54.8 µSv)=0.81, that is, the effective dose of the protocol with extended diameter is 19% smaller. The PKA values reveal very similar results between the two protocols. For the cases where the scanner uses an asymmetric beam to obtain images with large diameters that cover the entire face, there are advantages from the point of view of reducing the exposure of patients when compared to the use of symmetrical beam and/or to FOV images with a smaller diameter. - Highlights: • The study relies on the comparison of two image protocols in CBCT: symmetrical and asymmetrical FOV. • Effective dose assessment for symmetrical and asymmetrical FOV. • Measurements of air kerma-area product for CBCT with symmetrical and asymmetrical FOV

  13. Initial experience of percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy of lung nodules using C-arm cone-beam CT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Youkyung; Kim, Jung Im; Choi, So Young; Kim, Hyo-Cheol [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Park, Chang Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    To describe our initial experience with percutaneous transthoracic biopsy (PCNB) of lung nodules using C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). Seventy-one consecutive patients with lung nodules of 30 mm or smaller underwent CBCT-guided PCNB using a coaxial cutting needle. We evaluated the procedure time, coaxial introducer dwell time, the numbers of pleural passages, coaxial introducer repositionings and CT acquisitions, as well as the technical success rate and radiation doses. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and incidence of complications were also evaluated. PCNB was performed for 71 nodules: 63 solid, 6 part-solid and 2 ground-glass nodules. The procedure time, coaxial introducer dwell time, numbers of pleural passages, coaxial introducer repositionings and CT acquisitions were 17.9 {+-} 5.9 min, 8.7 {+-} 3.8 min, 1.1 {+-} 0.4, 0.2 {+-} 0.5 and 2.9 {+-} 0.7, respectively. The technical success rate was 100% and the radiation dose was 272 {+-} 116 mGy. Thirty-six nodules (50.7%) were diagnosed as malignant, 25 (35.2%) as benign and 10 (14.1%) as indeterminate. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and incidence of complications were 98.4%, 97%, 100% and 38%, respectively. Complications included pneumothorax in 18 patients (25.4%), haemoptysis in 10 (14.1%) and chest pain in one (1.4%). Under CBCT guidance, PCNB of lung nodules can be performed accurately, providing both real-time fluoroscopic guidance and CT imaging capabilities. (orig.)

  14. FDK Half-Scan with a Heuristic Weighting Scheme on a Flat Panel Detector-Based Cone Beam CT (FDKHSCW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruola Ning

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A cone beam circular half-scan scheme is becoming an attractive imaging method in cone beam CT since it improves the temporal resolution. Traditionally, the redundant data in the circular half-scan range is weighted by a central scanning plane-dependent weighting function; FDK algorithm is then applied on the weighted projection data for reconstruction. However, this scheme still suffers the attenuation coefficient drop inherited with FDK when the cone angle becomes large. A new heuristic cone beam geometry-dependent weighting scheme is proposed based on the idea that there exists less redundancy for the projection data away from the central scanning plane. The performance of FDKHSCW scheme is evaluated by comparing it to the FDK full-scan (FDKFS scheme and the traditional FDK half-scan scheme with Parker's fan beam weighting function (FDKHSFW. Computer simulation is employed and conducted on a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom. The result illustrates a correction of FDKHSCW to the attenuation coefficient drop in the off-scanning plane associated with FDKFS and FDKHSFW while maintaining the same spatial resolution.

  15. Chronic ankle instability: evaluation with stress radiography, CT and CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively evaluated the anterior talo-fibular ligament and the tarsal sinus of 17 patients who had complained of chronic ankle external instability. This study based on both surgery and CT-arthrography findings shows the pathologic or normal aspects of the talo-fibular anterior ligament (normal, lax, fibrosis residue, ruptured). It confirms the good anatomic analysis of the tarsal sinus, i particular the anterior talo-calcaneal interosseous ligament and the search for fibrosis. We underline that capsular distension due to subtalar laxity is not detected with medical imaging. Compared with surgery (all patients), CT arthrography demonstrated the different aspects of the anterior talo fibular ligament injuries (normal, lax, discontinuous). (authors)

  16. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  17. An Approximate Cone Beam Reconstruction Algorithm for Gantry-Tilted CT Using Tangential Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available FDK algorithm is a well-known 3D (three-dimensional approximate algorithm for CT (computed tomography image reconstruction and is also known to suffer from considerable artifacts when the scanning cone angle is large. Recently, it has been improved by performing the ramp filtering along the tangential direction of the X-ray source helix for dealing with the large cone angle problem. In this paper, we present an FDK-type approximate reconstruction algorithm for gantry-tilted CT imaging. The proposed method improves the image reconstruction by filtering the projection data along a proper direction which is determined by CT parameters and gantry-tilted angle. As a result, the proposed algorithm for gantry-tilted CT reconstruction can provide more scanning flexibilities in clinical CT scanning and is efficient in computation. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated with turbell clock phantom and thorax phantom and compared with FDK algorithm and a popular 2D (two-dimensional approximate algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better image quality for gantry-tilted CT image reconstruction.

  18. Deformable image registration for cone-beam CT guided transoral robotic base-of-tongue surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) offers a minimally invasive approach to resection of base-of-tongue tumors. However, precise localization of the surgical target and adjacent critical structures can be challenged by the highly deformed intraoperative setup. We propose a deformable registration method using intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to accurately align preoperative CT or MR images with the intraoperative scene. The registration method combines a Gaussian mixture (GM) model followed by a variation of the Demons algorithm. First, following segmentation of the volume of interest (i.e. volume of the tongue extending to the hyoid), a GM model is applied to surface point clouds for rigid initialization (GM rigid) followed by nonrigid deformation (GM nonrigid). Second, the registration is refined using the Demons algorithm applied to distance map transforms of the (GM-registered) preoperative image and intraoperative CBCT. Performance was evaluated in repeat cadaver studies (25 image pairs) in terms of target registration error (TRE), entropy correlation coefficient (ECC) and normalized pointwise mutual information (NPMI). Retraction of the tongue in the TORS operative setup induced gross deformation >30 mm. The mean TRE following the GM rigid, GM nonrigid and Demons steps was 4.6, 2.1 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The respective ECC was 0.57, 0.70 and 0.73, and NPMI was 0.46, 0.57 and 0.60. Registration accuracy was best across the superior aspect of the tongue and in proximity to the hyoid (by virtue of GM registration of surface points on these structures). The Demons step refined registration primarily in deeper portions of the tongue further from the surface and hyoid bone. Since the method does not use image intensities directly, it is suitable to multi-modality registration of preoperative CT or MR with intraoperative CBCT. Extending the 3D image registration to the fusion of image and planning data in stereo-endoscopic video is anticipated to

  19. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain. PMID:27022608

  20. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapong Aootaphao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain.

  1. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of the view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of ten iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron, the x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or ‘flat field’ scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to ‘flat field’ CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. The results presented in

  2. Interobserver variability in visual evaluation of thoracic CT scans and comparison with automatic computer measurements of CT lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, M.M.W.; Thomsen, Laura H.; Petersen, Jens;

    lung density measurements, i.e. densitometry. Methods – In a pilot study 60 CT scans were selected from a sample of 3980 CT scans from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST). The amount of emphysema in these scans was scored independently by two observers, who were blinded regarding clinical......Introduction – Emphysema is defined by pathology, but is most precisely evaluated in vivo by computed tomography (CT). Aims – were to determine the reproducibility of visual evaluation of emphysema, i.e. the observer variability, and furthermore to compare the visual evaluations to automatic CT...... correlation. Results – Spearman’s correlation coefficient between the two observers was r = 0.85, p < 0.001. However, the combined observations for both observers had a correlation with the CT lung density measurements of r = 0.25, p = 0.05. Conclusions – We found a high degree of interobserver consistency in...

  3. Interobserver variability in visual evaluation of thoracic CT scans and comparison with automatic computer measurements of CT lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Thomsen, Laura Hohwü; Dirksen, Asger;

    2012-01-01

    lung density measurements, i.e. densitometry. Methods – In a pilot study 60 CT scans were selected from a sample of 3980 CT scans from The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST). The amount of emphysema in these scans was scored independently by two observers, who were blinded regarding clinical......Introduction – Emphysema is defined by pathology, but is most precisely evaluated in vivo by computed tomography (CT). Aims – were to determine the reproducibility of visual evaluation of emphysema, i.e. the observer variability, and furthermore to compare the visual evaluations to automatic CT...... correlation. Results – Spearman’s correlation coefficient between the two observers was r = 0.85, p < 0.001. However, the combined observations for both observers had a correlation with the CT lung density measurements of r = 0.25, p = 0.05. Conclusions – We found a high degree of interobserver consistency in...

  4. Automatic calibration method of voxel size for cone-beam 3D-CT scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary stage along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new and easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least-square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained that reflects the relationship between the voxel size and the rotary stage translation distance from its nominal zero position. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system. When the rotary stage is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically exported. The experimental results prove that this method meets the requirements of the actual CT scanning system, and has virtues of easy implementation and high accuracy. (authors)

  5. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra-Pereira, Inês; Vaz, Paula; Faria Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective c...

  6. Intraoperative imaging for patient safety and QA: detection of intracranial hemorrhage using C-arm cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Wang, Adam; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Xia, Xuewei; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-03-01

    Intraoperative imaging could improve patient safety and quality assurance (QA) via the detection of subtle complications that might otherwise only be found hours after surgery. Such capability could therefore reduce morbidity and the need for additional intervention. Among the severe adverse events that could be more quickly detected by high-quality intraoperative imaging is acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), conventionally assessed using post-operative CT. A mobile C-arm capable of high-quality cone-beam CT (CBCT) in combination with advanced image reconstruction techniques is reported as a means of detecting ICH in the operating room. The system employs an isocentric C-arm with a flat-panel detector in dual gain mode, correction of x-ray scatter and beam-hardening, and a penalized likelihood (PL) iterative reconstruction method. Performance in ICH detection was investigated using a quantitative phantom focusing on (non-contrast-enhanced) blood-brain contrast, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and a porcine model with injection of fresh blood bolus. The visibility of ICH was characterized in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluation of images by a neurosurgeon. Across a range of size and contrast of the ICH as well as radiation dose from the CBCT scan, the CNR was found to increase from ~2.2-3.7 for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) to ~3.9-5.4 for PL at equivalent spatial resolution. The porcine model demonstrated superior ICH detectability for PL. The results support the role of high-quality mobile C-arm CBCT employing advanced reconstruction algorithms for detecting subtle complications in the operating room at lower radiation dose and lower cost than intraoperative CT scanners and/or fixedroom C-arms. Such capability could present a potentially valuable aid to patient safety and QA.

  7. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  self-calibration (p  self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible, such as complex non-circular CBCT orbits and systems with irreproducible source-detector trajectory.

  8. Few-view cone-beam CT reconstruction with deformed prior image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prior images can be incorporated into the image reconstruction process to improve the quality of subsequent cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from sparse-view or low-dose projections. The purpose of this work is to develop a deformed prior image-based reconstruction (DPIR) strategy to mitigate the deformation between the prior image and the target image. Methods: The deformed prior image is obtained by a projection-based registration approach. Specifically, the deformation vector fields used to deform the prior image are estimated through iteratively matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and the measured on-treatment projections. The deformed prior image is then used as the prior image in the standard prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm. A simulation study on an XCAT phantom and a clinical study on a head-and-neck cancer patient were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed DPIR strategy. Results: The deformed prior image matches the geometry of the on-treatment CBCT more closely as compared to the original prior image. Consequently, the performance of the DPIR strategy from few-view projections is improved in comparison to the standard PICCS algorithm, based on both visual inspection and quantitative measures. In the XCAT phantom study using 20 projections, the average root mean squared error is reduced from 14% in PICCS to 10% in DPIR, and the average universal quality index increases from 0.88 in PICCS to 0.92 in DPIR. Conclusions: The present DPIR approach provides a practical solution to the mismatch problem between the prior image and target image, which improves the performance of the original PICCS algorithm for CBCT reconstruction from few-view or low-dose projections

  9. Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Prisman, E.; Vescan, A.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Weersink, R.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-02-01

    Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

  10. Image-Based Motion Compensation for High-Resolution Extremities Cone-Beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1–4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10–15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2–4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  11. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  12. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  13. Helical CT evaluation of internal carotid artery stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the utility of helical CT angiography in the evaluation of carotid artery stenoses, helical CT images (reconstructed three-dimensional images, reconstructed multiplanar images, and two-dimensional axial images) obtained from 60 patients were compared with images obtained using conventional angiography. Based on conventional angiographic criteria, 22 arteries had no stenosis, 26 had mild stenosis. 69 had severe stenosis, and 3 were occluded. All carotid bifurcations were clearly identified on helical CT scanning and there were no complications. There were no motion artifacts due to the short examination time. In normal arteries, reconstructed three-dimensional images provided accurate anatomic depiction of the carotid bifurcation. Calcification was present at the stenotic lesion in 52 arteries. In 43 arteries in which the stenotic lesion was free of calcification, the degree of carotid stenosis determined using reconstructed three-dimensional images correlated with that determined using conventional angiography. In 19 of 52 arteries with calcification at the stenotic lesion, the calcification was focal and did not obscure the vessel lumen significantly when viewed from multiple angles. In the other 33 arteries, the calcification was dense and/or circumferential, making it difficult to evaluate the axial images allowed evaluation of the vessel lumen in the area of calcification, and the degree of stenosis was similar to that determined by conventional angiography. In 3 arteries, occlusion of the internal carotid artery was seen in reconstructed three-dimensional images and was confirmed by conventional angiography. (K.H.)

  14. Helical CT evaluation of internal carotid artery stenoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Yoshinori; Imakita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Susumu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsukahara, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Nobuo [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    To determine the utility of helical CT angiography in the evaluation of carotid artery stenoses, helical CT images (reconstructed three-dimensional images, reconstructed multiplanar images, and two-dimensional axial images) obtained from 60 patients were compared with images obtained using conventional angiography. Based on conventional angiographic criteria, 22 arteries had no stenosis, 26 had mild stenosis. 69 had severe stenosis, and 3 were occluded. All carotid bifurcations were clearly identified on helical CT scanning and there were no complications. There were no motion artifacts due to the short examination time. In normal arteries, reconstructed three-dimensional images provided accurate anatomic depiction of the carotid bifurcation. Calcification was present at the stenotic lesion in 52 arteries. In 43 arteries in which the stenotic lesion was free of calcification, the degree of carotid stenosis determined using reconstructed three-dimensional images correlated with that determined using conventional angiography. In 19 of 52 arteries with calcification at the stenotic lesion, the calcification was focal and did not obscure the vessel lumen significantly when viewed from multiple angles. In the other 33 arteries, the calcification was dense and/or circumferential, making it difficult to evaluate the axial images allowed evaluation of the vessel lumen in the area of calcification, and the degree of stenosis was similar to that determined by conventional angiography. In 3 arteries, occlusion of the internal carotid artery was seen in reconstructed three-dimensional images and was confirmed by conventional angiography. (K.H.)

  15. Comparative evaluation of clinical history, chest radiographs, standard CT, thin-section CT, reference-phantom CT in the classification of solitary pulmonary nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-five consecutive patients with solitary pulmonary nodules were evaluated by CT (General Electric 9800 instrument, 512-pixel matrix) performed using standard 10-mm sections, thin (1.5-mm) sections, and a commercially available CIRS model III phantom. For each of the techniques a consensus score was established as to whether the nodule was benign, indeterminate, or malignant, at three levels of confidence. Of the 35 proved nodules, 29 were benign and six malignant. When CT was performed using the phantom, 68% of benign nodules were correctly classified. None of the nodules classified as benign on thin-section CT or phantom CT proved to be malignant. Thin-section CT alone correctly indicated a benign process in 52% and a malignant process in 83% of pertinent cases. Standard-section CT was accurate only in 20% of benign and 33% of malignant nodules. Although thin-section CT is better than standard section CT for the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules, phantom CT adds further to the characterization of the benign process. A diagnostic algorithms is suggested

  16. Performance evaluation of the CT component of the IRIS PET/CT preclinical tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Daniele; Belcari, Nicola; Tripodi, Maria; Burchielli, Silvia; Salvadori, Piero A.; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the physical performance of the CT component of the IRIS scanner, a novel combined PET/CT scanner for preclinical imaging. The performance assessment is based on phantom measurement for the determination of image quality parameters (spatial resolution, linearity, geometric accuracy, contrast to noise ratio) and reproducibility in dynamic (4D) imaging. The CTDI100 has been measured free in air with a pencil ionization chamber, and the animal dose was calculated using Monte Carlo derived conversion factors taken from the literature. The spatial resolution at the highest quality protocol was 6.9 lp/mm at 10% of the MTF, using the smallest reconstruction voxel size of 58.8 μm. The accuracy of the reconstruction voxel size was within 0.1%. The linearity of the CT numbers as a function of the concentration of iodine was very good, with R2>0.996 for all the tube voltages. The animal dose depended strongly on the scanning protocol, ranging from 158 mGy for the highest quality protocol (2 min, 80 kV) to about 12 mGy for the fastest protocol (7.3 s, 80 kV). In 4D dynamic modality, the maximum scanning rate reached was 3.1 frames per minute, using a short-scan protocol with 7.3 s of scan time per frame at the isotropic voxel size of 235 μm. The reproducibility of the system was high throughout the 10 frames acquired in dynamic modality, with a standard deviation of the CT values of all frames <8 HU and an average spatial reproducibility within 30% of the voxel size across all the field of view. Example images obtained during animal experiments are also shown.

  17. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 μm focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 μm pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 μm pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm-1 at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses (99mTc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  18. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc

  19. Estimation of effective dose from limited cone beam X-ray CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limited cone beam X-ray CT (Ortho-CT) was developed on the basis of multi-functional panoramic apparatus, SCANORA (Soredex Co. Helsinki Finland). The imaging intensifier (I.I.) was built in this apparatus as a X-ray detection device instead of X-ray film. The signal provided from I.I. was converted from analog into digital by an analog-digital converter and image reconstitution was done as a three-directional image of the dimensions 3.8 cm of width, 3.0 cm height and 3.8 cm depth with the personal computer. The 3DX Multi image micro CT'' (3DX) was developed along similar lines by MORITA Co., Ltd. (Kyoto, JAPAN). In this study, the stochastic effect on organ and tissue caused by examinations using Ortho-CT and 3DX was measured. The effective dose was estimated according to the recommendation of ICRP60 and was compared with those of panoramic radiography and computed tomography. The irradiation conditions were as follows: 85 kV, 10 mA with the filtration of 3 mmAl and added 1 mmCu for Ortho-CT, and 80 kV, 2 mA and the filtration of 3.1 mmAL for 3DX. The measurement of organ and tissue dose was performed using an anthropomorphic Rando woman phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Co., Stanfora, CN), as well as by using two different type of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD); Panasonic UD-170A (BeO) and UD-110S (CaSO4: Tm). The UD-170A was for dose measurement of the inner useful X-ray beams, while the UD-110S was for outer beams. The measured organ and tissue were those recommended with ICRP60 (gonad, breast, bone marrow, lung, thyroid gland, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, bladder, skin, brain, thymus, adrenal, kidney, spleen, pancrease, upper large intestine, uterus, eyes and major salivary gland). The imaging by Orhto-CT was made in the left maxillary 1st molar, left mandibular 1st molar and temporomandibular joint. 3DX measurement was made in the maxillary incisor region and middle ear regions other than the regions mentioned above. The skin dose measurement

  20. CT arthrography of the wrist using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Haapamaeki, Ville V.; Kortesniemi, Mika [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Salo, Jari [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, UEF, Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Kuopio (Finland); Lindfors, Nina C. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, Lauri [Planmed Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Kimmo T. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland)

    2013-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and intra- and interobserver agreement of CBCT arthrography of wrist ligaments, triangular fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC), and to assess the sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), accuracy (ACC), and positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) of CBCT arthrography in the diagnosis of scapholunate (SLL) and lunotriquetral (LTL) ligament tears, TFCC, and cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity CBCT scanner. Fifty-two consecutively enrolled subjects (26 M, 26 F, mean age 38 years, range 18-66 years) with suspected wrist ligament tears underwent CBCT-arthrography before normally scheduled MR arthrography.An extremity CBCT was used for imaging with isotropic voxel size of 0.4 x 0.4 x 0.4 mm{sup 3}. Subsequent routine 1.5 T MRI was performed using a dedicated wrist coil.Two observers reviewed the anonymized CBCT images twice for contrast enhancement (CE) and technical details (TD), for tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC. Also, cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) were evaluated. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was determined using weighted kappa statistics. Since no surgery was performed, MRI served as a reference standard, and SE and SP, ACC, PPV, and NPV were calculated. Intra- and interobserver kappa values for both readers (reader 1/reader 2; first reading/second reading) with 95 % confidence limits were: CE 0.54 (0.08-1.00)/ 0.75 (0.46-1.00); 0.73 (0.29-1.00)/ 0.45 (0.07-0.83), TD 0.53 (0.30-0.88)/ 0.86 (0.60-1.00); 0.56 (0.22-0.91)/ 0.67 (0.37-0.98), SLL 0.59 (0.25-0.93)/ 0.66 (0.42-0.91); 0.31 (0.06-0.56)/ 0.49 (0.26-0.73), LTL 0.83 (0.66-1.00)/ 0.68 (0.46-0.91); 0.90 (0.79-1.00)/ 0.48 (0.22-0.74); TFCC (0.72-1.00)/ (0.79-1.00); 0.65 (0.43-0.87)/ 0.59 (0.35-0.83), radius (scaphoid fossa) 0.45 (0.12-0.77)/ 0.64 (0.31-0.96); 0

  1. Patient doses in CT, dental cone beam CT and projection radiography in Finland, with emphasis on paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic radiology represents the largest man-made contribution to population radiation doses in Europe. To be able to keep the diagnostic benefit versus radiation risk ratio as high as possible, it is important to understand the quantitative relationship between the patient radiation dose and the various factors which affect the dose, such as the scan parameters, scan mode, and patient size. Paediatric patients have a higher probability for late radiation effects, since longer life expectancy is combined with the higher radiation sensitivity of the developing organs. The experience with particular paediatric examinations may be very limited and paediatric acquisition protocols may not be optimised. The purpose of this thesis was to enhance and compare different dosimetric protocols, to promote the establishment of the paediatric diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), and to provide new data on patient doses for optimisation purposes in computed tomography (with new applications for dental imaging) and in paediatric radiography. Large variations in radiation exposure in paediatric skull, sinus, chest, pelvic and abdominal radiography examinations were discovered in patient dose surveys. There were variations between different hospitals and examination rooms, between different sized patients, and between imaging techniques; emphasising the need for harmonisation of the examination protocols. For computed tomography, a correction coefficient, which takes individual patient size into account in patient dosimetry, was created. The presented patient size correction method can be used for both adult and paediatric purposes. Dental cone beam CT scanners provided adequate image quality for dentomaxillofacial examinations while delivering considerably smaller effective doses to patient compared to the multi slice CT. However, large dose differences between cone beam scanners were not explained by differences in image quality, which indicated the lack of optimisation. For

  2. 应用锥形束CT评价最终等中心标记法定位头颈部肿瘤的摆位误差%Evaluation of setup errors for head-and-neck cancer localized with final isocenter marking method via cone beam CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴钦宏; 李高峰; 李雪南; 刘春玲; 朱宝全; 田丽红; 张清文; 竺萌; 秋晞; 王婵

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the setup errors of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for head-and-neck cancer using kilovoltage cone beam CT( kV CBCT).Methods 256 patients with head-and-neck cancer were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) from March 2009 to October 2011.All patients were immobilized with head-and-neck mask and localized with final isocenter marking method using the Philips PQS CT or Philips Brilliance CT Big Bore scanners,which were equipped with LAP movable laser systems.The CT images were transferred to a Varian Eclipse V8.6 workstation for contouring and planning.A kV cone-beam CT scans was acquired,and registered before the treatment for every patient on a Varian iX linear accelerator via OBI system.The setup errors in the right-left ( RL),superior-inferior (SI),and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded.Results The setup errors for the 473 datasets followed a Gaussian distribution.The systematic errors ± random errors in the RL,SI and AP were(-0.6 ± 1.3 ),(0.5 ± 1.6) and (0.9 ± 1.7 ) mm,respectively.The planning target volume (PTV) margins were calculated respectively as 2.4,2.4 and 3.4 mm according to the formula of M =2.5∑ +0.7δ The margins of 288 sets of data using the Big Bore CT scanner were calculated as 2.0,2.1 and 1.7 mm,respectively.Conclusions The setup errors using final isocenter marking method are smaller than those using reference point marking method.The result derived from this retrospective study could be used to set the margin between CTV and PTV.%目的 应用千伏级锥形束CT(kV CBCT)评价头颈部肿瘤图像引导放疗的摆位误差.方法 选取2009年3月至2011年10月的256例行调强放疗的头颈部肿瘤患者,采用头颈肩面罩固定体位,最终等中心标记法定位,配有LAP可移动式激光定位系统的Philips PQS CT或PhilipsBrilliance CT Big Bore进行CT扫描.CT图像通过网络传输给Varian Eclipse治疗计划系统,用来进行勾画靶区和设

  3. The role of pneumothorax CT for the evaluation of aortic invasion by lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the accuracy of T3 diagnosis in lung cancer, Pneumothorax CT was carried out in four patients having diagnosis of plain CT and enhanced CT. Both plain and enhanced CT demonstrated obliteration of low density zone between tumor and the aorta in all cases. In three of four cases, Pneumothorax CT, however, demonstrated free air space where tumor was evaluated to be invaded. Remaining one presented the loss of such free air space even by Pneumothorax CT and was made the diagnosis of aortic invasion, which was confirmed by surgicopathological finding. Pneumothorax CT is useful for the diagnosis of ruling out tumor invasion to the aorta. (author)

  4. Roman Pot Insertions in High-Intensity Beams for the CT-PPS Project at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deile, Mario; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Salvant, Benoit; Valentino, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) at the LHC IP5 aims at exploring diffractive physics at high luminosity in standard LHC fills. It is based on 14 Roman Pots (RPs), designed to host tracking and time-of-flight detectors for measuring the kinematics of leading protons. To reach the physics goals, the RPs will finally have to approach the beams to distances of 15 beam σs (i.e. ~1.5 mm) or closer. After problems with showers and impedance heating in first high-luminosity RP insertions in 2012, the LS1 of LHC was used for upgrades in view of impedance minimisation and for adding new collimators to intercept RP-induced showers. In 2015 the effectiveness of these improvements was shown by successfully inserting the RPs in all LHC beam intensity steps to a first-phase distance of ~25 σs. This contribution reviews the measurements of debris showers and impedance effects, i.e. the data from Beam Loss Monitors, beam vacuum gauges and temperature sensors. The dependences of the observables on the lu...

  5. Dose evaluation of narrow-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability of the dose from the narrow photon beam becomes more important since the single high-dose rate radiosurgery becoming popular. The dose evaluation for the optimal dose is difficult due to absence of lateral electronic equilibrium. Data necessary for treatment regimen are TMR (tissue maximum ratio), OCR (off center ratio) and Sc,p (total scatter factor). The narrow-beam was 10 MV X-ray from Varian Clinac 2100C equipped with cylindrical Fischer collimator CBI system. Detection was performed by Kodak XV-2 film, a PTW natural diamond detector M60003, Scanditronics silicon detector EDD-5 or Fujitec micro-chamber FDC-9.4C. Phantoms were the water equivalent one (PTW, RW3), water one (PTW, MP3 system) and Wellhofer WP600 system. Factors above were actually measured to reveal that in the dose evaluation of narrow photon beam, TMR should be measured by micro-chamber, OCR, by film, and Sc,p, by the two. The use of diamond detector was recommended for more precise measurement and evaluation of the dose. The importance of water phantom in the radiosurgery system was also shown. (K.H.)

  6. Ultrafast cone-beam CT scatter correction with GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT. We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1 FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2 Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3 MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4 Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5 Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6 FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC noise from the simulated scatter images caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on one simulated head-and-neck case with 364 projection angles.Results: We have examined variation of the scatter signal among projection angles using Fourier analysis. It is found that scatter images at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with < 0.1% error. For the simulated patient case with a resolution of 512 × 512 × 100, we simulated 5 × 106 photons per angle. The total computation time is 20.52 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU, and the time at each step is 2.53, 0.64, 14.78, 0.13, 0.19, and 2.25 seconds, respectively. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU.Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. It accomplished the whole procedure of scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.----------------------------Cite this

  7. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff. PMID:26975735

  8. Task-based modeling and optimization of a cone-beam CT scanner for musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, P.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14615 (United States); Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    protocol for 1 x 1 (full-resolution) projection data acquisition followed by full-resolution reconstruction with a sharp filter for high-frequency tasks along with 2 x 2 binning reconstruction with a smooth filter for low-frequency tasks. The analysis guided selection of specific source and detector components implemented on the proposed scanner. The analysis also quantified the potential benefits and points of diminishing return in focal spot size, reduced electronic noise, finer detector pixels, and low-dose limits of detectability. Theoretical results agreed quantitatively with the measured NPS and qualitatively with evaluation of cadaver images by a musculoskeletal radiologist. Conclusions: A fairly comprehensive model for 3D imaging performance in cone-beam CT combines factors of quantum noise, system geometry, anatomical background, and imaging task. The analysis provided a valuable, quantitative guide to design, optimization, and technique selection for a musculoskeletal extremities imaging system under development.

  9. Measurement of small lesions near metallic implants with mega-voltage cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, Violeta; Prevrhal, Sven; Pouliot, Jean

    2008-03-01

    Metallic objects severely limit diagnostic CT imaging because of their high X-ray attenuation in the diagnostic energy range. In contrast, radiation therapy linear accelerators now offer CT imaging with X-ray energies in the megavolt range, where the attenuation coefficients of metals are significantly lower. We hypothesized that Mega electron-Voltage Cone-Beam CT (MVCT) implemented on a radiation therapy linear accelerator can detect and quantify small features in the vicinity of metallic implants with accuracy comparable to clinical Kilo electron-Voltage CT (KVCT) for imaging. Our test application was detection of osteolytic lesions formed near the metallic stem of a hip prosthesis, a condition of severe concern in hip replacement surgery. Both MVCT and KVCT were used to image a phantom containing simulated osteolytic bone lesions centered around a Chrome-Cobalt hip prosthesis stem with hemispherical lesions with sizes and densities ranging from 0.5 to 4 mm radius and 0 to 500 mg•cm -3, respectively. Images for both modalities were visually graded to establish lower limits of lesion visibility as a function of their size. Lesion volumes and mean density were determined and compared to reference values. Volume determination errors were reduced from 34%, on KVCT, to 20% for all lesions on MVCT, and density determination errors were reduced from 71% on KVCT to 10% on MVCT. Localization and quantification of lesions was improved with MVCT imaging. MVCT offers a viable alternative to clinical CT in cases where accurate 3D imaging of small features near metallic hardware is critical. These results need to be extended to other metallic objects of different composition and geometry.

  10. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE BY ULTRASOUND AND CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmalatha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The goals of any radiologic procedure in obstructive Jaundice are to confirm the presence of bile duct obstruction, its location, its extent & the probable cause. It should also attempt to obtain a map of the biliary tree that will help the surgeon to det ermine the best approach to each individual case. OBJECTIVES: 1. To evaluate the role of Ultrasound and CT in patients presenting with clinical features of obstructive jaundice. 2. To evaluate the causes of obstructive jaundice by Ultrasound and CT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was carried with 45 patients from January 2006 to September 2007 who were attending the surgical and Gastroenterology Departments, Govt. General Hospital, Kurnool, which is an attached hospital to Kurnool Medical College, Kurnool. O BSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: In our study, there is female predominance with male: female ratio 1: 1.6.Majority of patients are in age group of 41 - 50 years. Jaundice was the commonest presentation in all patients followed by pruritis in 72% and pain abdomen in 67% of patients. Ultrasound identified the benign cause of biliary obstruction in 79.1% cases and the malignant cause in 61.9% cases. CT identified the benign cause of biliary obstruction in 91.6% of patients and the malignant cause in 80.9% cases.

  11. CT and MRI evaluation of orbital tumors: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To show our experience in the evaluation of orbital masses on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To describe their most important findings and epidemiological features found on literature review, related to their differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: During a 48-months period of time, 26 patients (13 male, 13 female; age range, 3 to 75 years) with orbital tumors were evaluated. Seventeen patients underwent MR scans, 8 underwent CT scans, and one underwent both imaging methods. It was employed 0,5 and 1 Tesla MR scanners, and axial-helical CT scanners. Results: Benign lesions were found on 7 patients (cavernous hemangioma [n=2], meningioma [n=1], epidermoid cyst [n=1], dermoid cyst [n=1], lipoma [n=1], orbital vein deformity [n=1]). It was found lesions with undetermined behavior (optical nerve glioma [n=2]), and malignant ones were found on 17 patients (metastatic lesions [n=5], non- Hodgkin's lymphoma [n=3], hemangiopericytoma [n=2], retinoblastoma [n=2], rhabdomyosarcoma [n=2], melanoma [n=1], and lacrimal adenocarcinoma [n=1]). Conclusion: In our experience, 65.4% was malignant tumors (orbital metastasis was the most common; 19.2%). More than one-quarter was benign tumor, where cavernous hemangioma was the most frequent. (author)

  12. Reproducibilty test of ferrous xylenol orange gel dose response with optical cone beam CT scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.; Battista, J.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies of ferrous xylenol orange gelatin gel have revealed a spatial dependence to the dose response of samples contained in 10 cm diameter cylinders. Dose response is defined as change in optical attenuation coefficient divided by the dose (units cm-1 Gy-1). This set of experiments was conducted to determine the reproducibility of our preparation, irradiation and full 3D optical cone beam CT scanning. The data provided an internal check of a larger storage time-dose response dependence study.

  13. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Akio, E-mail: akio.yoneyama.bu@hitachi.com; Baba, Rika [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [Institute of Materials Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry Showa University, Ota-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu [Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  14. The Relationships of the Maxillary Sinus With the Superior Alveolar Nerves and Vessels as Demonstrated by Cone-Beam CT Combined With μ-CT and Histological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Norio; Morita, Wataru; Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Kenmotsu, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    There are no available detailed data on the three-dimensional courses of the human superior alveolar nerves and vessels. This study aimed to clarify the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar nerves and vessels using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) combined with μ-CT and histological analyses. Digital imaging and communication in medicine data obtained from the scanned heads/maxillae of cadavers used for undergraduate/postgraduate dissection practice and skulls using cone-beam CT were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) images using software. The 3D images were compared with μ-CT images and histological sections. Cone-beam CT clarified the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar canals/grooves. The main anterior superior alveolar canal/groove ran anteriorly through the upper part of the sinus and terminated at the bottom of the nasal cavity near the piriform aperture. The main middle alveolar canal ran downward from the upper part of the sinus to ultimately join the anterior one. The main posterior alveolar canal ran through the lateral lower part of the sinus and communicated with the anterior one. Histological analyses demonstrated the existence of nerves and vessels in these canals/grooves, and the quantities of these structures varied across each canal/groove. Furthermore, the superior dental nerve plexus exhibited a network that was located horizontally to the occlusal plane, although these nerve plexuses appeared to be the vertical network that is described in most textbooks. In conclusion, cone-beam CT is suggested to be a useful method for clarifying the superior alveolar canals/grooves including the nerves and vessels. Anat Rec, 299:669-678, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26874792

  15. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist clinical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheurecker, G

    2001-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG...

  16. Laser CT evaluation on normoxic PAGAT gel dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. S.; Samuel, E. J. J.; Watanabe, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Optical computed tomography has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the radiation therapy physicists. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters. The purpose of this paper is to describe the initial evaluation of a newly fabricated laser CT scanner for 3D gel dosimetry which works using the first generation principle. A normoxic PAGAT (Polyacrylamide Gelatin and Tetrakis) gel is used as a dosimeter for this analysis. When a laser passes through the gel phantom, absorption and scattering of photon take place. The optical attenuation coefficient of the laser can be obtained by measuring its intensity after passing through the gel by a sensor. The scanner motion is controlled by a computer program written in Microsoft Visual C++. Reconstruction and data analysis on the irradiated gel phantom is performed by suitable algorithm using Matlab software.

  17. CT evaluation of the peripancreatic fat in normal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of peripancreatic extensive or invasion in pancreatic disease is an important role of CT (Computed Tomography). We analyzed the abdominal CT findings of 104 normal patients (including the patients with trivial disease processes not related to pancreas) in regard to whether they actually would visualize the peripancreatic fat lines distinctly or not. In regard to adjacent organs, the duodenal second portion showed the highest rate of obliteration of peripancreatic fat lines (75.0%). In regard to adjacent vessels, the portal cinfluence showed the highest rate of obliteration (93.75%) and the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein also showed high rates of obliteration of peripancreatic fat lines (89.3% and 78.4%, respectively). And the superior mesenteric artery showed the remarkable preservation rate of 98.1%.

  18. CT evaluation of the peripancreatic fat in normal patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Choi, Byung Ihn; Song, Chi Sung; Kim, Jin Sik; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    Evaluation of peripancreatic extensive or invasion in pancreatic disease is an important role of CT (Computed Tomography). We analyzed the abdominal CT findings of 104 normal patients (including the patients with trivial disease processes not related to pancreas) in regard to whether they actually would visualize the peripancreatic fat lines distinctly or not. In regard to adjacent organs, the duodenal second portion showed the highest rate of obliteration of peripancreatic fat lines (75.0%). In regard to adjacent vessels, the portal cinfluence showed the highest rate of obliteration (93.75%) and the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein also showed high rates of obliteration of peripancreatic fat lines (89.3% and 78.4%, respectively). And the superior mesenteric artery showed the remarkable preservation rate of 98.1%.

  19. CT evaluation of medial protrusion of the lamina papyracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency, location and gender difference of the medial protrusion of the lamina papyracea toward the ethmoid sinus were evaluated in 522 patients who underwent CT of the paranasal sinus region at our institution between January 1999 and January 2002. The area of interest was the nose and paranasal sinuses in 295 patients, auditory organ in 190 patients and maxillofacial area in 37 patients. The lamina papyracea was clearly identified in all the patients. Patients with a past history of paranasal sinus surgery and those with injuries in the lamina papyracea were excluded from the study. The patients consisted of 283 males and 239 females aged between 6 and 94 years. Twenty-nine patients were younger than 20 years old. Axial slices were taken in most cases. Medial protrusion was judged to be positive in cases where the lamina papyracea evidently deviated toward the ethmoid sinus on CT and the CT value of the protruded area was identical to that of the orbital fat. Medial protrusion of the lamina papyracea was positive in 4 males and 2 females with a frequency of 1.15%. All the 6 patients were older than 20 years old. The protrusion was located in the anterior ethmoid in 2 patients, middle ethmoid in 3 patients and entire ethmoid area in 1 patient whose ethmoid sinuses were poorly developed. The protrusion was also located on the right side in 4 patients and on the left side in 2. Bilateral protrusion was not observed. It has been reported that the frequency of medial protrusion of the lamina papyracea is about 1%. CT is an essential examination before surgery of the nose and paranasal sinuses. It is important to preoperatively evaluate the anatomical relation of critical structures including the lamina papyracea. (author)

  20. Job profiles and responsibilities of cone-beam CT in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first applications of Cone Beam CT (CBTC) were within the angiographic and radiotherapy. In recent years the CBTC has found its greatest field of application in the dental and maxillofacial surgery and is expected to be used more and more frequently in clinical practice. Wider use of CBTC and reducing costs of equipment purchase was made possible by the development of specific software for 3D reconstruction and hardware that can handle the amount of data to be processed. The technique TC volumetric 'Cone Beam', thanks to the higher resolution capability of the detectors used and the high intrinsic contrast of the bony structures, you can get good quality images with patient doses lower than those usually administered with conventional parameters, from equipment TC traditional (at equal volume irradiated from 5 to 20 times lower).

  1. Simulation of Cone Beam CT System Based on Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Hu, Liqin; Li, Bingbing

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) was developed based on Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) and it is the trend of photon radiation therapy. To get a better use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images for ART, the CBCT system model was established based on Monte Carlo program and validated against the measurement. The BEAMnrc program was adopted to the KV x-ray tube. Both IOURCE-13 and ISOURCE-24 were chosen to simulate the path of beam particles. The measured Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and lateral dose profiles under 1cm water were compared with the dose calculated by DOSXYZnrc program. The calculated PDD was better than 1% within the depth of 10cm. More than 85% points of calculated lateral dose profiles was within 2%. The correct CBCT system model helps to improve CBCT image quality for dose verification in ART and assess the CBCT image concomitant dose risk.

  2. A dual centre study of setup accuracy for thoracic patients based on Cone-Beam CT data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Vibeke N; Westberg, Jonas; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare setup uncertainties at two different institutions by using identical imaging and analysis techniques for thoracic patients with different fixation equipments. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patient registration results from Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) scans of 174 patients were...... evaluated (1068 CBCT scans). Patients were fixated using a standard or custom made fixation at Royal Marsden Hospital and Odense University Hospital, respectively. Five imaging protocols were retrospectively simulated to compare the fixation equipments. Systematic and random setup uncertainties were...... calculated to estimate sufficient treatment margins. RESULTS: The setup uncertainties are of similar sizes at the two institutions and there is no observable drift in the precision of the fixation equipments during the treatment course. When a correcting imaging protocol is performed there is a significant...

  3. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, S. J.; Rowshanfarzad, P.; Ebert, M. A.;

    2015-01-01

    the two methods was found for the Agility. This may be due to its reduced interleaf leakage compared to the MLCi2. Energy-dependence of the isocentre position calculation seems to be negligible. Conclusions: The RFC position calculation seemed to be the most challenging issue, especially for MLC...... radiation isocentre prior to routine use of the cone-beam CT system. The isocentre determination method used in the XVI software is not available to users. The aim of this work is to perform an independent evaluation of the Elekta XVI 4.5 software for isocentre verification with focus on the robustness and...... precision of the results. Materials and Methods: A ball bearing phantom with a diameter of 8 mm was attached to the treatment couch positioned close to the linac isocentre. Eight images of the phantom were acquired using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Image acquisition was based on the Elekta...

  4. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose–volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery. (paper)

  5. Automatic Calibration Method of Voxel Size for Cone-beam 3D-CT Scanning System

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Min; Liu, Yipeng; Men, Fanyong; Li, Xingdong; Liu, Wenli; Wei, Dongbo

    2013-01-01

    For cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary table along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained, which reflects the relationship between the rotary table displacement distance from its nominal zero position and the voxel size. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system, and when the rotary table is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically expo...

  6. Simulations and experimental feasibility study of fan-beam coherent-scatter CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Adrian; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Harding, Geoffrey L.

    2002-11-01

    Fan-beam coherent scatter computer tomography (CSCT) has been employed to obtain 2-dimensional images of spatially resolved diffraction patterns in order to supplement CT images in material discrimination. A Monte Carlo simulation tool DiPhoS (Diagnostic Photon Simulation) was used to create 2-dimensional scatter projection data sets of high-contrast water and Lucite phantom objects with plastic inserts. The results were used as input to a reconstruction routine based on a novel simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). At the same time an experimental demonstrator was assembled to confirm the simulations by measurements and to show the feasibility of coherent scatter CT. It consisted of a 4.5kW constant power X-ray tube, a rotatable object plate and a vertical detector column that could be panned around the object. Spatial resolution was ensured by mechanical collimation. Phantoms similar to those simulated were measured and reconstructed and the contrast achieved by CSCT between the materials under examination substantially exceeded that achieved in CT. A further step was taken by examining an animal tissue sample in the same way, the results of which show remarkable contrast between muscle, cartilage and fat, suggesting that CSCT can also be used in a medical scenario.

  7. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT. (paper)

  8. Evaluation of periventricular radiolucency in hydrocephalus by dynamic CT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Hideki; Bandou, Kuniaki; Miyaoka, Makoto (Fujisawa City Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The association of periventricular radiolucency (PVL) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) on CT scan is a common finding. However, it is difficult to differentiate NPH from atrophy or infarctions in which shunt surgery does not reverse these conditions. To distinguish NPH from these, we examined PVL by means of dynamic CT (DCT) studies. We investigated 12 elderly patients presenting with gait disturbance, urinary incontinence and mental dysfunction who had both enlarged lateral ventricles and PVL. All patients had laboratory investigations, including radioisotope and CT cisternography and Xenon CBF studies. Nine patients were shunted because of abnormal CSF dynamics. Varying degrees of clinical improvement after surgery were observed in 6 cases. A difference of arrival time (AT) between PVL and thalamus obtained from time-density-curve was calculated in each patient. The AT difference was 6.2[+-]1.5 sec. in the shunt-effective group, and 1.4[+-]1.3 sec. in both, the shunt in effective and ineligible group, this was highly significant (p<0.01). We also measured peak time (PT) in PVL, of the thalamus and anterior cerebral artery, but no significant correlation was obtained. An AT difference between PVL and thalamus obtained from DCT studies is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of NPH. (author).

  9. Evaluation of pituitary adenomas by multidirectional multislice dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Multidetector-row CT is a new technology with a short scanning time. Multislice dynamic CT (MSDCT) in various directions can be obtained using the multidetector-row CT with multiplanar reformatting (MPR) technique. Material and Methods: We evaluated the initial results of sagittal and coronal MSDCT images reconstructed by MPR (MSDCT-MPR) in 3 pituitary adenoma patients with a pacemaker. Results: In a patient with microadenoma, the maximum contrast between the normal anterior pituitary gland and the adenoma occurred approximately 50 s after the start of the contrast medium injection. A microadenoma was depicted as a less enhanced area relative to normal pituitary tissue. The macroadenomas were depicted as a less enhanced mass with cavernous sinus invasion in 1 patient and as a non-uniformly enhanced mass in another patient. Bone destruction and incomplete opening of the sellar floor during previous surgery were clearly detected in 2 patients with macroadenomas. These pituitary adenomas were removed via the transnasal route based on information from the MSDCT-MPR images only. The findings were verified surgically. Conclusion: The MSDCT-MPR provided the information needed for surgery with good image quality in the 3 patients with pacemakers. MSDCT-MPR appears to be a useful technique for patients with a pituitary adenoma in whom MR imaging is not available. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the MSDCT-MPR technique being used to demonstrate pituitary disorders

  10. Ring artifacts removal via spatial sparse representation in cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Li, Guang; Sun, Yi; Luo, Shouhua

    2016-03-01

    This paper is about the ring artifacts removal method in cone beam CT. Cone beam CT images often suffer from disturbance of ring artifacts which caused by the non-uniform responses of the elements in detectors. Conventional ring artifacts removal methods focus on the correlation of the elements and the ring artifacts' structural characteristics in either sinogram domain or cross-section image. The challenge in the conventional methods is how to distinguish the artifacts from the intrinsic structures; hence they often give rise to the blurred image results due to over processing. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the ring artifacts in spatial space, different from the continuous essence of 3D texture feature of the scanned objects, the ring artifacts are displayed discontinuously in spatial space, specifically along z-axis. Thus we can easily recognize the ring artifacts in spatial space than in cross-section. As a result, we choose dictionary representation for ring artifacts removal due to its high sensitivity to structural information. We verified our theory both in spatial space and coronal-section, the experimental results demonstrate that our methods can remove the artifacts efficiently while maintaining image details.

  11. Retrospective evaluation of acute appendicitis incorrectly diagnosed on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the CT images of patients suffering with surgically proven appendicitis to determine the causes of missed diagnoses. We reviewed the pathology reports of the patients with surgically proven appendicitis from two hospitals during a 3-year period. Thirty-seven such cases with a misdiagnosis were identified and they served as our misdiagnosed group (17 females and 20 males, mean age: 58 years, age range 15-68 years). These were cases that were misdiagnosed on preoperative abdominal CT. All 57 patients in the control group (30 females and 27 males, mean age: 44 years, age range: 21-78 years) had undergone laparotomy for acute appendicitis and they had been correctly diagnosed preoperatively on CT. Two abdominal radiologists evaluated the following items from all 94 CT examinations: 1) an abnormal appendix, 2) periappendiceal fat inflammation, 3) pericecal extraluminal fluid, 4) pericecal extraluminal air, 5) appendicolith, 6) cecal wall thickening, 7) small bowel dilatation, and 8) the pericecal fat content. Statistical analysis was performed using a Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Any abnormal appendix was not visualized, even retrospectively, in 27 (73%) of the 37 patients from the misdiagnosed group, whereas it was not visualized in 13 (23%) of the 57 patients in the control group (ρ = 0.001). Of the patients who had been misdiagnosed, inflammation of the pericecal fat was observed in 21 patients (57%) as compared to 50 (88%) patients in the control group (ρ =0.001). Pericecal fluid and air were noted in 15 (41%) and 9 (24%) patients, respectively, in the misdiagnosed group and in 19 (33%) and 14 (25%) patients, respectively, in the control group, (ρ = 0.477 and ρ =0.901, respectively). Appendicolith was found in 3 (8%) misdiagnosed subjects and in 10 (18%) of the controls (ρ = 0.001). Focal cecal wall thickening was noted in 14 (38%) misdiagnosed patients and in 28 (49%) control patients (

  12. Nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion for improving cone-beam-CT-based breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Willison, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cone-beam breast computed tomography (CB Breast CT) can easily detect micro-calcifications and distinguish fat and glandular tissues from normal breast tissue. However, it may be a challenging task for CB Breast CT to distinguish benign from malignant tumors because of the subtle difference in x-ray attenuation. Due to the use of polyenergetic x-ray source, the x-ray and tissue interaction exhibits energy-dependent attenuation behavior, a phenomenon that, to date, has not been used for breast tissue characterization. We will exploit this spectral nature by equipping our CB Breast CT with dual-spectral imaging. The dual-spectral cone-beam scanning produces two spectral image datasets, from which we propose a nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion scheme to combine them into a single dataset, thereby incorporating the spectral information. In implementation, we will perform dual-spectral image fusion through a bi-variable polynomial that can be established by applying dual-spectral imaging to a reference material (with eight different thicknesses). From the fused dataset, we can reconstruct a volume, called a reference-equivalent volume or a fusion volume. By selecting the benign tissue as a reference material, we obtain a benign-equivalent volume. Likewise, we obtain a malignant-equivalent volume as well. In the pursuit of the discrimination of benign versus malignant tissues in a breast image, we perform intra-image as well as inter-image processing. The intra-image processing is an intensity transformation imposed only to a tomographic breast image itself, while the inter-image processing is exerted on two tomographic images extracted from two volumes. The nonlinear fusion scheme possesses these properties: 1) no noise magnification; 2) no feature dimensionality problem, and 3) drastic enhancement among specific features offered by nonlinear mapping. Its disadvantage lies in the possible misinterpretation resulting from nonlinear mapping.

  13. Reduction of Cone-Beam CT scan time without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Jonas; Jensen, Henrik R; Bertelsen, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy accelerators are equipped with 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) which is used to verify patient position before treatment. The verification is based on an image registration between the CBCT acquired just before treatment and the CT scan made for the treatment planning. The purpose of...... this study is to minimise the scan time of the CBCT without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT....

  14. Detection of experimental acute myocardial infarction in dogs with electron beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The value and limitation of discovering the site, shape, density and size of acute myocardial infarction with enhanced volume scans of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in experimental dogs were assessed. Methods: The anterior descending and circumflex branches of the left coronary artery were ligated and infarction in the wall of left ventricle was created in six dogs. Enhancement volume scan was made with a EBCT scanner at 1.5, 6, 12, and 20 hour after the ligation and CT sectional images of dog heart were obtained. After finishing the scanning, the dogs were then scarified, and the samples were sent for electron and optic microscopes for pathologic examination. The morphologic findings of myocardial ischemia and infarction in CT images were carefully analysed. The CT numbers and the ratios of left ventricular myocardial and luminal CT number (M/L) in the myocardial ischemic and infarcted areas and normal areas were calculated. Results: The typical myocardial infarction in areas ligated were confirmed by ECG and pathology 20 hours after ligation. The site and shape of acute myocardial infarction were clearly shown on the EBCT images. The density of the ischemia and infarction area was significantly lower than that of the normal myocardium (P < 0.001). M/Ls of the low density areas and normal areas were 13.2% and 32.9%, respectively. The difference was significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: With adequate scanning technique, the site shape, density and size of acute myocardial ischemia and infarction can be accurately assessed by EBCT

  15. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT...

  16. WE-G-18A-06: Sinogram Restoration in Helical Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, K; Riviere, P La [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend CT sinogram restoration, which has been shown in 2D to reduce noise and to correct for geometric effects and other degradations at a low computational cost, from 2D to a 3D helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: A method for calculating sinogram degradation coefficients for a helical cone-beam geometry was proposed. These values were used to perform penalized-likelihood sinogram restoration on simulated data that were generated from the FORBILD thorax phantom. Sinogram restorations were performed using both a quadratic penalty and the edge-preserving Huber penalty. After sinogram restoration, Fourier-based analytical methods were used to obtain reconstructions. Resolution-variance trade-offs were investigated for several locations within the reconstructions for the purpose of comparing sinogram restoration to no restoration. In order to compare potential differences, reconstructions were performed using different groups of neighbors in the penalty, two analytical reconstruction methods (Katsevich and single-slice rebinning), and differing helical pitches. Results: The resolution-variance properties of reconstructions restored using sinogram restoration with a Huber penalty outperformed those of reconstructions with no restoration. However, the use of a quadratic sinogram restoration penalty did not lead to an improvement over performing no restoration at the outer regions of the phantom. Application of the Huber penalty to neighbors both within a view and across views did not perform as well as only applying the penalty to neighbors within a view. General improvements in resolution-variance properties using sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty were not dependent on the reconstruction method used or the magnitude of the helical pitch. Conclusion: Sinogram restoration for noise and degradation effects for helical cone-beam CT is feasible and should be able to be applied to clinical data. When applied with the edge-preserving Huber penalty

  17. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  18. Evaluation of abdominal CT in the initial treatment of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last four years 102 patients with abdominal trauma were examined by CT for preoperative evaluation in our hospital. In 35 patients (34 %), the CT scans revealed no abnormal findings. They were all managed conservatively except for one case of perforated small bowel. In 67 patients (66 %) CT revealed evidences of substantial abdominal or retroperitoneal trauma. In 30 of them CT findings were confirmed by surgery. Hepatic injury is usually easily recognized by CT. CT is also useful for the detection of renal or splenic injuries. The majority of those parenchymatous organ injuries were successfully managed with conservative therapy, despite apparent traumatic lesions revealed by CT. Repeat CT scans is proved to be very useful to follow the changes of these traumatic lesions. In conclusion, application of abdominal CT is extremely useful for the initial decision making in treatment of patients with abdominal trauma and for the follow-up observation of injured lesions. (author)

  19. Clinical evaluation of multiplanar reformation CT images in disk hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive procedure as compared with myelography in the diagnosis of diseases of the spine and spinal cord. In recent years, the performance of the CT-scan equipment has been markedly improved, resulting in an advancement of its diagnostic value, and it is said that CT is now superior to myelography in diagnosing some types of diseases of spine and spinal cord. We performed a multiplanar reformation in patients with disk hernia for the purpose of evaluating the method's clinical diagnostic value, and the reformatted images were compared with the axial images in the same patient. We used four types of reformation: coronal, sagittal, para-axial, and oblique reformations. The reformatted images were obtained from multiple continuous images with a slice thickness of 3 mm and with no declination of the gantry of the scanner. The axial images were obtained by making the gantry parallel to the disk and perpendicular to the vertebral body. The thickness of the axial images is 3 mm at the disk and 5 mm at the vertebral body level. We compared these reformatted and axial images with the extension of the disk hernia in the spinal canal and neural foramen and the degree of visualization of nerve roots. The sagittal reformatted images were useful in evaluating the extension of the disk hernia in the spinal canal and neural foramen. The coronal and oblique reformatted images were useful in visualizing the nerve roots. The axial images were excellent in ability to diagnose the disk hernia, while the reformatted images were significant in understanding the anatomical relation of the disease preoperatively. (author)

  20. Dose and scatter characteristics of a novel cone beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Muhit, A.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A novel cone-beam CT (CBCT) system has been developed with promising capabilities for musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., weight-bearing extremities and combined radiographic / volumetric imaging). The prototype system demonstrates diagnostic-quality imaging performance, while the compact geometry and short scan orbit raise new considerations for scatter management and dose characterization that challenge conventional methods. The compact geometry leads to elevated, heterogeneous x-ray scatter distributions - even for small anatomical sites (e.g., knee or wrist), and the short scan orbit results in a non-uniform dose distribution. These complex dose and scatter distributions were investigated via experimental measurements and GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The combination provided a powerful basis for characterizing dose distributions in patient-specific anatomy, investigating the benefits of an antiscatter grid, and examining distinct contributions of coherent and incoherent scatter in artifact correction. Measurements with a 16 cm CTDI phantom show that the dose from the short-scan orbit (0.09 mGy/mAs at isocenter) varies from 0.16 to 0.05 mGy/mAs at various locations on the periphery (all obtained at 80 kVp). MC estimation agreed with dose measurements within 10-15%. Dose distribution in patient-specific anatomy was computed with MC, confirming such heterogeneity and highlighting the elevated energy deposition in bone (factor of ~5-10) compared to soft-tissue. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) up to ~1.5-2 was evident in some regions of the knee. A 10:1 antiscatter grid was found earlier to result in significant improvement in soft-tissue imaging performance without increase in dose. The results of MC simulations elucidated the mechanism behind scatter reduction in the presence of a grid. A ~3-fold reduction in average SPR was found in the MC simulations; however, a linear grid was found to impart additional heterogeneity in the scatter distribution

  1. Delayed-Phase Cone-Beam CT Improves Detectability of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma During Conventional Transarterial Chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo evaluate the detectability of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) on dual-phase cone-beam CT (DPCBCT) during conventional transarterial chemoembolization (cTACE) compared to that of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with respect to pre-procedure contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) of the liver.MethodsThis retrospective study included 17 consecutive patients (10 male, mean age 64) with ICC who underwent pre-procedure CE-MRI of the liver, and DSA and DPCBCT (early-arterial phase (EAP) and delayed-arterial phase (DAP)) just before cTACE. The visibility of each ICC lesion was graded by two radiologists on a three-rank scale (complete, partial, and none) on DPCBCT and DSA images, and then compared to pre-procedure CE-MRI.ResultsOf 61 ICC lesions, only 45.9 % were depicted by DSA, whereas EAP- and DAP-CBCT yielded a significantly higher detectability rate of 73.8 % and 93.4 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Out of the 33 lesions missed on DSA, 18 (54.5 %) and 30 (90.9 %) were revealed on EAP- and DAP-CBCT images, respectively. DSA depicted only one lesion that was missed by DPCBCT due to streak artifacts caused by a prosthetic mitral valve. DAP-CBCT identified significantly more lesions than EAP-CBCT (p < 0.01). Conversely, EAP-CBCT did not detect lesions missed by DAP-CBCT. For complete lesion visibility, DAP-CBCT yielded significantly higher detectability (78.7 %) compared to EAP (31.1 %) and DSA (21.3 %) (p < 0.01).ConclusionDPCBCT, and especially the DAP-CBCT, significantly improved the detectability of ICC lesions during cTACE compared to DSA. We recommend the routine use of DAP-CBCT in patients with ICC for per-procedure detectability and treatment planning in the setting of TACE

  2. Delayed-Phase Cone-Beam CT Improves Detectability of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma During Conventional Transarterial Chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Lin, MingDe [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound and Interventions (United States); Duran, Rafael; Chapiro, Julius; Wang, Zhijun; Geschwind, Jean-François, E-mail: jfg@jhmi.edu [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the detectability of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) on dual-phase cone-beam CT (DPCBCT) during conventional transarterial chemoembolization (cTACE) compared to that of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with respect to pre-procedure contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) of the liver.MethodsThis retrospective study included 17 consecutive patients (10 male, mean age 64) with ICC who underwent pre-procedure CE-MRI of the liver, and DSA and DPCBCT (early-arterial phase (EAP) and delayed-arterial phase (DAP)) just before cTACE. The visibility of each ICC lesion was graded by two radiologists on a three-rank scale (complete, partial, and none) on DPCBCT and DSA images, and then compared to pre-procedure CE-MRI.ResultsOf 61 ICC lesions, only 45.9 % were depicted by DSA, whereas EAP- and DAP-CBCT yielded a significantly higher detectability rate of 73.8 % and 93.4 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Out of the 33 lesions missed on DSA, 18 (54.5 %) and 30 (90.9 %) were revealed on EAP- and DAP-CBCT images, respectively. DSA depicted only one lesion that was missed by DPCBCT due to streak artifacts caused by a prosthetic mitral valve. DAP-CBCT identified significantly more lesions than EAP-CBCT (p < 0.01). Conversely, EAP-CBCT did not detect lesions missed by DAP-CBCT. For complete lesion visibility, DAP-CBCT yielded significantly higher detectability (78.7 %) compared to EAP (31.1 %) and DSA (21.3 %) (p < 0.01).ConclusionDPCBCT, and especially the DAP-CBCT, significantly improved the detectability of ICC lesions during cTACE compared to DSA. We recommend the routine use of DAP-CBCT in patients with ICC for per-procedure detectability and treatment planning in the setting of TACE.

  3. Clinical evaluation of dynamic CT scan of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, Masamichi

    1984-09-01

    The clinical usefulness of dynamic CT scans (DCT) of the pancreas was evaluated in 62 normal cases, 9 cases of acute pancreatitis, 24 cases of chronic pancreatitis and 43 cases of carcinoma of the pancreas. The normal pancreas was intensely and homogeneously enhanced on DCT, and peripancreatic vessels were clearly demonstrated, especially the gastroduodenal artery (98.4%). DCT was useful to demonstrate vascular lesions, associated with pancreatitis such as pseudoaneurysm. Although the carcinoma of the pancreas showed poor contrast enhancement on conventional enhanced CT (CCT), 37.2% showed intense contrast enhancement on DCT. Visualization of the gastroduodenal artery by DCT is helpful to decide the extent of tumor. DCT is superior to CCT in demonstrating collateral veins caused by tumor invasion to the portal system in carcinoma. DCT was approximately as accurate as angiography (92.6%) in evaluating tumor invasion to the portal system. DCT is a useful and minimally invasive modality in assessing the resectability of pancreatic carcinoma. DCT may eliminate angiography and surgery in unresectable cases. (author).

  4. Assessment of Left Ventricular Volumes and Function: Intra individual Comparison of Multi-slice Spiral CT and Electron Beam CT in an Animal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) for measurements of left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction (EF), and myocardial mass in comparison with electron beam CT (EBCT) as a reference method. Material and Methods: Six minipigs underwent both standardized contrast-enhanced MSCT (effective acquisition time per cardiac cycle 125.7±30.1 ms, reconstructed slice thickness 8 mm) and EBCT (acquisition time 50 ms, collimated slice thickness 8 mm). The contrast-to-noise ratio of the left ventricle was measured in each animal, and the contour sharpness of the myocardium was analyzed. Volumes (EDV, ESV, SV) ejection fraction (EF), and muscle mass were calculated by MSCT and by EBCT using the slice summation method. Results: MSCT had a higher contrast-to-noise ratio and delineated the myocardial contours more sharply than EBCT. There was a close linear correlation between both modalities for all parameters (EDV: r P =0.88, ESV: r P =0.91, SV: r P =0.85, EF: r P =0.93; mass: r P =0.90; P <0.05 each). MSCT slightly overestimated ESV and slightly underestimated SV and EF compared with EBCT ( P <0.05 each). Conclusions: Image quality in MSCT is superior to that of EBCT. Functional parameters correlate well between both modalities, but the accuracy of MSCT is limited by its lower temporal resolution

  5. Development and validation of a measurement-based source model for kilovoltage cone-beam CT Monte Carlo dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to adapt an equivalent source model originally developed for conventional CT Monte Carlo dose quantification to the radiation oncology context and validate its application for evaluating concomitant dose incurred by a kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) system integrated into a linear accelerator.Methods: In order to properly characterize beams from the integrated kV CBCT system, the authors have adapted a previously developed equivalent source model consisting of an equivalent spectrum module that takes into account intrinsic filtration and an equivalent filter module characterizing the added bowtie filtration. An equivalent spectrum was generated for an 80, 100, and 125 kVp beam with beam energy characterized by half-value layer measurements. An equivalent filter description was generated from bowtie profile measurements for both the full- and half-bowtie. Equivalent source models for each combination of equivalent spectrum and filter were incorporated into the Monte Carlo software package MCNPX. Monte Carlo simulations were then validated against in-phantom measurements for both the radiographic and CBCT mode of operation of the kV CBCT system. Radiographic and CBCT imaging dose was measured for a variety of protocols at various locations within a body (32 cm in diameter) and head (16 cm in diameter) CTDI phantom. The in-phantom radiographic and CBCT dose was simulated at all measurement locations and converted to absolute dose using normalization factors calculated from air scan measurements and corresponding simulations. The simulated results were compared with the physical measurements and their discrepancies were assessed quantitatively.Results: Strong agreement was observed between in-phantom simulations and measurements. For the radiographic protocols, simulations uniformly underestimated measurements by 0.54%–5.14% (mean difference =−3.07%, SD = 1.60%). For the CBCT protocols, simulations uniformly underestimated

  6. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Radiation Oncology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali [Computed Tomography and Radiation Oncology Department, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, 757A Arnold Drive, Martinez, California 94553 (United States); Zeng, Chuan [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Krauss, Andreas [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, Forcheim 91301 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  7. Congenital cystic masses of the face and neck: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognition of the congenital cystic masses of the face and neck is important because they are usually benign, and can be completely cured by surgical excision. We retrospective analyzed CT scan of 18 surgically proven congenital cystic masses of the face and neck. The cases included 5 thyroglossal duct cysts, 4 cystic hygromas, 5 dermoid cysts, 1 branchial cleft cyst, and 3 fissural cysts of the face. Of five cases of thyroglossal duct cysts, CT showed either a well-marginated, rim enhancing unilocular cystic mass (n=3), or a diffuse but heterogeneous highly enhancing soft tissue mass (n=2). The latter two cases were confirmed later as infected thyroglossal duct cysts. Four cases of cystic hygromas were seen as either an irregularly-marginated (n=3) or a well-marginated (n=1) rim enhancing multiseptated cystic mass with a fluid-fluid level. Five cases of dermoid cysts appeared as well-marginated rim enhancing unilocular ovoid masses. The content of each mass was predominantly fluid in four cases, of which additional solid components were found in two, and interspersed fat globules in one. One case was composed of a homogeneous fatty density. One case of branchial cleft cyst was in the anterior triangle near the left mandibular angle, and appeared as a well-marginated enhancing cystic mass with a thick rim. In this case displacement of the adjacent structures was noted also. All three cases of fissural cysts of the face were seen as a well-marginated, rim enhancing cystic mass, causing a smooth pressure erosion of the adjacent bones. We conclude that CT is useful for the evaluation of the congenital cystic masses of the face and neck, because it can differentiate various forms of the congenital lesions and is able to clearly reveal the relation of the mass to the adjacent structures

  8. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  9. What is the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwanseop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kwanseop@hallym.or.kr; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kwangseon [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The objective of our study was to estimate the complementary role of ultrasound evaluation in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis after abdominoplevic CT. A total of 104 patients initially underwent abdominopelvic CT before appendix US due to acute abdominal pain. All CT examinations were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of acute appendicitis. The findings of appendix on CT were classified into five categories (definite appendicitis, probably appendicitis, equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, probably not appendicitis, and normal looking appendix). Appendix US images and their radiologic reports were also evaluated retrospectively. Then, CT and US findings were correlated with clinical or pathologic diagnosis. Three all patients with definite appendicitis initially on CT again showed US findings of appendicitis. In the 32 patients of probably appendicitis on CT, US showed normal looking appendix in seven patients (21.8%, 7 of 32) who improved with medical treatment and discharged. In the 16 patients of equivocal CT findings for diagnosis of appendicitis, US showed appendicitis in seven patients (43.8%, 7 of 16) and normal looking appendix in nine patients. In the 12 patients of probably not appendicitis on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in two patients (16.7%, 2 of 12). In the 41 patients of normal looking appendix on CT, US showed acute appendicitis in five patients (12.2%, 5 of 41). US reevaluation enables us to avoid misdiagnosis of appendicitis on CT and improve diagnostic accuracy of acute appendicitis.

  10. Simulation-aided investigation of beam hardening induced errors in CT dimensional metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems are being increasingly used as dimensional measuring machines. However, micron level accuracy is not always achievable, as of yet. The measurement accuracy is influenced by many factors, such as the workpiece properties, x-ray voltage, filter, beam hardening, scattering and calibration methods (Kruth et al 2011 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 60 821–42, Bartscher et al 2007 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 56 495–8, De Chiffre et al 2005 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 54 479–82, Schmitt and Niggemann 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 054008). Since most of these factors are mutually correlated, it remains challenging to interpret measurement results and to identify the distinct error sources. Since simulations allow isolating the different affecting factors, they form a useful complement to experimental investigations. Dewulf et al (2012 CIRP Ann. Manuf. Technol. 61 495–8) investigated the influence of beam hardening correction parameters on the diameter of a calibrated steel pin in different experimental set-ups. It was clearly shown that an inappropriate beam hardening correction can result in significant dimensional errors. This paper confirms these results using simulations of a pin surrounded by a stepped cylinder: a clear discontinuity in the measured diameter of the inner pin is observed where it enters the surrounding material. The results are expanded with an investigation of the beam hardening effect on the measurement results for both inner and outer diameters of the surrounding stepped cylinder. Accuracy as well as the effect on the uncertainty determination is discussed. The results are compared with simulations using monochromatic beams in order to have a benchmark which excludes beam hardening effects and x-ray scattering. Furthermore, based on the above results, the authors propose a case-dependent calibration artefact for beam hardening correction and edge offset determination. In the final part of the paper

  11. Cone-beam CT using a mobile C-arm: a registration solution for IGRT with an optical tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for registering images acquired from a prototype flat panel mobile C-arm, capable of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CT), to a linear accelerator (LINAC) isocenter is presented. A calibration procedure is performed which involves locating reflective markers placed on the C-arm and a phantom in two coordinate systems. A commercial optical tracking system locates the markers relative to the LINAC isocenter (room coordinates). The cone-beam imaging capabilities of the C-arm provide the location of the markers on the calibration phantom in image coordinates. A singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm is used to determine the relationship between the C-arm, image coordinates and room coordinates. Once the calibration is completed, the position of the C-arm at any arbitrary location is accurately determined from the tracking system. A final transformation is calculated capable of mapping voxels in the reconstructed image set to their corresponding position in room coordinates. An evaluation to determine the accuracy of this method was performed by locating markers on a phantom. The position of the phantom markers in room coordinates was obtained directly using the optical tracking system and compared with that using the described method above. A mean absolute distance of 1.4 ± 0.5 was observed for a completely transformed image set. This is comparable to that of systems routinely used for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

  12. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard L; Miften, Moyed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. We developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. Resu...

  13. Scattering correction based on regularization de-convolution for Cone-Beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Shi-peng

    2016-01-01

    In Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) imaging systems, the scattering phenomenon has a significant impact on the reconstructed image and is a long-lasting research topic on CBCT. In this paper, we propose a simple, novel and fast approach for mitigating scatter artifacts and increasing the image contrast in CBCT, belonging to the category of convolution-based method in which the projected data is de-convolved with a convolution kernel. A key step in this method is how to determine the convolution kernel. Compared with existing methods, the estimation of convolution kernel is based on bi-l1-l2-norm regularization imposed on both the intermediate the known scatter contaminated projection images and the convolution kernel. Our approach can reduce the scatter artifacts from 12.930 to 2.133.

  14. Radiochromic film thickness correction with convergent cone- beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cone-beam optical computed tomography (CT) scanner was modified by replacing the diffuse planar yellow light emitting diode (LED) source with violet and red LEDs and a large Fresnel lens. The narrow band sources provided transmission images of radiochromic EBT2 film at 420 and 633 nm, with air as a reference. The dose image was not detectable with the violet source. This demonstrated spectral independence of the two images. Assuming attenuation at 420 nm was dominated by absorption from yellow dye in the active film layer allowed a relative thickness image to be calculated. By scaling the 633 nm optical density image for relative thickness, non-uniformities in the recorded dose distribution due to film thickness variations, were removed

  15. An optimization-based method for geometrical calibration in cone-beam CT without dedicated phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D.; Belcari, N.; DelGuerra, A.; Moehrs, S.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present a new method for the determination of geometrical misalignments in cone-beam CT scanners, from the analysis of the projection data of a generic object. No a priori knowledge of the object shape and positioning is required. We show that a cost function, which depends on the misalignment parameters, can be defined using the projection data and that such a cost function has a local minimum in correspondence to the actual parameters of the system. Hence, the calibration of the scanner can be carried out by minimizing the cost function using standard optimization techniques. The method is developed for a particular class of 3D object functions, for which the redundancy of the fan beam sinogram in the transaxial midplane can be extended to cone-beam projection data, even at wide cone angles. The method has an approximated validity for objects which do not belong to that class; in that case, a suitable subset of the projection data can be selected in order to compute the cost function. We show by numerical simulations that our method is capable to determine with high accuracy the most critical misalignment parameters of the scanner, i.e., the transversal shift and the skew of the detector. Additionally, the detector slant can be determined. Other parameters such as the detector tilt, the longitudinal shift and the error in the source-detector distance cannot be determined with our method, as the proposed cost function has a very weak dependence on them. However, due to the negligible influence of these latter parameters in the reconstructed image quality, they can be kept fixed at estimated values in both calibration and reconstruction processes without compromising the final result. A trade-off between computational cost and calibration accuracy must be considered when choosing the data subset used for the computation of the cost function. Results on real data of a mouse femur as obtained with a small animal micro-CT are shown as well, proving

  16. Beam hardening and smoothing correction effects on performance of micro-ct SkyScan 1173 for imaging low contrast density materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed and fabricated phantom mimicking breast cancer composition known as a region that has low contrast density. The used compositions are a microcalcifications, fatty tissues and tumor mass by using Al2O3, C27H46O, and hard nylon materials. Besides, phantom also has a part to calculate low cost criteria /CNR (Contrast to Noise Ratio). Uniformity will be measured at water distillation medium located in a part of phantom scale contrast. Phantom will be imaged by using micro ct-sky scan 1173 high energy type, and then also can be quantified CT number to examine SkyScan 1173 performance in imaging low contrast density materials. Evaluation of CT number is done at technique configuration parameter using voltage of 30 kV, exposure 0.160 mAs, and camera resolution 560x560 pixel, the effect of image quality to reconstruction process is evaluated by varying image processing parameters in the form of beam hardening corrections with amount of 25%, 66% and100% with each smoothing level S10,S2 and S7. To obtain the better high quality image, the adjustment of beam hardening correction should be 66% and smoothing level reach maximal value at level 10

  17. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  18. Dose and image quality for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assess dose and image quality of a state-of-the-art angiographic C-arm system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) for three-dimensional neuro-imaging at various dose levels and tube voltages and an associated measurement method. Unlike conventional CT, the beam length covers the entire phantom, hence, the concept of computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is not the metric of choice, and one can revert to conventional dosimetry methods by directly measuring the dose at various points using a small ion chamber. This method allows us to define and compute a new dose metric that is appropriate for a direct comparison with the familiar CTDIW of conventional CT. A perception study involving the CATPHAN 600 indicates that one can expect to see at least the 9 mm inset with 0.5% nominal contrast at the recommended head-scan dose (60 mGy) when using tube voltages ranging from 70 kVp to 125 kVp. When analyzing the impact of tube voltage on image quality at a fixed dose, we found that lower tube voltages gave improved low contrast detectability for small-diameter objects. The relationships between kVp, image noise, dose, and contrast perception are discussed

  19. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Russo, Paolo, E-mail: russo@na.infn.i [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Cesarelli, Mario; Ospizio, Roberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Biomedica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Universita di Napoli Federico II, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Passeggio, Giuseppe; Roscilli, Lorenzo; Pontoriere, Giuseppe; Rocco, Raffaele [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-02-11

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 {mu}m focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 {mu}m pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 {mu}m pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm{sup -1} at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses ({sup 99m}Tc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  20. Intracranial aneurysms: evaluation in 200 patients with spiral CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of spiral CT angiography (CTA) with three- dimensional reconstructions in defining intracranial aneurysms, particularly around the Circle of Willis. Two hundred consecutive patients with angiographic and/or surgical correlation were studied between 1993 and 1998, with CTA performed on a GE HiSpeed unit and Windows workstation. The following clinical situations were evaluated: conventional CT suspicion of an aneurysm; follow-up of treated aneurysm remnants or of untreated aneurysms; subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and negative angiography; family or past aneurysm history; and for improved definition of aneurysm anatomy. Spiral CTA detected 140 of 144 aneurysms, and an overall sensitivity of 97%, including 30 of 32 aneurysms 3 mm or less in size. In 38 patients with SAH and negative angiography, CTA found six of the seven aneurysms finally diagnosed. There was no significant artefact in 17 of 23 patients (74%) with clips. The specificity of CTA was 86% with 8 false-positive cases. Spiral CTA is very useful in demonstrating intracranial aneurysms. (orig.)

  1. CT evaluation of sigmoid plate dehiscence causing pulsatile tinnitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Zhenchang [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Niu, Yantao; Xian, Junfang [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the characteristics of sigmoid plate dehiscence (SPD) causing pulsatile tinnitus (PT) on CT arteriography and venography (CTA + V). Thirty PT patients treated successfully with SPD reconstruction were enrolled. Sixty asymptomatic patients were matched. The location, extent, number of SPD cases and concomitant signs, including venous outflow dominance, transverse sinus stenosis, high jugular bulb, temporal bone pneumatization, height of pituitary gland and pituitary fossa, abnormal mastoid emissary vein, were detected and compared using CTA + V. More than one SPD was found on the symptomatic side in 13/30 PT patients (43.3 %). The upper segment of the sigmoid plate was involved in 29/44 SPDs in the vertical direction (65.9 %); the lateral wall was involved in 38/44 SPDs in the horizontal direction (86.4 %). Singular SPD was detected in 3/60 asymptomatic patients (1.67 ± 0.35 mm{sup 2}), less so in PT patients (7.97 ± 5.17 mm{sup 2}). Compared with the control group, ipsilateral venous outflow dominance, high jugular bulb and bilateral transverse sinus stenosis were more common in the PT group, together with deeper pituitary fossa and flatter pituitary glands. SPD causing PT has characteristic CT findings. It may be generated by vascular or intracranial pressure abnormalities and act as a common key to triggering PT's perception. (orig.)

  2. MicroCT Bone Densitometry: Context Sensitivity, Beam Hardening Correction and the Effect of Surrounding Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L. Salmon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The context-sensitivity of microCT bone densitometry due to beam hardening artefacts was assessed. Bones and teeth are scanned with varying thickness of surrounding media (water, alcohol, biological tissue and it is important to understand how this affects reconstructed attenuation (“density” of the mineralized tissue. Aluminium tubes and rods with thickness 0.127mm–5mm were scanned both in air or surrounded by up to 2cm of water. Scans were performed with different energy filters and degrees of software beam hardening correction (BHC. Also tested were the effects of signal-to-noise ratio, magnification and truncation. The thickness of an aluminium tube significantly affected its mean reconstructed attenuation. This effect of thickness could be reduced substantially by BHC for scans in air, but not for scans in water. Varying thickness of surrounding water also changed the mean attenuation of an aluminium tube. This artefact could be almost eliminated by an optimal BHC value. The “cupping” artefact of heterogeneous attenuation (elevated at outer surfaces could be corrected if aluminium was scanned in air, but in water BHC was much less effective. Scan truncation, changes to magnification and signal-to-noise ratio also caused artificial changes to measured attenuation. Measurement of bone mineral density by microCT is highly context sensitive. A surrounding layer of liquid or biological tissue reduces the ability of software BHC to remove bone density artefacts. Sample thickness, truncation, magnification and signal to noise ratio also affect reconstructed attenuation. Thus it is important for densitometry that sample and calibration phantom dimensions and mounting materials are standardised.

  3. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y. T.; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  4. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  5. Helical CT in the primary trauma evaluation of the cervical spine: an evidence-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review provides a summary of the cost-effectiveness, clinical utility, performance, and interpretation of screening helical cervical spine CT for trauma patients. Recent evidence supports the use of helical CT as a cost-effective method for screening the cervical spine in high-risk trauma patients. Screening cervical spine CT can be performed at the time of head CT to lower the cost of the evaluation, and when all short- and long-term costs are considered, CT may actually save money when compared with traditional radiographic screening. In addition to having higher sensitivity and specificity for cervical spine injury, CT screening also allows more rapid radiological clearance of the cervical spine than radiography. Patients who are involved in high-energy trauma, who sustain head injury, or who have neurological deficits are candidates for CT screening. Screening with CT may enhance detection of other potentially important injuries of the cervical region. (orig.)

  6. Image and surgery-related costs comparing cone beam CT and panoramic imaging before removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Bo; Olsen, Kim Rose; Christensen, Jennifer Heather; Wenzel, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to derive the absolute and relative costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) and panoramic imaging before removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Furthermore, the study aimed to analyse the influence of different cost-setting scenarios on the ...

  7. Influence of object location in different FOVs on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of human mandible: a cone beam CT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ibrahim; A. Parsa; B. Hassan; P. van der Stelt; I.H.A. Aartman; P. Nambiar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different object locations in different fields of view (FOVs) of two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of a human mandible. A block of dry human mandible was scanned at five different locations (centre, lef

  8. Study of different registration methods for on-line kilovoltage cone-beam CT guided lung cancer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To select the optimal registration method for on-line kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT) guided lung cancer radiation and evaluate the reproducibility of the selected method. Methods: Sixteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled into this study. A total of 96 pretreatment KVCBCT images from the 16 patients were available for the analysis. Image registration methods were bone-based automatic registration, gray-based automatic registration, manual registration and semi-automatic registration. All registrations were accomplished by one physician. Another physician blindly evaluated the results of each registration, then selected the optimal registration method and evaluated its reproducibility. Results: The average score of the bone-based automatic registration, gray-based automatic registration, manual registration and semi-automatic registration methods was 2.4, 2.7, 3.0 and 3.7, respectively. The score of the four different groups had statistics significant difference (F=42.20, P<0.001). Using the semi-automatic registration method, the probability of the difference between two registration results more than 3 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions was 0, 3% and 6% by the same physician, 0, 14% and 0 by different physicians, and 8%, 14% and 8% by physician and radiation therapist. Conclusions: Semi-automatic registration method, possessing the highest score and accepted reproducibility, is appropriate for KVCBCT guided lung cancer radiation. (authors)

  9. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Allison; Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixte...

  10. Using corrected Cone-Beam CT image for accelerated partial breast irradiation treatment dose verification: the preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate target localization is mandatory in the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) delivery. Dosimetric verification for positional error will further guarantee the accuracy of treatment delivery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a cone beam computer tomographic (CBCT) image correction method in APBI. A CBCT image correction method was developed. First, rigid image registration was proceeded for CTs and CBCTs; second, these images were separated into four parts; then, ratio images for each of the four parts of planning CTs/CBCTs were calculated and filtered to reduce the high spatial frequency; finally, the enhanced CBCT images were generated combing the four parts. An anthropomorphic thorax rando phantom was used to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of the CBCT correction method. The CBCT images of consecutive 10 patients receiving APBI were corrected using the above method and dosimetric variations were evaluated. Each set of CBCT is composed of three images: one acquired after skin-marker setup, one after online setup correction and one after treatment delivery. The phantom study showed the improved accuracy of dose calculation with corrected CBCT. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) difference between the planning CT and corrected CBCT is less than the difference between the planning CT and original CBCT. The maximum dose difference between the corrected CBCT and planning CT is 0.8% in PTV-EVAL V100, which is 3.8% between original CBCT and planning. In the patient study, 67.4% of fractions benefit from CBCT setup corrections in PTV-EVAL D95, while in 47.4% of the fractions, reduced dose coverage was found on the post-treatment CBCT. Overall, the CBCT based initial setup correction guaranteed target dose coverage in 9 patients. A generic CBCT image correction algorithm was created and proved to be easily implemented in clinic. Compared to the original CBCT, the corrected CBCT has more accuracy in dose calculation

  11. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235-8808 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4D-CBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).Methods: The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: (1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and (2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and backprojection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The quality of reconstructed 4D images and the accuracy of tumor motion trajectory are assessed by comparing with those resulting from conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstructions (FDK and total variation minimization) and motion estimation (demons algorithm). The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is further evaluated by reconstructing a lung cancer patient 4D-CBCT.Results: Image quality of 4D-CBCT is greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm in both phantom and patient studies. When all projections are used to reconstruct a 3D-CBCT by FDK, motion

  12. Evaluation of regional pulmonary compliance and air trapping with ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper establishes a method of evaluating regional pulmonary compliance and air trapping using ultrafast CT. One normal volunteer and 10 patients with various pulmonary diseases were studied. With an ultrafast CT scanner (Imatron C-100), multiple continuous CT images of the lung were obtained at inspiration and subsequently at expiration. Intrathoracic pressure change was measured with a balloon catheter inserted into the esophagus. On the corresponding CT images of both inspiration and expiration, regional changes in CT attenuation number were evaluated. In a normal volunteer, the CT attenuation number of the lung increased from 815 HU ± 23 to 582 HU ± 30 during expiration, and the change was even throughout the lung. In a patient with pulmonary emphysema, the expiration CT image revealed regional low-attenuation areas that were not clear on the inspiration image

  13. MR and CT cholangiography in evaluation of the biliary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Ichijo, K.; Imaoka, I.; Naito, M. [Seirei Mikatabara General Hospital, Hamamatsu (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takehara, Y.; Kaneko, M. [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Yamamoto, H.; Watahiki, H. [Seirei Mikatabara General Hospital, Hamamatsu (Japan). Dept. of Gastroenterology

    1998-09-01

    Objective: To compare MR and CT cholangiography (MRC and CTC) in evaluating the anatomy of the extrahepatic biliary tract and the pathology related to the gallbladder. Material and Methods: Twenty-three patients underwent MRC and CTC with a biliary contrast medium for investigation of biliary disease. 3D displays of both were also obtained. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was performed in 17 patients, and the pathology of all 23 was evaluated. Results: Overall, the image quality was higher with CTC than with MRC (4.7 vs 3.9, p<0.05). The cystic duct was demonstrated better by CTC than MRC (p<0.05). Multiplanar reformation (MPR) and source images provided additional information to that obtained from 3D MRC and CTC images. Gallstones were revealed in 6 patients by CTC and in 5 of these 6 by MRC. In 2 patients with cholecystitis, CTC demonstrated gallbladder wall thickening but MRC did not. In 3 patients with adenomyomatosis, MRC demonstrated Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses (RAS) while CTC demonstrated focal gallbladder wall thickening in all 3 and RAS in 1 of them. Conclusion: Both MRC and CTC provided anatomical and pathological information about the biliary system. With both techniques, however, either MPR or source images proved necessary in addition for evaluating the biliary system anatomy and pathology. The gallbladder wall was depicted clearly in source CTC, but MRC is recommended for the evaluation of adenomyomatosis because its depicts RAS clearly. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of superior vena cava syndrome by axial CT and CT phlebography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transverse axial computed tomography (CT) has been combined with CT digital phlebography to study nine patients with superior vena cava syndrome. Six were due to malignancy, two were secondary to benign disease, and one was a paraneoplastic manifestation. This combined CT approach successfully identified the abnormal morphology of the superior vena cava, demonstrating external compression, encasement, or intraluminal thrombus in all patients and the collateral venous channels in eight. This technique is a rapid, informative, and cost-effective method for the workup of superior vena cava syndrome. The CT digital phlebogram, however, is not successful in regularly and optimally opacifying the normal superior vena cava because of the limited amount of contrast material, dilution effect of the nonopacified incoming flow from the jugular and azygos veins, and the lack of image enhancement from the CT digital scanograms

  15. Evaluation of superior vena cava syndrome by axial CT and CT phlebography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncada, R.; Cardella, R.; Demos, T.C.; Churchill, R.J.; Cardoso, M.; Love, L.; Reynes, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    Transverse axial computed tomography (CT) has been combined with CT digital phlebography to study nine patients with superior vena cava syndrome. Six were due to malignancy, two were secondary to benign disease, and one was a paraneoplastic manifestation. This combined CT approach successfully identified the abnormal morphology of the superior vena cava, demonstrating external compression, encasement, or intraluminal thrombus in all patients and the collateral venous channels in eight. This technique is a rapid, informative, and cost-effective method for the workup of superior vena cava syndrome. The CT digital phlebogram, however, is not successful in regularly and optimally opacifying the normal superior vena cava because of the limited amount of contrast material, dilution effect of the nonopacified incoming flow from the jugular and azygos veins, and the lack of image enhancement from the CT digital scanograms.

  16. Soft tissue visualization using a highly efficient megavoltage cone beam CT imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelmansarai, Farhad A.; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Pouliot, Jean; Calderon, Ed; Hernandez, Paco; Mitschke, Matthias; Aubin, Michelle; Bucci, Kara

    2005-04-01

    Recent developments in two-dimensional x-ray detector technology have made volumetric Cone Beam CT (CBCT) a feasible approach for integration with conventional medical linear accelerators. The requirements of a robust image guidance system for radiation therapy include the challenging combination of soft tissue sensitivity with clinically reasonable doses. The low contrast objects may not be perceptible with MV energies due to the relatively poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) performance. We have developed an imaging system that is optimized for MV and can acquire Megavoltage CBCT images containing soft tissue contrast using a 6MV x-ray beam. This system is capable of resolving relative electron density as low as 1% with clinically acceptable radiation doses. There are many factors such as image noise, x-ray scatter, improper calibration and acquisitions that have a profound effect on the imaging performance of CBCT and in this study attempts were made to optimize these factors in order to maximize the SNR. A QC-3V phantom was used to determine the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and f50 of a single 2-D projection. The computed f50 was 0.43 lp/mm and the CNR for a radiation dose of 0.02cGy was 43. Clinical Megavoltage CBCT images acquired with this system demonstrate that anatomical structures such as the prostate in a relatively large size patient are visible using radiation doses in range of 6 to 8cGy.

  17. Cone beam CT based image guided radiotherapy: Implementation and clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kV cone beam CT (C.B.C.T.) consists of an X-ray tube and a flat panel detector placed perpendicularly to the treatment beam, allowing the acquisition of hundreds of projections in one rotation of the gantry about the patient. Available in all new linear accelerators, the C.B.C.T. provides volumetric imaging in treatment position proving the realization of image- and dose-guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T. and D.G.R.T.). The clinical indications correspond to mobile tumours irradiating with high precision required techniques, such as stereotactic, hypo fractionated or high dose radiotherapy. The clinical experience is still very limited and concerns mainly prostate, head and neck and lung tumours. The registration and treatment protocols are briefly described. Quality control and training are major issues. C.B.C.T. based I.G.R.T. is a new technique which needs to be optimized. However, it should provide significant clinical benefit in combination with intensity modulated radiotherapy and new imaging modalities for target delineation. (authors)

  18. Performance Evaluation of a Small-Animal PET/CT System

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Tordis Johnsen

    2014-01-01

    This master project is the first vendor-independent performance evaluation of the new nanoScan PET/CT system at the University of Bergen. A comprehensive performance evaluation of a novel scanner is very important, particularly when quantitative assessments of images are required. The nanoScan PET/CT system is a fully integrated small-animal PET/CT system. An abbreviated performance evaluation of the CT subsystem was done, which included a Hounsfield quality check, a comparison of reconstr...

  19. Accuracy study of different registration methods for cone beam CT and planning CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of image registration based on bony structure (RBS) and grey-scale (RGS) in positioning correction of radiation treatment, and their reliability in clinical application. Methods: Setup errors of anthropomorphic phantom (chest and abdomen, head and neck) were simulated with x-, y-, z-directions.CBCT images were acquired for each simulation and registered with planning CT. using bony structure and grey-scale registration separately. Geometry accuracy of all registration were then obtained and analyzed. Results: The errors of RBS and RGS in x-, y-, z-directions were (-0.65 ±0.22) mm and (-0.70±0.17) mm (P=0.00), (1.02 ±0.27) mm and (0.90±0.20) mm (P=0.00), (1.46 ± 0.53) mm and (1.47 ± 0.47) mm (P=0.54) for head and neck positioning; with (0.82±0.33) mm and (0.79±0.18) mm (P=0.03), (2.45±1.17) mm and (1.61 ±0.84) mm (P=0.00), (1.44 ± 3.25) mm and (0.19 ± 1.11) mm (P=0.00) for chest and abdomen positioning. Conclusions: RGS is more accurate and stable than RBS. The accuracy of image registration is a little better for head and neck than that for chest and abdomen. The algorithms of image registration used in clinical application needs to be tested independently and the systematic error needs to be corrected before applying in different treatment techniques according to their accuracy requirement. (authors)

  20. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Tianyu, E-mail: maty@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-21

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  1. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  2. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  3. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Park, Miran; Sung, Younghun; Lee, Jaehak; Choi, Jiyoung; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation.

  4. A megavoltage scatter correction technique for cone-beam CT images acquired during VMAT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV CBCT) can be acquired during the delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), in order to obtain an image of the patient during treatment. However, the quality of such CBCTs is degraded by megavoltage (MV) scatter from the treatment beam onto the imaging panel. The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel MV scatter correction method for simultaneous CBCT during VMAT, and to investigate its effectiveness when compared to other techniques. The correction requires the acquisition of a separate set of images taken during VMAT delivery, while the kV beam is off. These images—which contain only the MV scatter contribution on the imaging panel—are then used to correct the corresponding kV/MV projections. To test this method, CBCTs were taken of an image quality phantom during VMAT delivery and measurements of contrast to noise ratio were made. Additionally, the correction was applied to the datasets of three VMAT prostate patients, who also received simultaneous CBCTs. The clinical image quality was assessed using a validated scoring system, comparing standard CBCTs to the uncorrected simultaneous CBCTs and a variety of correction methods. Results show that the correction is able to recover some of the low and high-contrast signal to noise ratio lost due to MV scatter. From the patient study, the corrected CBCT scored significantly higher than the uncorrected images in terms of the ability to identify the boundary between the prostate and surrounding soft tissue. In summary, a simple MV scatter correction method has been developed and, using both phantom and patient data, is shown to improve the image quality of simultaneous CBCTs taken during VMAT delivery. (paper)

  5. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation. (paper)

  6. CT-Expo - a novel program for dose evaluation in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT-Expo is a novel MS Excel application for assessing the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing CT examinations, based on computational methods that were used to analyze the data collected in the German survey on CT practice in 1999. The program enables the calculation of all dose quantities of practical value, such as axial dose free-in-air, weighted CTDI, dose-length product, effective dose and uterine dose. In contrast to existing programs for CT dose assessment, CT-Expo offers a number of unique features, such as gender-specific dose calculation for all age groups (adults, children, newborns), applicability to all existing scanner models including correction of scanner-specific influences, and the possibility of comparison with the results from the German CT survey on CT practice. Three different application modules offer free and standardized dose calculations as well as a comprehensive benchmarking section including guidance on dose optimization. The program is available as shareware in both German and English version. Additional information and a demo version free of charge can be requested via e-mail from the author's address (stamm.georg rate at mh-hannover.de) or from the web page http://www.mh-hannover.de/klinken/radiologie/str04.html. (orig.)

  7. Multi-slice CT pulmonary function evaluation in emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of evaluating the lung function by MSCT in emphysema. Methods: The MSCT scan and pulmonary function tests (PFT) were respectively performed in 147 receptors within one week. They were randomly divided into 2 groups: group A (120 receptors), including normal, mild, moderate and severe abnormal pulmonary function based on the PFT, for comparing the correlation between pulmonary quantitative indexes of MSCT pulmonary function and PFT and settingup the primary, grade criteria of abnormal pulmonary, function in emphysema, group B (27 receptors) for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy in group A. The total lung was respectively scanned at the full inspiration and full expiration with MSCT. The pulmonary quantitative indexes of MSCT were measured with Siemens Pulmo pulmonary quantitative software. Results: There was correlation between pulmonary quantitative indexes of MSCT and PFT. The Piex/in-910 showed best correlation with FEV1% (r= -0. 905, P-910 (χ20.267, P=0.966, accuracy 81.5%), and the primary criteria for abnormal pulmonary, function of emphysema was normal (0-9.9), mild (10.0-34.9), moderate (35.0-74.9) and severe (≥75.0). Conclusion: It is feasible to evaluate the abnormal lung function of emphysema with pulmonary quantitative indexes of CT. The Piex/in910 was the most effective one in various indexes. (authors)

  8. SU-E-J-214: Comparative Assessment On IGRT On Partial Bladder Cancer Treatment Between CT-On-Rails (CTOR) and KV Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Image-Guided radiation therapy(IGRT) depends on reliable online patient-specific anatomy information to address random and progressive anatomy changes. Large margins have been suggested to bladder cancer treatment due to large daily bladder anatomy variation. KV Cone beam CT(CBCT) has been used in IGRT localization prevalently; however, its lack of soft tissue contrast makes clinicians hesitate to perform daily soft tissue alignment with CBCT for partial bladder cancer treatment. This study compares the localization uncertainties of bladder cancer IGRT using CTon- Rails(CTOR) and CBCT. Methods: Three T2N0M0 bladder cancer patients (total of 66 Gy to partial bladder alone) were localized daily with either CTOR or CBCT for their entire treatment course. A total of 71 sets of CTOR and 22 sets of CBCT images were acquired and registered with original planning CT scans by radiation therapists and approved by radiation oncologists for the daily treatment. CTOR scanning entailed 2mm slice thickness, 0.98mm axial voxel size, 120kVp and 240mAs. CBCT used a half fan pelvis protocol from Varian OBI system with 2mm slice thickness, 0.98axial voxel size, 125kVp, and 680mAs. Daily localization distribution was compared. Accuracy of CTOR and CBCT on partial bladder alignment was also evaluated by comparing bladder PTV coverage. Results: 1cm all around PTV margins were used in every patient except target superior limit margin to 0mm due to bowel constraint. Daily shifts on CTOR averaged to 0.48, 0.24, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions); CBCT averaged to 0.43, 0.09, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions). The CTOR daily localization showed superior results of V100% of PTV(102% CTOR vs. 89% CBCT) and bowel(Dmax 69.5Gy vs. 78Gy CBCT). CTOR images showed much higher contrast on bladder PTV alignment. Conclusion: CTOR daily localization for IGRT is more dosimetrically beneficial for partial bladder cancer treatment than kV CBCT localization and provided better soft tissue PTV

  9. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  11. Clinical usefulness of multidetector-row CT to evaluate coronary artery calcium score in type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent studies, multidetector-row CT (MDCT) with a retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gating reconstruction algorithm shows a high correlation with coronary artery calcium score determined using electron-beam CT. Diabetes leads to many macrovascular complications, including coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for cardiac macroangiopathy in type 2 diabetes using MDCT. An observational cross-sectional study was performed in 90 patients with diabetes mellitus. Coronary calcium data was acquired by MDCT (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Germany). Physical examinations, laboratory data, glycemic control, and control of other risk factors were analyzed. The coronary artery calcium score increased with age. Multivariant analysis revealed that the coronary calcium score was closely correlated with electrocardiogram evaluation and control of hypertension. Coronary artery calcium score as determined by MDCT can be used as a screening radiological examination for cardiac macroangiopathy in diabetes patients with electrocardiogram abnormality and hypertension. (author)

  12. Evaluation of brachial plexus injury by CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of CT myelography (CTM) in brachial plexus injury. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with brachial plexus injury were examined by using cervical CTM with spiral scan and bone reconstruction algorithm. CT images were reviewed by the senior radiologists, who determined if the nerve root avulsion was presented. The criteria of diagnosing nerve root avulsion were loss of normal nerve root appearance in the Isovist filled thecal sac in consecutive CTM slices plus companion signs. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CTM in diagnosing nerve root injuries were calculated with operation findings and follow-up results as gold standard. Results: Direct sign of nerve root avulsion was the loss of normal nerve root defect seen in the Isovist filled thecal sac in consecutive CTM slices. Indirect signs included: (1) Pseudomeningocele bulge: The leak of Isovist into nerve root sheath, and extended into foramina; (2) Arachnoid cyst: displacement of spinal cord; (3) Dissymmetry of subarachnoid cavity: deformity of thecal sac, partially lack of Isovist into arachnoid space; (4) Non-integrity of dural cap sule wall: one side of cap sule cavity was obstructed. Part of the surface of spinal cord was exposed. Brachial plexus injury could be diagnosed by direct sign with one of the indirect signs. Of the 27 patients (128 nerve roots), 91 nerve root avulsions were found on CTM, and 37 was found normal. Compared with operation findings, 84 were true positive, 7 false positive, 34 true negative, and 3 false negative. Based on these results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96.6%, 82.9%, and 92.2%, respectively. Conclusion: CTM is accurate in detecting nerve root avulsion of brachial plexus. (authors)

  13. 3D-CT imaging using characteristic X-rays and visible lights produced by ion micro-beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Yamazaki, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Momose, G.; Kikuchi, Y.; Terakawa, A.; Galster, W.

    2006-08-01

    We improved the spatial resolution of a 3D-CT imaging system consisting of a micro-beam and an X-ray CCD camera of 1 mega pixels (Hamamatsu photonics C8800X), whose element size is 8 μm × 8 μm providing an image size of 8 mm × 8 mm. A small ant of ∼6 mm body length was placed in a small tube, rotated by a stepping motor, and a spatial resolution of 4 μm for X-ray micron-CT using characteristic Ti-K-X-rays (4.558 keV) produced by 3 MeV proton micro-beams was obtained. We applied the X-ray micron-CT to a small ant's head and obtained the fine structures of the head's interior. Because the CCD is sensitive to visible light, we also examined the capability of light micron-CT using visible red light from an Al2O3(Cr) ruby scintillator and applied the micron-CT to a small red tick. Though the red tick is highly transparent to Ti-K-X-rays, visible red light does not penetrate through the red tick. The most serious problem was dispersion of lights due to Thomson scattering resulting in obscure projection images.

  14. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  15. CT evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodule : value of additional HRCT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution CT scans in addition to helical CT for characterizing a solitary pulmonary nodule. Our study included 49 patients with a solitary pulmonary nodule ; in each patient this was evaluated by both additional high-resolution CT and helical scanning. Images were evaluated by three independent observers, each of whom read them twice : initially with helical CT images only and then with helical images plus high-resolution CT images. After analysis, the observers recorded the following : histologic diagnosis, benignancy or malignancy of a nodule, and confidence in their diagnosis (three scales). In differentiating benign and malignant nodules, the accuracy of helical scans only was 75% (110/147 readings) whereas that of helical plus high-resolution CT scans was 82% (121/147 readings)(ρ=0.001). Correct histologic diagnosis was made in 47% of cases (69/147 readings) when helical scans only had been evaluated and in 48% of cases (71/147 readings) for which both helical and high-resolotion CT scans were available (ρ=0.815). Diagnosis was more often highly confident on the basis of additional high-resolution CT scans (25%) than helical scans only (5%) (ρ=0.001). By enhancing differential diagnostic accuracy between benign and malignant nodules and by increasing confidence in the histologic diagnosis of a pulmonary nodule, additional high-resolution CT scans are valuable for the evaluation of a solitary pulmonary nodule

  16. A breast-specific, negligible-dose scatter correction technique for dedicated cone-beam breast CT: a physics-based approach to improve Hounsfield Unit accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to correct the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and to achieve consistent Hounsfield Unit (HU) values of breast tissues for a dedicated breast CT (bCT) system. The use of a beam passing array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes has been previously proposed for scatter correction in various imaging applications. In this study, we first verified the efficacy and accuracy using BPA to measure the scatter signal on a cone-beam bCT system. A systematic scatter correction approach was then developed by modeling the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) in projection images acquired with and without BPA. To quantitatively evaluate the improved accuracy of HU values, different breast tissue-equivalent phantoms were scanned and radially averaged HU profiles through reconstructed planes were evaluated. The dependency of the correction method on object size and number of projections was studied. A simplified application of the proposed method on five clinical patient scans was performed to demonstrate efficacy. For the typical 10–18 cm breast diameters seen in the bCT application, the proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact and reduce the variation of HU values of breast equivalent material from 150 to 40 HU. The measured HU values of 100% glandular tissue, 50/50 glandular/adipose tissue, and 100% adipose tissue were approximately 46, −35, and −94, respectively. It was found that only six BPA projections were necessary to accurately implement this method, and the additional dose requirement is less than 1% of the exam dose. The proposed method can effectively correct for the cupping artifact caused from x-ray scattering and retain consistent HU values of breast tissues. (paper)

  17. Projection correlation based view interpolation for cone beam CT: primary fluence restoration in scatter measurement with a moving beam stop array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scatter correction is an open problem in x-ray cone beam (CB) CT. The measurement of scatter intensity with a moving beam stop array (BSA) is a promising technique that offers a low patient dose and accurate scatter measurement. However, when restoring the blocked primary fluence behind the BSA, spatial interpolation cannot well restore the high-frequency part, causing streaks in the reconstructed image. To address this problem, we deduce a projection correlation (PC) to utilize the redundancy (over-determined information) in neighbouring CB views. PC indicates that the main high-frequency information is contained in neighbouring angular projections, instead of the current projection itself, which provides a guiding principle that applies to high-frequency information restoration. On this basis, we present the projection correlation based view interpolation (PC-VI) algorithm; that it outperforms the use of only spatial interpolation is validated. The PC-VI based moving BSA method is developed. In this method, PC-VI is employed instead of spatial interpolation, and new moving modes are designed, which greatly improve the performance of the moving BSA method in terms of reliability and practicability. Evaluation is made on a high-resolution voxel-based human phantom realistically including the entire procedure of scatter measurement with a moving BSA, which is simulated by analytical ray-tracing plus Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc. With the proposed method, we get visually artefact-free images approaching the ideal correction. Compared with the spatial interpolation based method, the relative mean square error is reduced by a factor of 6.05-15.94 for different slices. PC-VI does well in CB redundancy mining; therefore, it has further potential in CBCT studies.

  18. High-performance C-arm cone-beam CT guidance of thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Otake, Yoshito; Uneri, Ali; Mirota, Daniel J.; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Graumann, Rainer; Sussman, Marc; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Localizing sub-palpable nodules in minimally invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) presents a significant challenge. To overcome inherent problems of preoperative nodule tagging using CT fluoroscopic guidance, an intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) image-guidance system has been developed for direct localization of subpalpable tumors in the OR, including real-time tracking of surgical tools (including thoracoscope), and video-CBCT registration for augmentation of the thoracoscopic scene. Acquisition protocols for nodule visibility in the inflated and deflated lung were delineated in phantom and animal/cadaver studies. Motion compensated reconstruction was implemented to account for motion induced by the ventilated contralateral lung. Experience in CBCT-guided targeting of simulated lung nodules included phantoms, porcine models, and cadavers. Phantom studies defined low-dose acquisition protocols providing contrast-to-noise ratio sufficient for lung nodule visualization, confirmed in porcine specimens with simulated nodules (3-6mm diameter PE spheres, ~100-150HU contrast, 2.1mGy). Nodule visibility in CBCT of the collapsed lung, with reduced contrast according to air volume retention, was more challenging, but initial studies confirmed visibility using scan protocols at slightly increased dose (~4.6-11.1mGy). Motion compensated reconstruction employing a 4D deformation map in the backprojection process reduced artifacts associated with motion blur. Augmentation of thoracoscopic video with renderings of the target and critical structures (e.g., pulmonary artery) showed geometric accuracy consistent with camera calibration and the tracking system (2.4mm registration error). Initial results suggest a potentially valuable role for CBCT guidance in VATS, improving precision in minimally invasive, lungconserving surgeries, avoid critical structures, obviate the burdens of preoperative localization, and improve patient safety.

  19. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L.; Khanna, A. Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (˜40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ˜1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ˜1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose.

  20. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images

  1. Acceleration of image reconstruction by generalized Landweber's iteration for X-ray cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-dose data acquisition is required for the imaging of rapidly moving objects, and the number of projections is usually sparse. In this case, severe artifacts will be introduced by conventional Filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, Iterative reconstruction (IR) has been shown to achieve great image quality improvements with the advantage of better noise tolerance and handling of sparse data. The main repellant for using IR in clinical situations was the slow speed. In this paper, we introduce an acceleration procedure based on the generalized Landweber's iteration (GLI) method for X-ray CT image reconstruction from cone-beam projections. Compared to conventional iterative methods, GLI can accelerate the reconstruction of high frequency components and preserve the stability of the solution when the system matrix is illconditioned. Specifically, the relaxation parameter in GLI is selected to be a linear operator, which can shape the response to singular functions of the forward operator. We study various linear operators, and their behavior with respect to speed up the convergence. Basically, we choose the linear operator as polynomials. Compared to conventional iterative methods which updates the image by multiplying a constant to the difference of measured and calculated projections, GLI methods update the image by several reprojection-backprojection of the difference of measured and calculated projections. At last, we compare the performance of using various linear operators by numerical experiments. Computational complexity is also analyzed. While our primary interest is in X-ray CT image reconstruction, it can be applied to radar, acoustic and geophysical imaging, to name a few. (orig.)

  2. Synchrotron X-ray CT of rose peduncles. Evaluation of tissue damage by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Bent-neck'' syndrome, an important postharvest problem of cut roses, is probably caused by water supply limitations and/or the structural weakness of vascular bundles of the peduncle tissue. For this reason, advanced knowledge about the microstructures of rose peduncles and their cultivar specific variations may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SXCT), especially phase-based CT, is a highly suitable technique to nondestructively investigate plants' micro anatomy. SXCT with monochromatic X-ray beams of 30, 40 and 50 keV photon energy was used to evaluate the three-dimensional inner structures of the peduncles of 3 rose cultivars that differ greatly in their bent-neck susceptibility. Results indicated that this technique achieves sufficiently high spatial resolution to investigate complex tissues. However, further investigations with chlorophyll fluorescence analysis (CFA) and optical microscope imagery reveal different kinds of heavy damage of the irradiated regions induced by synchrotron X-rays; in a cultivar-specific manner, partial destruction of cell walls occurred a few hours after X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, a delayed inhibition of photosynthesis accompanied by the degradation of chlorophyll was obvious from CFA within hours and days after the end of CT measurements. Although SXCT is certainly well suited for three-dimensional anatomical analysis of rose peduncles, the applied technique is not nondestructive.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray CT of rose peduncles. Evaluation of tissue damage by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herppich, Werner B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V., Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Technik im Gartenbau; Matsushima, Uzuki [Iwate Univ., Morioka (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Graf, Wolfgang [Association for Technology and Structures in Agriculture (KTBL), Darmstadt (Germany); Zabler, Simon [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Schaltungen (IIS), Wuerzburg (Germany). Project group NanoCT Systems (NCTS); Dawson, Martin [Salford Univ., Greater Manchester (United Kingdom); Choinka, Gerard; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    ''Bent-neck'' syndrome, an important postharvest problem of cut roses, is probably caused by water supply limitations and/or the structural weakness of vascular bundles of the peduncle tissue. For this reason, advanced knowledge about the microstructures of rose peduncles and their cultivar specific variations may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SXCT), especially phase-based CT, is a highly suitable technique to nondestructively investigate plants' micro anatomy. SXCT with monochromatic X-ray beams of 30, 40 and 50 keV photon energy was used to evaluate the three-dimensional inner structures of the peduncles of 3 rose cultivars that differ greatly in their bent-neck susceptibility. Results indicated that this technique achieves sufficiently high spatial resolution to investigate complex tissues. However, further investigations with chlorophyll fluorescence analysis (CFA) and optical microscope imagery reveal different kinds of heavy damage of the irradiated regions induced by synchrotron X-rays; in a cultivar-specific manner, partial destruction of cell walls occurred a few hours after X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, a delayed inhibition of photosynthesis accompanied by the degradation of chlorophyll was obvious from CFA within hours and days after the end of CT measurements. Although SXCT is certainly well suited for three-dimensional anatomical analysis of rose peduncles, the applied technique is not nondestructive.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of two helical CT reconstruction algorithms in CIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjak, H.; Costin, M.; Vienne, C.; Kaftandjian, V.

    2016-02-01

    The large majority of industrial CT systems reconstruct the 3D volume by using an acquisition on a circular trajec-tory. However, when inspecting long objects which are highly anisotropic, this scanning geometry creates severe artifacts in the reconstruction. For this reason, the use of an advanced CT scanning method like helical data acquisition is an efficient way to address this aspect known as the long-object problem. Recently, several analytically exact and quasi-exact inversion formulas for helical cone-beam reconstruction have been proposed. Among them, we identified two algorithms of interest for our case. These algorithms are exact and of filtered back-projection structure. In this work we implemented the filtered-backprojection (FBP) and backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithms of Zou and Pan (2004). For performance evaluation, we present a numerical compari-son of the two selected algorithms with the helical FDK algorithm using both complete (noiseless and noisy) and truncated data generated by CIVA (the simulation platform for non-destructive testing techniques developed at CEA).

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation of Composites Using Micro-Focused X-Ray CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-Focused X-Ray CT (Micro CT) Scanner has been used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials at Institute of Space Technology and Aeronautics, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Some successful examples of NDE of composites using Micro CT will be presented in this presentation. One example is debonding of fiber/matrix interface, splitting of fiber bundle and matrix crack in carbon/carbon composite. Another example is NDE of stitched CFRP. It was easy to evaluate state of stitch fiber. It has been demonstrated that Micro CT is a powerful device for detecting small damage/flaw in composites, such as delamination, matrix crack and void

  6. Bone Forming Potential of An-Organic Bovine Bone Graft: A Cone Beam CT study

    OpenAIRE

    Uzbek, Usman Haider; Rahman, Shaifulizan Ab; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; gillani, syed wasif

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: An-organic bovine bone graft is a xenograft with the potential of bone formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone density using cone beam computed tomography scans around functional endosseous implant in the region of both augmented maxillary sinus with the an-organic bovine bone graft and the alveolar bone over which the graft was placed to provide space for the implants.

  7. A dual modality phantom for cone beam CT and ultrasound image fusion in prostate implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate seed brachytherapy, TRUS provides good delineation of the prostate while x-ray imaging, e.g., C-arm, gives excellent contrast for seed localization. With the recent availability of cone beam CT (CBCT) technology, the combination of the two imaging modalities may provide an ideal system for intraoperative dosimetric feedback during implantation. A dual modality phantom made of acrylic and copper wire was designed to measure the accuracy and precision of image coregistration between a C-arm based CBCT and 3D TRUS. The phantom was scanned with TRUS and CBCT under the same setup condition. Successive parallel transverse ultrasound (US) images were acquired through manual stepping of the US probe across the phantom at an increment of 1 mm over 7.5 cm. The CBCT imaging was done with three reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mm) as well as at three different tilt angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg. ), and the coregistration between CBCT and US images was done using the Variseed system based on four fiducial markers. Fiducial localization error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE), and target registration error (TRE) were calculated for all registered image sets. Results showed that FLE were typically less than 0.4 mm, FRE were less than 0.5 mm, and TRE were typically less than 1 mm within the range of operation for prostate implant (i.e., <6 cm to surface of US probe). An analysis of variance test showed no significant difference in TRE for the CBCT-US fusion among the three slice thicknesses (p=0.37). As a comparison, the experiment was repeated with a US-conventional CT scanner combination. No significant difference in TRE was noted between the US-conventional CT fusion and that for all three CBCT image slice thicknesses (p=0.21). CBCT imaging was also performed at three different C-arm tilt angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., and 30 deg. and reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.8 mm. There is no significant

  8. A new method for x-ray scatter correction: first assessment on a cone-beam CT experimental setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Gerfault, L [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Esteve, F [INSERM U647-RSRM, ESRF, BP200, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dinten, J-M [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2007-08-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution and a shorter acquisition time compared to a helical CT scanner. Because a larger object volume is exposed for each projection, scatter levels are much higher than in collimated fan-beam systems, resulting in cupping artifacts, streaks and quantification inaccuracies. In this paper, a general method to correct for scatter in CBCT, without supplementary on-line acquisition, is presented. This method is based on scatter calibration through off-line acquisition combined with on-line analytical transformation based on physical equations, to adapt calibration to the object observed. The method was tested on a PMMA phantom and on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. The results were validated by comparison to simulation for the PMMA phantom and by comparison to scans obtained on a commercial multi-slice CT scanner for the thorax phantom. Finally, the improvements achieved with the new method were compared to those obtained using a standard beam-stop method. The new method provided results that closely agreed with the simulation and with the conventional CT scanner, eliminating cupping artifacts and significantly improving quantification. Compared to the beam-stop method, lower x-ray doses and shorter acquisition times were needed, both divided by a factor of 9 for the same scatter estimation accuracy.

  9. Development of virtual CT DICOM images of patients with tumors: application for TPS and Monte Carlo dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel procedure for the generation of a realistic virtual Computed Tomography (CT) image of a patient, using the advanced Boundary RE Presentation (BREP)-based model MASH, has been implemented. This method can be used in radiotherapy assessment. It is shown that it is possible to introduce an artificial cancer, which can be modeled using mesh surfaces. The use of virtual CT images based on BREP models presents several advantages with respect to CT images of actual patients, such as automation, control and flexibility. As an example, two artificial cases, namely a brain and a prostate cancer, were created through the generation of images and tumor/organ contours. As a secondary objective, the described methodology has been used to generate input files for treatment planning system (TPS) and Monte Carlo code dose evaluation. In this paper, we consider treatment plans generated assuming a dose delivery via an active proton beam scanning performed with the INFN-IBA TPS kernel. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations of the two treatment plans were carried out with GATE/GEANT4. The work demonstrates the feasibility of the approach based on the BREP modeling to produce virtual CT images. In conclusion, this study highlights the benefits in using digital phantom model capable of representing different anatomical structures and varying tumors across different patients. These models could be useful for assessing radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and computer simulations for the evaluation of the adsorbed dose. (author)

  10. Development of virtual CT DICOM images of patients with tumors: application for TPS and Monte Carlo dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian, F. M.; Attili, A.; Russo, G; Marchetto, F.; Cirio, R., E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.com, E-mail: attili@to.infn.it, E-mail: russo@to.infn.it, E-mail: fmarchet@to.infn.it, E-mail: cirio@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Torino, TO (Italy); Bourhaleb, F., E-mail: bourhale@to.infn.it [Universita di Torino (UNITO), Torino, TO (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    A novel procedure for the generation of a realistic virtual Computed Tomography (CT) image of a patient, using the advanced Boundary RE Presentation (BREP)-based model MASH, has been implemented. This method can be used in radiotherapy assessment. It is shown that it is possible to introduce an artificial cancer, which can be modeled using mesh surfaces. The use of virtual CT images based on BREP models presents several advantages with respect to CT images of actual patients, such as automation, control and flexibility. As an example, two artificial cases, namely a brain and a prostate cancer, were created through the generation of images and tumor/organ contours. As a secondary objective, the described methodology has been used to generate input files for treatment planning system (TPS) and Monte Carlo code dose evaluation. In this paper, we consider treatment plans generated assuming a dose delivery via an active proton beam scanning performed with the INFN-IBA TPS kernel. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations of the two treatment plans were carried out with GATE/GEANT4. The work demonstrates the feasibility of the approach based on the BREP modeling to produce virtual CT images. In conclusion, this study highlights the benefits in using digital phantom model capable of representing different anatomical structures and varying tumors across different patients. These models could be useful for assessing radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and computer simulations for the evaluation of the adsorbed dose. (author)

  11. Clinical evaluation of a breathing protocol for PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, Ramon de [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Carlos University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Seifert, Burkhardt [Department of Biostatistics, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Berthold, Thomas; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Goerres, Gerhard W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and severity of respiration-induced curvilinear respiration artifacts (RICA) on co-registered positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner before and after modifying the respiration protocol for CT scanning, with retrospective analysis of two groups of 100 patients each, before and after implementing a respiration protocol with breath-hold (BH) in the normal expiration position for the acquisition of the CT images. The CT data were used as attenuation map and for image co-registration. A ranking of co-registered PET/CT and PET images (including maximum intensity projection) was done by two observers in consensus using a scale from 0 to 3. Zero indicated that no RICA was visible and 1, 2, and 3 described artifact with increasing severity. A significant difference in RICA occurrence was found between the two groups (p<0.0001). There was a 45% decrease of artifact frequency when using the normal expiration protocol and a 68% decrease of grade-2 and grade-3 artifacts (p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that BH during the normal expiration position for CT scanning can be recommended to reduce the occurrence and the severity of RICA on PET/CT. (orig.)

  12. Clinical evaluation of a breathing protocol for PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and severity of respiration-induced curvilinear respiration artifacts (RICA) on co-registered positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner before and after modifying the respiration protocol for CT scanning, with retrospective analysis of two groups of 100 patients each, before and after implementing a respiration protocol with breath-hold (BH) in the normal expiration position for the acquisition of the CT images. The CT data were used as attenuation map and for image co-registration. A ranking of co-registered PET/CT and PET images (including maximum intensity projection) was done by two observers in consensus using a scale from 0 to 3. Zero indicated that no RICA was visible and 1, 2, and 3 described artifact with increasing severity. A significant difference in RICA occurrence was found between the two groups (p<0.0001). There was a 45% decrease of artifact frequency when using the normal expiration protocol and a 68% decrease of grade-2 and grade-3 artifacts (p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that BH during the normal expiration position for CT scanning can be recommended to reduce the occurrence and the severity of RICA on PET/CT. (orig.)

  13. Port-angio-CT and port-angio-SPECT in the evaluation of metastatic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the response of metastatic liver disease to regional chemotherapy and to verify complete perfusion limited to the liver, the authors have obtained 78 CT scans in 43 patients and 63 single-photon emission CT (SPECT) studies in 37 patients. Port-angio-CT (PACT) yielded higher sensitivity than did port-angio-SPECT) in detecting small metastases. Incomplete perfusion of liver segments was detected by both methods, but PA-CT had a higher sensitivity for depiction of partial perfusion of large metastases. CT allowed more detailed evaluation of morphologic patterns in neoplastic tissue and changes in tumor size. However, in nine patients, PA-CT revealed parenchymal enhancement with segmental or lobar distribution due to local obstruction of portal or hepatic veins, which could be misinterpreted as metastases or might obscure them; in these cases, SPECT could exclude metastases ≥ 2 cm

  14. Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules by integrated PET/CT: improved accuracy by FDG uptake pattern and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: FDG PET is useful to differentiate malignancy from benign lesions in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). However, FDG PET showed false positive results in benign inflammatory lesions such as tuberculosis and organizing pneumonia. Furthermore, malignant tumors such as adenocarcinoma (AC) with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) type had lower FDG uptake than other cell types of non-small cell lung cancer. We investigated whether FDG uptake pattern and image findings of CT for attenuation correction could improve accuracy for evaluating SPNs over SUV in integrated PET/CT imaging using FDG. Methods: Forty patients (M:F = 23:17, mean age 58.2±9.4 yrs) with non-calcified SPNs (diameter on CT 30 mm, no significant mediastinal node enlargement, no atelectasis) were included. All subjects underwent integrated PET/CT imaging using FDG. One nuclear medicine physician and 1 chest radiologist interpreted the PET and non-contrast CT images for attenuation correction, respectively. On PET images, maximum SUV of SPN was acquired, and FDG uptake pattern was categorized as diffusely increased or heterogeneously increased with upper threshold of window setting adjusted to maximum SUV of each nodule. A radiologist interpreted SPNs as benign or malignant based on CT images with lung and mediastinai window settings blinded to PET findings. Results: On pathological exam, 30 SPNs were confirmed to be malignant (11 AC with non-BAC type, 8 AC with BAC type, 8 squamous cell carcinoma, 1 adenosquamous cell carcinoma, 1 neuroendocrine carcinoma, 1 large cell carcinoma), and 10 were benign (4 tuberculosis, 3 organizing pneumonia, 2 sclerosing pneumocytoma, 1 non-specific inflammation). All 5 nodules with max SUV 7.0 except one with tuberculoma had malignancy. When only nodules with diffusely increased uptake were considered malignant in indeterminate group with max SUV of 4.0 to 7.0, PET could diagnose 5 of 9 malignant nodules with one false positive nodule. In 6 of

  15. Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CRI) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CRI were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information

  16. Evaluation of the efficiency of FDG PET/CT in detection and characterization of skeletal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Wafaie

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Fused PET/CT was highly efficient in evaluation of skeletal metastases with superior performance in: detection of early bone marrow infiltration not apparent on CT, resolution of metabolic activity before definite signs of complete healing on CT, detection of missed sclerotic metastases on PET due to their relatively low metabolic activity, detection of intra and extra osseous recurrence and differentiation of benign from malignant bone lesions.

  17. Investigation of cone-beam CT image quality trade-off for image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Junguo; Sharp, Gregory C; Park, Yang-Kyun; Ouyang, Jinsong; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that projections acquired over an angular range slightly over 180° (so-called short scan) are sufficient for fan-beam reconstruction. However, due to practical imaging conditions (projection data and reconstruction image discretization, physical factors, and data noise), the short-scan reconstructions may have different appearances and properties from the full-scan (scans over 360°) reconstructions. Nevertheless, short-scan configurations have been used in applications such as cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head-neck-cancer image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) that only requires a small field of view due to the potential reduced imaging time and dose. In this work, we studied the image quality trade-off for full, short, and full/short scan configurations with both conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction and iterative reconstruction algorithms based on total-variation (TV) minimization for head-neck-cancer IGRT. Anthropomorphic and Catphan phantoms were scanned at different exposure levels with a clinical scanner used in IGRT. Both visualization- and numerical-metric-based evaluation studies were performed. The results indicate that the optimal exposure level and number of views are in the middle range for both FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms and the optimization is object-dependent and task-dependent. The optimal view numbers decrease with the total exposure levels for both FBP and TV-based algorithms. The results also indicate there are slight differences between FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms for the image quality trade-off: FBP seems to be more in favor of larger number of views while the TV-based algorithm is more robust to different data conditions (number of views and exposure levels) than the FBP algorithm. The studies can provide a general guideline for image-quality optimization for CBCT used in IGRT and other applications. PMID:27032676

  18. Investigation of cone-beam CT image quality trade-off for image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Junguo; Sharp, Gregory C.; Park, Yang-Kyun; Ouyang, Jinsong; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that projections acquired over an angular range slightly over 180° (so-called short scan) are sufficient for fan-beam reconstruction. However, due to practical imaging conditions (projection data and reconstruction image discretization, physical factors, and data noise), the short-scan reconstructions may have different appearances and properties from the full-scan (scans over 360°) reconstructions. Nevertheless, short-scan configurations have been used in applications such as cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head-neck-cancer image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) that only requires a small field of view due to the potential reduced imaging time and dose. In this work, we studied the image quality trade-off for full, short, and full/short scan configurations with both conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction and iterative reconstruction algorithms based on total-variation (TV) minimization for head-neck-cancer IGRT. Anthropomorphic and Catphan phantoms were scanned at different exposure levels with a clinical scanner used in IGRT. Both visualization- and numerical-metric-based evaluation studies were performed. The results indicate that the optimal exposure level and number of views are in the middle range for both FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms and the optimization is object-dependent and task-dependent. The optimal view numbers decrease with the total exposure levels for both FBP and TV-based algorithms. The results also indicate there are slight differences between FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms for the image quality trade-off: FBP seems to be more in favor of larger number of views while the TV-based algorithm is more robust to different data conditions (number of views and exposure levels) than the FBP algorithm. The studies can provide a general guideline for image-quality optimization for CBCT used in IGRT and other applications.

  19. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  20. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. PMID:19889800

  1. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  2. Scatter correction method for cone-beam CT based on interlacing-slit scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the notable features of high efficiency and high precision, and is widely used in areas such as medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing. However, the presence of the ray scatter reduces the quality of CT images. By referencing the slit collimation approach, a scatter correction method for CBCT based on the interlacing-slit scan is proposed. Firstly, according to the characteristics of CBCT imaging, a scatter suppression plate with interlacing slits is designed and fabricated. Then the imaging of the scatter suppression plate is analyzed, and a scatter correction calculation method for CBCT based on the image fusion is proposed, which can splice out a complete set of scatter suppression projection images according to the interlacing-slit projection images of the left and the right imaging regions in the scatter suppression plate, and simultaneously complete the scatter correction within the flat panel detector (FPD). Finally, the overall process of scatter suppression and correction is provided. The experimental results show that this method can significantly improve the clarity of the slice images and achieve a good scatter correction. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. Iterative reconstruction optimisations for high angle cone-beam micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recur, B.; Fauconneau, M.; Kingston, A.; Myers, G.; Sheppard, A.

    2014-09-01

    We address several acquisition questions that have arisen for the high cone-angle helical-scanning micro-CT facility developed at the Australian National University. These challenges are generally known in medical and industrial cone-beam scanners but can be neglected in these systems. For our large datasets, with more than 20483 voxels, minimising the number of operations (or iterations) is crucial. Large cone-angles enable high signal-to-noise ratio imaging and a large helical pitch to be used. This introduces two challenges: (i) non-uniform resolution throughout the reconstruction, (ii) over-scan beyond the region-of-interest significantly increases re- quired reconstructed volume size. Challenge (i) can be addressed by using a double-helix or lower pitch helix but both solutions slow down iterations. Challenge (ii) can also be improved by using a lower pitch helix but results in more projections slowing down iterations. This may be overcome using less projections per revolution but leads to more iterations required. Here we assume a given total time for acquisition and a given reconstruction technique (SART) and seek to identify the optimal trajectory and number of projections per revolution in order to produce the best tomogram, minimise reconstruction time required, and minimise memory requirements.

  4. Scatter correction method for cone-beam CT based on interlacing-slit scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kui-Dong; Zhang, Hua; Shi, Yi-Kai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Zhe

    2014-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the notable features of high efficiency and high precision, and is widely used in areas such as medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing. However, the presence of the ray scatter reduces the quality of CT images. By referencing the slit collimation approach, a scatter correction method for CBCT based on the interlacing-slit scan is proposed. Firstly, according to the characteristics of CBCT imaging, a scatter suppression plate with interlacing slits is designed and fabricated. Then the imaging of the scatter suppression plate is analyzed, and a scatter correction calculation method for CBCT based on the image fusion is proposed, which can splice out a complete set of scatter suppression projection images according to the interlacing-slit projection images of the left and the right imaging regions in the scatter suppression plate, and simultaneously complete the scatter correction within the flat panel detector (FPD). Finally, the overall process of scatter suppression and correction is provided. The experimental results show that this method can significantly improve the clarity of the slice images and achieve a good scatter correction.

  5. GPU-based Cone Beam CT Reconstruction via Total Variation Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lewis, John; Li, Ruijiang; Gu, Xuejun; Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction is of central importance in image guided radiation therapy due to its broad applications in many clinical contexts. However, the high image dose in CBCT scans is a clinical concern, especially when it is used repeatedly for patient setup purposes before each radiotherapy treatment fraction. A desire for lower imaging does has motivated a vast amount of interest in the CBCT reconstruction based on a small number of X-ray projections. Recently, advances in image processing and compressed sensing have led to tremendous success in recovering signals based on extremely low sampling rates, laying the mathematical foundation for reconstructing CBCT from few projections. In this paper, we present our recent development on a GPU-based iterative algorithm for the highly under-sampled CBCT reconstruction problem. We considered an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a regularization term of a total variation norm. In order to solve our model, we developed a modified...

  6. GPU-based Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Using Tight Frame Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    X-ray imaging dose from serial cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans raises a clinical concern in most image guided radiation therapy procedures. It is the goal of this paper to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct high quality CBCT images from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. For this purpose, we have developed an iterative tight frame (TF) based CBCT reconstruction algorithm. A condition that a real CBCT image has a sparse representation under a TF basis is imposed in the iteration process as regularization to the solution. To speed up the computation, a multi-grid method is employed. Our GPU implementation has achieved high computational efficiency and a CBCT image of resolution 512x512x70 can be reconstructed in about ~139 sec. We have tested our algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom and a physical Catphan phantom. It is found that our TF-based algorithm leads to much higher CBCT quality than those obtained from a conventional FDK algorithm in the context of undersamp...

  7. A motion-compensated cone-beam CT using electrical impedance tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an imaging technique used in conjunction with radiation therapy. For example CBCT is used to verify the position of lung cancer tumours just prior to radiation treatment. The accuracy of the radiation treatment of thoracic and upper abdominal structures is heavily affected by respiratory movement. Such movement typically blurs the CBCT reconstruction and ideally should be removed. Hence motion-compensated CBCT has recently been researched for correcting image artefacts due to breathing motion. This paper presents a new dual-modality approach where CBCT is aided by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for motion compensation. EIT can generate images of contrasts in electrical properties. The main advantage of using EIT is its high temporal resolution. In this paper motion information is extracted from EIT images and incorporated directly in the CBCT reconstruction. In this study synthetic moving data are generated using simulated and experimental phantoms. The paper demonstrates that image blur, created as a result of motion, can be reduced through motion compensation with EIT

  8. Clinical Implementation Of Megavoltage Cone Beam CT As Part Of An IGRT Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing where the tumor is at all times during treatment is the next challenge in the field of radiation therapy. This issue has become more important because with treatments such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), healthy tissue is spared by using very tight margins around the tumor. These tight margins leave very small room for patient setup errors. The use of an imaging modality in the treatment room as a way to localize the tumor for patient set up is generally known as ''Image Guided Radiation Therapy'' or IGRT. This article deals with a form of IGRT known as Megavoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography (MCBCT) using a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator currently in use at Firelands Regional Medical Center. With MCBCT, we are capable of acquiring CT images right before the treatment of the patient and then use this information to position the patient tumor according to the treatment plan. This article presents the steps followed in order to clinically implement this system, as well as some of the quality assurance tests suggested by the manufacturer and some tests developed in house

  9. CT evaluation of the epibulbar dermoid and dermolipoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investiga