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Sample records for beam computed tomography

  1. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  2. A Clinical Evaluation Of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY by Bryan James Behm, D.D.S. Lieutenant, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis... COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner. ~mes Behm Endodontic...printed without the expressed written permission of the author. IV ABSTRACT A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY BRYAN JAMES

  3. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  4. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  5. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology an...

  6. Basic principle of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The use of computed tomography for dental procedures has increased recently. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the dentomaxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing high resolution in images of high diagnostic quality. This technology allows for 3-dimensional representation of the dentomaxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion, but at lower equipment cost, simpler image acquisition and lower patient dose. Because this technology produces images with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution, it is ideally suited for dedicated dentomaxillofacial imaging. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of cone beam scanning technology and compare it with the fan beam scanning used in conventional CT and the basic principles of currently available CBCT systems

  7. Radiation dose in cone-beam computed tomography: myth or reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi, Medhini

    2013-01-01

    In the growing inventory of clinical computed tomography technologies, cone-beam X-ray computed tomography is a relatively recent instalment. It is an advancement in computed tomography imaging which is designed to provide relatively low-dose high-spatial-resolution visualization of high contrast structures in the head and neck and other anatomic areas. Comparatively low dosing requirements and relatively compact design has led to intense interest in surgical planning and intra-operative cone-beam computed tomography applications, particularly in head and neck, and also in spinal, thoracic, abdominal and orthopaedic procedures. The use of this emerging imaging technology, which has potential applications for imaging of high-contrast structures in the head and neck as well as dentomaxillofacial regions, has been the subject of criticism as well as acclaim. This paper envisages to discuss the state-of-the-art of the technique. (author)

  8. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  9. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  10. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  11. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Morphometric analysis - Cone beam computed tomography to predict bone quality and quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlweg-Majert, B; Metzger, M C; Kummer, T; Schulze, D

    2011-07-01

    Modified quantitative computed tomography is a method used to predict bone quality and quantify the bone mass of the jaw. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone quantity or quality was detected by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) combined with image analysis. MATERIALS AND PROCEDURES: Different measurements recorded on two phantoms (Siemens phantom, Comac phantom) were evaluated on images taken with the Somatom VolumeZoom (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and the NewTom 9000 (NIM s.r.l., Verona, Italy) in order to calculate a calibration curve. The spatial relationships of six sample cylinders and the repositioning from four pig skull halves relative to adjacent defined anatomical structures were assessed by means of three-dimensional visualization software. The calibration curves for computer tomography (CT) and cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) using the Siemens phantom showed linear correlation in both modalities between the Hounsfield Units (HU) and bone morphology. A correction factor for CBCT was calculated. Exact information about the micromorphology of the bone cylinders was only available using of micro computer tomography. Cone-beam computer tomography is a suitable choice for analysing bone mass, but, it does not give any information about bone quality. 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  14. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  15. Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by multidetector computed tomography and electron-beam tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, LH; Dorgelo, J; Tio, RA; Jessurun, GAJ; Oudkerk, M; Zijlstra, F

    This case report describes the use of retrospectively ECG-gated 16-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and electron-beam tomography (EBT) for assessing bypass graft patency in two patients with recurrent angina after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The results of each tomographic

  16. Cone beam computed tomography: basics and applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Elluru; Elluru, Snehal Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices, changed the way oral and maxillofacial radiology is practiced. CBCT was embraced into the dental settings very rapidly due to its compact size, low cost, low ionizing radiation exposure when compared to medical computed tomography. Alike medical CT, 3 dimensional evaluation of the maxillofacial region with minimal distortion is offered by the CBCT. This article provides an overview of basics of CBCT technology and reviews the specific application of CBCT technology to oral and maxillofacial region with few illustrations.

  17. Performance of an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C.; Silva, Natália F.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2017-01-01

    Among the medical uses of ionizing radiations, the computed tomography (CT) diagnostic exams are responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. The dosimetry procedure in CT scanner beams makes use of pencil ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm. The aim of its calibration is to compare the values that are obtained with the instrument to be calibrated and a standard reference system. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam. Therefore, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI), was used to establish a CT primary standard. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests (short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, polarity effect and ion collection efficiency) in the standard X-rays beams established for computed tomography at the LCI. (author)

  18. Performance of an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa C.; Silva, Natália F.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mcastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Among the medical uses of ionizing radiations, the computed tomography (CT) diagnostic exams are responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. The dosimetry procedure in CT scanner beams makes use of pencil ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm. The aim of its calibration is to compare the values that are obtained with the instrument to be calibrated and a standard reference system. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam. Therefore, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI), was used to establish a CT primary standard. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests (short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, polarity effect and ion collection efficiency) in the standard X-rays beams established for computed tomography at the LCI. (author)

  19. Beam Hardening Artifacts: Comparison between Two Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. At present, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has become a substitute for computed tomography (CT in dental procedures. The metallic materials used in dentistry can produce artifacts due to the beam hardening phenomenon. These artifacts decrease the quality of images. In the present study, the number of artifacts as a result of beam hardening in the images of dental implants was compared between two NewTom VG and Planmeca Promax 3D Max CBCT machines. Materials and methods. An implant drilling model was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Scanning procedures were carried out by two CBCT machines. The corresponding sections (coronal and axial of the implants were evaluated by two radiologists. The number of artifacts in each image was determined using the scale provided. Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in beam hardening artifacts in axial and coronal sections between the two x-ray machines (P<0.001, with a higher quality in the images produced by the NewTom VG. Conclusion. Given the higher quality of the images produced by the NewTom VG x-ray machine, it is recommended for imaging of patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses or previous implant treatments.

  20. Direct estimation of human trabecular bone stiffness using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintström, Eva; Klintström, Benjamin; Pahr, Dieter; Brismar, Torkel B; Smedby, Örjan; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2018-04-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of estimating the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone through finite element simulations by using dental cone beam computed tomography data. Fourteen human radius specimens were scanned in 3 cone beam computed tomography devices: 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan), NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy), and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland). The imaging data were segmented by using 2 different methods. Stiffness (Young modulus), shear moduli, and the size and shape of the stiffness tensor were studied. Corresponding evaluations by using micro-CT were regarded as the reference standard. The 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) showed good performance in estimating stiffness and shear moduli but was sensitive to the choice of segmentation method. NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy) and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland) yielded good correlations, but they were not as strong as Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan). The cone beam computed tomography devices overestimated both stiffness and shear compared with the micro-CT estimations. Finite element-based calculations of biomechanics from cone beam computed tomography data are feasible, with strong correlations for the Accuitomo 80 scanner (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) combined with an appropriate segmentation method. Such measurements might be useful for predicting implant survival by in vivo estimations of bone properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  2. Comparison of Swedish and Norwegian Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: a Questionnaire Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerker Edén Strindberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry can be used in some countries by other dentists than specialists in radiology. The frequency of buying cone-beam computed tomography to examine patients is rapidly growing, thus knowledge of how to use it is very important. The aim was to compare the outcome of an investigation on the use of cone-beam computed tomography in Sweden with a previous Norwegian study, regarding specifically technical aspects. Material and Methods: The questionnaire contained 45 questions, including 35 comparable questions to Norwegian clinics one year previous. Results were based on inter-comparison of the outcome from each of the two questionnaire studies. Results: Responses rate was 71% in Sweden. There, most of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT examinations performed by dental nurses, while in Norway by specialists. More than two-thirds of the CBCT units had a scout image function, regularly used in both Sweden (79% and Norway (75%. In Sweden 4% and in Norway 41% of the respondents did not wait for the report from the radiographic specialist before initiating treatment. Conclusions: The bilateral comparison showed an overall similarity between the two countries. The survey gave explicit and important knowledge of the need for education and training of the whole team, since radiation dose to the patient could vary a lot for the same kind of radiographic examination. It is essential to establish quality assurance protocols with defined responsibilities in the team in order to maintain high diagnostic accuracy for all examinations when using cone-beam computed tomography for patient examinations.

  3. Using cone beam computed tomography to examine the prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the condylar bone changes in the temporomandibular region using cone‑beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to determine the prevalence of these changes in a population. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of ...

  4. [CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSTICS OF ODONTOGENIC MAXILLARY SINUSITIS (CASE REPORTS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E; Khurdzidze, G

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic studies performed by cone beam computed tomography Morita 3D made possible to obtain high resolution images of hard tissues of upper jawbone and maxillary sinus, to detect bony tissue defects, such as odontogenic cysts, cystogranulomas and granulomas. High-resolution and three dimensional tomographic image reconstructions allowed for optimal and prompt determination of the scope of surgical treatment and planning of effective conservative treatment regimen. Interactive diagnostics helped to estimate cosmetic and functional results of surgical treatment, to prevent the occurrence of surgical complications, and to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment. The obtained data contributed to determination of particular applications of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, detection of specific defects with cone beam tomography as the most informative method of diagnosis; as well as to determination of weak and strong sides, and helped to offer mechanisms of x-ray diagnostics to dental surgeons and ENT specialists.

  5. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 ± 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 ± 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm ± 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm ± 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm ± 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  6. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 {+-} 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 {+-} 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm {+-} 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm {+-} 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm {+-} 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  7. Impact of polychromatic x-ray sources on helical, cone-beam computed tomography and dual-energy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Zou Yu; Pan Xiaochuan

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been much work devoted to developing accurate and efficient algorithms for image reconstruction in helical, cone-beam computed tomography (CT). Little attention, however, has been directed to the effect of physical factors on helical, cone-beam CT image reconstruction. This work investigates the effect of polychromatic x-rays on image reconstruction in helical, cone-beam computed tomography. A pre-reconstruction dual-energy technique is developed to reduce beam-hardening artefacts and enhance contrast in soft tissue

  8. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  9. Basic principles of cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitch, Kenneth; Rice, Dwight D

    2014-07-01

    At the end of the millennium, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) heralded a new dental technology for the next century. Owing to the dramatic and positive impact of CBCT on implant dentistry and orthognathic/orthodontic patient care, additional applications for this technology soon evolved. New software programs were developed to improve the applicability of, and access to, CBCT for dental patients. Improved, rapid, and cost-effective computer technology, combined with the ability of software engineers to develop multiple dental imaging applications for CBCT with broad diagnostic capability, have played a large part in the rapid incorporation of CBCT technology into dentistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  11. Beam standardization and dosimetric methodology in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2005-01-01

    Special ionization chambers, named pencil ionization chambers, are used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT). In this work, an extensive study about pencil ionization chambers was performed, as a contribution to the accuracy of the dosimetric procedures in CT beams. The international scientific community has recently been discussing the need of the establishment of a specific calibration procedure for CT ionization chambers, once these chambers present special characteristics that differentiate them from other ionization chambers used in diagnostic radiology beams. In this work, an adequate calibration procedure for pencil ionization chambers was established at the Calibration Laboratory, of the Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, in accordance with the most recent international recommendations. Two calibration methodologies were tested and analyzed by comparative studies. Moreover, a new extended length parallel plate ionization chamber, with a transversal section very similar to pencil ionization chambers, was developed. The operational characteristics of this chamber were determined and the results obtained showed that its behaviour is adequate as a reference system in CT standard beams. Two other studies were performed during this work, both using CT ionization chambers. The first study was about the performance of a pencil ionization chamber in standard radiation beams of several types and energies, and the results showed that this chamber presents satisfactory behaviour in other radiation qualities as of diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy. In the second study, a tandem system for verification of hal'-value layer variations in CT equipment, using a pencil ionization chamber, was developed. Because of the X rays tube rotation, the determination of half-value layers in computed tomography equipment is not an easy task, and it is usually not performed within quality control programs. (author)

  12. Reliability of voxel gray values in cone beam computed tomography for preoperative implant planning assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsa, A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hassan, B.; Motroni, A.; van der Stelt, P.; Wismeijer, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the reliability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) voxel gray value measurements using Hounsfield units (HU) derived from multislice computed tomography (MSCT) as a clinical reference (gold standard). Materials and Methods: Ten partially edentulous human mandibular cadavers

  13. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A New Tool in the Interventional Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Santhosh; Irani, Farah Gillan; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo

    2013-11-01

    C-arm Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is a technology that is being integrated into many of the newer angiography systems in the interventional suite. Due to its ability to provide cross sectional imaging, it has opened a myriad of opportunities for creating new clinical applications. We review the technical aspects, current reported clinical applications and potential benefits of this technology. Searches were made via PubMed using the string "CBCT", "Cone Beam CT", "Cone Beam Computed Tomography" and "C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography". All relevant articles in the results were reviewed. CBCT clinical applications have been reported in both vascular and non-vascular interventions. They encompass many aspects of a procedure including preprocedural planning, intraprocedural guidance and postprocedural assessment. As a result, they have allowed the interventionalist to be safer and more accurate in performing image guided procedures. There are however several technical limitations. The quality of images produced is not comparable to conventional computed tomography (CT). Radiation doses are also difficult to quantify when compared to CT and fluoroscopy. CBCT technology in the interventional suite has contributed significant benefits to the patient despite its current limitations. It is a tool that will evolve and potentially become an integral part of imaging guidance for intervention.

  14. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  15. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  16. Treatment of a Four-Rooted Maxillary Second Molar Detected with Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Mohammadzade Akhlaghi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The significance of clinician’s knowledge about root canal anatomy and its possible variations cannot be overlooked. In some cases, taking advantage of complementary imaging techniques can help achieve a perfect flawless endodontic treatment. This article reports endodontic management of a second maxillary molar that had an uncommon anatomy of the chamber floor. After obtaining a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT image, the presence of a second palatal root was confirmed. All four roots were treated and patient’s symptoms were resolved.Keywords: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography; Root Canal Therapy; Tooth Root

  17. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Scarfe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics.

  18. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Puthenpurayil John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. [1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10-70 s and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15-100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  19. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10–70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15–100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:26929479

  20. Peri-implant assessment via cone beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography: an ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau Silveira-Neto

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This research evaluated detail registration in peri-implant bone using two different cone beam computer tomography systems and a digital periapical radiograph. METHODS: Three different image acquisition protocols were established for each cone beam computer tomography apparatus, and three clinical situations were simulated in an ex vivo fresh pig mandible: buccal bone defect, peri-implant bone defect, and bone contact. Data were subjected to two analyses: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analyses involved a comparison of real specimen measures using a digital caliper in three regions of the preserved buccal bone – A, B and E (control group – to cone beam computer tomography images obtained with different protocols (kp1, kp2, kp3, ip1, ip2, and ip3. In the qualitative analyses, the ability to register peri-implant details via tomography and digital periapical radiography was verified, as indicated by twelve evaluators. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The quantitative assessment showed means statistically equal to those of the control group under the following conditions: buccal bone defect B and E with kp1 and ip1, peri-implant bone defect E with kp2 and kp3, and bone contact A with kp1, kp2, kp3, and ip2. Qualitatively, only bone contacts were significantly different among the assessments, and the p3 results differed from the p1 and p2 results. The other results were statistically equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: The registration of peri-implant details was influenced by the image acquisition protocol, although metal artifacts were produced in all situations. The evaluators preferred the Kodak 9000 3D cone beam computer tomography in most cases. The evaluators identified buccal bone defects better with cone beam computer tomography and identified peri-implant bone defects better with digital periapical radiography.

  1. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those...

  2. Evidence supporting the use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, O.J.C. van; Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Berge, S.J.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Maal, T.J.J.; Breuning, H.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors conducted a systematic review of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in orthodontics and evaluated the level of evidence to determine whether the use of CBCT is justified in orthodontics. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors identified articles by searching

  3. THz computed tomography system with zero-order Bessel beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Liting; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Kejia; Liu, Jinsong; Yang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) waves can penetrate many optically opaque dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics and colorants. It is effective to reveal the internal structures of these materials. We have built a THz Computed Tomography (CT) system with 0.3 THz zero-order Bessel beam to improve the depth of focus of this imaging system for the non-diffraction property of Bessel beam. The THz CT system has been used to detect a paper cup with a metal rod inside. Finally, the acquired projection data have been processed by the filtered back-projection algorithm and the reconstructed image of the sample has been obtained.

  4. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were ≤ 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.)

  5. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-09-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the application and advantages associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications, while reducing radiation exposure during complex endodontic procedures. The benefits of the added diagnostic information provided by intraoperative CBCT images in select cases justify the risk associated with the limited level of radiation exposure.

  6. Integration of digital dental casts in cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all

  7. Cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography using combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to increase system sensitivity in cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) studies without increasing patient imaging time. For imaging the heart, convergent collimation offers the potential of increased sensitivity over that of parallel-hole collimation. However, if a cone-beam collimated gamma camera is rotated in a planar orbit, the projection data obtained are not complete. Two cone-beam collimators and one fan-beam collimator are used with a three-detector SPECT system. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provides a complete set of data for image reconstruction. The imaging geometry is evaluated using data acquired from phantom and patient studies. For the Jaszazck cardiac torso phantom experiment, the combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provided 1.7 times greater sensitivity than standard parallel-hole collimation (low-energy high-resolution collimators). Also, phantom and patient comparison studies showed improved image quality. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam imaging geometry with appropriate weighting of the two data sets provides improved system sensitivity while measuring sufficient data for artifact free cardiac images

  8. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  9. Comparison of Volumes between Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images using Dynamic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Eun; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Jung, Woo Hyun; Choi, Byeong Don [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between the volumes acquired with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)images with a reconstruction image-filtering algorithm and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with dynamic phantom. The 4DCT images were obtained from the computerized imaging reference systems (CIRS) phantom using a computed tomography (CT) simulator. We analyzed the volumes for maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and average intensity projection (AVG) of the images obtained with the 4DCT scanner against those acquired from CBCT images with CT ranger tools. Difference in volume for node of 1, 2 and 3 cm between CBCT and 4DCT was 0.54⁓2.33, 5.16⁓8.06, 9.03⁓20.11 ml in MIP, respectively, 0.00⁓1.48, 0.00⁓8.47, 1.42⁓24.85 ml in MinIP, respectively and 0.00⁓1.17, 0.00⁓2.19, 0.04⁓3.35 ml in AVG, respectively. After a comparative analysis of the volumes for each nodal size, it was apparent that the CBCT images were similar to the AVG images acquired using 4DCT.

  10. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage

  11. Use of cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: current concepts, indications and limitations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Michael M; Horner, Keith; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential component of treatment planning in the field of implant dentistry. This narrative review will present current concepts for the use of cone beam computed tomography imaging, before and after implant placement, in daily clinical practice and research. Guidelines for the selection of three-dimensional imaging will be discussed, and limitations will be highlighted. Current concepts of radiation dose optimization, including novel imaging modalities using low-dose protocols, will be presented. For preoperative cross-sectional imaging, data are still not available which demonstrate that cone beam computed tomography results in fewer intraoperative complications such as nerve damage or bleeding incidents, or that implants inserted using preoperative cone beam computed tomography data sets for planning purposes will exhibit higher survival or success rates. The use of cone beam computed tomography following the insertion of dental implants should be restricted to specific postoperative complications, such as damage of neurovascular structures or postoperative infections in relation to the maxillary sinus. Regarding peri-implantitis, the diagnosis and severity of the disease should be evaluated primarily based on clinical parameters and on radiological findings based on periapical radiographs (two dimensional). The use of cone beam computed tomography scans in clinical research might not yield any evident beneficial effect for the patient included. As many of the cone beam computed tomography scans performed for research have no direct therapeutic consequence, dose optimization measures should be implemented by using appropriate exposure parameters and by reducing the field of view to the actual region of interest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cone-beam computed tomography: An inevitable investigation in cleidocranial dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita S Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleidocranial dysplasia is a heritable skeletal dysplasia and one of the most common features of this syndrome is multiple impacted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography, the most recent advancement in maxillofacial imaging, provides the clinician to view the morphology of the skull and the dentition in all three dimensions and help in treatment planning for the patient.

  13. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C. [Service de Radiologie Centrale, Hopital Broussais, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were {<=} 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.) With 6 figs., 1 tab., 31 refs.

  14. Ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, G H

    1978-03-02

    The rotatable ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner is designed for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation. With it there can be measured parameters that are of importance for the structure of soft tissues, e.g. time as a function of the velocity distribution along a certain path of flight(the method is analogous to the transaxial X-ray tomography). Moreover it permits to perform the quantitative measurement of two-dimensional velocity distributions and may therefore be applied to serial examinations for detecting cancer of the breast. As computers digital memories as well as analog-digital-hybrid systems are suitable.

  15. Quality control and radioprotection in dental cone beam computed tomography - case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ligiane C.N.; Ferreira, Nadya M.P.D., E-mail: lnadya@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radiological protection in medical and odontologic radiology follows The Order (Portaria) 453/98 of the Ministry of Health, which presents the minimum set of tests for the constancy X-ray equipment. These tests follow the procedures set forth in the Resolution no. 64, the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance. This work aims to show a study on dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), evaluating the physical parameters that influence the performance and image quality and presenting the appropriate tests to this new system. The authors analyzed the tests specific for computed tomography (CT) of the Resolution no. 64, feasibility assessment of them and if their interpretations are compatible with CBCT. Once determined if testing is feasible, compare with those presented in the manual provided by the equipment manufacturer. The CT scanner used was the Mini-Cat Tomography Scanner Xoran Technologies of KAVO. In the study it was verified that four tests could be reproduced in CBCT: noise, accuracy and uniformity in the number of CT of water and spatial resolution. Considering experimental data, the methodology and tolerance of manufacturer for the first two tests were more appropriate. For the uniformity test of the CT number, we recommend using the phantom quality control. Three new tests were suggested to be made in the quality control of the Cone Beam: linearity, artifacts and alignment of the beam. (author)

  16. Quality control and radioprotection in dental cone beam computed tomography - case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Ligiane C.N.; Ferreira, Nadya M.P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The radiological protection in medical and odontologic radiology follows The Order (Portaria) 453/98 of the Ministry of Health, which presents the minimum set of tests for the constancy X-ray equipment. These tests follow the procedures set forth in the Resolution no. 64, the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance. This work aims to show a study on dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), evaluating the physical parameters that influence the performance and image quality and presenting the appropriate tests to this new system. The authors analyzed the tests specific for computed tomography (CT) of the Resolution no. 64, feasibility assessment of them and if their interpretations are compatible with CBCT. Once determined if testing is feasible, compare with those presented in the manual provided by the equipment manufacturer. The CT scanner used was the Mini-Cat Tomography Scanner Xoran Technologies of KAVO. In the study it was verified that four tests could be reproduced in CBCT: noise, accuracy and uniformity in the number of CT of water and spatial resolution. Considering experimental data, the methodology and tolerance of manufacturer for the first two tests were more appropriate. For the uniformity test of the CT number, we recommend using the phantom quality control. Three new tests were suggested to be made in the quality control of the Cone Beam: linearity, artifacts and alignment of the beam. (author)

  17. Accuracy and repeatability of anthropometric facial measurements using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of linear anthropometric measurements on the soft tissue surface model generated from cone beam computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of seven cadaver heads. The accuracy and

  18. Comparative study of a low-Z cone-beam computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D A; Hansen, V N; Poludniowski, G; Evans, P M; Thompson, M G; Niven, A; Seco, J

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography images have been acquired using an experimental (low atomic number (Z) insert) megavoltage cone-beam imaging system. These images have been compared with standard megavoltage and kilovoltage imaging systems. The experimental system requires a simple modification to the 4 MeV electron beam from an Elekta Precise linac. Low-energy photons are produced in the standard medium-Z electron window and a low-Z carbon electron absorber located after the window. The carbon electron absorber produces photons as well as ensuring that all remaining electrons from the source are removed. A detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies is also employed. Quantitative assessment of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) contrast shows that the low-Z imaging system is an order of magnitude or more superior to a standard 6 MV imaging system. CBCT data with the same contrast-to-noise ratio as a kilovoltage imaging system (0.15 cGy) can be obtained in doses of 11 and 244 cGy for the experimental and standard 6 MV systems, respectively. Whilst these doses are high for everyday imaging, qualitative images indicate that kilovoltage like images suitable for patient positioning can be acquired in radiation doses of 1-8 cGy with the experimental low-Z system.

  19. General surface reconstruction for cone-beam multislice spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Laigao; Liang Yun; Heuscher, Dominic J.

    2003-01-01

    A new family of cone-beam reconstruction algorithm, the General Surface Reconstruction (GSR), is proposed and formulated in this paper for multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. It provides a general framework to allow the reconstruction of planar or nonplanar surfaces on a set of rebinned short-scan parallel beam projection data. An iterative surface formation method is proposed as an example to show the possibility to form nonplanar reconstruction surfaces to minimize the adverse effect between the collected cone-beam projection data and the reconstruction surfaces. The improvement in accuracy of the nonplanar surfaces over planar surfaces in the two-dimensional approximate cone-beam reconstructions is mathematically proved and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The proposed GSR algorithm is evaluated by the computer simulation of cone-beam spiral scanning geometry and various mathematical phantoms. The results demonstrate that the GSR algorithm generates much better image quality compared to conventional multislice reconstruction algorithms. For a table speed up to 100 mm per rotation, GSR demonstrates good image quality for both the low-contrast ball phantom and thorax phantom. All other performance parameters are comparable to the single-slice 180 deg. LI (linear interpolation) algorithm, which is considered the 'gold standard'. GSR also achieves high computing efficiency and good temporal resolution, making it an attractive alternative for the reconstruction of next generation multislice spiral CT data

  20. Testing an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M. C.; Silva, N. F.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2018-03-01

    The computed tomography (CT) is responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. Therefore, the radiation doses in this procedure must be accurate. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam yet. In order to search for a CT primary standard, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was tested in this work. The results showed to be within the international recommended limits.

  1. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry: description and standardization of the technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Silva, Luiz A.F.; Fioravanti, Maria C. S.; Barriviera, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Eleven dogs and four cats with buccodental alterations, treated in the Centro Veterinario do Gama, in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, were submitted to cone beam computed tomography. The exams were carried out in a i-CAT tomograph, using for image acquisition six centimeters height, 40 seconds time, 0.2 voxel, 120 kilovolts and 46.72 milli amperes per second. The ideal positioning of the animal for the exam was also determined in this study and it proved to be fundamental for successful examination, which required a simple and safe anesthetic protocol due to the relatively short period of time necessary to obtain the images. Several alterations and diseases were identified with accurate imaging, demonstrating that cone beam computed tomography is a safe, accessible and feasible imaging method which could be included in the small animal dentistry routine diagnosis. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Optic Canal and Surrounding Structures Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography: Considerations for Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanoglu, Alper; Orhan, Kaan; Kursun, Sebnem; Inceoglu, Beste; Oztas, Bengi

    2016-07-01

    The optic canal connects the anterior cranial fossa and the orbit and maintains the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery. Within the extent of the surgical approach of the region, risk of iatrogenic injury of the neural and vascular structures increases. The aim of this retrospective morphometric study is to investigate the radiological anatomy of orbita, optic canal, and its surrounding using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans in a group of Turkish population.Cone beam computed tomography images of a total of 182 patients were evaluated by 2 observers. Anatomical parameters regarding optic canal and orbita were measured for all patients from axial, sagittal, and three-dimensional reconstructed images. To assess intraobserver reliability, the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was used. Pearson χ test and Student t test were performed for statistical analysis of differences, sex, localization, and measurements (P  0.05). The orbita width and height were larger for the males than females (P  0.05). Examination CBCT scans revealed that the shape of the optic canal was 70% funnel and 28% Hourglass shape, 2% amorph type round.These results provide detailed knowledge of the anatomical characteristics in the orbital area which may be of assistance for surgeons preoperatively. Cone beam computed tomography scans can be an alternative modality for multislice computed tomography with submillimeter resolution and lower dose in preoperative imaging of the orbit.

  3. Contours identification of elements in a cone beam computed tomography for investigating maxillary cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioran, Doina; Nicoarǎ, Adrian; Roşu, Şerban; Cǎrligeriu, Virgil; Ianeş, Emilia

    2013-10-01

    Digital processing of two-dimensional cone beam computer tomography slicesstarts by identification of the contour of elements within. This paper deals with the collective work of specialists in medicine and applied mathematics in computer science on elaborating and implementation of algorithms in dental 2D imagery.

  4. The outcome of root-canal treatments assessed by cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Y.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, in-vivo and ex-vivo methods were utilized to assess the outcome of root canal treatments determined by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the reliability of the CBCT-findings. CBCT provided useful and reliable information leading to a better understanding of the outcome and

  5. Beam standardization of X radiation in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The ionization chamber used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT), is a cylindrical chamber, unsealed, with the sensitive length between 10 and 15 cm, named pencil ionization chamber. Because the doses involved in CT procedures are higher s than those in the procedures in radiology, it is very important to ensure the appropriate calibration of pencil ionization chambers and thus the accuracy of Dosimetric procedures. Recently, only the Calibration Laboratory, from Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, had standards fields of conventional radiodiagnostic, but not arrived to include the energy range used in CT. In this work, will be shown the results obtained in standard field of radiodiagnostic - all qualities of radiodiagnostic of series RQR (direct beam) and RQA (attenuated beam) described in IEC 61267 norm - in an industrial X-ray equipment of the Calibration Laboratory. The recommended qualities for the calibration of TC chambers are the qualities RQA9 and RQR9. The other qualities will be used for calibration of other radiodiagnostic dosimeters and also for a larger study of the energy dependence of the pencil ionization chambers

  6. The detailed evaluation of supernumerary teeth with the aid of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumen, E.C.; Yavuz, I.; Atakul, F.; Tumen, D.S.; Hamamci, N.; Berber, G.; Uysal, E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of a recently developed three-dimensional imaging system, cone beam computed tomography, in the detailed evaluation of supernumerary teeth. Two-hundred and twenty three patients with supernumerary teeth (68 females and 155 males) were included in this study. Patients ranged in age from 12 to 25 years. Supernumerary teeth were detected by clinical examination and traditional radiographies. Moreover, careful investigation for more details was made with the cone beam computed tomography. Supernumerary teeth which were detected with the examinations of the cone beam computed tomography images were classified according to the number, location, shape and eruption rate. The prevalence of supernumerary teeth was determined to be 1.45% of the study population. Males were affected more than females in a ratio of 2.3:1. Supernumerary teeth were most frequently located in 86.2% of the cases in the maxilla; 10.1% in the mandible and 3.7% both in the maxilla and mandible. Supernumerary teeth were most commonly conical in shape (68.8%). One supernumerary tooth was present in 67.7% of the patients, 30.9% had two, and 1.4% had three supernumeraries. Definite and early diagnosis of the supernumerary teeth is very important. Detailed examinations and evaluations of these teeth with three-dimensional images is very beneficial in terms of treatment planning and preventing complications which may occur.

  7. A study of incisive canal using a cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the anatomical structure of the incisive canal radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. 38 persons (male 26, female 12) were chosen to take images of maxillary anterior region in dental CT mode using a cone beam computed tomography. The tube voltage were 65, 67, and 70 kVp, the tube current was 7 mA, and the exposure time was 13.3 seconds. The FH plane of each person was parallel to the floor. The images were analysed on the CRT display. The mean length of incisive canal was 15.87 mm ± 2.92. The mean diameter at the side of palate and nasal fossa were 3.49 mm ± 0.76 and 3.89 mm ± 1.06, respectively. In the cross-sectional shape of incisive canal, 50% were round, 34.2% were ovoid, and 15.8% were lobulated. 87% of incisive canal at the side of nasal fossa have one canal, 10.4% have two canals, and 2.6% have three canals, but these canals were merged into one canal in the middle portion of palate. The mean angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were 110.3 ± 6.96 and 117.45 ± 7.41, respectively. The angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were least correlated (r 0.258). This experiment suggests that a cone beam computed radiography will be helpful in surgery or implantation on the maxillary incisive area.

  8. A study of incisive canal using a cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To investigate the anatomical structure of the incisive canal radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. 38 persons (male 26, female 12) were chosen to take images of maxillary anterior region in dental CT mode using a cone beam computed tomography. The tube voltage were 65, 67, and 70 kVp, the tube current was 7 mA, and the exposure time was 13.3 seconds. The FH plane of each person was parallel to the floor. The images were analysed on the CRT display. The mean length of incisive canal was 15.87 mm {+-} 2.92. The mean diameter at the side of palate and nasal fossa were 3.49 mm {+-} 0.76 and 3.89 mm {+-} 1.06, respectively. In the cross-sectional shape of incisive canal, 50% were round, 34.2% were ovoid, and 15.8% were lobulated. 87% of incisive canal at the side of nasal fossa have one canal, 10.4% have two canals, and 2.6% have three canals, but these canals were merged into one canal in the middle portion of palate. The mean angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were 110.3 {+-} 6.96 and 117.45 {+-} 7.41, respectively. The angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were least correlated (r 0.258). This experiment suggests that a cone beam computed radiography will be helpful in surgery or implantation on the maxillary incisive area.

  9. The accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Duk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing in rat model. Sprague-Dawely strain rats weighing about 350 gms were selected. Then critical size bone defects were done at parietal bone with implantation of collagen sponge. The rats were divided into seven groups of 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and 8 weeks. The healing of surgical defect was assessed by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images and three-dimensional (3-D) images of cone beam computed tomography, compared with soft X-ray radiograph and histopathologic examination. MPR images and 3-D images showed similar reformation of the healing amount at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks, however, lower reformation at 3 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks. According to imaging-based methodologies, MPR images revealed similar reformation of the healing mount than 3-D images compare with soft X-ray image. Among the four threshold values for 3-D images, 400-500 HU revealed similar reformation of the healing amount. Histopathologic examination confirmed the newly formed trabeculation correspond with imaging-based mythologies. MPR images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of bone defect healing

  10. Accuracy of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography on periapical radiolucency detection in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Daugela, Povilas; Strazdas, Marijus; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images) from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women) a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible) were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42) and radiographic (n = 24) examinations (P cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  11. Multi-mounted X-ray cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Wang, Jingzheng; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng

    2018-04-01

    As a powerful nondestructive inspection technique, X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) has been widely applied to clinical diagnosis, industrial production and cutting-edge research. Imaging efficiency is currently one of the major obstacles for the applications of X-CT. In this paper, a multi-mounted three dimensional cone-beam X-CT (MM-CBCT) method is reported. It consists of a novel multi-mounted cone-beam scanning geometry and the corresponding three dimensional statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The scanning geometry is the most iconic design and significantly different from the current CBCT systems. Permitting the cone-beam scanning of multiple objects simultaneously, the proposed approach has the potential to achieve an imaging efficiency orders of magnitude greater than the conventional methods. Although multiple objects can be also bundled together and scanned simultaneously by the conventional CBCT methods, it will lead to the increased penetration thickness and signal crosstalk. In contrast, MM-CBCT avoids substantially these problems. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed MM-CBCT prototype system. This technique will provide a possible solution for the CT inspection in a large scale.

  12. Pictorial review: Electron beam computed tomography and multislice spiral computed tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Klessen, Christian; Wiese, Till H.; Hoffmann, Udo; Hamm, Bernd; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) revolutionized cardiac imaging by combining a constant high temporal resolution with prospective ECG triggering. For years, EBCT was the primary technique for some non-invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures such as calcium scoring and non-invasive angiography of the coronary arteries. Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on the other hand significantly advanced cardiac imaging through high volume coverage, improved spatial resolution and retrospective ECG gating. This pictorial review will illustrate the basic differences between both modalities with special emphasis to their image quality. Several experimental and clinical examples demonstrate the strengths and limitations of both imaging modalities in an intraindividual comparison for a broad range of diagnostic applications such as coronary artery calcium scoring, coronary angiography including stent visualization as well as functional assessment of the cardiac ventricles and valves. In general, our examples indicate that EBCT suffers from a number of shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and a low contrast-to-noise ratio. Thus, EBCT should now only be used in selected cases where a constant high temporal resolution is a crucial issue, such as dynamic (cine) imaging. Due to isotropic submillimeter spatial resolution and retrospective data selection MSCT seems to be the non-invasive method of choice for cardiac imaging in general, and for assessment of the coronary arteries in particular. However, technical developments are still needed to further improve the temporal resolution in MSCT and to reduce the substantial radiation exposure

  13. Simulating the influence of scatter and beam hardening in dimensional computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, J. J.; Carmignato, S.

    2017-10-01

    Cone-beam x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is a radiographic scanning technique that allows the non-destructive dimensional measurement of an object’s internal and external features. XCT measurements are influenced by a number of different factors that are poorly understood. This work investigates how non-linear x-ray attenuation caused by beam hardening and scatter influences XCT-based dimensional measurements through the use of simulated data. For the measurement task considered, both scatter and beam hardening are found to influence dimensional measurements when evaluated using the ISO50 surface determination method. On the other hand, only beam hardening is found to influence dimensional measurements when evaluated using an advanced surface determination method. Based on the results presented, recommendations on the use of beam hardening and scatter correction for dimensional XCT are given.

  14. Comparison of Tissue Density in Hounsfield Units in Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshowsaz, Masoud; Goorang, Sepideh; Ehsani, Sara; Azizi, Zeynab; Rahimian, Sepideh

    2016-03-01

    Bone quality and quantity assessment is one of the most important steps in implant treatment planning. Different methods such as computed tomography (CT) and recently suggested cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with lower radiation dose and less time and cost are used for bone density assessment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the tissue density values in Hounsfield units (HUs) in CBCT and CT scans of different tissue phantoms with two different thicknesses, two different image acquisition settings and in three locations in the phantoms. Four different tissue phantoms namely hard tissue, soft tissue, air and water were scanned by three different CBCT and a CT system in two thicknesses (full and half) and two image acquisition settings (high and low kVp and mA). The images were analyzed at three sites (middle, periphery and intermediate) using eFilm software. The difference in density values was analyzed by ANOVA and correction coefficient test (P<0.05). There was a significant difference between density values in CBCT and CT scans in most situations, and CBCT values were not similar to CT values in any of the phantoms in different thicknesses and acquisition parameters or the three different sites. The correction coefficients confirmed the results. CBCT is not reliable for tissue density assessment. The results were not affected by changes in thickness, acquisition parameters or locations.

  15. Evaluation of imaging reformation with cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone density and shape in mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sang Woo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwan, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic estimation of destruction and formation of bone has the typical limit according to capacity of x-ray generator and image detector. So the aim of this study was to find out how much it can reproduce the shape and the density of bone in the case of using recently developed dental type of cone beam computed tomography, and which image is applied by new detector and mathematic calculation. Cone beam computed tomography (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and soft x-ray radiography were executed on dry mandible that was already decalcified during 5 hours, 10 hours, 15 hours, 20 hours, and 25 hours. Estimating and comparing of those came to the following results. The change of inferior border of mandible and anterior border of ramous in the region of cortical bone was observed between first 5 and 10 hours of decalcification. The reproduction of shape and density in the region of cortical bone and cancellous bone can be hardly observed at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. The difference of decrease of bone density according to hours of decalcification increase was not reproduced at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution. However, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity is the inferiority of images' property.

  16. Assessment of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions by cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Alexandre Perez; Perrella, Andreia; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pereira, Marlene Fenyo Soeiro de Matos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso, E-mail: alexperez34@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Estomatologia

    2010-10-15

    There are many limitations to image acquisition, using conventional radiography, of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a better option, due to its higher accuracy, for purposes of diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment of bone injuries. The aim of the present study was to analyze two protocols of cone beam computed tomography for the evaluation of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Spherical lesions were simulated in 30 dry mandibular condyles, using dentist drills and drill bits sizes 1, 3 and 6. Each of the mandibular condyles was submitted to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using two protocols: axial, coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR); and sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis of the mandibular condyles. For these protocols, 2 observers analyzed the CBCT images independently, regarding the presence or not of injuries. Only one of the observers, however, performed on 2 different occasions. The results were compared to the gold standard, evaluating the percentage of agreement, degree of accuracy of CBCT protocols and observers' examination. The z test was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 protocols. There was greater difficulty in the assessment of small-size simulated lesions (drill no.1). From the results of this study, it can be concluded that CBCT is an accurate tool for analyzing mandibular condyle bone lesions, with the MPR protocol showing slightly better results than the sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis. (author)

  17. Estimation of computed tomography dose index in cone beam computed tomography: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry; Toncheva, Greta; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang; Frush, Donald

    2010-05-01

    To address the lack of accurate dose estimation method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), we performed point dose metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) was employed to measure point doses in the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT phantoms with MOSFETs for standard and low dose modes. A MC model of the OBI x-ray tube was developed using BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system and validated by the half value layer, x-ray spectrum and lateral and depth dose profiles. We compared the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) between MOSFET measurements and MC simulations. The CTDIw was found to be 8.39 cGy for the head scan and 4.58 cGy for the body scan from the MOSFET measurements in standard dose mode, and 1.89 cGy for the head and 1.11 cGy for the body in low dose mode, respectively. The CTDIw from MC compared well to the MOSFET measurements within 5% differences. In conclusion, a MC model for Varian CBCT has been established and this approach may be easily extended from the CBCT geometry to multi-detector CT geometry.

  18. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation. PMID:26225116

  19. GPU-based cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Xu, Jinhui; Corso, Jason J; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Schafer, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is growing in the clinical arena due to its ability to provide 3D information during interventions, its high diagnostic quality (sub-millimeter resolution), and its short scanning times (60 s). In many situations, the short scanning time of CBCT is followed by a time-consuming 3D reconstruction. The standard reconstruction algorithm for CBCT data is the filtered backprojection, which for a volume of size 256(3) takes up to 25 min on a standard system. Recent developments in the area of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) make it possible to have access to high-performance computing solutions at a low cost, allowing their use in many scientific problems. We have implemented an algorithm for 3D reconstruction of CBCT data using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) provided by NVIDIA (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, California), which was executed on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280. Our implementation results in improved reconstruction times from minutes, and perhaps hours, to a matter of seconds, while also giving the clinician the ability to view 3D volumetric data at higher resolutions. We evaluated our implementation on ten clinical data sets and one phantom data set to observe if differences occur between CPU and GPU-based reconstructions. By using our approach, the computation time for 256(3) is reduced from 25 min on the CPU to 3.2 s on the GPU. The GPU reconstruction time for 512(3) volumes is 8.5 s. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of intensity variability in multislice and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Maes, Frederik; Yan, Hua; Couto Souza, Paulo; Pauwels, Ruben; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of intensity values in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging compared with multislice computed tomography Hounsfield units (MSCT HU) in order to assess the reliability of density assessments using CBCT images. A quality control phantom was scanned with an MSCT scanner and five CBCT scanners. In one CBCT scanner, the phantom was scanned repeatedly in the same and in different positions. Images were analyzed using registration to a mathematical model. MSCT images were used as a reference. Density profiles of MSCT showed stable HU values, whereas in CBCT imaging the intensity values were variable over the profile. Repositioning of the phantom resulted in large fluctuations in intensity values. The use of intensity values in CBCT images is not reliable, because the values are influenced by device, imaging parameters and positioning. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Movement of the patient and the cone beam computed tomography scanner: objectives and possible solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzelka, T.; Dušek, J.; Ocásek, F.; Kučera, J.; Šedý, Jiří; Beneš, J.; Pavlíková, G.; Foltán, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2013), s. 769-773 ISSN 2212-4403 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cone beam computed tomography * movement artifacts * dry-run scan Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.265, year: 2013

  2. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography scans in cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Pazera, A.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Berge, S.J.; Vissink, A.; Pazera, P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is frequently used in treatment planning for alveolar bone grafting (ABG) and orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). CBCT images may depict coincident findings. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of

  3. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  4. Integration of Digital Dental Casts in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all reported methods have drawbacks. The aim of this feasibility study is to present a new simplified method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. In a patient scheduled for orthognathic ...

  5. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography scans in cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Mette A. R.; Pazera, Andrzej; Admiraal, Ronald J.; Berge, Stefaan J.; Vissink, Arjan; Pazera, Pawel

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is frequently used in treatment planning for alveolar bone grafting (ABG) and orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). CBCT images may depict coincident findings. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of incidental findings

  6. Projection matrix acquisition for cone-beam computed tomography iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Wenlong; Zhang, Caixin; Gao, Zongzhao

    2017-02-01

    Projection matrix is an essential and time-consuming part in computed tomography (CT) iterative reconstruction. In this article a novel calculation algorithm of three-dimensional (3D) projection matrix is proposed to quickly acquire the matrix for cone-beam CT (CBCT). The CT data needed to be reconstructed is considered as consisting of the three orthogonal sets of equally spaced and parallel planes, rather than the individual voxels. After getting the intersections the rays with the surfaces of the voxels, the coordinate points and vertex is compared to obtain the index value that the ray traversed. Without considering ray-slope to voxel, it just need comparing the position of two points. Finally, the computer simulation is used to verify the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  7. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.; Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januario, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  8. Diagnosis and decision making in endodontics with the use of cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metska, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    In the current thesis the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been evaluated within the framework of ex vivo and in vivo studies. The first objective of the thesis was to examine whether CBCT scans can be used for the detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically

  9. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  10. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  11. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  12. Comparison of five cone beam computed tomography systems for the detection of vertical root fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Metska, M.E.; Ozok, A.R.; van der Stelt, P.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans made by five different systems in detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs). It also assessed the influence of the presence of root canal filling (RCF), CBCT slice orientation selection, and the type of tooth

  13. Accuracy assessment of three-dimensional surface reconstructions of teeth from cone beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Rawi, B.; Hassan, B.; Vandenberge, B.; Jacobs, R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models of the dentition obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming increasingly more popular in dentistry. A recent trend is to replace the traditional dental casts with digital CBCT models for diagnosis, treatment planning and simulation. The

  14. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice - from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  15. Combined X-ray fluorescence and absorption computed tomography using a synchrotron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, C

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) using synchrotron sources are both useful tools in biomedical imaging research. Synchrotron CT (SRCT) in its various forms is considered an important technique for biomedical imaging since the phase coherence of SR beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. Using a synchrotron as the source for FXCT ensures a fluorescence signal that is optimally detectable by exploiting the beam monochromaticity and polarisation. The ability to combine these techniques so that SRCT and FXCT images are collected simultaneously, would bring distinct benefits to certain biomedical experiments. Simultaneous image acquisition would alleviate some of the registration difficulties which comes from collecting separate data, and it would provide increased information about the sample: functional X-ray images from the FXCT, with the morphological information from the SRCT. A method is presented for generating simultaneous SRCT and FXCT images. Proof of principle modelling has been used to show that it is possible to recover a fluorescence image of a point-like source from an SRCT apparatus by suitably modulating the illuminating planar X-ray beam. The projection image can be successfully used for reconstruction by removing the static modulation from the sinogram in the normal flat and dark field processing. Detection of the modulated fluorescence signal using an energy resolving detector allows the position of a fluorescent marker to be obtained using inverse reconstruction techniques. A discussion is made of particular reconstruction methods which might be applied by utilising both the CT and FXCT data.

  16. Trabecular bone structure parameters from 3D image processing of clinical multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klintstroem, Eva; Smedby, Oerjan [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); UHL County Council of Oestergoetland, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Moreno, Rodrigo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH)/Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Brismar, Torkel B. [KUS Huddinge, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-02-15

    Bone strength depends on both mineral content and bone structure. The aim of this in vitro study was to develop a method of quantitatively assessing trabecular bone structure by applying three-dimensional image processing to data acquired with multi-slice and cone-beam computed tomography using micro-computed tomography as a reference. Fifteen bone samples from the radius were examined. After segmentation, quantitative measures of bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, trabecular nodes, and trabecular termini were obtained. The clinical machines overestimated bone volume and trabecular thickness and underestimated trabecular nodes and number, but cone-beam CT to a lesser extent. Parameters obtained from cone beam CT were strongly correlated with μCT, with correlation coefficients between 0.93 and 0.98 for all parameters except trabecular termini. The high correlation between cone-beam CT and micro-CT suggest the possibility of quantifying and monitoring changes of trabecular bone microarchitecture in vivo using cone beam CT. (orig.)

  17. Use of cone beam computed tomography in identifying postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro, C B; Chalub, L L F H; Abreu, M H N G; Barreiros, I D; Amaral, T M P; Kakehasi, A M; Mesquita, R A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to correlate radiometric indices from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. Quantitative CBCT indices can be used to screen for women with low BMD. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by the deterioration of bone tissue and the consequent decrease in BMD and increase in bone fragility. Several studies have been performed to assess radiometric indices in panoramic images as low-BMD predictors. The aim of this study is to correlate radiometric indices from CBCT images and BMD in postmenopausal women. Sixty postmenopausal women with indications for dental implants and CBCT evaluation were selected. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed, and the patients were divided into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Cross-sectional images were used to evaluate the computed tomography mandibular index (CTMI), the computed tomography index (inferior) (CTI (I)) and computed tomography index (superior) (CTI (S)). Student's t test was used to compare the differences between the indices of the groups' intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Statistical analysis showed a high degree of interobserver and intraobserver agreement for all measurements (ICC > 0.80). The mean values of CTMI, CTI (S), and CTI (I) were lower in the osteoporosis group than in osteopenia and normal patients (p < 0.05). In comparing normal patients and women with osteopenia, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean value of CTI (I) (p = 0.075). Quantitative CBCT indices may help dentists to screen for women with low spinal and femoral bone mineral density so that they can refer postmenopausal women for bone densitometry.

  18. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  20. Three-dimensional SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Jianying Li; Huili Wang; Coleman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cone beam (CB) collimation exhibits increased sensitivity compared with acquisition geometries using parallel (P) hole collimation. However, CB collimation has a smaller field-of-view which may result in truncated projections and image artifacts. A primary objective of this work is to investigate maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods to reconstruct simultaneously acquired parallel and cone beam (P and CB) SPECT data. Simultaneous P and CB acquisition can be performed with commercially available triple camera systems by using two cone-beam collimators and a single parallel-hole collimator. The loss in overall sensitivity (relative to the use of three CB collimators) is about 15 to 20%. The authors have developed three methods to combine P and CB data using modified ML-EM algorithms. (author)

  1. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of human jaw bone microarchitecture: correlation between the microarchitectural parameters of cone beam computed tomography and micro-computer tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jo-Eun; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul; Huh, Kyung-Hoe

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the potential feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the assessment of trabecular bone microarchitecture. Sixty-eight specimens from four pairs of human jaw were scanned using both micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of 19.37-μm voxel size and CBCT of 100-μm voxel size. The correlation of 3-dimensional parameters between CBCT and micro-CT was evaluated. All parameters, except bone-specific surface and trabecular thickness, showed linear correlations between the 2 imaging modalities (P < .05). Among the parameters, bone volume, percent bone volume, trabecular separation, and degree of anisotropy (DA) of CBCT images showed strong correlations with those of micro-CT images. DA showed the strongest correlation (r = 0.693). Most microarchitectural parameters from CBCT were correlated with those from micro-CT. Some microarchitectural parameters, especially DA, could be used as strong predictors of bone quality in the human jaw. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Yi, Huangjian; Zhang, Xianghan; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-03-01

    The appearance of x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging by x ray. In the previous XLCT system, the sample was irradiated by a sequence of narrow x-ray beams and the x-ray luminescence was measured by a highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera. This resulted in a relatively long sampling time and relatively low utilization of the x-ray beam. In this paper, a novel cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography strategy is proposed, which can fully utilize the x-ray dose and shorten the scanning time. The imaging model and reconstruction method are described. The validity of the imaging strategy has been studied in this paper. In the cone beam XLCT system, the cone beam x ray was adopted to illuminate the sample and a highly sensitive CCD camera was utilized to acquire luminescent photons emitted from the sample. Photons scattering in biological tissues makes it an ill-posed problem to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the x-ray luminescent sample in the cone beam XLCT. In order to overcome this issue, the authors used the diffusion approximation model to describe the photon propagation in tissues, and employed the sparse regularization method for reconstruction. An incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method and permissible region strategy were used for reconstruction. Meanwhile, traditional x-ray CT imaging could also be performed in this system. The x-ray attenuation effect has been considered in their imaging model, which is helpful in improving the reconstruction accuracy. First, simulation experiments with cylinder phantoms were carried out to illustrate the validity of the proposed compensated method. The experimental results showed that the location error of the compensated algorithm was smaller than that of the uncompensated method. The permissible region strategy was applied and reduced the reconstruction error to less than 2 mm. The robustness and stability were then

  4. Evaluation of dose from kV cone-beam computed tomography during radiotherapy: a comparison of methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J.; Wilkinson, D.; Malaroda, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    2017-01-01

    Three alternative methodologies to the Computed-Tomography Dose Index for the evaluation of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography dose are compared, the Cone-Beam Dose Index, IAEA Human Health Report No. 5 recommended methodology and the AAPM Task Group 111 recommended methodology. The protocols were evaluated for Pelvis and Thorax scan modes on Varian® On-Board Imager and Truebeam kV XI imaging systems. The weighted planar average dose was highest for the AAPM methodology across all scans, with the CBDI being the second highest overall. A 17.96% and 1.14% decrease from the TG-111 protocol to the IAEA and CBDI protocols for the Pelvis mode and 18.15% and 13.10% decrease for the Thorax mode were observed for the XI system. For the OBI system, the variation was 16.46% and 7.14% for Pelvis mode and 15.93% to the CBDI protocol in Thorax mode respectively.

  5. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: a comprehensive review. Part 2: applications associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohenca, N.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript

  6. The possible usability of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, I.; Rizal, M. F.; Kiswanjaya, B.

    2017-08-01

    The innovations and advantages of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography (3D CBCT) are continually growing for its potential use in dental research. Imaging techniques are important for planning research in dentistry. Newly improved 3D CBCT imaging systems and accessory computer programs have recently been proven effective for use in dental research. The aim of this study is to introduce 3D CBCT and open a window for future research possibilities that should be given attention in dental research.

  7. History of imaging in orthodontics from Broadbent to cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Mark G; Palomo, J Martin; Valiathan, Manish

    2015-12-01

    The history of imaging and orthodontics is a story of technology informing biology. Advances in imaging changed our thinking as our understanding of craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment deepened. This article traces the history of imaging in orthodontics from the invention of the cephalometer by B. Holly Broadbent in 1930 to the introduction of low-cost, low-radiation-dose cone-beam computed tomography imaging in 2015. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 2-D Low Energy Electron Beam Profile Measurement Based on Computer Tomography Algorithm with Multi-Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Nengjie; Li Qing Feng; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Zheng, Shuxin

    2005-01-01

    A new method for low energy electron beam profile measurement is advanced, which presents a full 2-D beam profile distribution other than the traditional 2-D beam profile distribution given by 1-D vertical and horizontal beam profiles. The method is based on the CT (Computer Tomography) algorithm. Multi-sets of data about the 1-D beam profile projections are attained by rotating the multi-wire scanner. Then a 2-D beam profile is reconstructed from these projections with CT algorithm. The principle of this method is presented. The simulation and the experiment results are compared and analyzed in detail.

  9. Detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically treated teeth by a cone beam computed tomography scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Metska, M.E.; Özok, A.R.; van der Stelt, P.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and periapical radiographs (PRs) in detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs) and to assess the influence of root canal filling (RCF) on fracture visibility. Eighty teeth were endodontically prepared and divided into

  10. Cone beam computed tomography in dentistry: what dental educators and learners should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Shawn; Zhang, Wenjian; Servos, Tom; O'Neill, Paula N

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry have identified the importance of providing outcomes related to the appropriate use of this innovative technology to practitioners, educators, and investigators. To assist in determining whether and what types of evidence exist, the authors conducted PubMed, Google, and Cochrane Library searches in the spring of 2011 using the key words "cone beam computed tomography and dentistry." This search resulted in over 26,900 entries in more than 700 articles including forty-one reviews recently published in national and international journals. This article is based on existing publications and studies and will provide readers with an overview of the advantages, disadvantages, and indications/contraindications of this emerging technology as well as some thoughts on the current educational status of CBCT in U.S. dental schools. It is the responsibility of dental educators to incorporate the most updated information on this technology into their curricula in a timely manner, so that the next generation of oral health providers and educators will be competent in utilizing this technology for the best interest of patients. To do so, there is a need to conduct studies meeting methodological standards to demonstrate the diagnostic efficacy of CBCT in the dental field.

  11. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  12. A rare case of dilated invaginated odontome with talon cusp in a permanent maxillary central incisor diagnosed by cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaya, Ranganathan; Kumar, Rangarajan Sundaresan Mohan; Srinivasan, Ramasamy [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Priyadarshini Dental College and Hospital, Chennai (India)

    2013-09-15

    It has been a challenge to establish the accurate diagnosis of developmental tooth anomalies based on periapical radiographs. Recently, three-dimensional imaging by cone beam computed tomography has provided useful information to investigate the complex anatomy of and establish the proper management for tooth anomalies. The most severe variant of dens invaginatus, known as dilated odontome, is a rare occurrence, and the cone beam computed tomographic findings of this anomaly have never been reported for an erupted permanent maxillary central incisor. The occurrence of talon cusp occurring along with dens invaginatus is also unusual. The aim of this report was to show the importance of cone beam computed tomography in contributing to the accurate diagnosis and evaluation of the complex anatomy of this rare anomaly.

  13. A rare case of dilated invaginated odontome with talon cusp in a permanent maxillary central incisor diagnosed by cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaya, Ranganathan; Kumar, Rangarajan Sundaresan Mohan; Srinivasan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been a challenge to establish the accurate diagnosis of developmental tooth anomalies based on periapical radiographs. Recently, three-dimensional imaging by cone beam computed tomography has provided useful information to investigate the complex anatomy of and establish the proper management for tooth anomalies. The most severe variant of dens invaginatus, known as dilated odontome, is a rare occurrence, and the cone beam computed tomographic findings of this anomaly have never been reported for an erupted permanent maxillary central incisor. The occurrence of talon cusp occurring along with dens invaginatus is also unusual. The aim of this report was to show the importance of cone beam computed tomography in contributing to the accurate diagnosis and evaluation of the complex anatomy of this rare anomaly.

  14. Cone-beam computed tomography: Time to move from ALARA to ALADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaju, Prashant P.; Jaju, Sushma P. [Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopa(Indonesia)

    2015-12-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is routinely recommended for dental diagnosis and treatment planning. CBCT exposes patients to less radiation than does conventional CT. Still, lack of proper education among dentists and specialists is resulting in improper referral for CBCT. In addition, aiming to generate high-quality images, operators may increase the radiation dose, which can expose the patient to unnecessary risk. This letter advocates appropriate radiation dosing during CBCT to the benefit of both patients and dentists, and supports moving from the concept of 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) to 'as low as diagnostically acceptable' (ALADA.

  15. Reproducibility of coronary calcification detection with electron-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernigou, A.; Challande, P.; Boudeville, J.C.; Sene, V.; Grataloup, C.; Plainfosse, M.

    1996-01-01

    If coronary calcification scores obtained with electron-beam computed tomography (EBT) were proved to be correlated to coronary atherosclerosis, the reproducibility of the technique had to be assessed before being useed for patient follow-up. A total of 150 patients, selected as a result of a cholesterol screening programme, were studied by EBT. Twelve contiguous 3-mm-thick transverse slices beginning on the proximal coronary arteries were obtained through the base of the heart. The amount of calcium was evaluated as the calcified area weighted by a coefficient depending on the density peak level. The value was expressed as a logarithmic scale. Intra-observer, inter-observer and inter-examination reproducibilities were calculated. They were 1.9, 1.3 and 7.2%, respectively. These results were good enough to allow the use of EBT for longitudinal studies. The influence of acquisition and calculation conditions on score computation were also analysed. (orig.)

  16. Cone-beam computed tomography in the management of dentigerous cyst of the jaws: A report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidya, Lakshminarayanan; Ranganathan, Kannan; Praveen, B; Gunaseelan, Rajan; Shanmugasundaram, S

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an emerging technology finding application in all branches of dentistry. The current series highlights the application of CBCT in the preoperative assessment of dentigerous cyst of the jaws

  17. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN. (author)

  18. Comparative evaluation of computed tomography for dental implants on the mandibular edentulous area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kyung Hoon; Jeong, Ho Gul; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Kim, Kee Deog [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral Science Research Center, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the recently developed multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in pre-operative implant evaluation, by comparing them with the single detector computed tomography, already confirmed for accuracy in this area. Five partially edentulous dry human mandibles, with 1 X 1 mm gutta percha cones, placed in 5 mm intervals posterior to the mental foramen on each side of the buccal part of the mandible, were used in this study. They were scanned as follows: 1) Single detector computed tomography: slice thickness 1 mm, 200 mA, 120 kV 2) Multi-detector computed tomography: slice thickness 0.75 mm, 250 mA, 120 kV 3) Cone beam computed tomography: 15 mAs, 120 kV Axial images acquired from three computed tomographs were transferred to personal computer, and then reformatted cross-sectional images were generated using V-Implant 2.0 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software. Among the cross-sectional images of the gutta percha cone, placed in the buccal body of the mandible, the most precise cross section was selected as the measuring point and the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest was measured and analyzed 10 times by a dentist. There were no significant intraobserver differences in the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest (p>0.05). There were no significant differences among single detector computed tomography, multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest (p>0.05). Multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography are clinically useful in the evaluation of pre-operative site for mandibular dental implants, with consideration for radiation exposure dose and scanning time.

  19. Comparative evaluation of computed tomography for dental implants on the mandibular edentulous area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kyung Hoon; Jeong, Ho Gul; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Kim, Kee Deog

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the recently developed multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in pre-operative implant evaluation, by comparing them with the single detector computed tomography, already confirmed for accuracy in this area. Five partially edentulous dry human mandibles, with 1 X 1 mm gutta percha cones, placed in 5 mm intervals posterior to the mental foramen on each side of the buccal part of the mandible, were used in this study. They were scanned as follows: 1) Single detector computed tomography: slice thickness 1 mm, 200 mA, 120 kV 2) Multi-detector computed tomography: slice thickness 0.75 mm, 250 mA, 120 kV 3) Cone beam computed tomography: 15 mAs, 120 kV Axial images acquired from three computed tomographs were transferred to personal computer, and then reformatted cross-sectional images were generated using V-Implant 2.0 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software. Among the cross-sectional images of the gutta percha cone, placed in the buccal body of the mandible, the most precise cross section was selected as the measuring point and the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest was measured and analyzed 10 times by a dentist. There were no significant intraobserver differences in the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest (p>0.05). There were no significant differences among single detector computed tomography, multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the distance from the most superior border of the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest (p>0.05). Multi-detector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography are clinically useful in the evaluation of pre-operative site for mandibular dental implants, with consideration for radiation exposure dose and scanning time.

  20. The Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarudi, Amir Hosein; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Safi, Yaser; Aghdasi, Mohammad Mehdi; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    By producing undistorted three-dimensional images of the area under examination, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems have met many of the limitations of conventional radiography. These systems produce images with small field of view at low radiation doses with adequate spatial resolution that are suitable for many applications in endodontics from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. This review article comprehensively assembles all the data from literature regarding the potential applications of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:25598804

  1. Effects of four instruments on coronal pre-enlargement by using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfelice, Cintia Mussoline; da Costa, Fernanda Botega; Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana; Souza Bier, Carlos Alexandre; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2010-05-01

    This ex vivo study used cone beam computed tomography to evaluate the amount of dentin removal from the distal wall of the mesial canal of human mandibular first molars caused by 4 instruments used to flare the cervical third. Thirty-two mesial roots were divided into 4 groups prepared by using ProTaper, K3, Gates-Glidden, or LA Axxess. The dentin thickness of the distal cervical wall of mesial canals was measured before and after the preparation by using computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop software. There was no statistically significant difference between the study groups (P > 05). All the instruments used for cervical preparation seemed to be safe and did not damage the dentin structure of the distal wall of mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cone-beam computed tomography analysis of curved root canals after mechanical preparation with three nickel-titanium rotary instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsherief, Samia M.; Zayet, Mohamed K.; Hamouda, Ibrahim M.

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography is a 3-dimensional high resolution imaging method. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different NiTi rotary instruments used to prepare curved root canals on the final shape of the curved canals and total amount of root canal transportation by using cone-beam computed tomography. A total of 81 mesial root canals from 42 extracted human mandibular molars, with a curvature ranging from 15 to 45 degrees, were selected. Canals were randomly divided into 3 groups of 27 each. After preparation with Protaper, Revo-S and Hero Shaper, the amount of transportation and centering ability that occurred were assessed by using cone beam computed tomography. Utilizing pre- and post-instrumentation radiographs, straightening of the canal curvatures was determined with a computer image analysis program. Canals were metrically assessed for changes (surface area, changes in curvature and transportation) during canal preparation by using software SimPlant; instrument failures were also recorded. Mean total widths and outer and inner width measurements were determined on each central canal path and differences were statistically analyzed. The results showed that all instruments maintained the original canal curvature well with no significant differences between the different files (P = 0.226). During preparation there was failure of only one file (the protaper group). In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, all instruments maintained the original canal curvature well and were safe to use. Areas of uninstrumented root canal wall were left in all regions using the various systems. PMID:23885273

  3. The measurement of proton stopping power using proton-cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, P.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Gall, K.P.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system utilizing a proton beam has been developed and tested. The cone beam is produced by scattering a 160 MeV proton beam with a modifier that results in a signal in the detector system, which decreases monotonically with depth in the medium. The detector system consists of a Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb intensifying screen viewed by a cooled CCD camera. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is applied to the projection data to obtain the CT voxel data representing proton stopping power. The system described is capable of reconstructing data over a 16x16x16cm 3 volume into 512x512x512 voxels. A spatial and contrast resolution phantom was scanned to determine the performance of the system. Spatial resolution is significantly degraded by multiple Coulomb scattering effects. Comparison of the reconstructed proton CT values with x-ray CT derived proton stopping powers shows that there may be some advantage to obtaining stopping powers directly with proton CT. The system described suggests a possible practical method of obtaining this measurement in vivo. (author)

  4. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  5. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland(United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Div. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed.

  6. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  7. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  8. Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, Irene

    2011-11-15

    There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6?18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation ...

  10. Quality control of a kV cone beam computed tomography imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, M.; Bodez, V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the introduction of a quality assurance program for the On-Board Imager (O.B.I., Varian) kV cone beam computed tomography (kV C.B.C.T.) system, together with the results of 1 year monthly testing. Materials and methods: Firstly the geometric precision and stability of the equipment and of the associated software were evaluated using the Marker phantom. The coincidence of the accelerator isocenter and the imager isocenter was verified as well as the accuracy of the registration of kV cone beam computed tomography (kV C.B.C.T.) with reference CT images. Then, the kV C.B.C.T. image quality was evaluated using the Catphan 504 phantom and ArtiScan software (Aquilab) for both full-fan (F.F.) and half-fan (H.F.) imaging modes. Results: The kV C.B.C.T. isocenter and image registration with correction of the table position were found to be within a tolerance of 2.0 mm. Concerning the kV C.B.C.T. image quality, image noise and uniformity, the Hounsfield units (HU) stability and linearity, geometric distortion and high contrast resolution were all found to be within the manufacturer's recommendations for both F.F. and H.F. modes. However, the low contrast resolution for the HF mode did not meet the manufacturer's specifications. Conclusion: The quality assurance tests introduced have defined the initial system characteristics and their evolution during a period of 1 year, demonstrating the stability of the O.B.I.. (authors)

  11. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography in temporal bone imaging for surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erovic, Boban M; Chan, Harley H L; Daly, Michael J; Pothier, David D; Yu, Eugene; Coulson, Chris; Lai, Philip; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging is the standard imaging technique for temporal bone diseases, whereas cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is a very fast imaging tool with a significant less radiation dose compared with conventional CT. We hypothesize that a system for intraoperative cone-beam CT provides comparable image quality to diagnostic CT for identifying temporal bone anatomical landmarks in cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study. University tertiary care facility. Twenty cadaveric temporal bones were affixed into a head phantom and scanned with both a prototype cone-beam CT C-arm and multislice helical CT. Imaging performance was evaluated by 3 otologic surgeons and 1 head and neck radiologist. Participants were presented images in a randomized order and completed landmark identification questionnaires covering 21 structures. CBCT and multislice CT have comparable performance in identifying temporal structures. Three otologic surgeons indicated that CBCT provided statistically equivalent performance for 19 of 21 landmarks, with CBCT superior to CT for the chorda tympani and inferior for the crura of the stapes. Subgroup analysis showed that CBCT performed superiorly for temporal bone structures compared with CT. The radiologist rated CBCT and CT as statistically equivalent for 18 of 21 landmarks, with CT superior to CBCT for the crura of stapes, chorda tympani, and sigmoid sinus. CBCT provides comparable image quality to conventional CT for temporal bone anatomical sites in cadaveric specimens. Clinical applications of low-dose CBCT imaging in surgical planning, intraoperative guidance, and postoperative assessment are promising but require further investigation.

  12. Neutron beam tomography software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbery, A.C.R.

    1988-05-01

    When a sample is traversed by a neutron beam, inhomogeneities in the sample will cause deflections, and the deflections will permit conclusions to be drawn concerning the location and size of the inhomogeneities. The associated computation is similar to problems in tomography, analogous to X-ray tomography though significantly different in detail. We do not have any point-sample information, but only mean values over short line segments. Since each mean value is derived from a separate neutron counter, the quantity of available data has to be modest; also, since each datum is an integral, its geometric precision is inferior to that of X-ray data. Our software is designed to cope with these difficulties. (orig.) [de

  13. Assessment of phantom dosimetry and image quality of i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, John B; Walker, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    The increasing use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics has been coupled with heightened concern about the long-term risks of x-ray exposure in orthodontic populations. An industry response to this has been to offer low-exposure alternative scanning options in newer cone-beam computed tomography models. Effective doses resulting from various combinations of field of view size and field location comparing child and adult anthropomorphic phantoms with the recently introduced i-CAT FLX cone-beam computed tomography unit (Imaging Sciences, Hatfield, Pa) were measured with optical stimulated dosimetry using previously validated protocols. Scan protocols included high resolution (360° rotation, 600 image frames, 120 kV[p], 5 mA, 7.4 seconds), standard (360°, 300 frames, 120 kV[p], 5 mA, 3.7 seconds), QuickScan (180°, 160 frames, 120 kV[p], 5 mA, 2 seconds), and QuickScan+ (180°, 160 frames, 90 kV[p], 3 mA, 2 seconds). Contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated as a quantitative measure of image quality for the various exposure options using the QUART DVT phantom. Child phantom doses were on average 36% greater than adult phantom doses. QuickScan+ protocols resulted in significantly lower doses than standard protocols for the child (P = 0.0167) and adult (P = 0.0055) phantoms. The 13 × 16-cm cephalometric fields of view ranged from 11 to 85 μSv in the adult phantom and 18 to 120 μSv in the child phantom for the QuickScan+ and standard protocols, respectively. The contrast-to-noise ratio was reduced by approximately two thirds when comparing QuickScan+ with standard exposure parameters. QuickScan+ effective doses are comparable with conventional panoramic examinations. Significant dose reductions are accompanied by significant reductions in image quality. However, this trade-off might be acceptable for certain diagnostic tasks such as interim assessment of treatment results. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc

  14. Anatomical Variation of the Maxillary Sinus in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lupion Poleti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this paper is to report a case in which the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was important for the confirmation of the presence of maxillary sinus septum and, therefore, the absence of a suspected pathologic process. Case Description. A 27-year-old male patient was referred for the assessment of a panoramic radiograph displaying a radiolucent area with radiopaque border located in the apical region of the left upper premolars. The provisional diagnosis was either anatomical variation of the maxillary sinuses or a bony lesion. Conclusion. The CBCT was important for an accurate assessment and further confirmation of the presence of maxillary septum, avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations.

  15. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  16. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  17. Computed gray levels in multislice and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Fabiane; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Enciso, Reyes; Weissheimer, Andre; de Oliveira, Rogério Belle

    2013-07-01

    Gray level is the range of shades of gray in the pixels, representing the x-ray attenuation coefficient that allows for tissue density assessments in computed tomography (CT). An in-vitro study was performed to investigate the relationship between computed gray levels in 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanners and 1 multislice spiral CT device using 5 software programs. Six materials (air, water, wax, acrylic, plaster, and gutta-percha) were scanned with the CBCT and CT scanners, and the computed gray levels for each material at predetermined points were measured with OsiriX Medical Imaging software (Geneva, Switzerland), OnDemand3D (CyberMed International, Seoul, Korea), E-Film (Merge Healthcare, Milwaukee, Wis), Dolphin Imaging (Dolphin Imaging & Management Solutions, Chatsworth, Calif), and InVivo Dental Software (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The repeatability of these measurements was calculated with intraclass correlation coefficients, and the gray levels were averaged to represent each material. Repeated analysis of variance tests were used to assess the differences in gray levels among scanners and materials. There were no differences in mean gray levels with the different software programs. There were significant differences in gray levels between scanners for each material evaluated (P <0.001). The software programs were reliable and had no influence on the CT and CBCT gray level measurements. However, the gray levels might have discrepancies when different CT and CBCT scanners are used. Therefore, caution is essential when interpreting or evaluating CBCT images because of the significant differences in gray levels between different CBCT scanners, and between CBCT and CT values. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of -11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  19. A theoretically exact reconstruction algorithm for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Sun Yi; Zhu Peiping

    2013-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) reconstruction problems are usually solved by using parallel-, fan- or cone-beam algorithms. For rod-shaped objects, the x-ray beams cannot recover all the slices of the sample at the same time. Thus, if a rod-shaped sample is required to be reconstructed by the above algorithms, one should alternately perform translation and rotation on this sample, which leads to lower efficiency. The helical cone-beam CT may significantly improve scanning efficiency for rod-shaped objects over other algorithms. In this paper, we propose a theoretically exact filter-backprojection algorithm for helical cone-beam DPC-CT, which can be applied to reconstruct the refractive index decrement distribution of the samples directly from two-dimensional differential phase-contrast images. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the proposed algorithm. Our work provides a potential solution for inspecting the rod-shaped samples using DPC-CT, which may be applicable with the evolution of DPC-CT equipments. (paper)

  20. Cone Beam X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography Based on Bayesian Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanglei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie; Luo, Jianwen; Xie, Yaoqin; Bai, Jing; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), which aims to achieve molecular and functional imaging by X-rays, has recently been proposed as a new imaging modality. Combining the principles of X-ray excitation of luminescence-based probes and optical signal detection, XLCT naturally fuses functional and anatomical images and provides complementary information for a wide range of applications in biomedical research. In order to improve the data acquisition efficiency of previously developed narrow-beam XLCT, a cone beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) mode is adopted here to take advantage of the useful geometric features of cone beam excitation. Practically, a major hurdle in using cone beam X-ray for XLCT is that the inverse problem here is seriously ill-conditioned, hindering us to achieve good image quality. In this paper, we propose a novel Bayesian method to tackle the bottleneck in CB-XLCT reconstruction. The method utilizes a local regularization strategy based on Gaussian Markov random field to mitigate the ill-conditioness of CB-XLCT. An alternating optimization scheme is then used to automatically calculate all the unknown hyperparameters while an iterative coordinate descent algorithm is adopted to reconstruct the image with a voxel-based closed-form solution. Results of numerical simulations and mouse experiments show that the self-adaptive Bayesian method significantly improves the CB-XLCT image quality as compared with conventional methods.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of cone beam computed tomography scanning protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Maria Rosangela

    2015-01-01

    It was evaluated the cone beam computed tomography, CBCT scanning protocols, that was introduced in dental radiology at the end of the 1990's, and quickly became a fundamental examination for various procedures. Its main characteristic, the difference of medical CT is the beam shape. This study aimed to calculate the absorbed dose in eight tissues / organs of the head and neck, and to estimate the effective dose in 13 protocols and two techniques (stitched FOV e single FOV) of 5 equipment of different manufacturers of cone beam CT. For that purpose, a female anthropomorphic phantom was used, representing a default woman, in which were inserted thermoluminescent dosimeters at several points, representing organs / tissues with weighting values presented in the standard ICRP 103. The results were evaluated by comparing the dose according to the purpose of the tomographic image. Among the results, there is a difference up to 325% in the effective dose in relation to protocols with the same image goal. In relation to the image acquisition technique, the stitched FOV technique resulted in an effective dose of 5.3 times greater than the single FOV technique for protocols with the same image goal. In the individual contribution, the salivary glands are responsible for 31% of the effective dose in CT exams. The remaining tissues have also a significant contribution, 36%. The results drew attention to the need of estimating the effective dose in different equipment and protocols of the market, besides the knowledge of the radiation parameters and equipment manufacturing engineering to obtain the image. (author)

  2. Cone beam computed tomography: A boon for maxillofacial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Rao Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day to day practice, the radiographic techniques used individually or in combination suffer from some inherent limits of all planar two-dimensional (2D projections such as magnification, distortion, superimposition, and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region, heralds a major shift from 2D to three-dimensional (3D approach. It provides a complete 3D view of the maxilla, mandible, teeth, and supporting structures with relatively high resolution allowing a more accurate diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring, and analysis of outcomes than conventional 2D images, along with low radiation exposure to the patient. CBCT has opened up new vistas for the use of 3D imaging as a diagnostic and treatment planning tool in dentistry. This paper provides an overview of the imaging principles, underlying technology, dental applications, and in particular focuses on the emerging role of CBCT in dentistry.

  3. Accuracy of Digital Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Periapical Radiolucency Detection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Venskutonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. Results: In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42 and radiographic (n = 24 examinations (P < 0.05. In molar teeth, CBCT identify a significantly higher amount of periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P < 0.05. There were significant differences between CBCT and PR in the mean number of lesions identified per tooth (1.2 vs 0.66, P = 0.03, number of teeth with lesions (0.71 vs 0.46, P = 0.03 and number of lesions identified per canal (0.57 vs 0.33, P = 0.005. Considering CBCT as “gold standard” in lesion detection with the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy considering as score 1, then the same parameters of PR were 0.57, 1 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  4. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  5. Quality assessment and enhancement for cone-beam computed tomography in dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Sung Chae

    2006-02-01

    Cone-beam CT will become increasingly important in diagnostic imaging modality in the dental practice over the next decade. For dental diagnostic imaging, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system based on large area flat panel imager has been designed and developed for three-dimensional volumetric image. The new CBCT system can provide a 3-D volumetric image during only one circular scanning with relatively short times (20-30 seconds) and requires less radiation dose than that of conventional CT. To reconstruct volumetric image from 2-D projection images, FDK algorithm was employed. The prototype of our CBCT system gives the promising results that can be efficiently diagnosed. This dissertation deals with assessment, enhancement, and optimization for dental cone-beam computed tomography with high performance. A new blur estimation method was proposed, namely model based estimation algorithm. Based on the empirical model of the PSF, an image restoration is applied to radiological images. The accuracy of the PSF estimation under Poisson noise and readout electronic noise is significantly better for the R-L estimator than the Wiener estimator. In the image restoration experiment, the result showed much better improvement in the low and middle range of spatial frequency. Our proposed algorithm is more simple and effective method to determine 2-D PSF of the x-ray imaging system than traditional methods. Image based scatter correction scheme to reduce the scatter effects was proposed. This algorithm corrects scatter on projection images based on convolution, scatter fraction, and angular interpolation. The scatter signal was estimated by convolving a projection image with scatter point spread function (SPSF) followed by multiplication with scatter fraction. Scatter fraction was estimated using collimator which is similar to SPECS method. This method does not require extra x-ray dose and any additional phantom. Maximum estimated error for interpolation was less than 7

  6. Accurate technique for complete geometric calibration of cone-beam computed tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho Youngbin; Moseley, Douglas J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography systems have been developed to provide in situ imaging for the purpose of guiding radiation therapy. Clinical systems have been constructed using this approach, a clinical linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy RP) and an iso-centric C-arm. Geometric calibration involves the estimation of a set of parameters that describes the geometry of such systems, and is essential for accurate image reconstruction. We have developed a general analytic algorithm and corresponding calibration phantom for estimating these geometric parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) systems. The performance of the calibration algorithm is evaluated and its application is discussed. The algorithm makes use of a calibration phantom to estimate the geometric parameters of the system. The phantom consists of 24 steel ball bearings (BBs) in a known geometry. Twelve BBs are spaced evenly at 30 deg in two plane-parallel circles separated by a given distance along the tube axis. The detector (e.g., a flat panel detector) is assumed to have no spatial distortion. The method estimates geometric parameters including the position of the x-ray source, position, and rotation of the detector, and gantry angle, and can describe complex source-detector trajectories. The accuracy and sensitivity of the calibration algorithm was analyzed. The calibration algorithm estimates geometric parameters in a high level of accuracy such that the quality of CT reconstruction is not degraded by the error of estimation. Sensitivity analysis shows uncertainty of 0.01 deg. (around beam direction) to 0.3 deg. (normal to the beam direction) in rotation, and 0.2 mm (orthogonal to the beam direction) to 4.9 mm (beam direction) in position for the medical linear accelerator geometry. Experimental measurements using a laboratory bench Cone-beam CT system of known geometry demonstrate the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in the imaging geometry with an uncertainty of 0.1 mm in

  7. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Liver Cancer Using Respiratory-Correlated Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Mueller, Gerd; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 ± 4 mm and 5 ± 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion

  8. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography: case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Abella

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new method that produces three-dimensional (3D information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissue, with a lower effective radiation dose than traditional CT scans. Specific endodontic applications for CBCT are being identified as the use of this technology becomes more common. CBCT has great potential to become a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing endodontic problems, as well as for assessing root fractures, apical periodontitis, resorptions, perforations, root canal anatomy and the nature of the alveolar bone topography around teeth. This article aims to review cone beam technology and its advantages over CT scans and conventional radiography, to illustrate current and future clinical applications in endodontic practice, and to highlight areas of further research of CBCT in endodontics. Specific case examples illustrate how treatment planning has changed with the images obtained with CBCT technology compared with only periapical radiography.

  9. Automated method for structural segmentation of nasal airways based on cone beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymkovych, Maksym Yu.; Avrunin, Oleg G.; Paliy, Victor G.; Filzow, Maksim; Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Glasmacher, Birgit; Omiotek, Zbigniew; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Smailova, Saule; Kozbekova, Ainur

    2017-08-01

    The work is dedicated to the segmentation problem of human nasal airways using Cone Beam Computed Tomography. During research, we propose a specialized approach of structured segmentation of nasal airways. That approach use spatial information, symmetrisation of the structures. The proposed stages can be used for construction a virtual three dimensional model of nasal airways and for production full-scale personalized atlases. During research we build the virtual model of nasal airways, which can be used for construction specialized medical atlases and aerodynamics researches.

  10. Accuracy and reliability of a novel method for fusion of digital dental casts and cone beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Breuning, K.H.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental

  11. Maxillary first molars with six canals confirmed with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahra Mohammad Al-Habboubi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary first molar exhibits unpredictable root canal morphology. Different number of root canals has been reported with the aids of new tools. It is very important to clinically detect all canals for better outcome results. The purpose of the present case is to present a case of the maxillary first molar in a Saudi male patient with an anatomical variation of having six root canals that were confirmed with cone-beam computed tomography.

  12. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions wer...

  13. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  14. X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Wang Jue; Chen Weimin

    2009-01-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials. (authors)

  15. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  16. Asymptomatic radiopaque lesions of the jaws. A radiographic study using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Masao; Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Ohnishi, Masaaki; Honda, Kazuya; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) were used to analyze asymptomatic radiopaque lesions in the jaw bones and determine the diagnostic relevance of the lesions based on their relationships to teeth and site of origin. One hundred radiopaque lesions detected between 1998 and 2002 were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT. On the basis of panoramic radiographs, the region was classified as periapical, body, or edentulous, and the site was classified as molar or premolar. Follow-up data from medical records were available for only 36 of these cases. The study protocol for simultaneous use of cone-beam CT was approved by the ethics review board of our institution. A large majority of radiopaque lesions were observed in premolar and molar sites of the mandible; 60% of lesions were periapical, 24% were in the body, and 16% were in the edentulous region. An interesting type of radiopaque lesion, which we named a pearl shell structure (PSS), was observed on cone-beam CT in 34 of the 100 lesions. The PSS is a distinctive structure, and this finding on cone-beam CT likely represents the start of bone formation before bone sclerosis. (author)

  17. Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Golamian, Masoud; Shahrzad, Maryam; Hajalioghli, Parisa; Shahmorady, Zahra; Fouladi, Daniel F; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Akhoundzadeh, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility of buccal bone measurements at dental implants with cone beam computed tomography in the esthetic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sufficient buccal bone is important for optimal esthetic results of implant treatment in the anterior region. It can be measured with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), but background scattering and problems with standardization of the measurements are encountered. The aim was to

  19. Evaluation of the Prevalence of Complete Isthmii in Permanent Teeth Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Haghanifar, Sina; Moudi, Ehsan; Madani, Zahrasadat; Farahbod, Foroozan; Bijani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The current study aimed at determining the prevalence of complete isthmii in permanent teeth, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a selected Iranian community. Methods and Materials: In this cross sectional study, 100 CBCT images (from 58 female and 42 male patients) including 1654 teeth (809 maxillary and 845 mandibular teeth) were evaluated. Each tooth root was evaluated in axial plane (interval, 0.1 mm; thickness, 0.1 mm) from the orifice to the apex and from the ap...

  20. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were g...

  1. Conservative Management of Type III Dens in Dente Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens in dente, also known as dens invaginatus, dilated composite odontoma, or deep foramen caecum, is a developmental malformation that usually affects maxillary incisor teeth, particularly lateral incisors. It may occur in teeth anywhere within the jaws, other locations are comparatively rare. It can occur within both the crown and the root, although crown invaginations are more common. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is very helpful in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. In this case we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and endodontic management of a Type III dens in dente (Oehler′s Type III.

  2. Analisis gambaran histogramdan densitas kamar pulpa pada gigi suspek pulpitis reversibel dan ireversibel dengan menggunakan radiografi cone beam computed tomography (Histogram and density analysis of irreversible and reversible pulpitissuspected tooth using cone beam computed tomography radiography)

    OpenAIRE

    Lusi Epsilawati; Suhardjo Sitam; Sam Belly; Fahmi Oscandar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the pulp is most common and difficult to diagnose. For it radiographs is necessary. One attempt to do is to assess its histogram and density. Radiography equipment that has the ability to analyze is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study is to analyze radiograph of the pulp chamber histogram: peak value, grayscale and trends , as well as the density on the condition reversible and irreversible pulpitis condition. The population of this ...

  3. Comparison of Adsorbed Skin Dose Received by Patients in Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Spiral and Conventional Computed Tomography Scanninng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The evaluation of absorbed dose received by patients could give useful information for radiation risk estimation. This study was performed to compare the entrance skin dose received by patients in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, conventional and spiral computed tomography (CT.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 81 calibrated TLD chips were used. the TLD chips were placed on facial, thyroid and end of sternum skin surface in patients referred for CT of the paranasal sinuses(3 TLD chips for each area to estimate the absorbed dose received by central part of radiation field, thyroid and out of field areas, respectively. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The dose delivered to the center of irradiated field was about 0.79±0.09 mGy in CBCT technique compared with 16.31±3.71 and 18.84±4.12 mGy for spiral and conventional CT, respectively. The received dose by the out of field areas was about 54 percent of central area dose. There was statistical significant relationship between the imaging modalities and absorbed dose received by patients (P=0.016. The least absorbed dose was for CBCT and the greatest dose was for conventional CT imaging technique.Conclusion: The dose delivered to central area of irradiated field in conventional and spiral CT imaging modalities was about 24 times greater than of that in CBCT. Also, the highest received dose was for central area of radiated field and the lowest dose was for the out of field areas.

  4. Illustrated computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book provides the following information: basic aspects of computed tomography; atlas of computed tomography of the normal adult; clinical application of computed tomography; and radiotherapy planning and computed tomography

  5. Evaluation of canalis basilaris medianus using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Ali Z.; Zahedpasha, Samir; Rathore, Sonali A.; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present two cases of canalis basilaris medianus as identified on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the base of the skull. The CBCT data sets were sent for radiographic consultation. In both cases, multi-planar views revealed an osseous defect in the base of the skull in the clivus region, the sagittal view showed a unilateral, well-defined, non-corticated, track-like low-attenuation osseous defect in the clivus. The appearance of the defect was highly reminiscent of a fracture of the clivus. The borders of osseous defect were smooth, and no other radiographic signs suggestive of osteolytic destructive processes were noted. Based on the overall radiographic examination, a radiographic impression of canalis basilaris medianus was made. Canalis basilaris medianus is a rare anatomical variant and is generally observed on the clivus. Due to its potential association with meningitis, it should be recognized and reported to avoid potential complications

  6. Evaluation of canalis basilaris medianus using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z.; Zahedpasha, Samir [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, CWRU School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland (United States); Rathore, Sonali A. [Dept. of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, VCU School of Dentistry, Richmond (United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Dept. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this report is to present two cases of canalis basilaris medianus as identified on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the base of the skull. The CBCT data sets were sent for radiographic consultation. In both cases, multi-planar views revealed an osseous defect in the base of the skull in the clivus region, the sagittal view showed a unilateral, well-defined, non-corticated, track-like low-attenuation osseous defect in the clivus. The appearance of the defect was highly reminiscent of a fracture of the clivus. The borders of osseous defect were smooth, and no other radiographic signs suggestive of osteolytic destructive processes were noted. Based on the overall radiographic examination, a radiographic impression of canalis basilaris medianus was made. Canalis basilaris medianus is a rare anatomical variant and is generally observed on the clivus. Due to its potential association with meningitis, it should be recognized and reported to avoid potential complications.

  7. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications

  8. Volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Jin Ho; Seo, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Sae Rom; Kang, Ju Hee; Oh, Song Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of object shape and distance from the center of the image on the volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, according to different parameters of tube voltage and current. Four geometric objects (cylinder, cube, pyramid, and hexagon) with predefined dimensions were fabricated. The objects consisted of Teflon-perfluoroalkoxy embedded in a hydrocolloid matrix (Dupli-Coe-Loid TM; GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), encased in an acrylic resin cylinder assembly. An Alphard Vega Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire CBCT images. OnDemand 3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software was used for object segmentation and image analysis. The accuracy was expressed by the volume error (VE). The VE was calculated under 3 different exposure settings. The measured volumes of the objects were compared to the true volumes for statistical analysis. The mean VE ranged from −4.47% to 2.35%. There was no significant relationship between an object's shape and the VE. A significant correlation was found between the distance of the object to the center of the image and the VE. Tube voltage affected the volume measurements and the VE, but tube current did not. The evaluated CBCT device provided satisfactory volume measurements. To assess volume measurements, it might be sufficient to use serial scans with a high resolution, but a low dose. This information may provide useful guidance for assessing volume measurements.

  9. Volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Jin Ho; Seo, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Sae Rom; Kang, Ju Hee; Oh, Song Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of object shape and distance from the center of the image on the volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, according to different parameters of tube voltage and current. Four geometric objects (cylinder, cube, pyramid, and hexagon) with predefined dimensions were fabricated. The objects consisted of Teflon-perfluoroalkoxy embedded in a hydrocolloid matrix (Dupli-Coe-Loid TM; GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), encased in an acrylic resin cylinder assembly. An Alphard Vega Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire CBCT images. OnDemand 3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software was used for object segmentation and image analysis. The accuracy was expressed by the volume error (VE). The VE was calculated under 3 different exposure settings. The measured volumes of the objects were compared to the true volumes for statistical analysis. The mean VE ranged from −4.47% to 2.35%. There was no significant relationship between an object's shape and the VE. A significant correlation was found between the distance of the object to the center of the image and the VE. Tube voltage affected the volume measurements and the VE, but tube current did not. The evaluated CBCT device provided satisfactory volume measurements. To assess volume measurements, it might be sufficient to use serial scans with a high resolution, but a low dose. This information may provide useful guidance for assessing volume measurements

  10. Determination and evaluation of intra fractional and set-up changes during radiotherapy to the cervical carcinoma using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Pankaj; Kumar, Rajesh; Birbiya, Narendra; Mishra, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Manisha; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    To confirm the accuracy of the location of the Fudicial markings in relation to the actual isocentre of the irradiated volume due to Intra-fractional and Set-Up changes in Cancer Cervix with the help of Cone Beam computed Tomography (CBCT)

  11. A local region of interest image reconstruction via filtered backprojection for fan-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has been experimentally implemented using a conventional source combined with several gratings. Images were reconstructed using a parallel-beam reconstruction formula. However, parallel-beam reconstruction formulae are not directly applicable for a large image object where the parallel-beam approximation fails. In this note, we present a new image reconstruction formula for fan-beam DPC-CT. There are two major features in this algorithm: (1) it enables the reconstruction of a local region of interest (ROI) using data acquired from an angular interval shorter than 180 0 + fan angle and (2) it still preserves the filtered backprojection structure. Numerical simulations have been conducted to validate the image reconstruction algorithm. (note)

  12. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study , an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance ( P < 0.05. Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections ( P = 0.299. In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners ( P < 0.001, with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners ( P < 0.001, with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants.

  13. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models

  14. Motion-compensated cone beam computed tomography using a conjugate gradient least-squares algorithm and electrical impedance tomography imaging motion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengpen, T; Soleimani, M

    2015-06-13

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that has been used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). For applications such as lung radiation therapy, CBCT images are greatly affected by the motion artefacts. This is mainly due to low temporal resolution of CBCT. Recently, a dual modality of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and CBCT has been proposed, in which the high temporal resolution EIT imaging system provides motion data to a motion-compensated algebraic reconstruction technique (ART)-based CBCT reconstruction software. High computational time associated with ART and indeed other variations of ART make it less practical for real applications. This paper develops a motion-compensated conjugate gradient least-squares (CGLS) algorithm for CBCT. A motion-compensated CGLS offers several advantages over ART-based methods, including possibilities for explicit regularization, rapid convergence and parallel computations. This paper for the first time demonstrates motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using CGLS and reconstruction results are shown in limited data CBCT considering only a quarter of the full dataset. The proposed algorithm is tested using simulated motion data in generic motion-compensated CBCT as well as measured EIT data in dual EIT-CBCT imaging. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulation Study of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Industrial Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2008-01-01

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) provides for an invaluable non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting source. For many applications of radioisotopes for medical and industrial application, not only the positional information of the distribution of radioisotopes is needed but also its strength. The well-established X-ray radiography or transmission tomography techniques do not yield sufficient quantitative information about these objects. Emission tomography is one of the important methods for such characterization. Application of parallel beam, fan beam and 3D cone beam emission tomography methods have been discussed in this paper. Simulation studies to test these algorithms have been carried out to validate the technique.

  16. Comparison of hand and semiautomatic tracing methods for creating maxillofacial artificial organs using sequences of computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bence T; Aksoy, Seçil; Repassy, Gabor; Csomo, Krisztian; Dobo-Nagy, Csaba; Orhan, Kaan

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to compare the paranasal sinus volumes obtained by manual and semiautomatic imaging software programs using both CT and CBCT imaging. 121 computed tomography (CT) and 119 cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations were selected from the databases of the authors' institutes. The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images were imported into 3-dimensonal imaging software, in which hand mode and semiautomatic tracing methods were used to measure the volumes of both maxillary sinuses and the sphenoid sinus. The determined volumetric means were compared to previously published averages. Isometric CBCT-based volume determination results were closer to the real volume conditions, whereas the non-isometric CT-based volume measurements defined coherently lower volumes. By comparing the 2 volume measurement modes, the values gained from hand mode were closer to the literature data. Furthermore, CBCT-based image measurement results corresponded to the known averages. Our results suggest that CBCT images provide reliable volumetric information that can be depended on for artificial organ construction, and which may aid the guidance of the operator prior to or during the intervention.

  17. Identification and Endodontic Management of Middle Mesial Canal in Mandibular Second Molar Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatments are routinely done with the help of radiographs. However, radiographs represent only a two-dimensional image of an object. Failure to identify aberrant anatomy can lead to endodontic failure. This case report presents the use of three-dimensional imaging with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT as an adjunct to digital radiography in identification and management of mandibular second molar with three mesial canals.

  18. An electron beam linear scanning mode for industrial limited-angle nano-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiang; Zeng, Li; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Lingli; Guo, Yumeng; Gong, Changcheng

    2018-01-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT), which utilizes X-rays to research the inner structure of some small objects and has been widely utilized in biomedical research, electronic technology, geology, material sciences, etc., is a high spatial resolution and non-destructive research technique. A traditional nano-CT scanning model with a very high mechanical precision and stability of object manipulator, which is difficult to reach when the scanned object is continuously rotated, is required for high resolution imaging. To reduce the scanning time and attain a stable and high resolution imaging in industrial non-destructive testing, we study an electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system that can avoid mechanical vibration and object movement caused by the continuously rotated object. Furthermore, to further save the scanning time and study how small the scanning range could be considered with acceptable spatial resolution, an alternating iterative algorithm based on ℓ0 minimization is utilized to limited-angle nano-CT reconstruction problem with the electron beam linear scanning mode. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system.

  19. Computed tomography from photon statistics to modern cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Buzug, T M

    2008-01-01

    Tis book provides an overview of X-ray technology, the historic developmental milestones of modern CT systems, and gives a comprehensive insight into the main reconstruction methods used in computed tomography. Te basis of reconstr- tion is, undoubtedly, mathematics. However, the beauty of computed tomography cannot be understood without a detailed knowledge of X-ray generation, photon- matter interaction, X-ray detection, photon statistics, as well as fundamental signal processing concepts and dedicated measurement systems. Terefore, the reader will ?nd a number of references to these basic d

  20. Thickness of the Buccal Plate in Posterior Teeth: A Prospective Cone Beam Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Kayleigh Eaves; Schoolfield, John; Noujeim, Marcel E; Huynh-Ba, Guy; Lasho, David J; Mealey, Brian L

    Buccal plate thickness is an important clinical parameter for postextraction implant treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to assess buccal plate thickness of the posterior maxilla and mandible using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 265 patients and 934 teeth met the inclusion criteria for this study. CBCT volumes were taken and aligned for measurement at the ideal midsagittal cross-section. Buccal plate thickness was measured at 1, 3, and 5 mm apical to the alveolar crest. The frequency of thick (≥ 1 mm), thin (teeth.

  1. Clinical application of electron beam computed tomography in intravenous three-dimensional coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chufan; Du Zhimin; Hu Chengheng; Li Yi; Zeng Wutao; Ma Hong; Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of intravenous three-dimensional coronary angiography using electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) as compared with selective coronary angiography. Methods: Intravenous EBCT and selective coronary angiography were performed during the same period in 38 patients. The value of EBCT angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease was evaluated. Results: The number of coronary arteries adequately evaluated by EBCT angiography was 134 out of 152 vessels (88.2%), including 100% of the left main coronary arteries, 94.7% of the left anterior descending arteries, 81.6% of the left circumflex arteries and 76.3 % of the right coronary arteries. Significantly more left main and heft anterior descending coronary arteries were adequately visualized than the left circumflex and right coronary arteries (P < 0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value of EBCT angiography for diagnosing coronary artery disease were 88.0%, 84.6%, 86.8%, 91.7% and 78.6%, respectively. Of the 38 arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis, EBCT underestimated 8, for a sensitivity of 78.9%. Of the 96 arteries without significant stenosis, EBCT overestimated 7 stenosis, for a specificity of 92.7%. Conclusion: Intravenous electron beam computed tomographic coronary angiography is a promising noninvasive method for diagnosing coronary artery disease

  2. Diagnostic value of electron-beam computed tomography (EBT). I. cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Lembcke, A.; Rogalla, P.; Taupitz, M.; Wiese, T.H.; Hammm, B.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Felix, R.; Knollmann, F.D.; Georgi, M.; Weisser, G.; Lehmann, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam tomography (EBT) directly competes with other non-invasive imaging modalities, such as multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiography, in the diagnostic assessment of cardiac diseases. EBT is the gold standard for the detection and quantification of coronary calcium as a preclinical sign of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its standardized examination protocols and the broad experience with this method favor EBT. First results with multislice CT indicate that this new technology may be equivalent to EBT for coronary calcium studies. The principal value of CT-based coronary calcium measurements continues to be an issue of controversy amongst radiologists and cardiologists due to lack of prospective randomized trials. Coronary angiography with EBT is characterized by a high negative predictive value and, in addition, may be indicated in some patients with manifest CAD. It remains to be shown whether coronary angiography with multislice CT is reliable and accurate enough to be introduced into the routine work-up, to replace some of the many strictly diagnostic coronary catheterizations in Germany and elsewhere. Assessment of coronary stent patency with EBT is associated with several problems and in our opinion cannot be advocated as a routine procedure. EBT may be recommended for the evaluation of coronary bypasses to look for bypass occlusions and significant stenoses, which, however, can be equally well achieved with multislice CT. Quantification of myocardial perfusion with EBT could not replace MRI or other modalities in this field. EBT has proven to be accurate, reliable and in some instances equivalent to MRI, which is the gold standard for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of cardiac function. Some disadvantages not the least of which is the limited distribution of electron beam scanners, favor MRI for functional assessment of the heart. (orig.) [de

  3. Characteristics of kilovoltage x-ray beams used for cone-beam computed tomography in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, George X; Duggan, Dennis M; Coffey, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the beams produced by a kilovoltage (kV) imager integrated into a linear accelerator (Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator) for acquiring high resolution volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the patient on the treatment table. The x-ray tube is capable of generating photon spectra with kVp values between 40 and 125 kV. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristics of kV beams and the properties of imaged target scatters. The Monte Carlo results were benchmarked against measurements, and excellent agreements were obtained. We also studied the effect of including the electron impact ionization (EII), and the simulation showed that the characteristic radiation is increased significantly in the energy spectra when EII is included. Although only slight beam hardening is observed in the spectra of all photons after passing through the phantom target, there is a significant difference in the spectra and angular distributions between scattered and primary photons. The results also show that the photon fluence distributions are significantly altered by adding bow tie filters. The results indicate that a combination of large cone-beam field size and large imaged target significantly increases scatter-to-primary ratios for photons that reach the detector panel. For phantoms 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm thick of water placed at the isocentre, the scatter-to-primary ratios are 0.94, 3.0 and 7.6 respectively for an open 125 kVp CBCT beam. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the increase of the scatter is proportional to the increase of the imaged volume, and this also applies to scatter-to-primary ratios. This study shows both the magnitude and the characteristics of scattered x-rays. The knowledge obtained from this investigation may be useful in the future design of the image detector to improve the image quality

  4. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota [Dept. of Endodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Paulista State University, Aracatuba(Brazil); Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores [School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Oliveira Santos, Christiano [Dept. of Stomatology, Oral Public Health, and Forensic Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Neves, Frederico Sampaio [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  5. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota; Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Oliveira Santos, Christiano; Neves, Frederico Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  6. AAE and AAOMR Joint Position Statement: Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics 2015 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The following statement was prepared by the Special Committee to Revise the Joint American Association of Endodontists/American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Position on Cone Beam Computed Tomography, and approved by the AAE Board of Directors and AAOMR Executive Council in May 2015. AAE members may reprint this position statement for distribution to patients or referring dentists. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Calcium score of small coronary calcifications on multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groen, J M; Kofoed, K F; Zacho, M

    2013-01-01

    Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) underestimates the coronary calcium score as compared to electron beam tomography (EBT). Therefore clinical risk stratification based on MDCT calcium scoring may be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a new phantom which...

  8. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and value in an imaging technique field through the comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars. Participants consisted of 100 patients offered the images through cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography. PSR-9000TM Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) was used as the unit of cone beam computed tomography. CE-II (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) and Pro Max (Planmeca Oy, Finland) were used as the unit of panoramic radiography. The images obtained through panoramic radiography were classified into 3 types according to the distance between mandibular canal and root of mandibular third molar. And they were classified into 4 types according to the proximity of radiographic feature. The images obtained through cone beam computed tomography based on the classification above were classified into 4 types according to the location between the mandibular canal and the root and were analyzed. And they were classified into buccal, inferior, lingual, and between roots, according to the location between mandibular canal and root. The data were statistically analyzed and estimated by x2-test. 1. There was no statistical significance according to 3 types (type I, type II, type III) through CBCT. 2. The results of 4 types (type A, type B, type C, type D) through CBCT were as high prevalence of CBCT 1 in type A, CBCT 2 in type B, CBCT 3 in type C, and CBCT1 in type D and those of which showed statistical significance (P value=0.03). 3. The results according to location between mandibular canal and root through CBCT recorded each 49, 25, 17, 9 as buccal, inferior, lingual, between roots. When estimating the mandibular canal and the roots through the panoramic radiography, it could be difficult to drive the views of which this estimation was considerable. Thus it is required to

  9. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  10. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  11. Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, J.T.; Berndt, D.C.; Zehnder, M. [University of Basel, Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital for Oral Surgery, Oral Radiology and Oral Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Schumacher, R. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Institute for Medical and Analytical Technologies, Muttenz (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to generate three-dimensional models based on digital volumetric data that can be used in basic and advanced education. Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan). Datasets were exported as Dicom formats and imported into Mimics and Magic software programs to separate the different tissues such as nerve, tooth and bone. These data were transferred to a Polyjet 3D Printing machine (Eden 330, Object, Israel) to generate the models. Three-dimensional prototype models of certain limited anatomical structures as acquired volumetrically were fabricated. Generating three-dimensional models based on CBCT datasets is possible. Automated routine fabrication of these models, with the given infrastructure, is too time-consuming and therefore too expensive. (orig.)

  12. Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, J.T.; Berndt, D.C.; Zehnder, M.; Schumacher, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate three-dimensional models based on digital volumetric data that can be used in basic and advanced education. Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan). Datasets were exported as Dicom formats and imported into Mimics and Magic software programs to separate the different tissues such as nerve, tooth and bone. These data were transferred to a Polyjet 3D Printing machine (Eden 330, Object, Israel) to generate the models. Three-dimensional prototype models of certain limited anatomical structures as acquired volumetrically were fabricated. Generating three-dimensional models based on CBCT datasets is possible. Automated routine fabrication of these models, with the given infrastructure, is too time-consuming and therefore too expensive. (orig.)

  13. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  14. Development and characterization of special ionization chambers for computed tomography beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa Costa de

    2016-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging procedures is growing due to advances in the CT equipment technology, because they allow the obtention of images with better resolution than through other techniques. Therefore, they are responsible for increasing the dose radiation of patients during the procedure. This fact led to a greater concern about the doses received by patients who undergo this type of examination. To perform the dosimetry in CT beams, the most widely used instrument is the pencil type ionization chamber, because this dosimeter has a uniform response to the incident radiation beam for all angles. The conventional ionization chamber, which is available on the market, has a sensitive volume length of 10 cm; however, some studies have shown that this dosimeter has underestimated the dose values. Therefore, in this study two ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm and 30 cm, making use of low cost national materials, were developed at the Calibration Laboratory of Instruments (LCI-IPEN/CNEN). The characterization of these chambers was performed, and the results were obtained within the international recommended limits. As an application, the developed ionization chambers and a commercial chamber were tested in a clinical tomograph. The developed ionization chambers were analyzed in a complete way for their possible uses. (author)

  15. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin, E-mail: kayipmaz@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Sezgin, Omer Said, E-mail: omersaidsezgin@gmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra, E-mail: senem_tugra@hotmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Can, Gamze, E-mail: gcanktu@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  16. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Omer Said; Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra; Can, Gamze

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  17. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: a comprehensive review. Part 1: applications associated with endodontic treatment and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohenca, N.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new technology that produces three-dimensional (3D) digital imaging at reduced cost and less radiation for the patient than traditional CT scans. It also delivers faster and easier image acquisition. By providing a 3D representation of the maxillofacial

  18. Mathematics in computed tomography and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical basis of computed tomography (CT) was formulated in 1917 by Radon. His theorem states that the 2-D function f(x,y) can be determined at all points from a complete set of its line integrals. Modern methods of image reconstruction include three approaches: algebraic reconstruction techniques with simultaneous iterative reconstruction or simultaneous algebraic reconstruction; convolution back projection; and the Fourier transform method. There is no one best approach. Because the experimental data do not strictly satisfy theoretical models, a number of effects have to be taken into account; in particular, the problems of beam geometry, finite beam dimensions and distribution, beam scattering, and the radiation source spectrum. Tomography with truncated data is of interest, employing mathematical approximations to compensate for the unmeasured projection data. Mathematical techniques in image processing and data analysis are also extensively used. 13 refs

  19. High speed computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydan, D.; Shepp, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray generation and detection apparatus for use in a computer assisted tomography system which permits relatively high speed scanning. A large x-ray tube having a circular anode (3) surrounds the patient area. A movable electron gun (8) orbits adjacent to the anode. The anode directs into the patient area xrays which are delimited into a fan beam by a pair of collimating rings (21). After passing through the patient, x-rays are detected by an array (22) of movable detectors. Detector subarrays (23) are synchronously movable out of the x-ray plane to permit the passage of the fan beam

  20. Beam Based RF Voltage Measurements and Longitudinal Beam Tomography at the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab

    2017-10-19

    Increasing proton beam power on neutrino production targets is one of the major goals of the Fermilab long term accelerator programs. In this effort, the Fermilab 8 GeV Booster synchrotron plays a critical role for at least the next two decades. Therefore, understanding the Booster in great detail is important as we continue to improve its performance. For example, it is important to know accurately the available RF power in the Booster by carrying out beam-based measurements in order to specify the needed upgrades to the Booster RF system. Since the Booster magnetic field is changing continuously measuring/calibrating the RF voltage is not a trivial task. Here, we present a beam based method for the RF voltage measurements. Data analysis is carried out using computer programs developed in Python and MATLAB. The method presented here is applicable to any RCS which do not have flat-bottom and flat-top in the acceleration magnetic ramps. We have also carried out longitudinal beam tomography at injection and extraction energies with the data used for RF voltage measurements. Beam based RF voltage measurements and beam tomography were never done before for the Fermilab Booster. The results from these investigations will be very useful in future intensity upgrades.

  1. Cone-beam computed tomography fusion and navigation for real-time positron emission tomography-guided biopsies and ablations: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Mielekamp, Peter; Noordhoek, Niels; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Millo, Corina; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J

    2012-06-01

    To describe a novel technique for multimodality positron emission tomography (PET) fusion-guided interventions that combines cone-beam computed tomography (CT) with PET/CT before the procedure. Subjects were selected among patients scheduled for a biopsy or ablation procedure. The lesions were not visible with conventional imaging methods or did not have uniform uptake on PET. Clinical success was defined by adequate histopathologic specimens for molecular profiling or diagnosis and by lack of enhancement on follow-up imaging for ablation procedures. Time to target (time elapsed between the completion of the initial cone-beam CT scan and first tissue sample or treatment), total procedure time (time from the moment the patient was on the table until the patient was off the table), and number of times the needle was repositioned were recorded. Seven patients underwent eight procedures (two ablations and six biopsies). Registration and procedures were completed successfully in all cases. Clinical success was achieved in all biopsy procedures and in one of the two ablation procedures. The needle was repositioned once in one biopsy procedure only. On average, the time to target was 38 minutes (range 13-54 min). Total procedure time was 95 minutes (range 51-240 min, which includes composite ablation). On average, fluoroscopy time was 2.5 minutes (range 1.3-6.2 min). An integrated cone-beam CT software platform can enable PET-guided biopsies and ablation procedures without the need for additional specialized hardware. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bapst, Blanche, E-mail: blanchebapst@hotmail.com; Lagadec, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.lagadec@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France); Breguet, Romain, E-mail: romain.breguet@hcuge.ch [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: Valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr; Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France)

    2016-01-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures.

  3. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography: A new approach to the diagnosis and treatment planning of impacted mandibular third molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazirska, P.; Yordanov, G.; Angelova, I.; Kanazirski, N.

    2017-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new method in dental practice which raises a more precise diagnosis and correct treatment plan. The image of the impacted teeth and surrounding structures with CBCT are with better quality and informativity than the conventional imaging-diagnostic methods . The use of CBCT to determine the ratio of the impacted teeth to the mandibular canal is necessary for the prevention of complications associated with iatrogenic trauma to the vascular- nerve bundle. The aim of this study was to determine the anatomic relationship between the roots of impacted third molars and mandibular canal using CBCT imaging. The studied patients with impacted third molars of the mandible are 127, aged 17 through 60.They were examined with Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). From the 195 impacted third molar with the - higher frequency are those in which the channel is below their roots-107 teeth (54.9%). The second frequency are the teeth where the channel is located lingually-57 (29.2%). Follow the teeth, in which the channel has a buccal location-25 (12.8%). With the lowest frequency are cases in which the mandibular canal is between the roots of impacted teeth-6 teeth (3.1%).At 132 teeth (67.7%) mandibular canal is at a distance of 1 mm. At 63 teeth (32.3%) the channel is at a distance of over 1 mm. The high resolution cuts in different planes and three-dimensional reconstructions made substantially as set forth preferred for different specialists in dentistry. Precise measurements of the bone around the mandibular canal prevent damage to neurovascular bundle. This makes the method preferred for planning appropriate treatment. Key words: Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Impacted Third Molars. Mandibular Canal [bg

  4. A review of setup error in supine breast radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: Vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    Setup error in breast radiotherapy (RT) measured with 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more common. The purpose of this study is to review the literature relating to the magnitude of setup error in breast RT measured with CBCT. The different methods of image registration between CBCT and planning computed tomography (CT) scan were also explored. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with the following key words: breast cancer, RT, setup error, and CBCT. This review includes studies that reported on systematic and random errors, and the methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan. A total of 11 relevant studies were identified for inclusion in this review. The average magnitude of error is generally less than 5 mm across a number of studies reviewed. The common registration methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan are based on bony anatomy, soft tissue, and surgical clips. No clear relationships between the setup errors detected and methods of registration were observed from this review. Further studies are needed to assess the benefit of CBCT over electronic portal image, as CBCT remains unproven to be of wide benefit in breast RT.

  5. A review of setup error in supine breast radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Holloway, Lois; Delaney, Geoff P.

    2016-01-01

    Setup error in breast radiotherapy (RT) measured with 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more common. The purpose of this study is to review the literature relating to the magnitude of setup error in breast RT measured with CBCT. The different methods of image registration between CBCT and planning computed tomography (CT) scan were also explored. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with the following key words: breast cancer, RT, setup error, and CBCT. This review includes studies that reported on systematic and random errors, and the methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan. A total of 11 relevant studies were identified for inclusion in this review. The average magnitude of error is generally less than 5 mm across a number of studies reviewed. The common registration methods used when registering CBCT scans with planning CT scan are based on bony anatomy, soft tissue, and surgical clips. No clear relationships between the setup errors detected and methods of registration were observed from this review. Further studies are needed to assess the benefit of CBCT over electronic portal image, as CBCT remains unproven to be of wide benefit in breast RT.

  6. Three-dimensional evaluation of pharyngeal airway in individuals with varying growth patterns using cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan Diwakar; Maninder Singh Sidhu; Mona Prabhakar; Seema Grover; Ritu Phogat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharyngeal airway volume in individuals with different vertical growth patterns. Methods: Cone beam computed tomography scans were evaluated of 40 subjects with the age range from 14 to 25 years and were divided into three groups. Horizontal growers consisted of 13 subjects, normal growers consisted of 14 subjects, and the vertical growers consisted of 13 subjects. The pharyngeal airway volume was measured using In Vivo Dental 5.1 so...

  7. Computed tomography for light materials using a monochromatic X-ray beam produced by parametric X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Y., E-mail: yahayak@lebra.nihon-u.ac.jp [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Inagaki, M. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Kaneda, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Nakao, K.; Nogami, K. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Sakae, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Sakai, T.; Sato, I. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba 305-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for light materials such as soft biological tissues was performed using a monochromatic X-ray beam provided by a parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) source at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) of Nihon University. Using a high-efficiency flat panel detector (FPD), each projection image for CT was taken with exposure times of 5 or 10 s, and 60–360 projection images in each run were obtained with total measurement time of 5 min to 1 h. CT images were obtained from the projection images using the conventional calculation method. The typical tomograms obtained had sharp outlines, which are likely attributable to the propagation-based phase contrast.

  8. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  9. Rare finding of Eustachian tube calcifications with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali Z; Hawkins, Anna; Alluri, Leela Subashini; Jadallah, Buthainah; Shahid, Kiran; Landers, Michael; Assaf, Hussein M

    2017-12-01

    Soft tissue calcification is a pathological condition in which calcium and phosphate salts are deposited in the soft tissue organic matrix. This study presents an unusual calcification noted in the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube. A 67-year-old woman presented for dental treatment, specifically for implant placement, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed. The CBCT scan was reviewed by a board-certified oral and maxillofacial radiologist and revealed incidental findings of 2 distinct calcifications in the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube. To the authors' knowledge, no previous study has reported the diagnosis of Eustachian tube calcification using CBCT. This report describes an uncommon variant of Eustachian tube calcification, which has a significant didactic value because such cases are seldom illustrated either in textbooks or in the literature. This case once again underscores the importance of having CBCT scans evaluated by a board-certified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

  10. Comparison of micro-computerized tomography and cone-beam computerized tomography in the detection of accessory canals in primary molars

    OpenAIRE

    Acar, Buket; Kamburo?lu, K?van?; Tatar, ?lkan; Ar?kan, Volkan; ?elik, Hakan Hamdi; Y?ksel, Selcen; ?zen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the accuracy of micro-computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting accessory canals in primary molars. Materials and Methods Forty-one extracted human primary first and second molars were embedded in wax blocks and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. After the images were taken, the samples were processed using a clearing technique and examined under a stereomicroscope in order to establish the gold standard for this s...

  11. [Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in endodontics: rational case selection criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2016-01-01

    To present rational case selection criteria for the use of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) in endodontics. This article reviews the literature concerning the benefits of CBCT in endodontics, alongside its radiation risks, and present case selection criteria for referral of endodontic patients to CBCT. Up to date, the expected ultimate benefit of CBCT to the endodontic patient is yet uncertain, and the current literature is mainly restricted to its technical efficacy. In addition, the potential radiation risks of CBCT scan are stochastic in nature and uncertain, and are worrying especially in pediatric patients. Both the efficacy of CBCT in supporting the endodontic practitioner decision making and in affecting treatment outcomes, and its long term potential radiation risks are yet uncertain. Therefore, a cautious rational decision making is essential when a CBCT scan is considered in endodontics. Risk-benefit considerations are presented.

  12. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nada, R.M.; Maal, T.J.J.; Breuning, K.H.; Berge, S.J.; Mostafa, Y.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D) assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans.

  13. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility of linear measurements on digital models obtained from intraoral and cone-beam computed tomography scans of alginate impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiranto, Matthew G.; Engelbrecht, W. Petrie; Nolthenius, Heleen E. Tutein; van der Meer, W. Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Digital 3-dimensional models are widely used for orthodontic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of digital models obtained from the Lava Chairside Oral scanner (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and cone-beam computed tomography scans

  14. Image quality assessment of three limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography devices in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in dento-maxillo-facial radiology, many CBCT devices with different technical aspects and characteristics were produced. Technical variations between CBCT and acquisition settings could involve image quality differences. In order to compare the performance of three limited field-of-view CBCT devices, an objective and subjective evaluation of image quality was carried out using an ex-vivo phantom, which combines both diagnostic and technical features. A significant difference in image quality was found between the five acquisition protocols of the study. (author) [fr

  15. Development of a proton Computed Tomography Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md. [Delhi U.; Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Boi, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Erdelyi, B. [Northern Illinois U.; Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois U.; Krider, J. [Northern Illinois U.; Rukalin, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois U.; Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois U.; Fordt, R. [Fermilab; Sellberg, G. [Fermilab; Rauch, J. E. [Fermilab; Roman, M. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab; Wilson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-02-04

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Assisted Endodontic Management of a Rare Case of Mandibular First Premolar with Three Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Balakasireddy, K; Kumar, K Pavan; John, Gijo; Gagan, C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the morphological anatomy of the root and root canal systems of the teeth increases the success rate of endodontic therapy. Advanced diagnostic imaging techniques like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are an essential aid in understanding the anatomy of teeth especially in mandibular premolars. Most commonly mandibular first and second premolars have a single root and a single canal. However, multiple root and canals have also been reported. The present case report discusses...

  17. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  19. Variability of four-dimensional computed tomography patient models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos; van Herk, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the interfractional variability in lung tumor trajectory and mean position during the course of radiation therapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Repeat four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (median, nine scans/patient) routinely acquired during the course of

  20. Evaluation of artifacts generated by zirconium implants in cone-beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Bechara, Boulos B; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Noujeim, Marcel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate zirconium implant artifact production in cone beam computed tomography images obtained with different protocols. One zirconium implant was inserted in an edentulous mandible. Twenty scans were acquired with a ProMax 3D unit (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland), with acquisition settings ranging from 70 to 90 peak kilovoltage (kVp) and voxel sizes of 0.32 and 0.16 mm. A metal artifact reduction (MAR) tool was activated in half of the scans. An axial slice through the middle region of the implant was selected for each dataset. Gray values (mean ± standard deviation) were measured in two regions of interest, one close to and the other distant from the implant (control area). The contrast-to-noise ratio was also calculated. Standard deviation decreased with greater kVp and when the MAR tool was used. The contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher when the MAR tool was turned off, except for low resolution with kVp values above 80. Selection of the MAR tool and greater kVp resulted in an overall reduction of artifacts in images acquired with low resolution. Although zirconium implants do produce image artifacts in cone-bean computed tomography scans, the setting that best controlled artifact generation by zirconium implants was 90 kVp at low resolution and with the MAR tool turned on. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A simulation-based study on the influence of beam hardening in X-ray computed tomography for dimensional metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Joseph J; Malcolm, Andrew A; McBride, John W

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a radiographic scanning technique for visualising cross-sectional images of an object non-destructively. From these cross-sectional images it is possible to evaluate internal dimensional features of a workpiece which may otherwise be inaccessible to tactile and optical instruments. Beam hardening is a physical process that degrades the quality of CT images and has previously been suggested to influence dimensional measurements. Using a validated simulation tool, the influence of spectrum pre-filtration and beam hardening correction are evaluated for internal and external dimensional measurements. Beam hardening is shown to influence internal and external dimensions in opposition, and to have a greater influence on outer dimensions compared to inner dimensions. The results suggest the combination of spectrum pre-filtration and a local gradient-based surface determination method are able to greatly reduce the influence of beam hardening in X-ray CT for dimensional metrology.

  2. Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of maxilla with its analysis on cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan R Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO is a rare mixed odontogenic tumor which shows properties of both ameloblastic fibroma and odontoma. It commonly affects children and young adults. In most cases, it is asymptomatic but may cause painless, slow growing swelling and discomfort. Radiologically, it is a well-circumscribed, mixed radiopaque and radiolucent entity consisting of radiolucency within which radiopaque foci of various sizes and shapes are seen. Histological examination shows both hard and soft tissue. The treatment of AFO usually conservative due to their benign biological behavior and consists of enucleation or surgical curettage. The purpose of this article is to present a case of an AFO in the posterior maxilla, along with discussion on clinical, radiological (including cone beam computed tomography scan, histological findings, and treatment of this tumor.

  3. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  4. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  5. Role of cone beam computed tomography in the prompt diagnosis of a nasopalatine duct cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Panjwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasopalatine duct cyst (NPDC is the most common of all the developmental, epithelial, and non-odontogenic cysts of the maxilla, believed to originate from the epithelial remnants of the nasopalatine duct. Typically, the lesion is asymptomatic and is detected accidentally on a radiograph. The definite diagnosis must be based on the clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Frequently misdiagnosed, the NPDC is not rare. The motive of reporting an entity that is not very rare is that the lesion is mostly misdiagnosed, and to emphasize the importance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the diagnosis and optimized treatment planning of NPDCs.

  6. Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Dentistry: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sagrika; Chug, Ashi; Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I

    2017-11-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning are the backbone of any medical therapy; for this reason, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was introduced and has been widely used. CBCT technology provides a three-dimensional image viewing, enabling exact location and extent of lesions or any anatomical region. For the very same reason, CBCT can not only be used for surgical fields but also for fields such as endodontics, prosthodontics, and orthodontics for appropriate treatment planning and effective dental care. The aim and clinical significance of this review are to update dental clinicians on the CBCT applications in each dental specialty for an appropriate diagnosis and more predictable treatment.

  7. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78{sub 0}.84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images.

  8. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2007-01-01

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78 0 .84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images

  9. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO"R phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500"R, ProMax"R 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax"R 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 μSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 μSv (SD = 0.31 μSv). For the CS 9500"R, the ED was 88 and 86 μSv (SD = 0.95 μSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam. (authors)

  10. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  11. Development and implementation of a low-cost phantom for quality control in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, W. O.; Navarro, M. V. T.; Maia, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    A phantom for quality control in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners was designed and constructed, and a methodology for testing was developed. The phantom had a polymethyl methacrylate structure filled with water and plastic objects that allowed the assessment of parameters related to quality control. The phantom allowed the evaluation of essential parameters in CBCT as well as the evaluation of linear and angular dimensions. The plastics used in the phantom were chosen so that their density and linear attenuation coefficient were similar to those of human facial structures. Three types of CBCT equipment, with two different technological concepts, were evaluated. The results of the assessment of the accuracy of linear and angular dimensions agreed with the existing standards. However, other parameters such as computed tomography number accuracy, uniformity and high-contrast detail did not meet the tolerances established in current regulations or the manufacturer's specifications. The results demonstrate the importance of establishing specific protocols and phantoms, which meet the specificities of CBCT. The practicality of implementation, the quality control test results for the proposed phantom and the consistency of the results using different equipment demonstrate its adequacy. (authors)

  12. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...

  13. A novel image-domain-based cone-beam computed tomography enhancement algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Li Tianfang; Yang Yong; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful, E-mail: lix@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image-guided radiotherapy. However, due to a large cone-beam angle, scatter effects significantly degrade the CBCT image quality and limit its clinical application. The goal of this study is to develop an image enhancement algorithm to reduce the low-frequency CBCT image artifacts, which are also called the bias field. The proposed algorithm is based on the hypothesis that image intensities of different types of materials in CBCT images are approximately globally uniform (in other words, a piecewise property). A maximum a posteriori probability framework was developed to estimate the bias field contribution from a given CBCT image. The performance of the proposed CBCT image enhancement method was tested using phantoms and clinical CBCT images. Compared to the original CBCT images, the corrected images using the proposed method achieved a more uniform intensity distribution within each tissue type and significantly reduced cupping and shading artifacts. In a head and a pelvic case, the proposed method reduced the Hounsfield unit (HU) errors within the region of interest from 300 HU to less than 60 HU. In a chest case, the HU errors were reduced from 460 HU to less than 110 HU. The proposed CBCT image enhancement algorithm demonstrated a promising result by the reduction of the scatter-induced low-frequency image artifacts commonly encountered in kV CBCT imaging.

  14. Hybrid simulation of scatter intensity in industrial cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, R.; Miceli, A.; Hofmann, J.; Flisch, A.; Sennhauser, U.

    2009-01-01

    A cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system using a 450 kV X-ray tube has been developed to challenge the three-dimensional imaging of parts of the automotive industry in short acquisition time. Because the probability of detecting scattered photons is high regarding the energy range and the area of detection, a scattering correction becomes mandatory for generating reliable images with enhanced contrast detectability. In this paper, we present a hybrid simulator for the fast and accurate calculation of the scattering intensity distribution. The full acquisition chain, from the generation of a polyenergetic photon beam, its interaction with the scanned object and the energy deposit in the detector is simulated. Object phantoms can be spatially described in form of voxels, mathematical primitives or CAD models. Uncollided radiation is treated with a ray-tracing method and scattered radiation is split into single and multiple scattering. The single scattering is calculated with a deterministic approach accelerated with a forced detection method. The residual noisy signal is subsequently deconvoluted with the iterative Richardson-Lucy method. Finally the multiple scattering is addressed with a coarse Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The proposed hybrid method has been validated on aluminium phantoms with varying size and object-to-detector distance, and found in good agreement with the MC code Geant4. The acceleration achieved by the hybrid method over the standard MC on a single projection is approximately of three orders of magnitude.

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  16. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  17. Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Bok Yeol; Choi, Hwa Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model. CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures. The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures. Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

  18. Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Bok Yeol; Choi, Hwa Young

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model. CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures. The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures. Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

  19. Slice image pretreatment for cone-beam computed tomography based on adaptive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kuidong; Zhang Dinghua; Jin Yanfang

    2009-01-01

    According to the noise properties and the serial slice image characteristics in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system, a slice image pretreatment for CBCT based on adaptive filter was proposed. The judging criterion for the noise is established firstly. All pixels are classified into two classes: adaptive center weighted modified trimmed mean (ACWMTM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by Gauss noise and adaptive median (AM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by impulse noise. In ACWMTM filtering algorithm, the estimated Gauss noise standard deviation in the current slice image with offset window is replaced by the estimated standard deviation in the adjacent slice image to the current with the corresponding window, so the filtering accuracy of the serial images is improved. The pretreatment experiment on CBCT slice images of wax model of hollow turbine blade shows that the method makes a good performance both on eliminating noises and on protecting details. (authors)

  20. Optimizing contrast agents with respect to reducing beam hardening in nonmedical X-ray computed tomography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is commonly used as a contrast agent in nonmedical science and engineering, for example, to visualize Darcy flow in porous geological media using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Undesirable beam hardening artifacts occur when a polychromatic X-ray source is used, which makes the quantitative analysis of CT images difficult. To optimize the chemistry of a contrast agent in terms of the beam hardening reduction, we performed computer simulations and generated synthetic CT images of a homogeneous cylindrical sand-pack (diameter, 28 or 56 mm; porosity, 39 vol.% saturated with aqueous suspensions of heavy elements assuming the use of a polychromatic medical CT scanner. The degree of cupping derived from the beam hardening was assessed using the reconstructed CT images to find the chemistry of the suspension that induced the least cupping. The results showed that (i) the degree of cupping depended on the position of the K absorption edge of the heavy element relative to peak of the polychromatic incident X-ray spectrum, (ii) (53)I was not an ideal contrast agent because it causes marked cupping, and (iii) a single element much heavier than (53)I ((64)Gd to (79)Au) reduced the cupping artifact significantly, and a four-heavy-element mixture of elements from (64)Gd to (79)Au reduced the artifact most significantly.

  1. A bent Laue-Laue monochromator for a synchrotron-based computed tomography system

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, B; Chapman, L D; Ivanov, I; Wu, X Y; Zhong, Z; Huang, X

    1999-01-01

    We designed and tested a two-crystal bent Laue-Laue monochromator for wide, fan-shaped synchrotron X-ray beams for the program multiple energy computed tomography (MECT) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). MECT employs monochromatic X-ray beams from the NSLS's X17B superconducting wiggler beamline for computed tomography (CT) with an improved image quality. MECT uses a fixed horizontal fan-shaped beam with the subject's apparatus rotating around a vertical axis. The new monochromator uses two Czochralski-grown Si crystals, 0.7 and 1.4 mm thick, respectively, and with thick ribs on their upper and lower ends. The crystals are bent cylindrically, with the axis of the cylinder parallel to the fan beam, using 4-rod benders with two fixed rods and two movable ones. The bent-crystal feature of the monochromator resolved the difficulties we had had with the flat Laue-Laue design previously used in MECT, which included (a) inadequate beam intensity, (b) excessive fluctuations in beam intensity, and (c) i...

  2. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  3. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1year after BPA. Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...

  5. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO® phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500®, ProMax® 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax® 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 µSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 µSv (SD = 0.31 µSv). For the CS 9500®, the ED was 88 and 86 µSv (SD = 0.95 µSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Fundamentals for routined utilization of tomography in beam diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichau, Hermine

    2012-01-01

    A general and systematic approach to implement tomography for beam diagnostics has been invented and exemplarily shown for the invention of beam tomography for the Frankfurt Neutron Source. Following the diagnostic pipeline the first step was to prepare the data basis for the tomography reconstruction. For the monitoring, standard parameters have to be obtained with sufficient accuracy. In the context of this work, tomography has been kept as flexible as possible. Firstly, it will be used for the analysis of beam dynamics but also for the further development of beam tomography for routined utilization. Later on it will have to serve as a monitoring system at the end of the LEBT of FRANZ. The data preparation for tomography was demonstrated step by step. The iterated backprojection (FBP) algorithm was derived to show the basic idea of tomography which is contained in all forms of tomography algorithms. In connection with data exhibiting a high signal to noise ratio the FBP obtains the result with the highest accuracy, beyond that the accuracy can be controlled by the number of projections. The algebraic reconstruction and maximum entropy approach were outlined in a nutshell. By the introduction of the diagnostic pipeline in combination with the decision systematics the basis for a routined utilization of tomography in ion beam diagnostics have been established and exemplarily demonstrated on the introduction of beam tomography for FRANZ. A rotatable vacuum chamber has been developed to close a gap between the availability of projections to use the FBP and the small physical space on which they have to be determined. (orig.)

  7. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  8. Ground-glass opacity: High-resolution computed tomography and 64-multi-slice computed tomography findings comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Ciccio, Carmelo; Boi, Luca; Velari, Luca; Crusco, Sonia; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Comparative evaluation of ground-glass opacity using conventional high-resolution computed tomography technique and volumetric computed tomography by 64-row multi-slice scanner, verifying advantage of volumetric acquisition and post-processing technique allowed by 64-row CT scanner. Methods: Thirty-four patients, in which was assessed ground-glass opacity pattern by previous high-resolution computed tomography during a clinical-radiological follow-up for their lung disease, were studied by means of 64-row multi-slice computed tomography. Comparative evaluation of image quality was done by both CT modalities. Results: It was reported good inter-observer agreement (k value 0.78-0.90) in detection of ground-glass opacity with high-resolution computed tomography technique and volumetric Computed Tomography acquisition with moderate increasing of intra-observer agreement (k value 0.46) using volumetric computed tomography than high-resolution computed tomography. Conclusions: In our experience, volumetric computed tomography with 64-row scanner shows good accuracy in detection of ground-glass opacity, providing a better spatial and temporal resolution and advanced post-processing technique than high-resolution computed tomography.

  9. Pediatric Phantom Dosimetry of Kodak 9000 Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Juan F; Booe, Megan R; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Ehrlich, Ygal; Ludlow, John B; Johnson, Brandon

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiation dose of the Kodak 9000 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) device for different anatomical areas using a pediatric phantom. Absorbed doses resulting from maxillary and mandibular region three by five cm CBCT volumes of an anthropomorphic 10-year-old child phantom were acquired using optical stimulated dosimetry. Equivalent doses were calculated for radiosensitive tissues in the head and neck area, and effective dose for maxillary and mandibular examinations were calculated following the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Of the mandibular scans, the salivary glands had the highest equivalent dose (1,598 microsieverts [μSv]), followed by oral mucosa (1,263 μSv), extrathoracic airway (pharynx, larynx, and trachea; 859 μSv), and thyroid gland (578 μSv). For the maxilla, the salivary glands had the highest equivalent dose (1,847 μSv), followed closely by oral mucosa (1,673 μSv), followed by the extrathoracic airway (pharynx, larynx, and trachea; 1,011 μSv) and lens of the eye (202 μSv). Compared to previous research of the Kodak 9000, completed with the adult phantom, a child receives one to three times more radiation for mandibular scans and two to 10 times more radiation for maxillary scans.

  10. Deriving motion from megavoltage localization cone beam computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredo C Siochi, R

    2009-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data consist of views of a moving point (e.g. diaphragm apex). The point is selected in identification views of extreme motion (two inhale, two exhale). The room coordinates of the extreme points are determined by source-to-view ray tracing intersections. Projected to other views, these points become opposite corners of a motion-bounding box. The view coordinates of the point, relative to the box, are used to interpolate between extreme room coordinates. Along with the views' time stamps, this provides the point's room coordinates as a function of time. CBCT-derived trajectories of a tungsten pin, moving 3 cm cranio-caudally and 1 cm elsewhere, deviate from expected ones by at most 1.06 mm. When deviations from the ideal imaging geometry are considered, mean errors are less than 0.2 mm. While CBCT-derived cranio-caudal positions are insensitive to the choice of identification views, the bounding box determination requires view separations between 15 and 163 deg. Inhale views with the two largest amplitudes should be used, though corrections can account for different amplitudes. The information could be used to calibrate motion surrogates, adaptively define phase triggers immediately before gated radiotherapy and provide phase and amplitude sorting for 4D CBCT.

  11. Study of Variation in Dose Calculation Accuracy Between kV Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and kV fan-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliyaperumal, Venkatesan; Raphael, C. Jomon; Varghese, K. Mathew; Gopu, Paul; Sivakumar, S.; Boban, Minu; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Senthilnathan, K.; Babu, P. Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are presently used for geometric verification for daily patient positioning. In this work, we have compared the images of CBCT with the images of conventional fan beam CT (FBCT) in terms of image quality and Hounsfield units (HUs). We also compared the dose calculated using CBCT with that of FBCT. Homogenous RW3 plates and Catphan phantom were scanned by FBCT and CBCT. In RW3 and Catphan phantom, percentage depth dose (PDD), profiles, isodose distributions (for intensity modulated radiotherapy plans), and calculated dose volume histograms were compared. The HU difference was within ± 20 HU (central region) and ± 30 HU (peripheral region) for homogeneous RW3 plates. In the Catphan phantom, the difference in HU was ± 20 HU in the central area and peripheral areas. The HU differences were within ± 30 HU for all HU ranges starting from −1000 to 990 in phantom and patient images. In treatment plans done with simple symmetric and asymmetric fields, dose difference (DD) between CBCT plan and FBCT plan was within 1.2% for both phantoms. In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans, for different target volumes, the difference was <2%. This feasibility study investigated HU variation and dose calculation accuracy between FBCT and CBCT based planning and has validated inverse planning algorithms with CBCT. In our study, we observed a larger deviation of HU values in the peripheral region compared to the central region. This is due to the ring artifact and scatter contribution which may prevent the use of CBCT as the primary imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning. The reconstruction algorithm needs to be modified further for improving the image quality and accuracy in HU values. However, our study with TG-119 and intensity modulated radiotherapy test targets shows that CBCT can be used for adaptive replanning as the recalculation of dose with the anisotropic analytical algorithm is in full accord

  12. A beam optics study of a modular multi-source X-ray tube for novel computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brandon J.; Radtke, Jeff; Chen, Guang-Hong; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    A modular implementation of a scanning multi-source X-ray tube is designed for the increasing number of multi-source imaging applications in computed tomography (CT). An electron beam array coupled with an oscillating magnetic deflector is proposed as a means for producing an X-ray focal spot at any position along a line. The preliminary multi-source model includes three thermionic electron guns that are deflected in tandem by a slowly varying magnetic field and pulsed according to a scanning sequence that is dependent on the intended imaging application. Particle tracking simulations with particle dynamics analysis software demonstrate that three 100 keV electron beams are laterally swept a combined distance of 15 cm over a stationary target with an oscillating magnetic field of 102 G perpendicular to the beam axis. Beam modulation is accomplished using 25 μs pulse widths to a grid electrode with a reverse gate bias of -500 V and an extraction voltage of +1000 V. Projected focal spot diameters are approximately 1 mm for 138 mA electron beams and the stationary target stays within thermal limits for the 14 kW module. This concept could be used as a research platform for investigating high-speed stationary CT scanners, for lowering dose with virtual fan beam formation, for reducing scatter radiation in cone-beam CT, or for other industrial applications.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Technical aspects of X-ray micro-computed tomography. Initial experience of 27-μm resolution using feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kohara, Kazushi; Iinuma, Gen; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce the technical utility of micro-computed tomography (CT) with 27-μm resolution by cone-beam CT algorithm. Whole-body micro-CT scans were performed to honeybee. Two- and three-dimensional image analyses were performed by originally developed and available open-source software for acquired images. The original contribution of this work is to describe the technical characteristics of the X-ray micro-CT system, keeping a small experimental insect in a unique condition. Micro-CT may be used as a rapid prototyping tool to research and understand the high-resolution system with Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction. (author)

  15. The importance of cone-beam computed tomography in the management of endodontic problems: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Mickevičienė, Lina

    2014-12-01

    To obtain essential information in clinical endodontics, cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging can be used in all phases of treatment including diagnosis, treatment planning, during the treatment phase, and through post-treatment assessment and follow-up. The purpose of this article was to review the use of CBCT imaging in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessing the outcome of endodontic complications. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases for the following keywords: tooth root injuries, tooth root radiography, tooth root perforation, tomography, cone-beam computed tomography, endodontic complications, tooth root internal/external resorption, root fractures, and broken instruments. The research was restricted to articles published in English. One hundred twelve articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Currently, intraoral radiography is the imaging technique of choice for the management of endodontic disease, but CBCT imaging appears to have a superior validity and reliability in the management of endodontic diagnosis and complications. Endodontic cases should be judged individually, and CBCT imaging should be considered in situations in which information from conventional imaging systems may not yield an adequate amount of information to allow the appropriate management of endodontic problems. CBCT imaging has the potential to become the first choice for endodontic treatment planning and outcome assessment, especially when new scanners with lower radiation doses will be available. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mandibular dimensions of subjects with asymmetric skeletal class III malocclusion and normal occlusion compared with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyoYeon; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Ki Beom; Behrents, Rolf G; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use cone-beam computed tomography to compare mandibular dimensions in subjects with asymmetric skeletal Class III malocclusion and those with normal occlusion. Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 38 subjects with normal occlusion and 28 patients with facial asymmetry were evaluated and digitized with Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). Three midsagittal and 13 right and left measurements were taken. The paired t test was used to compare the right and left sides in each group. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the midsagittal variables and the differences between the 2 sides of the group with normal occlusion with those of asymmetry patients. The posterior part of the mandibular body showed significant differences between the deviated and nondeviated sides in asymmetric Class III patients. The difference of the asymmetry group was significantly greater than that of the normal occlusion group for the mediolateral ramal and the anteroposterior condylar inclinations (P = 0.007 and P = 0.019, respectively). The asymmetric skeletal Class III group showed significant differences in condylar height, ramus height, and posterior part of the mandibular body compared with the subjects with normal occlusion. These results might be useful for diagnosis and treatment planning of asymmetric Class III patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of cone beam computed tomography in the postoperative assessment of orbital wall fracture reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Kim; Cheng, Andrew; Goss, Alastair; Donovan, David

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the standard in postoperative evaluation of orbital wall fracture reconstruction, but cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers potential advantages including reduced radiation dose and cost. The purpose of this study is to examine objectively the image quality of CBCT in the postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction, its radiation dose, and cost compared with CT. Four consecutive patients with orbital wall fractures in whom surgery was indicated underwent orbital reconstruction with radio-opaque grafts (bone, titanium-reinforced polyethylene, and titanium plate) and were assessed postoperatively with orbital CBCT. CBCT was evaluated for its ability to provide objective information regarding the adequacy of orbital reconstruction, radiation dose, and cost. In all patients, CBCT was feasible and provided hard tissue image quality comparable to CT with significantly reduced radiation dose and cost. However, it has poorer soft tissue resolution, which limits its ability to identify the extraocular muscles, their relationship to the reconstructive graft, and potential muscle entrapment. CBCT is a viable alternative to CT in the routine postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction. However, in the patient who develops gaze restriction postoperatively, conventional CT is preferred over CBCT for its superior soft tissue resolution to exclude extraocular muscle entrapment.

  18. Development of a guidance guide for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent questions from users of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (LCI - IPEN), on how to properly apply the factors indicated in their calibration certificates, a guide was prepared guidance for dosimetry in computed tomography. The guide includes guidance prior knowledge of half value layer (HVL), as it is necessary to know the effective beam energy for application quality for correction factor (kq). The evaluation of HVL in TC scanners becomes a difficult task due to system geometry and therefore a survey was conducted of existing methodologies for the determination of HVL in clinical beams Computed Tomography, taking into account technical, practical and economic factors. In this work it was decided to test a Tandem System consists of absorbing covers made in the workshop of IPEN, based on preliminary studies due to low cost and good response. The Tandem system consists of five cylindrical absorbing layers of 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 7mm and 10mm aluminum and 3 cylindrical absorbing covers 15mm, 25mm and acrylic 35mm (PMMA) coupled to the ionization chamber of commercial pencil type widely used in quality control tests in dosimetry in clinical beams Computed tomography. Through Tandem curves it was possible to assess HVL values and from the standard curve pencil-type ionization chamber, Kq find the appropriate beam. The elaborate Guide provides information on how to build the calibration curve on the basis of CSR, to find the Kq and information for construction Tandem curve, to find values close to CSR. (author)

  19. Surgical positioning of orthodontic mini-implants with guides fabricated on models replicated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Hun; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Nelson, Gerald

    2007-04-01

    This article illustrates a new surgical guide system that uses cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to replicate dental models; surgical guides for the proper positioning of orthodontic mini-implants were fabricated on the replicas, and the guides were used for precise placement. The indications, efficacy, and possible complications of this method are discussed. Patients who were planning to have orthodontic mini-implant treatment were recruited for this study. A CBCT system (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire virtual slices of the posterior maxilla that were 0.1 to 0.15 mm thick. Color 3-dimensional rapid prototyping was used to differentiate teeth, alveolus, and maxillary sinus wall. A surgical guide for the mini-implant was fabricated on the replica model. Proper positioning for mini-implants on the posterior maxilla was determined by viewing the CBCT images. The surgical guide was placed on the clinical site, and it allowed precise pilot drilling and accurate placement of the mini-implant. CBCT imaging allows remarkably lower radiation doses and thinner acquisition slices compared with medical computed tomography. Virtually reproduced replica models enable precise planning for mini-implant positions in anatomically complex sites.

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  2. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry: description and standardization of the technique; Tomografia computadorizada de feixe conico na odontologia veterinaria: descricao e padronizacao da tecnica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roza, Marcello R. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goianai, GO (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelloroza@gmail.com; Silva, Luiz A.F.; Fioravanti, Maria C. S. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Veterinaria. Dept. de Medicina Veterinaria; Januario, Alessandro L. [International Team for Implantology (ITI), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barriviera, Mauricio [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia (UCB), DF (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia; Oliveira, Alexandre C.A. [Faculdade de Odontologia Sao Leopoldo Mandic, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-08-15

    Eleven dogs and four cats with buccodental alterations, treated in the Centro Veterinario do Gama, in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, were submitted to cone beam computed tomography. The exams were carried out in a i-CAT tomograph, using for image acquisition six centimeters height, 40 seconds time, 0.2 voxel, 120 kilovolts and 46.72 milli amperes per second. The ideal positioning of the animal for the exam was also determined in this study and it proved to be fundamental for successful examination, which required a simple and safe anesthetic protocol due to the relatively short period of time necessary to obtain the images. Several alterations and diseases were identified with accurate imaging, demonstrating that cone beam computed tomography is a safe, accessible and feasible imaging method which could be included in the small animal dentistry routine diagnosis. (author)

  3. Status of computed tomography dosimetry for wide cone beam scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    International standardization in dosimetry is essential for the successful exploitation of radiation technology. To provide such standardization in diagnostic radiology, the IAEA published Code of Practice entitled Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice (IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457; 2007), which recommends procedures for calibration and dosimetric measurement both in standards dosimetry laboratories, especially Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), and in clinical centres for radiology, as found in most hospitals. These standards address the main dosimetric methodologies needed in clinical diagnostic radiology, with the calibration of associated dosimetric equipment, including the measurement methodologies for computed tomography (CT). For some time now there has been a growing awareness that radiation dose originating from medical diagnostic procedures in radiology, is contributing an increasing proportion to the total population dose, with a large component coming from CT examinations. This is accompanied by rapid developments in CT technology, including the use of increasingly wide X ray scanning beams, which are presenting problems in dosimetry that currently cannot be adequately addressed by existing standards. This situation has received attention from a number of professional bodies, and institutions have proposed and are investigating new and adapted dosimetric models in order to find robust solutions to these problems that are critically affecting clinical application of CT dosimetry. In view of these concerns, and as a response to a recommendation from a coordinated research project that reviewed the implementation of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 457, a meeting was held to review current dosimetric methodologies and to determine if a practical solution for dosimetry for wide X ray beam CT scanners was currently available. The meeting rapidly formed the view that there was an interim solution that

  4. External cervical resorption: an analysis using cone beam and microfocus computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, V; Mavridou, A; Huybrechts, B; Van Gorp, G; Bergmans, L; Lambrechts, P

    2013-09-01

    To provide a three-dimensional representation of external cervical resorption (ECR) with microscopy, stereo microscopy, cone beam computed tomography (CT), microfocus CT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). External cervical resorption is an aggressive form of root resorption, leading to a loss of dental hard tissues. This is due to clastic action, activated by a damage of the covering cementum and stimulated probably by infection. Clinically, it is a challenging situation as it is characterized by a late symptomatology. This is due to the pericanalar protection from a resorption-resistant sheet, composed of pre-dentine and surrounding dentine. The clastic activity is often associated with an attempt to repair, seen by the formation of osteoid tissue. Cone beam CT is extremely useful in the diagnoses and treatment planning of ECR. SEM analyses provide a better insight into the activity of osteoclasts. The root canal is surrounded by a layer of dentine that is resistant to resorption. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Integration of Digital Dental Casts in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all reported methods have drawbacks. The aim of this feasibility study is to present a new simplified method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. In a patient scheduled for orthognathic surgery, titanium markers were glued to the gingiva. Next, a CBCT scan and dental impressions were made. During the impression-taking procedure, the titanium markers were transferred to the impression. The impressions were scanned, and all CBCT datasets were exported in DICOM format. The two datasets were matched, and the dentition derived from the scanned impressions was transferred to the CBCT of the patient. After matching the two datasets, the average distance between the corresponding markers was 0.1 mm. This novel method allows for the integration of digital dental casts into CBCT scans, overcoming problems such as unwanted extra radiation exposure, distortion of soft tissues due to the use of bite jigs, and time-consuming digital data handling. PMID:23050159

  6. Weightbearing Computed Tomography of the Foot and Ankle: Emerging Technology Topical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, Alexej; Bailey, Travis; Richter, Martinus; de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Lintz, François; Burssens, Arne; Phisitkul, Phinit; Hanrahan, Christopher J; Saltzman, Charles L

    2018-03-01

    In the last decade, cone-beam computed tomography technology with improved designs allowing flexible gantry movements has allowed both supine and standing weight-bearing imaging of the lower extremity. There is an increasing amount of literature describing the use of weightbearing computed tomography in patients with foot and ankle disorders. To date, there is no review article summarizing this imaging modality in the foot and ankle. Therefore, we performed a systematic literature review of relevant clinical studies targeting the use of weightbearing computed tomography in diagnosis of patients with foot and ankle disorders. Furthermore, this review aims to offer insight to those with interest in considering possible future research opportunities with use of this technology. Level V, expert opinion.

  7. Applications of X-ray Computed Tomography and Emission Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seletchi, Emilia Dana; Sutac, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Computed Tomography is a non-destructive imaging method that allows visualization of internal features within non-transparent objects such as sedimentary rocks. Filtering techniques have been applied to circumvent the artifacts and achieve high-quality images for quantitative analysis. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) can be used to identify the position of the growth axis in speleothems by detecting subtle changes in calcite density between growth bands. HRXCT imagery reveals the three-dimensional variability of coral banding providing information on coral growth and climate over the past several centuries. The Nuclear Medicine imaging technique uses a radioactive tracer, several radiation detectors, and sophisticated computer technologies to understand the biochemical basis of normal and abnormal functions within the brain. The goal of Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) is to accurately determine the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution resulting from the radiopharmaceutical uptake inside the patient instead of the attenuation coefficient distribution from different tissues as obtained from X-ray Computer Tomography. ECT is a very useful tool for investigating the cognitive functions. Because of the low radiation doses associated with Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this technique has been applied in clinical research, allowing the direct study of human neurological diseases. (authors)

  8. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of the Nasopharyngeal Airway in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdawi, Mahmood Abd; Farid, Mary Medhat; El-Fotouh, Mona Abou; El-Kassaby, Marwa Abdelwahab

    2017-03-01

      To assess the nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth in previously repaired nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate versus bilateral cleft lip and palate patients compared with noncleft controls using cone-beam computed tomography with the ultimate goal of finding whether cleft lip and palate patients are more liable to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction.   A retrospective analysis comparing bilateral cleft lip and palate, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and control subjects. Significance at P ≤ .05.   Cleft Care Center and the outpatient clinic that are both affiliated with our faculty.   Cone-beam computed tomography data were selected of 58 individuals aged 9 to 12 years: 14 with bilateral cleft lip and palate and 20 with unilateral cleft lip and palate as well as 24 age- and gender-matched noncleft controls.   Volume, depth, and cross-sectional area of nasopharyngeal airway were measured.   Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger nasopharyngeal airway volume than controls and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger cross-sectional area than those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P .05). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger depth than controls and those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed insignificant nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth compared with controls (P > .05).   Unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients did not show significantly less volume, cross-sectional area, or depth of nasopharyngeal airway than controls. From the results of this study we conclude that unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the studied age and stage of repaired clefts are not more prone to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction than controls.

  9. Performance of cone-beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in diagnostic imaging of the midface: A comparative study on Phantom and cadaver head scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Schoellchen, Maximilian; Hanken, H.; Precht, C.; Heiland, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Oral- and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Henes, F.O.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schoen, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Hamburg (Germany); Nagel, H.D. [Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany); Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Institute of Anatomy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) regarding radiation, resolution, image noise, and image quality. CBCT and 256-MDCT were compared based on three scan protocols: Standard-dose (∼24 mGy), reduced-dose (∼9 mGy), and low-dose (∼4 mGy). MDCT images were acquired in standard- and high-resolution mode (HR-MDCT) and reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR). Spatial resolution in linepairs (lp) and objective image noise (OIN) were assessed using dedicated phantoms. Image quality was assessed in scans of 25 cadaver heads using a Likert scale. OIN was markedly higher in FBP-MDCT when compared to CBCT. IR lowered the OIN to comparable values in standard-mode MDCT only. CBCT provided a resolution of 13 lp/cm at standard-dose and 11 lp/cm at reduced-dose vs. 11 lp/cm and 10 lp/cm in HR-MDCT. Resolution of 10 lp/cm was observed for both devices using low-dose settings. Quality scores of MDCT and CBCT did not differ at standard-dose (CBCT, 3.4; MDCT, 3.3-3.5; p > 0.05). Using reduced- and low-dose protocols, CBCT was superior (reduced-dose, 3.2 vs. 2.8; low dose, 3.0 vs. 2.3; p < 0.001). Using the low-dose protocol, the assessed CBCT provided better objective and subjective image quality and equality in resolution. Similar image quality, but better resolution using CBCT was observed at higher exposure settings. (orig.)

  10. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore

  11. Clinical application of electron beam computed tomography in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gejun; Dai Ruping; Cao Cheng; Qi Xiaoou; Bai Hua; Ma Zhanhong; Chen Yao; Mu Feng; Ren Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus (TA). Methods: Ten cases of TA with age ranging from 2-month to 24 years were studied. All cases were examined and diagnosed with Imatron C-150 scanner using contrastmedia. The results of EBCT were analyzed and compared with the results of echocardiography (in 10 cases), cardiovascular angiography (in 3 cases) and surgery findings (in 1 case ). Results: EBCT yielded qualitative diagnosis and classification in all 10 cases. Echocardiography revealed qualitative diagnosis in 9 cases, however its classification was accordant to EBCT just in 5 cases. The concomitant abnormalities of TA were found more with EBCT than that with echocardiography. Cardiovascular angiography was performed in 3 cases, yielding inaccurate classification 2 cases. One case of TA was operated just based on the results of echocardiography, EBCT and catheterization. Conclusion: As a noninvasive method, EBCT could yield qualitative diagnosis of TA as well as classification. The results of EBCT examination combining echocardiography and catheterization could guide the operations. (authors)

  12. Incidental dentomaxillofacial findings on cone beam computed tomography images of Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Khojastepour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present study aimed to assess the nature and prevalence of incidental findings in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images of oral and maxillofacial patients. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 773 CBCT samples were retrieved from archives of a private oral and maxillofacial radiology center. Any findings that were not related to the reason of CBCT request was recorded in forms designed originally for this study. RESULTS: 475 patients out of 773 had at least one incidental finding. It composed about 60% of the patients. The largest frequency of incidental findings were cases of periapical lesions. (n = 189, followed by mucous thickening of maxillary sinus (n = 170, retained root (n = 32, impaction and 3rd molar (n = 26. Other incidental findings were torus (n = 25, dental anomalies (n = 13, vertical root fracture (n = 5, intra bony lesion and periapical pathosis (n = 4 and the lowest frequency was sialoliths (n = 1. CONCLUSION: About half of the subjects have had at least one incidental finding, so the precise review of the CBCT images seems to be necessary.

  13. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of Incidental Maxillary Sinus Pathologies in North Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta S Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maxillary sinus can be visualized in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Computed tomography (CT is considered the gold standard method for the examination of maxillary sinus. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT addresses the limitation of CT and provides many dental advantages. It can provide valuable knowledge about the pathology with limited exposure and low cost compared with other imaging used for diagnostic purposes. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study is to analyze the prevalence of pathological changes in maxillary sinus of asymptomatic cases using CBCT for diagnostic purposes. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 231 patients for incidental maxillary sinus pathologies. Pathological findings were categorized as mucosal thickening, polypoid mucosal thickening, radiopacification, and no pathological findings. Evaluation of pathological findings was done using factors of age and gender. Results: The present study showed 86 cases with maxillary sinus pathology and 145 cases with no pathological findings. Patients with maxillary sinus pathology were mostly diagnosed with mucosal thickening on both sides. In right maxillary sinus, 45 cases (52.3% showed mucosal thickening, and on the left side 36 cases (41.9% were diagnosed with mucosal thickening. Among 86 cases reported, 20 right maxillary sinus (23.3% and 25 left maxillary sinus (29.1% showed no signs of pathology. Conclusion: The incidental maxillary sinus pathologies are highly prevalent in asymptomatic patients. Therefore, oral radiologists should be aware of these incidental findings which will help in early diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  14. Quantitative assessment of cervical vertebral maturation using cone beam computed tomography in Korean girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6-18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  15. Apical root resorption due to orthodontic treatment detected by cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Iury O; Alencar, Ana H G; Valladares-Neto, José; Estrela, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    To determine the frequency of apical root resorption (ARR) due to orthodontic treatment using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a sample of 1256 roots from 30 patients. All patients had Class I malocclusion with crowding. Of the 30 patients evaluated, 11 were boys and 19 were girls; their mean age was 13 years (11 to 16 years). Orthodontic treatment followed the nonextraction treatment. CBCT images were obtained before and after orthodontic treatment, and ARR was determined using Axial Guided Navigation of CBCT images. All patients had ARR. No statistically significant association was found between resorption frequency, gender, and age. ARR was detected using CBCT in 46% of all roots that underwent orthodontic treatment. CBCT was effective for detecting in vivo even minimal degrees of ARR due to orthodontic treatment and allowed three-dimensional evaluation of dental roots and visualization of palatine roots of maxillary molars. The highest frequencies and the most significant ARR occurred in incisors and distal roots of first maxillary and mandibular molars.

  16. Comparison of the radiation dose from cone beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in examinations of the hand; Vergleich der Strahlendosis von Cone-Beam Computertomografie und Multidetektor Computertomografie in Untersuchungen der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J.; Neubauer, C.; Gerstmair, A.; Krauss, T.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Reising, K. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery; Zajonc, H. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Plastic and Hand Surgery; Fiebich, M.; Voigt, J. [University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection

    2016-05-15

    Comparison of radiation dose of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in examinations of the hand. Dose calculations were carried out by means of Monte Carlo simulations in MDCT and CBCT. A corpse hand was examined in a 320-row MDCT scanner and a dedicated extremities CBCT scanner with standard protocols and multiple low-dose protocols. The image quality of the examinations was evaluated by 5 investigators using a Likert scale from 1 (very good) to 5 (very poor) regarding depiction of cortical bone, cancellous bone, joint surfaces, soft tissues and artifacts. For a sum of ratings of all structures < 50 a good overall image quality was expected. The studies with at least good overall image quality were compared with respect to the dose. The dose of the standard examination was 13.21 (12.96 to 13.46 CI) mGy in MDCT and 7.15 (6.99 to 7.30 CI) mGy in CBCT. The lowest dose in a study with good overall image quality was 4.54 (4.43 to 4.64 CI) mGy in MDCT and 5.72 (5.59 to 5.85 CI) mGy in CBCT. Although the dose of the standard protocols in the CBCT is lower than in the MDCT, the MDCT can realize a good overall image quality at a lower dose than the CBCT. Dose optimization of CT examination protocols for the hand is useful in both modalities, the MDCT has an even greater potential for optimization.

  17. The neutron computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Krata, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of computer tomography (CT) was applied for neutrons instead of X-rays. The neutron radiography image of samples was scanned by microphotometer to get the transmission data. This process was so time-consuming that the number of incident angles to samples could not be increased. The transmission data was processed by FACOM computer and CT image was gained. In the experiment at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 at Tokai-mura with 18 projection angles, the resolution of paraffin in the aluminum block was less than 0.8 mm. In the experiment at Van de Graaf accelerator of Nagoya University, this same resolution was 1.2 mm because of the angle distribution of neutron beam. This experiment is the preliminary one, the facility which utilizes neutron television and video-recorder will be necessary for the next stage. (Auth.)

  18. Single photon emission computed tomography by using fan beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihisa

    1992-01-01

    A multislice fan beam collimator which has parallel collimation along the cephalic-caudul axis of a patient and converging collimation within planes that are perpendicular to that axis was designed for a SPECT system with a rotating scintillation camera, and it was constructed by the lead casting method which was developed in recent years. A reconstruction algorithm for fan beam SPECT was formed originally by combining the reconstruction algorithm of the parallel beam SPECT with that of the fan beam X-ray CT. The algorithm for fan beam SPECT was confirmed by means of computer simulation and a head phantom filled with diluted radionuclide. Not only 99m Tc but also 123 I was used as a radionuclide. A SPECT image with the fan beam collimator was compared with that of a parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator which was routinely used for clinical and research SPECT studies. Both system resolution and sensitivity of the fan beam collimator were ∼20% better than those of the parallel hole collimator. Comparing SPECT images obtained from fan beam collimator with those of parallel hole collimator, the SPECT images using fan beam collimator had far better resolution. A fan beam collimator is a useful implement for the SPECT study. (author)

  19. Trends in maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnheiter, C.; Scarfe, W.C.; Farman, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is making inroads into dental practice worldwide, both in terms of adding the third dimension to diagnosis, and also in terms of enabling image-guided treatment strategies. This article reports trends in the early referral pattern of patients to a CBCT facility in the United States. With institutional review board approval, a retrospective study was made of sequential CBCT radiographic reports made by a specialist oral and maxillofacial radiology service from May 2004 through January 2006 (n=329). Demographic and referral data were extracted from the reports. Descriptive statistics identified referral patterns, trends, and indications for CBCT. Comparisons were made with the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. The mean age of referred patients was 45±21 years, and there was a predominance of women (62%). Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (51%) and periodontology specialists (17%) made most patient referrals. The listed reasons for CBCT referrals were dental implant planning (40%), suspected surgical pathology (24%), and temporomandibular joint analysis (16%). Other uses included planning extraction of impacted teeth and orthodontic assessment. Over the period of the study, the numbers of pathology diagnosis cases remained relatively constant, while adoption of CBCT for dental implant planning followed closely the first three stages of the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. Alongside this increased CBCT adoption for dental implant planning, there was an associated increased demand for use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image sets for laser modeling and provision of surgical guides. Diagnosis will probably remain a constant source of referral for CBCT examination by oral and maxillofacial radiologists. Nevertheless, more specialized applications such as laser-guided model fabrication and image-guided surgery are expanding indications for CBCT referrals by dentists and also expanding the

  20. SU-G-JeP1-01: A Combination of Real Time Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking with Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, Suresh; Ponaganti, Srinivas; Krishna, Jayarama; Sujana, Kolla V; Komanduri, Priya K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were entered into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.

  1. SU-G-JeP1-01: A Combination of Real Time Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking with Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, Suresh; Ponaganti, Srinivas; Krishna, Jayarama; Sujana, Kolla V; Komanduri, Priya K [American Oncology Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 1. online verification of patient position during treatment using calypso electromagnetic localization and tracking system. 2. Verification and comparison of positional accuracy between cone beam computed tomography and calypso system. 3. Presenting the advantage of continuation localization in Stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Methods: Ten brain tumor cases were taken for this study. Patients with head mask were under gone Computed Tomography (CT). Before scanning, mask was cut on the fore head area to keep surface beacons on the skin. Slice thickness of 0.65 mm were taken for this study. x, y, z coordinates of these beacons in TPS were entered into tracking station. Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with On Board Imager was used to take Cone beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) to localize the patient. Simultaneously Surface beacons were used to localize and track the patient throughout the treatment. The localization values were compared in both systems. For localization CBCT considered as reference. Tracking was done throughout the treatment using Calypso tracking system using electromagnetic array. This array was in tracking position during imaging and treatment. Flattening Filter free beams of 6MV photons along with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy was used for the treatment. The patient movement was observed throughout the treatment ranging from 2 min to 4 min. Results: The average variation observed between calypso system and CBCT localization was less than 0.5 mm. These variations were due to manual errors while keeping beacon on the patient. Less than 0.05 cm intra-fraction motion was observed throughout the treatment with the help of continuous tracking. Conclusion: Calypso target localization system is one of the finest tools to perform radiosurgery in combination with CBCT. This non radiographic method of tracking is a real beneficial method to treat patients confidently while observing real-time motion information of the patient.

  2. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  3. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  4. Computer tomography in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of design and the action of computer tomography which was applied also for the diagnosis of nose, ear and throat diseases are discussed. Computer tomography makes possible visualization of the structures of the nose, nasal sinuses and facial skeleton in transverse and eoronal planes. The method enables an accurate evaluation of the position and size of neoplasms in these regions and differentiation of inflammatory exudates against malignant masses. In otology computer tomography is used particularly in the diagnosis of pontocerebellar angle tumours and otogenic brain abscesses. Computer tomography of the larynx and pharynx provides new diagnostic data owing to the possibility of obtaining transverse sections and visualization of cartilage. Computer tomograms of some cases are presented. (author)

  5. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs

  6. Assessment of vertical fracture using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Madani, Zahrasadat; Alhavaz, Abdolhamid; Bijani, Ali [Dental Material Research Center, Dental School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, (Korea, Republic of); Bagheri, Mohammad [Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in a tooth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts. This study selected 96 extracted molar and premolar teeth of the mandible. These teeth were divided into six groups as follows: Groups A, B, and C consisted of teeth with vertical root fractures, and groups D, E, and F had teeth without vertical root fractures; groups A and D had teeth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts; groups B and E had teeth with gutta-percha but without prefabricated posts, and groups C and F had teeth without gutta-percha or prefabricated posts. Then, the CBCT scans were obtained and examined by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists in order to determine the presence of vertical root fractures. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 20.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). The kappa coefficient was 0.875 ± 0.049. Groups A and D showed a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 100%; groups E and B, a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100%; and groups C and F, a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 100%. The CBCT scans revealed a high accuracy in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures; the accuracy did not decrease in the presence of gutta-percha. The presence of prefabricated posts also had little effect on the accuracy of the system, which was, of course, not statistically significant.

  7. Three-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography Volumetric Outcomes of rhBMP-2/Demineralized Bone Matrix versus Iliac Crest Bone Graft for Alveolar Cleft Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Yen, Stephen L-K; Imahiyerobo, Thomas; Sanborn, Luke; Yen, Leia; Yen, Daniel; Nazarian, Sheila; Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Urata, Mark; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in a demineralized bone matrix scaffold is a comparable alternative to iliac bone autograft in the setting of secondary alveolar cleft repair. Postreconstruction occlusal radiographs demonstrate improved bone stock when rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix (DBM) scaffold is used but lack the capacity to evaluate bone growth in three dimensions. This study uses cone beam computed tomography to provide the first clinical evaluation of volumetric and density comparisons between these two treatment modalities. A prospective study was conducted with 31 patients and 36 repairs of the alveolar cleft over a 2-year period. Twenty-one repairs used rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold and 14 repairs used iliac bone grafting. Postoperatively, occlusal radiographs were obtained at 3 months to evaluate bone fill; cone beam computed tomographic images were obtained at 6 to 9 months to compare volumetric and density data. At 3 months, postoperative occlusal radiographs demonstrated that 67 percent of patients receiving rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold had complete bone fill of the alveolus, versus 56 percent of patients in the autologous group. In contrast, cone beam computed tomographic data showed 31.6 percent (95 percent CI, 24.2 to 38.5 percent) fill in the rhBMP-2 group compared with 32.5 percent (95 percent CI, 22.1 to 42.9 percent) in the autologous population. Density analysis demonstrated identical average values between the groups (1.38 g/cc). These data demonstrate comparable bone regrowth and density values following secondary alveolar cleft repair using rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold versus autologous iliac bone graft. Cone beam computed tomography provides a more nuanced understanding of true bone regeneration within the alveolar cleft that may contribute to the information provided by occlusal radiographs alone. Therapeutic, II.

  8. Effects of various cone-beam computed tomography settings on the detection of recurrent caries under restorations in extracted primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Kamburo?lu, K?van?; S?nmez, G?l; Berkta?, Zeynep Serap; Kurt, Hakan; ?zen, Do?ukan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the ex vivo diagnostic ability of 9 different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) settings in the detection of recurrent caries under amalgam restorations in primary teeth. Materials and Methods Fifty-two primary teeth were used. Twenty-six teeth had dentine caries and 26 teeth did not have dentine caries. Black class II cavities were prepared and restored with amalgam. In the 26 carious teeth, recurrent caries were left under restorations. The oth...

  9. Clinical cone beam computed tomography compared to high-resolution peripheral computed tomography in the assessment of distal radius bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Charry, C; Boutroy, S; Ellouz, R; Duboeuf, F; Chapurlat, R; Follet, H; Pialat, J B

    2016-10-01

    Clinical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was compared to high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) for the assessment of ex vivo radii. Strong correlations were found for geometry, volumetric density, and trabecular structure. Using CBCT, bone architecture assessment was feasible but compared to HR-pQCT, trabecular parameters were overestimated whereas cortical ones were underestimated. HR-pQCT is the most widely used technique to assess bone microarchitecture in vivo. Yet, this technology has been only applicable at peripheral sites, in only few research centers. Clinical CBCT is more widely available but quantitative assessment of the bone structure is usually not performed. We aimed to compare the assessment of bone structure with CBCT (NewTom 5G, QR, Verona, Italy) and HR-pQCT (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical AG, Brüttisellen, Switzerland). Twenty-four distal radius specimens were scanned with these two devices with a reconstructed voxel size of 75 μm for Newtom 5G and 82 μm for XtremeCT, respectively. A rescaling-registration scheme was used to define the common volume of interest. Cortical and trabecular compartments were separated using a semiautomated double contouring method. Density and microstructure were assessed with the HR-pQCT software on both modality images. Strong correlations were found for geometry parameters (r = 0.98-0.99), volumetric density (r = 0.91-0.99), and trabecular structure (r = 0.94-0.99), all p < 0.001. Correlations were lower for cortical microstructure (r = 0.80-0.89), p < 0.001. However, absolute differences were observed between modalities for all parameters, with an overestimation of the trabecular structure (trabecular number, 1.62 ± 0.37 vs. 1.47 ± 0.36 mm(-1)) and an underestimation of the cortical microstructure (cortical porosity, 3.3 ± 1.3 vs. 4.4 ± 1.4 %) assessed on CBCT images compared to HR-pQCT images. Clinical CBCT devices are able to

  10. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Background corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Carey E.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Xia, Jessie Q.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kiser, Matthew R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Pedroni, Ronald S.; Macri, Robert A.; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Howell, Calvin R.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is an imaging technique that provides an in-vivo tomographic spectroscopic image of the distribution of elements in a body. To achieve this, a neutron beam illuminates the body. Nuclei in the body along the path of the beam are stimulated by inelastic scattering of the neutrons in the beam and emit characteristic gamma photons whose unique energy identifies the element. The emitted gammas are collected in a spectrometer and form a projection intensity for each spectral line at the projection orientation of the neutron beam. Rotating and translating either the body or the beam will allow a tomographic projection set to be acquired. Images are reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements in the body. Critical to this process is the appropriate removal of background gamma events from the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of two background correction techniques and discuss the appropriate application of each

  11. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  12. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  15. A comparative study for image quality and radiation dose of a cone beam computed tomography scanner and a multislice computed tomography scanner for paranasal sinus imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Jens; Zanca, Federica; Canning, John; Pauwels, Ruben; Hermans, Robert

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of a state of the art cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) system in patients with sinonasal poliposis. In this retrospective study two radiologists evaluated 57 patients with sinonasal poliposis who underwent a CBCT or MSCT sinus examination, along with a control group of 90 patients with normal radiological findings. Tissue doses were measured using a phantom model with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Overall image quality in CBCT was scored significantly higher than in MSCT in patients with normal radiologic findings (p-value: 0.00001). In patients with sinonasal poliposis, MSCT scored significantly higher than CBCT (p-value: 0.00001). The average effective dose for MSCT was 42% higher compared to CBCT (108 μSv vs 63 μSv). CBCT and MSCT are both suited for the evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important structures of the paranasal sinuses can be better delineated with MSCT, whereas in patients without sinonasal poliposis, CBCT turns out to define the important structures of the sinonasal region better. However, given the lower radiation dose, CBCT can be considered for the evaluation of the sinonasal structures in patients with sinonasal poliposis. • CBCT and MSCT are both suited for evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. • Effective dose for MSCT was 42% higher compared to CBCT. • In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important anatomical structures are better delineated with MSCT. • In patients with normal radiological findings, clinically important anatomical structures are better delineated with CBCT.

  16. Assessment of the effective dose in supine, prone, and oblique positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel combined extremity and maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koivisto, J.; Wolff, J.; Järnstedt, J.; Dastidar, P.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to assess the organ and effective doses (International Commission on Radiological Protection [ICRP] 103 standard) resulting from supine, prone, and oblique phantom positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)

  17. Mesenteric panniculitis: computed tomography aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Alves, Jose Ricardo Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Pinheiro, Ricardo Andrade; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Noro, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is an inflammatory process that represents the second stage of a rare progressive disease involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery. Imaging methods used in the diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis include barium studies, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomography is important for both, diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of the disease and treatment monitoring. Computed tomography findings may vary according to the stage of the disease and the amount of inflammatory material or fibrosis. There is also good correlation between the computed tomography and anatomical pathology findings. The authors studied 10 patients with mesenteric panniculitis submitted to computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in one patient. In all patients, computed tomography revealed a heterogeneous mass in the mesentery with density of fat, interspersed with areas of soft tissue density and dilated vessels. (author)

  18. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2011-01-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  19. Compensation of deformations in 3D cone beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbat, L.; Roux, S.; Roux, S.; Grangeat, P.

    2006-01-01

    In dynamic tomography, the measured objects or organs are no-longer supposed to be static in the scanner during the acquisition but are supposed to move or to be deformed. Our approach is the analytic deformation compensation during the reconstruction. Our work concentrates on 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. We introduce a new large class of deformations preserving the 3-dimensional cone beam geometry. We show that deformations from this class can be analytically compensated. We present numerical experiments on phantoms showing the compensation of these deformations in 3-dimensional cone beam tomography. (authors)

  20. CT angiography using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Kato, Akira; Kudo, Sho

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of CT angiography in small vessels using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). Vessel phantoms with inner diameters of 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm were prepared with segments of 75%, 50%, and 25% stenosis in each vessel. The vessels were filled with contrast medium (Iopamidol 300 at 1/24 dilution, approximately 380 HU). The EBCT apparatus used was an Imatron C-150. The step volume scan mode was used with slice thicknesses of 1.5 mm and 3.0 mm, scan time of 0.3 sec, and 210 mm field of view. Images with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm were definitely better than those with a slice thickness of 3.0 mm. The quality of maximum intensity projection (MIP) images was quite similar to that of three-dimensional (3D) images. Using the 8 mm vessel phantom, all stenotic segments were accurately visualized on CT angiography. The 50% stenotic segments were accurately estimated in all vessels. However, the 75% stenotic segments were slightly overestimated in smaller vessels, and the 25% stenotic segments were slightly underestimated in smaller vessels. We consider CT angiography using EBCT to be a useful, less invasive diagnostic modality for stenoocclusive lesions. (author)

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  3. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for calculating effective dose in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes B, W. O., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho 40301-015, Salvador de Bahia (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to develop a geometry of irradiation applicable to the software PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of the Computed Tomography Cone Beam (CBCT). We evaluated two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications: Care stream Cs 9000 3-dimensional tomograph; i-CAT and GENDEX GXCB-500. Initially characterize each protocol measuring the surface kerma input and the product kerma air-area, P{sub KA}, with solid state detectors RADCAL and PTW transmission chamber. Then we introduce the technical parameters of each preset protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for 3-dimensional computer 9000 Cs; within the range 44.5 to 89 μSv for GXCB-500 equipment and in the range of 62-111 μSv for equipment Classical i-CAT. These values were compared with results obtained dosimetry using TLD implanted in anthropomorphic phantom and are considered consistent. Os effective dose results are very sensitive to the geometry of radiation (beam position in mathematical phantom). This factor translates to a factor of fragility software usage. But it is very useful to get quick answers to regarding process optimization tool conclusions protocols. We conclude that use software PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation is useful assessment protocols for CBCT tests in dental applications. (Author)

  4. Simulation on a limited angle beam gamma ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jung, Sung Hee; Moon, Jin Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Limited angle beam tomography was introduced in the medical field more than two decades ago, where it was mainly used for cardiovascular diagnostics. Later, it was also used to trace multiphase flows. In these studies, the detection systems were fixed and a scanning electron beam was rapidly swept across an xray target using deflection coils. Thus very fast scanning was possible in these studies, but their geometry resulted in a heavy and bulky system because of a complex control system and vacuum tube. Because of its heavy hardware, limited angle beam tomography has remained as indoor equipment. If the source section is replaced by a gamma ray source, limited angle beam tomography will have a very light source device. In addition, limited angle beam tomography with a gamma ray source can be designed using an open type portable gantry because it does not need a vacuum guide for an electron beam. There is a lot of need for a portable tomographic system but so far no definitive solution has been created. The inspection of industrial on-line pipes, wood telephone poles, and cultural assets are some application areas. This study introduces limited angle beam gamma ray tomography, its simulation, and image reconstruction results. Image reconstruction was performed on the virtual experimental data from a Monte Carlo simulation. Image reconstruction algorithms that are known to be useful for limited angle data were applied and their results compared

  5. Evaluating the Amount of Tooth Movement and Root Resorption during Canine Retraction with Friction versus Frictionless Mechanics Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Mohamed; Aboul-Ezz, Amr; Fayed, Mona Salah; Hafez, Hend

    2018-02-15

    The current study was carried out to compare the amount of tooth movement during canine retraction comparing two different retraction mechanics; friction mechanics represented by a NiTi closed coil spring versus frictionless mechanics represented by T - loop, and their effect on root resorption using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Ten patients were selected in a split-mouth study design that had a malocclusion that necessitates the extraction of maxillary first premolars and retraction of maxillary canines. The right maxillary canines were retracted using T - loops fabricated from 0.017 X 0.025 TMA wires. The left maxillary canines received NiTi coil spring with 150 gm of retraction force. Pre retraction and post retraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography were taken to evaluate the amount of tooth movement and root resorption using three-dimensional planes. T - loop side showed statistically significant higher mean anteroposterior measurement than NiTi coil spring side, indicating a lower amount of canine movement pre and post a canine retraction. Concerning the root resorption, there was no statistically significant change in the mean measurements of canine root length post retraction. The NiTi coil spring side showed more distal movement more than the T-loop side. Both retraction mechanics with controlled retraction force, do not cause root resorption.

  6. Review of medical radiography and tomography with proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The use of hadron beams, especially proton beams, in cancer radiotherapy has expanded rapidly in the past two decades. To fully realize the advantages of hadron therapy over traditional x-ray and gamma-ray therapy requires accurate positioning of the Bragg peak throughout the tumor being treated. A half century ago, suggestions had already been made to use protons themselves to develop images of tumors and surrounding tissue, to be used for treatment planning. The recent global expansion of hadron therapy, coupled with modern advances in computation and particle detection, has led several collaborations around the world to develop prototype detector systems and associated reconstruction codes for proton computed tomography (pCT), as well as more simple proton radiography, with the ultimate intent to use such systems in clinical treatment planning and verification. Recent imaging results of phantoms in hospital proton beams are encouraging, but many technical and programmatic challenges remain to be overcome before pCT scanners will be introduced into clinics. This review introduces hadron therapy and the perceived advantages of pCT and proton radiography for treatment planning, reviews its historical development, and discusses the physics related to proton imaging, the associated experimental and computation issues, the technologies used to attack the problem, contemporary efforts in detector and computational development, and the current status and outlook.

  7. Developmental salivary gland depression in the ascending mandibular ramous: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine A.; Ahn, Yoon Hee; Odell, Scott; Mupparapu, Mel; Graham, David Mattew [University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A static, unilateral, and focal bone depression located lingually within the ascending ramous, identical to the Stafne's bone cavity of the angle of the mandible, is being reported. During development of the mandible, submandibular gland inclusion may lead to the formation of a lingual concavity, which could contain fatty tissue, blood vessels, or soft tissue. However, similar occurrences in the ascending ramous at the level of the parotid gland are extremely rare. Similar cases were previously reported in dry, excavated mandibles, and 3 cases were reported in living patients. A 52-year-old African American male patient was seen for pain in the mandibular teeth. Panoramic radiography showed an unusual concavity within the left ascending ramous. Cone-beam computed tomography confirmed this incidental finding. The patient was cleared for the extraction of non-restorable teeth and scheduled for annual follow-up.

  8. Osteoporosis prediction from the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barngkgei, Imad; Al Haffar, Iyad [Dept. of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Khattab, Razan [Dept. of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2014-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis among menopausal and postmenopausal women by using only a CBCT viewer program. Thirty-eight menopausal and postmenopausal women who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination for hip and lumbar vertebrae were scanned using CBCT (field of view: 13 cmx15 cm; voxel size: 0.25 mm). Slices from the body of the mandible as well as the ramus were selected and some CBCT-derived variables, such as radiographic density (RD) as gray values, were calculated as gray values. Pearson's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) evaluation based on linear and logistic regression were performed to choose the variable that best correlated with the lumbar and femoral neck T-scores. RD of the whole bone area of the mandible was the variable that best correlated with and predicted both the femoral neck and the lumbar vertebrae T-scores; further, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.5/0.6 (p value=0.037/0.009). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on the logistic regression were 50%, 88.9%, and 78.4%, respectively, for the femoral neck, and 46.2%, 91.3%, and 75%, respectively, for the lumbar vertebrae. Lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck osteoporosis can be predicted with high accuracy from the RD value of the body of the mandible by using a CBCT viewer program.

  9. Osteoporosis prediction from the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barngkgei, Imad; Al Haffar, Iyad; Khattab, Razan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis among menopausal and postmenopausal women by using only a CBCT viewer program. Thirty-eight menopausal and postmenopausal women who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination for hip and lumbar vertebrae were scanned using CBCT (field of view: 13 cmx15 cm; voxel size: 0.25 mm). Slices from the body of the mandible as well as the ramus were selected and some CBCT-derived variables, such as radiographic density (RD) as gray values, were calculated as gray values. Pearson's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) evaluation based on linear and logistic regression were performed to choose the variable that best correlated with the lumbar and femoral neck T-scores. RD of the whole bone area of the mandible was the variable that best correlated with and predicted both the femoral neck and the lumbar vertebrae T-scores; further, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.5/0.6 (p value=0.037/0.009). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on the logistic regression were 50%, 88.9%, and 78.4%, respectively, for the femoral neck, and 46.2%, 91.3%, and 75%, respectively, for the lumbar vertebrae. Lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck osteoporosis can be predicted with high accuracy from the RD value of the body of the mandible by using a CBCT viewer program.

  10. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbert, Nicholas [Private Practice, Reconstructive Dental Specialists of Utah, Salt Lake (United States); Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A. [Dept. of rosthodontics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, Memphis (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  11. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  12. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Cagna, David R; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A

    2015-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  14. The use of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of internal root resorption associated with chronic apical periodontitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlea, Paula; Nistor, Cristina Coralia; Iliescu, Mihaela Georgiana; Iliescu, Alexandru Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Internal root resorption is a consequence of chronic pulp inflammation. Later on, the pulp necrosis followed by a chronic apical periodontitis is installed. Hence, usually, in clinical practice, both lesions have to be simultaneously managed. Conventional periapical radiograph is mandatory in diagnosis. Improving the diagnosis and management of both lesions, cone beam computed tomography proves to be more reliable than conventional radiography.

  15. Effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Shokri, Abbas, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Dental Research Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, Amin Mahdavi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalzadeh, Mohsen [Department of Endodontics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tayari, Maryam [Department of Pedodontics, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinipanah, Mohammad [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmal, Javad [Research Center for Health Sciences and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog’s teeth. Forty eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. (author)

  16. Effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Shokri, Abbas; Asl, Amin Mahdavi; Jalalzadeh, Mohsen; Tayari, Maryam; Hosseinipanah, Mohammad; Fardmal, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog’s teeth. Forty eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. (author)

  17. Accuracy and Reliability of a Novel Method for Fusion of Digital Dental Casts and Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Breuning, K. Hero; Schols, Jan G. J. H.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were scanned, impressions were taken from the plaster models and the impressions were also scanned. Linear measurements were performed on all three models, to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Besides that, matching of the scanned plaster models and scanned impressions was done, to assess the accuracy of the matching procedure. Results show that all measurement errors are smaller than 0.2 mm, and that 81% is smaller than 0.1 mm. Matching of the scanned plaster casts and scanned impressions show a mean error between the two surfaces of the upper arch of 0.14 mm and for the lower arch of 0.18 mm. The time needed for reconstructing the CBCT scans to a digital patient, where the impressions are integrated into the CBCT scan of the patient takes about 15 minutes, with little variance between patients. In conclusion, we can state that this new method is a reliable method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. As far as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and digital handling processes are concerned, it is a significant improvement compared to the previously published methods. PMID:23527111

  18. Accuracy and reliability of a novel method for fusion of digital dental casts and Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frits A Rangel

    Full Text Available Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were scanned, impressions were taken from the plaster models and the impressions were also scanned. Linear measurements were performed on all three models, to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Besides that, matching of the scanned plaster models and scanned impressions was done, to assess the accuracy of the matching procedure. Results show that all measurement errors are smaller than 0.2 mm, and that 81% is smaller than 0.1 mm. Matching of the scanned plaster casts and scanned impressions show a mean error between the two surfaces of the upper arch of 0.14 mm and for the lower arch of 0.18 mm. The time needed for reconstructing the CBCT scans to a digital patient, where the impressions are integrated into the CBCT scan of the patient takes about 15 minutes, with little variance between patients. In conclusion, we can state that this new method is a reliable method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. As far as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and digital handling processes are concerned, it is a significant improvement compared to the previously published methods.

  19. Computational adaptive optics for broadband optical interferometric tomography of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Steven G; Graf, Benedikt W; Ahmad, Adeel; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2012-05-08

    Aberrations in optical microscopy reduce image resolution and contrast, and can limit imaging depth when focusing into biological samples. Static correction of aberrations may be achieved through appropriate lens design, but this approach does not offer the flexibility of simultaneously correcting aberrations for all imaging depths, nor the adaptability to correct for sample-specific aberrations for high-quality tomographic optical imaging. Incorporation of adaptive optics (AO) methods have demonstrated considerable improvement in optical image contrast and resolution in noninterferometric microscopy techniques, as well as in optical coherence tomography. Here we present a method to correct aberrations in a tomogram rather than the beam of a broadband optical interferometry system. Based on Fourier optics principles, we correct aberrations of a virtual pupil using Zernike polynomials. When used in conjunction with the computed imaging method interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy, this computational AO enables object reconstruction (within the single scattering limit) with ideal focal-plane resolution at all depths. Tomographic reconstructions of tissue phantoms containing subresolution titanium-dioxide particles and of ex vivo rat lung tissue demonstrate aberration correction in datasets acquired with a highly astigmatic illumination beam. These results also demonstrate that imaging with an aberrated astigmatic beam provides the advantage of a more uniform depth-dependent signal compared to imaging with a standard gaussian beam. With further work, computational AO could enable the replacement of complicated and expensive optical hardware components with algorithms implemented on a standard desktop computer, making high-resolution 3D interferometric tomography accessible to a wider group of users and nonspecialists.

  20. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the methods of computer assisted tomography for determination of the three-dimensional distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the human body. The major applications of emission computed tomography are in biological research and medical diagnostic procedures. The objectives of these procedures are to make quantitative measurements of in vivo biochemical and hemodynamic functions

  1. Cone beam computed tomography image guidance system for a dedicated intracranial radiosurgery treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschin, Mark; Komljenovic, Philip T; Ansell, Steve; Ménard, Cynthia; Bootsma, Gregory; Cho, Young-Bin; Chung, Caroline; Jaffray, David

    2013-01-01

    Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210° of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of producing high-resolution images of bone and soft tissue. The system is in clinical use and provides excellent image guidance without invasive frames. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unusual bilateral dentigerous cysts in a nonsyndromic patient assessed by cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Sumie Imada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of syndromes, bilateral dentigerous cysts (DC located on the jaws are unusual. In English based language literature review, we only found eight reports of nonsyndromic bilateral dentigerous cyst associated with mandibular third molars. Therefore, we report the unusual occurrence of sizable nonsyndromic bilateral DC associated with mandibular impacted third molars in a 42-year-old Caucasian woman. The lesions were assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT the right lesion showed approximately 23.64 mm and the left one, 16.57 mm diameter, both located intimately next to the mandibular canal. Bilateral surgical enucleation, related teeth excision of both third molars and plate for fixation placement on the right and bigger lesion, under general anesthesia was the final treatment choice. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological features confirmed diagnose of bilateral dentigerous cyst. Now-a-days, the patient is on 18 months radiograph follow-up with favorable osseous formation with no evidence of recurrence of the cysts.

  3. An energy-based beam hardening model in tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteele, E van de; Dyck, D van; Sijbers, J; Raman, E

    2002-01-01

    As a consequence of the polychromatic x-ray source, used in micro-computer tomography (μCT) and in medical CT, the attenuation is no longer a linear function of absorber thickness. If this nonlinear beam hardening effect is not compensated, the reconstructed images will be corrupted by cupping artefacts. In this paper, a bimodal energy model for the detected energy spectrum is presented, which can be used for reduction of artefacts caused by beam hardening in well-specified conditions. Based on the combination of the spectrum of the source and the detector efficiency, the assumption is made that there are two dominant energies which can describe the system. The validity of the proposed model is examined by fitting the model to the experimental datapoints obtained on a microtomograph for different materials and source voltages

  4. Detection of the posterior superior alveolar artery in the lateral sinus wall using computed tomography/cone beam computed tomography: a prevalence meta-analysis study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Centelles, P; Loira-Gago, M; Seoane-Romero, J M; Takkouche, B; Monteiro, L; Seoane, J

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, and Proceedings Web of Science was undertaken to assess the prevalence of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) in the lateral sinus wall in sinus lift patients, as identified using computed tomography (CT)/cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). For inclusion, the article had to report PSAA detection in the bony wall using CT and/or CBCT in patients with subsinus edentulism. Studies on post-mortem findings, mixed samples (living and cadaveric), those presenting pooled results only, or studies performed for a sinus pathology were excluded. Heterogeneity was checked using an adapted version of the DerSimonian and Laird Q test, and quantified by calculating the proportion of the total variance due to between-study variance (Ri statistic). Eight hundred and eleven single papers were reviewed and filtered according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Ten studies were selected (1647 patients and 2740 maxillary sinuses (study unit)). The pooled prevalence of PSAA was 62.02 (95% confidence interval (CI) 46.33-77.71). CBCT studies detected PSAA more frequently (78.12, 95% CI 61.25-94.98) than CT studies (51.19, 95% CI 42.33-60.05). Conventional CT revealed thicker arteries than CBCT. It is concluded that PSAA detection is more frequent when CBCT explorations are used. Additional comparative studies controlling for potential confounding factors are needed to ascertain the actual diagnostic value of radiographic explorations for assessing the PSAA prior to sinus floor elevation procedures. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging What is Computed Tomography? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Chest X ray Image back to top Computed Tomography (CT) Although also based on the variable absorption ...

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    imaging in small- animal on-Medical Physics, Vol. 34, No. 12, December 2007cology models,” Mol. Imag. 3, 55–62 2004. 8E. B. Walters, K. Panda , J. A...publication 8 October 2007; published 28 November 2007 Cone-beam microcomputed tomography microCT is one of the most popular choices for small animal ...imaging which is becoming an important tool for studying animal models with transplanted diseases. Region-of-interest ROI imaging techniques in CT, which

  7. The dynamic micro computed tomography at SSRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Xu, L.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Xie, H.; Xiao, T.

    2018-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) is a critical technique for quantitative characterizing the 3D internal structure of samples, recently the dynamic SR-μCT has been attracting vast attention since it can evaluate the three-dimensional structure evolution of a sample. A dynamic μCT method, which is based on monochromatic beam, was developed at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, by combining the compressed sensing based CT reconstruction algorithm and hardware upgrade. The monochromatic beam based method can achieve quantitative information, and lower dose than the white beam base method in which the lower energy beam is absorbed by the sample rather than contribute to the final imaging signal. The developed method is successfully used to investigate the compression of the air sac during respiration in a bell cricket, providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  8. High-resolution-cone beam tomography analysis of bone microarchitecture in patients with acromegaly and radiological vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Maddalo, Michele; Frara, Stefano; Mezzone, Monica; Zorza, Ivan; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Maroldi, Roberto; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Vertebral fractures are an emerging complication of acromegaly but their prediction is still difficult occurring even in patients with normal bone mineral density. In this study we evaluated the ability of high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography to provide information on skeletal abnormalities associated with vertebral fractures in acromegaly. 40 patients (24 females, 16 males; median age 57 years, range 25-72) and 21 healthy volunteers (10 females, 11 males; median age 60 years, range: 25-68) were evaluated for trabecular (bone volume/trabecular volume ratio, mean trabecular separation, and mean trabecular thickness) and cortical (thickness and porosity) parameters at distal radius using a high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography system. All acromegaly patients were evaluated for morphometric vertebral fractures and for mineral bone density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and distal radius. Acromegaly patients with vertebral fractures (15 cases) had significantly (p acromegaly patients did not have significant differences in bone density at either skeletal site. Patients with acromegaly showed lower bone volume/trabecular volume ratio (p = 0.003) and mean trabecular thickness (p acromegaly. High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography at the distal radius may be useful to evaluate and predict the effects of acromegaly on bone microstructure.

  9. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogo, Takeshi, E-mail: ogo.takeshi.hp@mail.ncvc.go.jp [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Department of Advanced Mediccal Research for Pulmonary Hypertension, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Tetsuya [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Sanda, Yoshihiro [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Morita, Yoshiaki [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Yasuda, Satoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  10. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  11. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p < 0.001). Effective dose and 10% MTF were 0.92 mSv and 360 μ m at 120 kV/10 mA. Various intracranial structures were clearly visible in the brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  12. Scatter kernel estimation with an edge-spread function method for cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Zhu, X Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The clinical applications of kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have been compromised by the limited quality of CBCT images, which typically is due to a substantial scatter component in the projection data. In this paper, we describe an experimental method of deriving the scatter kernel of a CBCT imaging system. The estimated scatter kernel can be used to remove the scatter component from the CBCT projection images, thus improving the quality of the reconstructed image. The scattered radiation was approximated as depth-dependent, pencil-beam kernels, which were derived using an edge-spread function (ESF) method. The ESF geometry was achieved with a half-beam block created by a 3 mm thick lead sheet placed on a stack of slab solid-water phantoms. Measurements for ten water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) ranging from 0 cm to 41 cm were taken with (half-blocked) and without (unblocked) the lead sheet, and corresponding pencil-beam scatter kernels or point-spread functions (PSFs) were then derived without assuming any empirical trial function. The derived scatter kernels were verified with phantom studies. Scatter correction was then incorporated into the reconstruction process to improve image quality. For a 32 cm diameter cylinder phantom, the flatness of the reconstructed image was improved from 22% to 5%. When the method was applied to CBCT images for patients undergoing image-guided therapy of the pelvis and lung, the variation in selected regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from >300 HU to <100 HU. We conclude that the scatter reduction technique utilizing the scatter kernel effectively suppresses the artifact caused by scatter in CBCT.

  13. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayram, Mehmet, E-mail: dtmehmetbayram@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Oemer Said [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Radiology, Trabzon (Turkey); Kuecuek, Murat [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers' measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers' measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  14. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayram, Mehmet; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Ömer Said; Küçük, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers’ measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers’ measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  15. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  16. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.; Davis, J.; Morgan, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography. This review article presents a brief historical perspective on CT, its current status and the underlying physics. The mathematical fundamentals of computed tomography are developed for the simplest transmission CT modality. A description of CT scanner instrumentation is provided with an emphasis on radiation sources and systems. Examples of CT images are shown indicating the range of materials that can be scanned and the spatial and contrast resolutions that may be achieved. Attention is also given to the occurrence, interpretation and minimisation of various image artefacts that may arise. A final brief section is devoted to the principles and potential of a range of more recently developed tomographic modalities including diffraction CT, positron emission CT and seismic tomography. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  17. Dual-energy imaging method to improve the image quality and the accuracy of dose calculation for cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jianrong; Chen, Xinyuan; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    To improve the image quality and accuracy of dose calculation for cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images through implementation of a dual-energy cone-beam computed tomography method (DE-CBCT), and evaluate the improvement quantitatively. Two sets of CBCT projections were acquired using the X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) system on a Synergy (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) system with 120kV (high) and 70kV (low) X-rays, respectively. Then, the electron density relative to water (relative electron density (RED)) of each voxel was calculated using a projection-based dual-energy decomposition method. As a comparison, single-energy cone-beam computed tomography (SE-CBCT) was used to calculate RED with the Hounsfield unit-RED calibration curve generated by a CIRS phantom scan with identical imaging parameters. The imaging dose was measured with a dosimetry phantom. The image quality was evaluated quantitatively using a Catphan 503 phantom with the evaluation indices of the reproducibility of the RED values, high-contrast resolution (MTF 50% ), uniformity, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Dose calculation of two simulated volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans using an Eclipse treatment-planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) was performed on an Alderson Rando Head and Neck (H&N) phantom and a Pelvis phantom. Fan-beam planning CT images for the H&N and Pelvis phantom were set as the reference. A global three-dimensional gamma analysis was used to compare dose distributions with the reference. The average gamma values for targets and OAR were analyzed with paired t-tests between DE-CBCT and SE-CBCT. In two scans (H&N scan and body scan), the imaging dose of DE-CBCT increased by 1.0% and decreased by 1.3%. It had a better reproducibility of the RED values (mean bias: 0.03 and 0.07) compared with SE-CBCT (mean bias: 0.13 and 0.16). It also improved the image uniformity (57.5% and 30.1%) and SNR (9.7% and 2.3%), but did not affect the MTF 50% . Gamma

  18. Usefulness of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Automatic Vessel Detection Software in Emergency Transarterial Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, E-mail: gcarraf@gmail.com; Ierardi, Anna Maria, E-mail: amierardi@yahoo.it; Duka, Ejona, E-mail: ejonaduka@hotmail.com [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy); Radaelli, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.radaelli@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Netherlands); Floridi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.floridi@gmail.com [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy); Bacuzzi, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.bacuzzi@ospedale.varese.it [University of Insubria, Anaesthesia and Palliative Care (Italy); Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: maximilian.de-bucourt@charite.de [Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Marchi, Giuseppe De, E-mail: giuseppedemarchi@email.it [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    BackgroundThis study was designed to evaluate the utility of dual phase cone beam computed tomography (DP-CBCT) and automatic vessel detection (AVD) software to guide transarterial embolization (TAE) of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings in emergency settings.MethodsTwenty patients with an arterial bleeding at computed tomography angiography and an inconclusive identification of the bleeding vessel at the initial 2D angiographic series were included. Accuracy of DP-CBCT and AVD software were defined as the ability to detect the bleeding site and the culprit arterial bleeder, respectively. Technical success was defined as the correct positioning of the microcatheter using AVD software. Clinical success was defined as the successful embolization. Total volume of iodinated contrast medium and overall procedure time were registered.ResultsThe bleeding site was not detected by initial angiogram in 20 % of cases, while impossibility to identify the bleeding vessel was the reason for inclusion in the remaining cases. The bleeding site was detected by DP-CBCT in 19 of 20 (95 %) patients; in one case CBCT-CT fusion was required. AVD software identified the culprit arterial branch in 18 of 20 (90 %) cases. In two cases, vessel tracking required manual marking of the candidate arterial bleeder. Technical success was 95 %. Successful embolization was achieved in all patients. Mean contrast volume injected for each patient was 77.5 ml, and mean overall procedural time was 50 min.ConclusionsC-arm CBCT and AVD software during TAE of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings is feasible and may facilitate successful embolization. Staff training in CBCT imaging and software manipulation is necessary.

  19. Osteoporosis prediction from the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Haffar, Iyad; Khattab, Razan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the use of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis among menopausal and postmenopausal women by using only a CBCT viewer program. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight menopausal and postmenopausal women who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination for hip and lumbar vertebrae were scanned using CBCT (field of view: 13 cm×15 cm; voxel size: 0.25 mm). Slices from the body of the mandible as well as the ramus were selected and some CBCT-derived variables, such as radiographic density (RD) as gray values, were calculated as gray values. Pearson's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) evaluation based on linear and logistic regression were performed to choose the variable that best correlated with the lumbar and femoral neck T-scores. Results RD of the whole bone area of the mandible was the variable that best correlated with and predicted both the femoral neck and the lumbar vertebrae T-scores; further, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.5/0.6 (p value=0.037/0.009). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on the logistic regression were 50%, 88.9%, and 78.4%, respectively, for the femoral neck, and 46.2%, 91.3%, and 75%, respectively, for the lumbar vertebrae. Conclusion Lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck osteoporosis can be predicted with high accuracy from the RD value of the body of the mandible by using a CBCT viewer program. PMID:25473633

  20. Applicability of Cone Beam Computed Tomography to the Assessment of the Vocal Tract before and after Vocal Exercises in Normal Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elisângela Zacanti; Yamashita, Hélio Kiitiro; Garcia, Davi Sousa; Padovani, Marina Martins Pereira; Azevedo, Renata Rangel; Chiari, Brasília Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), which represents an alternative to traditional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, may be a useful instrument to study vocal tract physiology related to vocal exercises. This study aims to evaluate the applicability of CBCT to the assessment of variations in the vocal tract of healthy individuals before and after vocal exercises. Voice recordings and CBCT images before and after vocal exercises performed by 3 speech-language pathologists without vocal complaints were collected and compared. Each participant performed 1 type of exercise, i.e., Finnish resonance tube technique, prolonged consonant "b" technique, or chewing technique. The analysis consisted of an acoustic analysis and tomographic imaging. Modifications of the vocal tract settings following vocal exercises were properly detected by CBCT, and changes in the acoustic parameters were, for the most part, compatible with the variations detected in image measurements. CBCT was shown to be capable of properly assessing the changes in vocal tract settings promoted by vocal exercises. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A technique for transferring a patient's smile line to a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2014-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment for patients requiring a gingival prosthesis often demands that bone and implant levels be apical to the patient's maximum smile line. This is to avoid the display of the prosthesis-tissue junction (the junction between the gingival prosthesis and natural soft tissues) and prevent esthetic failures. Recording a patient's lip position during maximum smile is invaluable for the treatment planning process. This article presents a simple technique for clinically recording and transferring the patient's maximum smile line to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images for analysis. The technique can help clinicians accurately determine the need for and amount of bone reduction required with respect to the maximum smile line and place implants in optimal positions. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CTmod—A toolkit for Monte Carlo simulation of projections including scatter in computed tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malušek, Alexandr; Sandborg, M.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 2 (2008), s. 167-178 ISSN 0169-2607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Monte Carlo * computed tomography * cone beam * scatter Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2008 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmpb.2007.12.005

  3. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Olding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low′s gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery. When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low′s gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a from the same gel batch and (b from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration.

  4. Management of Oehler’s Type III Dens Invaginatus Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Ranganathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens Invaginatus is a dental malformation that poses diagnostic difficulties in the clinical context. This anomaly may increase the risk of pulp disease and can potentially complicate endodontic procedure due to the aberrant root canal anatomy. Compared to conventional radiographs, three-dimensional images obtained with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT are invaluable in the diagnosis of the extent of this anomaly and in the appropriate treatment planning. Oehler’s classification (1957 for Dens Invaginatus (DI into three types depending on the depth of the invagination has been used for treatment planning. Of the three types Type III DI is characterized by infolding of the enamel into the tooth up to the root apex and is considered as the most severe variant of DI and hence the most challenging to treat endodontically, due to the morphological complexities. This report describes a case of Oehler’s Type III DI in a necrotic permanent maxillary lateral incisor in which CBCT images played a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. The case was managed successfully by a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic therapy with orthograde and retrograde thermoplastic gutta percha obturation.

  5. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHWARTZ, João Paulo; RAVELI, Taísa Boamorte; ALMEIDA, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; SCHWARTZ-FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; RAVELI, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance. PMID:26537718

  6. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo SCHWARTZ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT.Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0 and after Herbst treatment (T1. All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%.Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders.Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance.

  7. Influence of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography filters on diagnosis of simulated endodontic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, F S; D'Addazio, P S; Campos, C N; Devito, K L; Almeida, S M; Junqueira, R B

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) filters on diagnosis of simulated endodontic complications. Sixteen human teeth, in three mandibles, were submitted to the following simulated endodontic complications: (G1) fractured file, (G2) perforations in the canal walls, (G3) deviated cast post, and (G4) external root resorption. The mandibles were submitted to CBCT examination (I-Cat ® Next Generation). Five oral radiologists evaluated the images independently with and without XoranCat ® software filters. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined. ROC curves were calculated for each group with the filters, and the areas under the curves were compared using anova (one-way) test. McNemar test was applied for pair-wise agreement between all images versus the gold standard and original images versus images with filters (P originals images (P = 0.00 for all filters) only in G1 group. There were no differences in the other groups. The filters did not improve the diagnosis of the simulated endodontic complications evaluated. Their diagnosis remains a major challenge in clinical practice. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Indications for cone beam computed tomography in children and young patients in a Turkish subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşman, Özlem; Yılmaz, Hasan Hüseyin; Aktan, Ali Murat; Yilmaz, Büşra

    2017-05-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is widely used in children; however, it remains controversial because of the health effects of radiation. This retrospective study investigated the indications for CBCT and dentomaxillofacial pathologies in paediatric patients. CBCT images of 329 paediatric patients (i.e., aged anomalies (38.5%), followed by the localisation of impacted teeth (33.1%). There was no relationship between sex and indications. There were significant associations between age groups and malocclusion and dentomaxillofacial anomalies, localisation of impacted teeth, and trauma. The face was the most frequently imaged region, followed by the jaws (maxilla and mandible). The most common indication for CBCT was malocclusion and dentomaxillofacial anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition age groups, whereas the localisation of impacted teeth was the most common indication in the mixed dentition age group. Generally, CBCT was indicated in orthodontics and surgery. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of the accuracy of 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography and micro-computed tomography reconstructions by using different voxel sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Delphine; Peters, Ove A; Galibourg, Antoine; Dumoncel, Jean; Esclassan, Rémi; Kahn, Jean-Luc; Sixou, Michel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data are, in principle, metrically exact. However, clinicians need to consider the precision of measurements of dental morphology as well as other hard tissue structures. CBCT spatial resolution, and thus image reconstruction quality, is restricted by the acquisition voxel size. The aim of this study was to assess geometric discrepancies among 3-dimensional CBCT reconstructions relative to the micro-CT reference. A total of 37 permanent teeth from 9 mandibles were scanned with CBCT 9500 and 9000 3D and micro-CT. After semiautomatic segmentation, reconstructions were obtained from CBCT acquisitions (voxel sizes 76, 200, and 300 μm) and from micro-CT (voxel size 41 μm). All reconstructions were positioned in the same plane by image registration. The topography of the geometric discrepancies was displayed by using a color map allowing the maximum differences to be located. The maximum differences were mainly found at the cervical margins and on the cusp tips or incisal edges. Geometric reconstruction discrepancies were significant at 300-μm resolution (P = .01, Wilcoxon test). To study hard tissue morphology, CBCT acquisitions require voxel sizes smaller than 300 μm. This experimental study will have to be complemented by studies in vivo that consider the conditions of clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstruction for interior region-of-interest inverse geometry computed tomography: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) composed of multiple source and small size detector has several merits such as reduction of scatter effect and large volumetric imaging within one rotation without cone-beam artifact, compared to conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). By using this multi-source characteristics, we intend to present a selective and multiple interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging method by using a designed source on-off sequence of IGCT. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. Projection of ROI-IGCT is performed by selective irradiation, hence unnecessary imaging dose to non-interest region can be reduced. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy.

  11. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam K; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W; Gladstone, David J

    2015-07-01

    To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm(3) volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%-99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  12. Computed tomography and/or ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, S.; Kishikawa, T.; Huewel, N.; Kazner, E.; Grumme, T.; Lanksch, W.

    1982-01-01

    It is discussed if in intracranial tumors, especially in tumors of the posterior cranial fossa, a CT and/or a ventriculography should be practiced. We have made investigations of 134 patients, 93 of whom were children up to 14 years of age. Each case was undertaken computed tomography as well as ventriculography. The results are clearly demonstrating the superiority of computed tomography compared with ventriculography. Ventriculography is a surgical intervention stressing the patients, side-effects may occur, and sometimes serious complications are caused. Modern computed tomography is producing pictures of high quality, which are highly sufficient for neurosurgical intervention. Very rarely additional angiography has to be performed. The diagnosis of intracranial tumors can fully be established by computed tomography, whereas ventriculography is no longer necessary. (orig.) [de

  13. Cone-beam computed tomography imaging: therapeutic staff dose during chemoembolisation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J; Chacko, Annamma; Mbalisike, Emmanuel C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is an important requirement to perform real-time therapeutic image-guided procedures on patients. The purpose of this study is to estimate the personal-dose-equivalent and annual-personal-dose from CBCT imaging during transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE). Therapeutic staff doses (therapeutic and assistant physician) were collected during 200 patient (65  ±  15 years, range: 40–86) CBCT examinations over six months. Absorbed doses were assessed using thermo-luminescent dosimeters during patient hepatic TACE therapy. We estimated personal-dose-equivalent (PDE) and annual-personal-dose (APD) from absorbed dose based on international atomic energy agency protocol. APD for therapeutic procedure was calculated (therapeutic physician: 5.6 mSv; assistant physician: 5.08 mSv) based on institutional work load. Regarding PDE, the hands of the staff members received a greater dose compared to other anatomical locations (therapeutic physician: 56 mSv, 72 mSv; assistant physician: 12 mSv, 14 mSv). Annual radiation doses to the eyes and hands of the staff members were lower compared to the prescribed limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). PDE and APD of both therapeutic staff members were within the recommended ICRP-103 annual limit. Dose to the assistant physician was lower than the dose to the therapeutic physician during imaging. Annual radiation doses to eye-lenses and hands of both staff members were lower than prescribed limits. (paper)

  14. Computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  15. A development of super computed tomography scanner for industrial column investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Quddoos Abu Bakar; Jaafar Abdullah; Ismail Mustapha

    2004-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a desired devices on create images of internal structure of unrecognized object. The formation of a CT images is a distinct three phase process. The scanning phase produces data, but not an image. Then, reconstruction phase processes the acquired data and forms a digital image. The visible and displayed analog image is produced by the digital to analog conversation phase. In this case, there are adjustable factors associated with each of these phases that can have an effect on the characteristics and quantity of the image. In term on this project of column scanning, during the scanning phase a fan-shaped gamma ray beam is scanned around the column. The amount of gamma radiation that penetrates the column along each individual ray (pathway) through the column is measured by the detectors that intercept the gamma ray beam after it passes through the column.This project of Super Computed Tomography (CT) is develop to reconstruct and redesign the mechanical parts and equipment to suits the purpose of the industrial column investigation in the region. (Author)

  16. Accuracy of volumetric measurement of simulated root resorption lacunas based on cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; He, S; Guo, Y; Wang, S; Chen, S

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of volumetric measurement of simulated root resorption cavities based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in comparison with that of Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) which served as the reference. The State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases at Sichuan University. Thirty-two bovine teeth were included for standardized CBCT scanning and Micro-CT scanning before and after the simulation of different degrees of root resorption. The teeth were divided into three groups according to the depths of the root resorption cavity (group 1: 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 mm; group 2: 0.6, 1.0 mm; group 3: 1.5, 2.0, 3.0 mm). Each depth included four specimens. Differences in tooth volume before and after simulated root resorption were then calculated from CBCT and Micro-CT scans, respectively. The overall between-method agreement of the measurements was evaluated using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For the first group, the average volume of resorption cavity was 1.07 mm(3) , and the between-method agreement of measurement for the volume changes was low (CCC = 0.098). For the second and third groups, the average volumes of resorption cavities were 3.47 and 6.73 mm(3) respectively, and the between-method agreements were good (CCC = 0.828 and 0.895, respectively). The accuracy of 3-D quantitative volumetric measurement of simulated root resorption based on CBCT was fairly good in detecting simulated resorption cavities larger than 3.47 mm(3), while it was not sufficient for measuring resorption cavities smaller than 1.07 mm(3) . This method could be applied in future studies of root resorption although further studies are required to improve its accuracy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Assessment of the Stylohyoid Complex with Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    İlgüy, Dilhan; İlgüy, Mehmet; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Dölekoğlu, Semanur [Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-12-27

    Orientation of the stylohyoid complex (SHC) may be important for evaluation of the patient with orofacial pain or dysphagia. Our purpose was to assess the length and angulations of SHC using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, 3D images provided by CBCT of 69 patients (36 females, 33 males, age range 15-77 years) were retrospectively evaluated. All CBCT images were performed because of other indications. None of the patients had symptoms of ossified SHC. The length and the thickness of SHC ossification, the anteroposterior angle (APA) and the mediolateral angle (MLA) were measured by maxillofacial radiologists on the anteroposterior, right lateral and left lateral views of CBCT. Student’s t test, Pearson's correlation and Chi-square test tests were used for statistical analysis. According to the results, the mean length of SHC was 25.3 ± 11.3 mm and the mean thickness of SHC was 4.8 ± 1.8 mm in the study group. The mean APA value of SHCs was 25.6° ± 5.4° and the mean MLA value was 66.4° ± 6.7°. A positive correlation coefficient was found between age and APA (r = 0.335; P < 0.01); between thickness and APA (r = 0.448; P < 0.01) and also between length and thickness was found (r=0.236). The size and morphology of the SHC can be easily assessed by 3D views provided by CBCT. In CBCT evaluation of the head and neck region, the radiologist should consider SHC according to these variations, which may have clinical importance.

  18. Assessment of the Stylohyoid Complex with Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    İlgüy, Dilhan; İlgüy, Mehmet; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Dölekoğlu, Semanur

    2012-01-01

    Orientation of the stylohyoid complex (SHC) may be important for evaluation of the patient with orofacial pain or dysphagia. Our purpose was to assess the length and angulations of SHC using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, 3D images provided by CBCT of 69 patients (36 females, 33 males, age range 15-77 years) were retrospectively evaluated. All CBCT images were performed because of other indications. None of the patients had symptoms of ossified SHC. The length and the thickness of SHC ossification, the anteroposterior angle (APA) and the mediolateral angle (MLA) were measured by maxillofacial radiologists on the anteroposterior, right lateral and left lateral views of CBCT. Student’s t test, Pearson's correlation and Chi-square test tests were used for statistical analysis. According to the results, the mean length of SHC was 25.3 ± 11.3 mm and the mean thickness of SHC was 4.8 ± 1.8 mm in the study group. The mean APA value of SHCs was 25.6° ± 5.4° and the mean MLA value was 66.4° ± 6.7°. A positive correlation coefficient was found between age and APA (r = 0.335; P < 0.01); between thickness and APA (r = 0.448; P < 0.01) and also between length and thickness was found (r=0.236). The size and morphology of the SHC can be easily assessed by 3D views provided by CBCT. In CBCT evaluation of the head and neck region, the radiologist should consider SHC according to these variations, which may have clinical importance

  19. Excitation-resolved cone-beam x-ray luminescence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai; Yan, Zhuangzhi

    2015-07-01

    Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography (CB-XLCT), as an emerging imaging technique, plays an important role in in vivo small animal imaging studies. However, CB-XLCT suffers from low-spatial resolution due to the ill-posed nature of reconstruction. We improve the imaging performance of CB-XLCT by using a multiband excitation-resolved imaging scheme combined with principal component analysis. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the physical phantom experiment is performed with a custom-made XLCT/XCT imaging system. The experimental results validate the feasibility of the method, where two adjacent nanophosphors (with an edge-to-edge distance of 2.4 mm) can be located.

  20. General rigid motion correction for computed tomography imaging based on locally linear embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mianyi; He, Peng; Feng, Peng; Liu, Baodong; Yang, Qingsong; Wei, Biao; Wang, Ge

    2018-02-01

    The patient motion can damage the quality of computed tomography images, which are typically acquired in cone-beam geometry. The rigid patient motion is characterized by six geometric parameters and are more challenging to correct than in fan-beam geometry. We extend our previous rigid patient motion correction method based on the principle of locally linear embedding (LLE) from fan-beam to cone-beam geometry and accelerate the computational procedure with the graphics processing unit (GPU)-based all scale tomographic reconstruction Antwerp toolbox. The major merit of our method is that we need neither fiducial markers nor motion-tracking devices. The numerical and experimental studies show that the LLE-based patient motion correction is capable of calibrating the six parameters of the patient motion simultaneously, reducing patient motion artifacts significantly.

  1. Endodontic Management of Maxillary First Molar With Two Palatal Canals Aided With Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamboo, Jaya; Hans, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Subhas; Sharma, Kapil

    2017-04-01

    The success of endodontic therapy is based on having sufficient endodontic access, correct cleaning and shaping, and adequate root canal obturation. However, endodontic treatment is also dependent on having a sound knowledge of the internal anatomy of human teeth, especially when anatomic variations are present. Reporting these alterations is important for improving the understanding and expertise of endodontists. The aim of this case report is to describe a unique case of maxillary first molar with 2 palatal canals within a single root, as confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This article also reviews recent case reports of extra palatal root canals in the maxillary first molars and the role of CBCT analysis in successfully diagnosing them.

  2. RELIABILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN EVALUATION OF TESTICULAR CARCINOMA PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletić, Katarina; Mihailović, Jasna; Matovina, Emil; Žeravica, Radmila; Srbovan, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the reliability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in evaluation of testicular carcinoma patients. The study sample consisted of 26 scans performed in 23 patients with testicular carcinoma. According to the pathohistological finding, 14 patients had seminomas, 7 had nonseminomas and 2 patients had a mixed histological type. In 17 patients, the initial treatment was orchiectomy+chemotherapy, 2 patients had orchiectomy+chemotherapy+retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, 3 patients had orchiectomy only and one patient was treated with chemotherapy only. Abnormal computed tomography was the main cause for the oncologist to refer the patient to positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan (in 19 scans), magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in 1 scan, high level oftumor markers in 3 and 3 scans were perforned for follow-up. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging results were compared with histological results, other imaging modalities or the clinical follow-up of the patients. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were positive in 6 and negative in 20 patients. In two patients, positron emission tomography-computed tomography was false positive. There were 20 negative positron emission omography-computed tomography scans perforned in 18 patients, one patient was lost for data analysis. Clinically stable disease was confirmed in 18 follow-up scans performed in 16 patients. The values of sensitivty, specificity, accuracy, and positive- and negative predictive value were 60%, 95%, 75%, 88% and 90.5%, respectively. A hgh negative predictive value obtained in our study (90.5%) suggests that there is a small possibility for a patient to have future relapse after normal positron emission tomography-computed tomography study. However, since the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the study ire rather low, there are limitations of positive

  3. Image reconstruction with shift-variant filtration and its implication for noise and resolution properties in fan-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiaochuan; Yu Lifeng

    2003-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the fan-beam filtered backprojection (FFBP) algorithm is used widely for image reconstruction. It is known that the FFBP algorithm can significantly amplify data noise and aliasing artifacts in situations where the focal lengths are comparable to or smaller than the size of the field of measurement (FOM). In this work, we propose an algorithm that is less susceptible to data noise, aliasing, and other data inconsistencies than is the FFBP algorithm while retaining the favorable resolution properties of the FFBP algorithm. In an attempt to evaluate the noise properties in reconstructed images, we derive analytic expressions for image variances obtained by use of the FFBP algorithm and the proposed algorithm. Computer simulation studies are conducted for quantitative evaluation of the spatial resolution and noise properties of images reconstructed by use of the algorithms. Numerical results of these studies confirm the favorable spatial resolution and noise properties of the proposed algorithm and verify the validity of the theoretically predicted image variances. The proposed algorithm and the derived analytic expressions for image variances can have practical implications for both estimation and detection/classification tasks making use of CT images, and they can readily be generalized to other fan-beam geometries

  4. Trabecular bone structural parameters evaluated using dental cone-beam computed tomography: cellular synthetic bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jung-Ting; Wu, Jay; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Michael Y c; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2013-11-09

    This study compared the adequacy of dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT) in evaluating the structural parameters of trabecular bones. The cellular synthetic bones in 4 density groups (Groups 1-4: 0.12, 0.16, 0.20, and 0.32 g/cm3) were used in this study. Each group comprised 8 experimental specimens that were approximately 1 cm3. Dental CBCT and micro-CT scans were conducted on each specimen to obtain independent measurements of the following 4 trabecular bone structural parameters: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), specific bone surface (BS/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp.). Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to compare the measurement variations between the dental CBCT and micro-CT scans. A Spearman analysis was conducted to calculate the correlation coefficients (r) of the dental CBCT and micro-CT measurements. Of the 4 groups, the BV/TV and Tb.Th. measured using dental CBCT were larger compared with those measured using micro-CT. By contrast, the BS/BV measured using dental CBCT was significantly less compared with those measured using micro-CT. Furthermore, in the low-density groups (Groups 1 and 2), the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was smaller compared with those measured using micro-CT. However, the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was slightly larger in the high-density groups (Groups 3 and 4) than it was in the low density groups. The correlation coefficients between the BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., and Tb.Sp. values measured using dental CBCT and micro-CT were 0.9296 (p < .001), 0.8061 (p < .001), 0.9390 (p < .001), and 0.9583 (p < .001), respectively. Although the dental CBCT and micro-CT approaches exhibited high correlations, the absolute values of BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., Tb.Sp. differed significantly between these measurements. Additional studies must be conducted to evaluate using dental CBCT in clinical practice.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  6. Contrast-enhanced angiographic cone-beam computed tomography without pre-diluted contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, K.I.; Kim, S.R.; Choi, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Jeon, P. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been introduced and accepted as a useful technique to evaluate delicate vascular anatomy and neurovascular stents. Current protocol for CBCT requires quantitative dilution of contrast medium to obtain adequate quality images. Here, we introduce simple methods to obtain contrast-enhanced CBCT without quantitative contrast dilution. A simple experiment was performed to estimate the change in flow rate in the internal carotid artery during the procedure. Transcranial doppler (TCD) was used to evaluate the velocity change before and after catheterization and fluid infusion. In addition, 0.3 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 3) and 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 7) contrast infusions were injected and followed by saline flushes using a 300 mmHg pressure bag to evaluate neurovascular stent and host arteries. Flow velocities changed -15 ± 6.8 % and +17 ± 5.5 % from baseline during catheterization and guiding catheter flushing with a 300 mmHg pressure bag, respectively. Evaluation of the stents and vascular structure was feasible using this technique in all patients. Quality assessment showed that the 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s contrast infusion protocol was better for evaluating the stent and host artery. Contrast-enhanced CBCT can be performed without quantitative contrast dilution. Adequate contrast dilution can be achieved with a small saline flush and normal blood flow. (orig.)

  7. [Contribution of X-ray computed tomography in the evaluation of kidney performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Rognant, Nicolas; Collet-Benzaquen, Diane; Juillard, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    X-ray computer assisted tomography scanner is an imaging method based on the use of X-ray attenuation in tissue. This attenuation is proportional to the density of the tissue (without or after contrast media injection) in each pixel image of the image. Spiral scanner, the electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) scanner and multidetector computed tomography scanner allow renal anatomical measurements, such as cortical and medullary volume, but also the measurement of renal functional parameters, such as regional renal perfusion, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. These functional parameters are extracted from the modeling of the kinetics of the contrast media concentration in the vascular space and the renal tissue, using two main mathematical models (the gamma variate model and the Patlak model). Renal functional imaging allows measuring quantitative parameters on each kidney separately, in a non-invasive manner, providing significant opportunities in nephrology, both for experimental and clinical studies. However, this method uses contrast media that may alter renal function, thus limiting its use in patients with chronic renal failure. Moreover, the increase irradiation delivered to the patient with multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the effects of TripleGates and Gates-Glidden burs on cervical dentin thickness and root canal area by using cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio SOUSA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for new instruments to promote an appropriate cervical preparation has led to the development of new rotary instruments such as TripleGates. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no study evaluating TripleGates effect on the “risk zone” of mandibular molars. Objectives : The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a crown-down sequence of Gates-Glidden and TripleGates burs on the remaining cervical dentin thickness and the total amount of dentin removed from the root canals during the instrumentation by using cone beam computed tomography. The number of separated instruments was also evaluated. Material and Methods : Mesial roots of 40 mandibular first molars were divided into 2 equal groups: crown-down sequence of Gates-Glidden (#3, #2, #1 and TripleGates burs. Cervical dentin thickness and canal area were measured before and after instrumentation by using cone beam computed tomography and image analysis software. Student’s t-test was used to determine significant differences at p0.05 were observed between the instruments, regarding the root canal area and dentin wall thickness. Conclusion : Both tested instruments used for cervical preparation were safe to be used in the mesial root canal of mandibular molars.

  9. Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7681 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt, Chris M...Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt and Matthew S Bratcher Weapons and Materials Research...values to account for projectile variability in the ballistic evaluation of armor. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computed tomography , CT, BS41, projectiles

  10. The impact of different cone beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography scan parameters on virtual three-dimensional model accuracy using a highly precise ex vivo evaluation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Ragai-Edward; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Neuhuber, Winfried; Lell, Michael; Neukam, Friedrich W; Adler, Werner; Wichmann, Manfred; Bergauer, Bastian

    2016-05-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are indispensable imaging techniques in advanced medicine. The possibility of creating virtual and corporal three-dimensional (3D) models enables detailed planning in craniofacial and oral surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of different scan protocols for CBCT and MSCT on virtual 3D model accuracy using a software-based evaluation method that excludes human measurement errors. MSCT and CBCT scans with different manufacturers' predefined scan protocols were obtained from a human lower jaw and were superimposed with a master model generated by an optical scan of an industrial noncontact scanner. To determine the accuracy, the mean and standard deviations were calculated, and t-tests were used for comparisons between the different settings. Averaged over 10 repeated X-ray scans per method and 19 measurement points per scan (n = 190), it was found that the MSCT scan protocol 140 kV delivered the most accurate virtual 3D model, with a mean deviation of 0.106 mm compared to the master model. Only the CBCT scans with 0.2-voxel resolution delivered a similar accurate 3D model (mean deviation 0.119 mm). Within the limitations of this study, it was demonstrated that the accuracy of a 3D model of the lower jaw depends on the protocol used for MSCT and CBCT scans. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison between conventional tomography and computer tomography in diseases of the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritz, J.D.; Ganter, H.; Winter, C.; Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Giessen

    1990-01-01

    16 patients with diseases of the sacroiliac joints were examined both with computer tomography and with conventional tomography. Both techniques were characterized by a high sensitivity. Computer tomography was superior in exactly delineating the extent of the pathologic changes. In conventional tomography the joint surface was more blurred, erosions were larger, and signs of ankylosis were more expanded, so that the joints seemed to be more altered in 8 cases than demonstrated by computer tomography. Very accurate changes like subchondral cysts were recognized only in the computer tomograms. In all cases in which anteroposterior radiographs revealed no clear result, the authors recommend to additionally employ computer tomography. (orig.) [de

  12. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  13. Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography based on x-ray absorption dosage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshuai; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Lu, Hongbing

    2018-02-01

    With the advances of x-ray excitable nanophosphors, x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising hybrid imaging modality. In particular, a cone-beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) system has demonstrated its potential in in vivo imaging with the advantage of fast imaging speed over other XLCT systems. Currently, the imaging models of most XLCT systems assume that nanophosphors emit light based on the intensity distribution of x-ray within the object, not completely reflecting the nature of the x-ray excitation process. To improve the imaging quality of CB-XLCT, an imaging model that adopts an excitation model of nanophosphors based on x-ray absorption dosage is proposed in this study. To solve the ill-posed inverse problem, a reconstruction algorithm that combines the adaptive Tikhonov regularization method with the imaging model is implemented for CB-XLCT reconstruction. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments indicate that compared with the traditional forward model based on x-ray intensity, the proposed dose-based model could improve the image quality of CB-XLCT significantly in terms of target shape, localization accuracy, and image contrast. In addition, the proposed model behaves better in distinguishing closer targets, demonstrating its advantage in improving spatial resolution.

  14. Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A; Critchley, S; Monsour, P A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia. Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s). In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita. In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jung Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region using a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Mandibular CBCT was performed on 33 adults (18 males and 15 female) with no history of systemic disease, and any other dental surgery history. Location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region were radiographically evaluated. A statistical comparison was done by SPSS. In the location and distribution of nutrient canals, they were found in 6.8% at labial portion above root apex, in 93.28% at lingual portion above root apex in 46.2% at labial portion below root apex, and in 53.6% at lingual portion below root apex. Nutrient canals at lingual portion above root apex were most frequently observed between central and lateral incisors, and those at labial and lingual portion below root apex were most frequently observed between central incisors. The mean diameters of nutrient canals were 0.54 mm at labial portion above root apex, 0.61 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 0.66 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 0.76 mm at lingual portion below root apex. The mean lengths of nutrient canals were 2.63 mm at labial portion above root apex, 3.74 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 4.51 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 6.77 mm at lingual portion below root apex. CBCT is useful device to evaluate the anatomical structure of nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region

  16. Nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To evaluate location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region using a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Mandibular CBCT was performed on 33 adults (18 males and 15 female) with no history of systemic disease, and any other dental surgery history. Location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region were radiographically evaluated. A statistical comparison was done by SPSS. In the location and distribution of nutrient canals, they were found in 6.8% at labial portion above root apex, in 93.28% at lingual portion above root apex in 46.2% at labial portion below root apex, and in 53.6% at lingual portion below root apex. Nutrient canals at lingual portion above root apex were most frequently observed between central and lateral incisors, and those at labial and lingual portion below root apex were most frequently observed between central incisors. The mean diameters of nutrient canals were 0.54 mm at labial portion above root apex, 0.61 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 0.66 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 0.76 mm at lingual portion below root apex. The mean lengths of nutrient canals were 2.63 mm at labial portion above root apex, 3.74 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 4.51 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 6.77 mm at lingual portion below root apex. CBCT is useful device to evaluate the anatomical structure of nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region.

  17. Arrested Pneumatization of the Sphenoid Sinus on Large Field-of-View Cone Beam Computed Tomography Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Tahmasbi-Arashlow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull base lesions. Two cases are presented with incidental findings. Both studies, acquired for other diagnostic purposes, demonstrated unique osseous patterns that were eventually deemed to be anatomic variations in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms although the pattern of bone loss and remodeling was diagnosed as pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus by a panel of medical and maxillofacial radiologists following contrasted advanced imaging. It is important to differentiate arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus from lesions, such as arachnoid granulations, acoustic neuroma, glioma, metastatic lesions, meningioma, or chordoma, to prevent unnecessary biopsies or exploratory surgeries that would consequently reduce treatment costs and alleviate anxiety in patients.

  18. Accuracy of three-dimensional cone beam computed tomography digital model measurements compared with plaster study casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaib Al Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT study casts by comparing with direct measurements taken from plaster study casts. Materials and Methods: The dental arches of 30 patient subjects were imaged with a Kodak 9300 3D CBCT devise; Anatomodels were created and in vivo 5 imaging software was used to measure 10 dental arch variables which were compared to measurements of plaster study casts. Results: Three of the 10 variables, i.e., overbite, maxillary intermolar width, and arch length, were found significantly smaller (P < 0.05 using the Anatomodels following nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank testing. None of the differences found in the study averaged <0.5 mm. Conclusions: 3D CBCT imaging provided clinically acceptable accuracy for dental arch analysis. 3D CBCT imaging tended to underestimate the actual measurement compared to plaster study casts.

  19. Use of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnosing and treating endodontic treatment failure: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT as a complementary imaging modality applies to various clinical situations that with conventional two-dimensional radiographs alone may pose diagnostic challenges. These challenges include but are not limited to locating missed canals in endodontic retreatment and diagnosing the presence of lesions such as resorption, periapical bone defects, root fractures, and perforations. In this study, we present a case of an asymptomatic apical periodontitis that was incidentally found on a panoramic radiograph. Analyses based on panoramic and periapical radiographs and clinical examinations were insufficient for definitive diagnosis, which necessitated the use of CBCT. The CBCT scan allowed identification of the cause of the apical disease, an unfilled mesiolingual canal in previously root canal treated left mandibular second molar, as well as the extent of the lesion. We also explore the diagnostic challenges in using traditional two-dimensional radiographs only, the challenges in locating root canals in mandibular second molars, and risks and benefits in using CBCT.

  20. Density gradients in ceramic pellets measured by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Palmer, B.J.F.

    1986-07-01

    Density gradients are of fundamental importance in ceramic processing and computed tomography (CT) can provide accurate measurements of density profiles in sintered and unsintered ceramic parts. As a demonstration of this potential, the density gradients in an unsintered pellet pressed from an alumina powder were measured by CT scanning. To detect such small density gradients, the CT images must have good density resolution and be free from beam-hardening effects. This was achieved by measuring high-contrast (low-noise) images with the use of an Ir-192 isotopic source. A beam-hardening correction was applied. The resulting images are discussed relative to the transmission of forces through the powder mass during the pelletizing process

  1. Computed tomography of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Aakhus, T.; Bergan, A.; Fausa, O.; Elgjo, K.

    1980-01-01

    The findings by computed tomography in 203 cases of suspected pancreatic tumours, pancreatitis or peripancreatic abnormalities were evaluated. The appearances of the normal and the diseased pancreas are described. Computed tomography is highly accurate in detecting pancreatic masses, but can not differentiate neoplastic from inflammatory disease. The only reliable signs of pancreatic carcinoma are a focal mass in the pancreas, together with liver metastasis. When a pancreatic mass is revealed by computed tomography, CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is recommended. Thus the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures and explorative laparotomy may be avoided in some patients. (Auth.)

  2. Patient study of in vivo verification of beam delivery and range, using positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging after proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S; DeLaney, Thomas F; Liebsch, Norbert J; Munzenrider, John E; Fischman, Alan J; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3

  3. Tilting the jaw to improve the image quality or to reduce the dose in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckow, Marlen; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Müller, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be improved tilting the mandible that contains two dental titanium implants, within the relevant range of motion. Materials and methods: Using the mandible of a five-month-old pig, CBCT was performed varying the accelerating voltage, beam current, the starting rotation angle of the mandible in the source-detector plane and the tilt angles of the jaw with respect to the source-detector plane. The different datasets were automatically registered with respect to micro CT data to extract the common volume and the deviance to the pre-defined standard that characterizes the image quality. Results: The variations of the accelerating voltage, beam current and the rotation within the source-detection plane provided the expected quantitative behavior indicating the appropriate choice of the imaging quality factor. The tilting of the porcine mandible by about 14° improves the image quality by almost a factor of two. Conclusions: The tilting of the mandible with two dental implants can be used to significantly reduce the artifacts of the strongly X-ray absorbing materials in the CBCT images. The comparison of 14° jaw tilting with respect to the currently recommended arrangement in plane with the teeth demonstrates that the applied exposure time and the related dose can be reduced by a factor of four without decreasing the image quality.

  4. Artifact Elimination Technique in Tomogram of X-ray Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasif Mohd Zain

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts of tomogram are main commonly problems occurred in x-ray computed tomography. The artifacts will be appearing in tomogram due to noise, beam hardening, and scattered radiation. The study has been carried out using CdTe time pix detector. The new technique has been developed to eliminate the artifact occurred in hardware and software. The hardware setup involved the careful alignment all of the components of the system and the introduction of a collimator beam. Meanwhile, in software development deal with the flat field correction, noise filter and data projection algorithm. The results show the technique developed produce good quality images and eliminate the artifacts. (author)

  5. Dynamic iterative beam hardening correction (DIBHC) in myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrie, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In cardiac perfusion examinations with computed tomography (CT) large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle and in the descending aorta cause beam hardening artifacts that can lead to incorrect perfusion parameters. The aim of this study is to reduce these artifacts by performing an iterative correction and by accounting for the 3 materials soft tissue, bone, and iodine. Beam hardening corrections are either implemented as simple precorrections which cannot account for higher order beam hardening effects, or as iterative approaches that are based on segmenting the original image into material distribution images. Conventional segmentation algorithms fail to clearly distinguish between iodine and bone. Our new algorithm, DIBHC, calculates the time-dependent iodine distribution by analyzing the voxel changes of a cardiac perfusion examination (typically N approximately 15 electrocardiogram-correlated scans distributed over a total scan time up to T approximately 30 s). These voxel dynamics are due to changes in contrast agent. This prior information allows to precisely distinguish between bone and iodine and is key to DIBHC where each iteration consists of a multimaterial (soft tissue, bone, iodine) polychromatic forward projection, a raw data comparison and a filtered backprojection. Simulations with a semi-anthropomorphic dynamic phantom and clinical scans using a dual source CT scanner with 2 x 128 slices, a tube voltage of 100 kV, a tube current of 180 mAs, and a rotation time of 0.28 seconds have been carried out. The uncorrected images suffer from beam hardening artifacts that appear as dark bands connecting large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle, aorta, and bony structures. The CT-values of the affected tissue are usually underestimated by roughly 20 HU although deviations of up to 61 HU have been observed. For a quantitative evaluation circular regions of interest have been analyzed. After application of DIBHC the mean values obtained deviate by

  6. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  7. Accuracy of image guidance using free-breathing cone-beam computed tomography for stereotactic lung radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Monzen, Hajime; Nakayama, Shinichi; Mizote, Rika; Oonishi, Yuuichi; Kaneshige, Soichiro; Sakamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Movement of the target object during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) leads to motion blurring artifacts. The accuracy of manual image matching in image-guided radiotherapy depends on the image quality. We aimed to assess the accuracy of target position localization using free-breathing CBCT during stereotactic lung radiotherapy. The Vero4DRT linear accelerator device was used for the examinations. Reference point discrepancies between the MV X-ray beam and the CBCT system were calculated using a phantom device with a centrally mounted steel ball. The precision of manual image matching between the CBCT and the averaged intensity (AI) images restructured from four-dimensional CT (4DCT) was estimated with a respiratory motion phantom, as determined in evaluations by five independent operators. Reference point discrepancies between the MV X-ray beam and the CBCT image-guidance systems, categorized as left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI), were 0.33 ± 0.09, 0.16 ± 0.07, and 0.05 ± 0.04 mm, respectively. The LR, AP, and SI values for residual errors from manual image matching were -0.03 ± 0.22, 0.07 ± 0.25, and -0.79 ± 0.68 mm, respectively. The accuracy of target position localization using the Vero4DRT system in our center was 1.07 ± 1.23 mm (2 SD). This study experimentally demonstrated the sufficient level of geometric accuracy using the free-breathing CBCT and the image-guidance system mounted on the Vero4DRT. However, the inter-observer variation and systematic localization error of image matching substantially affected the overall geometric accuracy. Therefore, when using the free-breathing CBCT images, careful consideration of image matching is especially important.

  8. Orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion: redefining the amount of movement assessed by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Zuega Cappellozza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT is essential for tridimensional planning of orthognathic surgery, as it allows visualization and evaluation of bone structures and mineralized tissues. Tomographic slices allow evaluation of tooth inclination and individualization of movement performed during preoperative decompensation. The aim of this paper was to assess maxillary and mandibular incisors inclination pre and post orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion.Methods:The study was conducted on six individuals with skeletal Class III malocclusion, surgically treated, who had Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic scans obtained before and after orthodontic decompensation. On multiplanar reconstruction view, tomographic slices (axial, coronal and sagittal were obtained on the long axis of each incisor. The sagittal slice was used for measurement taking, whereas the references used to assess tooth inclination were the long axis of maxillary teeth in relation to the palatal plane and the long axis of mandibular teeth in relation to the mandibular plane.Results:There was significant variation in the inclination of incisors before and after orthodontic decompensation. This change was of greater magnitude in the mandibular arch, evidencing that natural compensation is more effective in this arch, thereby requiring more intensive decompensation.Conclusion:When routinely performed, the protocols of decompensation treatment in surgical individuals often result in intensive movements, which should be reevaluated, since the extent of movement predisposes to reduction in bone attachment levels and root length.

  9. Computer tomography of the neurocranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliequist, B; Forssell, A

    1976-07-01

    The experience with computer tomography of the neurocranium in 300 patients submitted for computer tomography of the brain is reported. The more appropriate projections which may be obtained with the second generation of scanners in combination with an elaborated reconstruction technique seem to constitute a replacement of conventional skull films.

  10. Protean appearance of craniopharyngioma on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, A.; Price, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas present a diverse appearance on computed tomography. Histological diagnosis is not always possible, but computed tomography is of great assistance in the delineation of the tumour as well as of the degree of associated hydrocephalus. Computed tomography also enables rapid non-invasive follow-up after surgery or radiotherapy, or both

  11. Bilateral and pseudobilateral tonsilloliths: Three dimensional imaging with cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misirlioglu, Melda; Adisen, Mehmet Zahit; Yardimci, Selmi [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale (Turkmenistan); Nalcaci, Rana [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2013-09-15

    Tonsilloliths are calcifications found in the crypts of the palatal tonsils and can be detected on routine panoramic examinations. This study was performed to highlight the benefits of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of tonsilloliths appearing bilaterally on panoramic radiographs. The sample group consisted of 7 patients who had bilateral radiopaque lesions at the area of the ascending ramus on panoramic radiographs. CBCT images for every patient were obtained from both sides of the jaw to determine the exact locations of the lesions and to rule out other calcifications. The calcifications were evaluated on the CBCT images using Ez3D2009 software. Additionally, the obtained images in DICOM format were transferred to ITK SNAP 2.4.0 pc software for semiautomatic segmentation. Segmentation was performed using contrast differences between the soft tissues and calcifications on grayscale images, and the volume in mm{sup 3} of the segmented three dimensional models were obtained. CBCT scans revealed that what appeared on panoramic radiographs as bilateral images were in fact unilateral lesions in 2 cases. The total volume of the calcifications ranged from 7.92 to 302.5mm{sup 3}. The patients with bilaterally multiple and large calcifications were found to be symptomatic. The cases provided the evidence that tonsilloliths should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiopaque masses involving the mandibular ramus, and they highlight the need for a CBCT scan to differentiate pseudo- or ghost images from true bilateral pathologies.

  12. Cone Beam X-Ray Luminescence Tomography Imaging Based on KA-FEM Method for Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Fanzhen; Zhao, Fengjun; Xu, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography can realize fast X-ray luminescence tomography imaging with relatively low scanning time compared with narrow beam X-ray luminescence tomography. However, cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography suffers from an ill-posed reconstruction problem. First, the feasibility of experiments with different penetration and multispectra in small animal has been tested using nanophosphor material. Then, the hybrid reconstruction algorithm with KA-FEM method has been applied in cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography for small animals to overcome the ill-posed reconstruction problem, whose advantage and property have been demonstrated in fluorescence tomography imaging. The in vivo mouse experiment proved the feasibility of the proposed method.

  13. Non-destructive characterisation of polymers and Al-alloys by polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, Johann; Plank, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important tool for the non-destructive characterisation of materials. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and detectors have led to cone-beam XCT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 μm and even below. Since not only the amplitude but also the phase of an X-ray beam is altered while passing through an object, phase contrast effects can occur even for polychromatic sources when the spatial coherence due to a small focal spot size is high enough. This can lead to significant improvements over conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography. Phase contrast can increase by edge enhancement the visibility of small structures and of features which are only slightly different in attenuation. We report on the possibilities of polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography for non-destructive characterisation of materials. A carbon fibre-reinforced polymer and the Al-alloys AlMg5Si7 and AlSi18 were investigated with high resolution cone-beam X-ray computed tomography with a polychromatic tube source. Under certain conditions strong phase contrast resulting in an upward and downward overshooting of the grey values across edges was observed. The phase effects are much stronger for the polymer than for the Al-alloys. The influence on the phase contrast of the parameters, including source-detector distance, focal spot size and tube acceleration voltage is presented. Maximum phase contrast was observed for a maximum distance between the source and the detector, for a low voltage and a minimum focal spot size at the X-ray source. The detectability of the different phases is improved by the edge enhancement and the resulting improvement of sharpness. Thus, a better segmentation of the carbon fibres in the fibre-reinforced polymer and of the Mg 2 Si-phase in the AlMg5Si7-alloy is achieved. Primary and eutectic Si cannot be detected by attenuation-based X

  14. Performance of cone beam computed tomography in comparison to conventional imaging techniques for the detection of bone invasion in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, C; Müller-Richter, U D A; Buck, A K; Mottok, A; Ritter, C; Schneider, P; Metzen, D; Heuschmann, P; Malzahn, U; Kübler, A C; Herrmann, K; Bluemel, C

    2015-01-01

    Detecting bone invasion in oral cancer is crucial for therapy planning and the prognosis. The present study evaluated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detecting bone invasion in comparison to standard imaging techniques. A total of 197 patients with diagnoses of oral cancer underwent CBCT as part of preoperative staging between January 2007 and April 2013. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CBCT were compared with panoramic radiography (PR), multi-slice computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone scintigraphy (BS) using McNemar's test. Histopathology and clinical follow-up served as references for the presence of bone invasion. CBCT and BS (84.8% and 89.3%, respectively), as well as CBCT and CT/MRI (83.2%), showed comparable accuracy (P = 0.188 and P = 0.771). CBCT was significantly superior to PR, which was reconstructed based on a CBCT dataset (74.1%, P = 0.002). In detecting bone invasion, CBCT was significantly more accurate than PR and was comparable to BS and CT/MRI. However, each method has certain advantages, and the best combination of imaging methods must be evaluated in prospective clinic trials. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Accuracy of computer aided measurement for detecting dental proximal caries lesions in images of cone-beam computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z L; Li, J P; Li, G; Ma, X C

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To establish and validate a computer program used to aid the detection of dental proximal caries in the images cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Methods: According to the characteristics of caries lesions in X-ray images, a computer aided detection program for proximal caries was established with Matlab and Visual C++. The whole process for caries lesion detection included image import and preprocessing, measuring average gray value of air area, choosing region of interest and calculating gray value, defining the caries areas. The program was used to examine 90 proximal surfaces from 45 extracted human teeth collected from Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. The teeth were then scanned with a CBCT scanner (Promax 3D). The proximal surfaces of the teeth were respectively detected by caries detection program and scored by human observer for the extent of lesions with 6-level-scale. With histologic examination serving as the reference standard, the caries detection program and the human observer performances were assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Student t -test was used to analyze the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) for the differences between caries detection program and human observer. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the detection accuracy of caries depth. Results: For the diagnosis of proximal caries in CBCT images, the AUC values of human observers and caries detection program were 0.632 and 0.703, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the AUC values ( P= 0.023). The correlation between program performance and gold standard (correlation coefficient r (s)=0.525) was higher than that of observer performance and gold standard ( r (s)=0.457) and there was a statistically significant difference between the correlation coefficients ( P= 0.000). Conclusions: The program that automatically detects dental proximal caries lesions could improve the

  16. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  17. Endodontic management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an unusual root dilaceration diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammed Eid Mahgoub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth may have aberrant anatomical variations in the roots and root canals. Root dilaceration is an anomaly characterized by the displacement of the root of a tooth from its normal alignment with the crown which may be a consequence of injury during tooth development. This report aims to present a successful root canal treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with unusual palatal root dilaceration (diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography in which the access cavity was prepared from the labial aspect of the tooth to provide a straight line access to the root canal system which was instrumented using OneShape rotary file system and precurved K-files up to size 50 under copious irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl using a side-vented irrigation tip. The canal was then obturated using the warm vertical compaction technique.

  18. Evidence supporting the use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vlijmen, Olivier J C; Kuijpers, Mette A R; Bergé, Stefaan J; Schols, Jan G J H; Maal, Thomas J J; Breuning, Hero; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-03-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in orthodontics and evaluated the level of evidence to determine whether the use of CBCT is justified in orthodontics. The authors identified articles by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases. They searched the articles' reference lists manually for additional articles and had no language limitations. They did not search the gray literature. Inclusion criteria were CBCT use in orthodontics and that the participants be human. The lowest level of evidence accepted for inclusion was a case series with five or more participants. The authors evaluated the studies' methodological quality according to 13 criteria related to study design, measurements and statistical analysis. The authors identified 550 articles, and 50 met the inclusion criteria. Study topics included temporary anchorage devices, cephalometry, combined orthodontic and surgical treatment, airway measurements, root resorption and tooth impactions, and cleft lip and palate. The methodological quality averaged 53 percent (range, 15-77 percent) of the maximum score. The authors found no high-quality evidence regarding the benefits of CBCT use in orthodontics. Limited evidence shows that CBCT offers better diagnostic potential, leads to better treatment planning or results in better treatment outcome than do conventional imaging modalities. Only the results of studies on airway diagnostics provided sound scientific data suggesting that CBCT use has added value. The additional radiation exposure should be weighed against possible benefits of CBCT, which have not been supported in the literature. In future studies, investigators should evaluate the effects of CBCT on treatment procedures, progression and outcome quantitatively.

  19. Computed tomography in renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, W.; Eisenberger, F.; Buck, J.

    1981-01-01

    In a group of 19 patients suffering from flank trauma and gross hematuria the diagnostic value of angiography was compared with that of computed tomography. The cases that underwent both tests were found to have the some diagnosis of rupture of the kidney. Typical CT-findings in kidney rupture are demonstrated. Whereas angiography presents an exact picture of the arterial system of the kidney, including its injures computed tomography reveals the extent of organ lesons by showing extra- and intrarenal hematomas. If surgery is planned angiography is still mandatory, whereby the indication is largely determined by the clinical findings. Computed tomography as a non-invasive method is equally suitable for follow-ups. (orig.) [de

  20. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...... that compares the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector row computed tomography with that of coronary angiography Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/6...

  1. Conventional frontal radiographs compared with frontal radiographs obtained from cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Metin; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Bayram, Mehmet; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Kilkis, Dogan; Sezgin, Omer Said

    2012-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is no difference between measurements performed on conventional frontal radiographs (FRs) and those performed on FRs obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This study consisted of conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs obtained from 30 young adult patients. Twenty-three landmarks were identified on both types of cephalometric radiographs. Twenty-one widely used cephalometric variables (14 linear distances, 4 angles, and 3 ratios) were calculated. Paired t-tests were performed to compare the means of corresponding measurements on two cephalometric radiographs of the same patient. Reproducibility of measurements ranged from 0.85 to 0.99 for CBCT-constructed FRs, and from 0.78 to 0.96 for conventional FRs. A statistically significant difference was observed between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for all linear measurements (eurR-eurL, loR-loL, moR-moL, zygR-zygL, lapR-lapL, mxR-mxL, maR-maL, umR-umL, lmR-lmL, agR-agL, me-ans) (P .05). However, no statistically significant differences were noted between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for ratios and angular measurements (P > .05). The hypothesis was rejected. A difference has been noted between measurements performed on conventional FRs and those performed on CBCT-constructed FRs, particularly in terms of linear measurements.

  2. Cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of dentoskeletal changes after asymmetric rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baka, Zeliha Muge; Akin, Mehmet; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Ileri, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantitatively evaluate the changes in arch widths and buccolingual inclinations of the posterior teeth after asymmetric rapid maxillary expansion (ARME) and to compare the measurements between the crossbite and the noncrossbite sides with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). From our clinic archives, we selected the CBCT records of 30 patients with unilateral skeletal crossbite (13 boys, 14.2 ± 1.3 years old; 17 girls, 13.8 ± 1.3 years old) who underwent ARME treatment. A modified acrylic bonded rapid maxillary expansion appliance including an occlusal locking mechanism was used in all patients. CBCT records had been taken before ARME treatment and after a 3-month retention period. Fourteen angular and 80 linear measurements were taken for the maxilla and the mandible. Frontally clipped CBCT images were used for the evaluation. Paired sample and independent sample t tests were used for statistical comparisons. Comparisons of the before-treatment and after-retention measurements showed that the arch widths and buccolingual inclinations of the posterior teeth increased significantly on the crossbite side of the maxilla and on the noncrossbite side of the mandible (P ARME treatment, the crossbite side of the maxilla and the noncrossbite side of the mandible were more affected than were the opposite sides. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The value of computed tomography in ''sciatica''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm-Jurkovic, H.; Hammer, B.

    1981-01-01

    13 cases of therapy-resistant lumboischialgia without herniated disk, caused in 12 cases by a tumour and in 1 case by an abscess, were examined by computed tomography of the lumbar and pelvic region. This method is indicated immediately after insufficient results of conventional X-ray methods (including tomography) and of lumbosacral radiculography. The computed tomography is indispensable also in patients with ''sciatica'' with a known malignoma. The information given by computed tomography is essential for the therapy planning. (author)

  4. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.D.; Ritman, E.L.; Robb, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  5. Comparison of electron beam computed tomography and exercise electrocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shinji; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    Although exercise electrocardiography (ECG) is a useful noninvasive screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD), one prerequisite for ECG screening is that patient be able to exercise enough to evoke myocardial ischemia. Thus, exercise ECG may not be suitable for, some elderly people with CAD who cannot exercise enough. We compared electron beam Computed Tomography (EBCT) with exercise ECG for detecting CAD in 196 patients (mean age, 58.4±12.5 (standard deviation)) who had undergone coronary angiography. Using the angiographic findings as the ''gold standard'', we found that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 88%, 77%, 89%, and 77%, respectively, for EBCT, and 66%, 72%, 83%, and 52%, respectively, for exercise ECG. Although the results were similar when the subjects were divided into different age groups, the negative predictive value for exercise ECG, among older patients was very low. These findings suggest that EBCT is superior to exercise ECG in detecting CAD in the elderly. (author)

  6. Factors affecting the possibility to detect buccal bone condition around dental implants using cone beam computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedke, Gabriela S; Spin-Neto, Rubens; da Silveira, Heloisa E D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate factors with impact on the conspicuity (possibility to detect) of the buccal bone condition around dental implants in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Titanium (Ti) or zirconia (Zr) implants and abutments were inserted into 40 bone blocks...... in a way to obtain variable buccal bone thicknesses. Three combinations regarding the implant-abutment metal (TiTi, TiZr, or ZrZr) and the number of implants (one, two, or three) were assessed. Two CBCT units (Scanora 3D - Sc and Cranex 3D - Cr) and two voxel resolutions (0.2 and 0.13 mm) were used...... variable. Odds ratio (OR) were calculated separately for each CBCT unit. RESULTS: Implant-abutment combination (ZrZr) (OR Sc = 19.18, OR Cr = 11.89) and number of implants (3) (OR Sc = 12.10, OR Cr = 4.25) had major impact on buccal bone conspicuity. The thinner the buccal bone, the higher the risk...

  7. Clival Lesion incidentally discovered on cone-beam computed tomography: A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Aniket B.; Tadinada, Aditya; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Lurie, Alan G. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States); Douglas, Fellows [Division of Diagnostic Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2014-06-15

    An osteolytic lesion with a small central area of mineralization and sclerotic borders was discovered incidentally in the clivus on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of a 27-year-old male patient. This benign appearance indicated a primary differential diagnosis of non-aggressive lesions such as fibro-osseous lesions and arrested pneumatization. Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity. These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis. Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

  8. ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS FINDINGS ON CONE BEAM-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN CLEFT LIP AND PALATE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yllka DECOLLI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is frequently used in surgery treatment planning in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of different anatomical variations of patients with cleft lip and palate using CBCT images. Materials and method: CBCTs taken from consecutive patients (n =25; mean age 10.7±4 years, range 6.5–23 years with a non-syndromic cleft lip and palate (CLP, between June 2014-2015, were systematically evaluated. Sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ, maxilla and mandible were checked for incidental findings. Results: On 90.1 % of the CBCTs, incidental findings were found. The most prevalent ones were airway/sinus findings (78.1%, followed by dental problems, e.g. missing teeth (54%, nasal septum deviation (93%, middle ear and mastoid opacification, suggestive for otitis media (8% and (chronic mastoiditis (7%, abnormal TMJ anatomy (4.3%. Conclusions: Incidental findings are common on CBCTs in cleft lip and palate patients. Compared with the literature, CLP patients have more dental, nasal and ear problems. The CBCT scan should be reviewed by all specialists in the CLP team, stress being laid on their specific background knowledge concerning symptoms and treatment of these patients.

  9. Association between clinical and cone-beam computed tomography findings in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the association between the clinical and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT findings in relation to bony changes in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: According to the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorder (RDC/TMD, forty-one patients with type II TMD (42 TM joints and type III TMD (40 TM joints were recruited for this study. Condylar position and bony changes including flattening, sclerosis, osteophytes, resorption, and erosion of joint were evaluated by CBCT and compared with clinical findings. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. RESULTS: Condylar flattening, sclerosis, resorption, and erosion were not significantly associated with joint/masticatory muscles pain or crepitus sound. The vertical or horizontal position of the condyle showed no significant relationship with the clinical findings. Condylar osteophyte was significantly associated with pain in masticatory muscles and crepitus (P = 0.030 and P = 0.010, respectively. There was no association between the condylar range of motion and pain in joint or masticatory muscles. CONCLUSION: Condylar osteophyte was significantly associated with both masticatory muscles pain and crepitus sound. No significant relationship was found between the other temporomandibular joint (TMJ radiographic and clinical findings in patients with TMD.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of a Four-Implant-Supported Polyetherketoneketone Framework Prosthesis: A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Computer-Aided Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Sun; Shin, Sang-Wan; Lee, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Yol

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate and compare polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) with different framework materials for implant-supported prostheses by means of a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA) based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computer-aided design (CAD) data. A geometric model that consisted of four maxillary implants supporting a prosthesis framework was constructed from CBCT and CAD data of a treated patient. Three different materials (zirconia, titanium, and PEKK) were selected, and their material properties were simulated using FEA software in the generated geometric model. In the PEKK framework (ie, low elastic modulus) group, the stress transferred to the implant and simulated adjacent tissue was reduced when compressive stress was dominant, but increased when tensile stress was dominant. This study suggests that the shock-absorbing effects of a resilient implant-supported framework are limited in some areas and that rigid framework material shows a favorable stress distribution and safety of overall components of the prosthesis.

  11. Backprojection filtering for variable orbit fan-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Zeng, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Backprojection filtering algorithms are presented for three variable Orbit fan-beam geometries. Expressions for the fan beam projection and backprojection operators are given for a flat detector fan-beam geometry with fixed focal length, with variable focal length, and with fixed focal length and off-center focusing. Backprojection operators are derived for each geometry using transformation of coordinates to transform from a parallel geometry backprojector to a fan-beam backprojector for the appropriate geometry. The backprojection operator includes a factor which is a function of the coordinates of the projection ray and the coordinates of the pixel in the backprojected image. The backprojection filtering algorithm first backprojects the variable orbit fan-beam projection data using the appropriately derived backprojector to obtain a 1/r blurring of the original image then takes the two-dimensional (2D) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the backprojected image, then multiples the transformed image by the 2D ramp filter function, and finally takes the inverse 2D FFT to obtain the reconstructed image. Computer simulations verify that backprojectors with appropriate weighting give artifact free reconstructions of simulated line integral projections. Also, it is shown that it is not necessary to assume a projection model of line integrals, but the projector and backprojector can be defined to model the physics of the imaging detection process. A backprojector for variable orbit fan-beam tomography with fixed focal length is derived which includes an additional factor which is a function of the flux density along the flat detector. It is shown that the impulse response for the composite of the projection and backprojection operations is equal to 1/r

  12. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  13. Age estimation by pulp-to-tooth area ratio using cone-beam computed tomography: A preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Arpita; Acharya, Ashith B; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation of living or deceased individuals is an important aspect of forensic sciences. Conventionally, pulp-to-tooth area ratio (PTR) measured from periapical radiographs have been utilized as a nondestructive method of age estimation. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new method to acquire three-dimensional images of the teeth in living individuals. The present study investigated age estimation based on PTR of the maxillary canines measured in three planes obtained from CBCT image data. Sixty subjects aged 20-85 years were included in the study. For each tooth, mid-sagittal, mid-coronal, and three axial sections-cementoenamel junction (CEJ), one-fourth root level from CEJ, and mid-root-were assessed. PTR was calculated using AutoCAD software after outlining the pulp and tooth. All statistical analyses were performed using an SPSS 17.0 software program. Linear regression analysis showed that only PTR in axial plane at CEJ had significant age correlation ( r = 0.32; P < 0.05). This is probably because of clearer demarcation of pulp and tooth outline at this level.

  14. Attenuation Correction Strategies for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and 4-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tinsu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses attenuation correction strategies in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 4 dimensional PET/CT imaging. Average CT scan derived from averaging the high temporal resolution CT images is effective in improving the registration of the CT and the PET images and quantification of the PET data. It underscores list mode data acquisition in 4 dimensional PET and introduces 4 dimensional CT popular in thoracic treatment planning to 4 dimensional PET/CT. ...

  15. Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography with a circle-plus-two-arcs data acquisition orbit: Preliminary phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Ruola; Tang Xiangyang; Conover, David; Yu Rongfeng

    2003-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been investigated in the past two decades due to its potential advantages over a fan beam CT. These advantages include (a) great improvement in data acquisition efficiency, spatial resolution, and spatial resolution uniformity, (b) substantially better utilization of x-ray photons generated by the x-ray tube compared to a fan beam CT, and (c) significant advancement in clinical three-dimensional (3D) CT applications. However, most studies of CBCT in the past are focused on cone beam data acquisition theories and reconstruction algorithms. The recent development of x-ray flat panel detectors (FPD) has made CBCT imaging feasible and practical. This paper reports a newly built flat panel detector-based CBCT prototype scanner and presents the results of the preliminary evaluation of the prototype through a phantom study. The prototype consisted of an x-ray tube, a flat panel detector, a GE 8800 CT gantry, a patient table and a computer system. The prototype was constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT gantry such that both a single-circle cone beam acquisition orbit and a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit can be achieved. With a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit, a complete set of cone beam projection data can be obtained, consisting of a set of circle projections and a set of arc projections. Using the prototype scanner, the set of circle projections were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and the FPD together on the gantry, and the set of arc projections were obtained by tilting the gantry while the x-ray tube and detector were at the 12 and 6 o'clock positions, respectively. A filtered backprojection exact cone beam reconstruction algorithm based on a circle-plus-two-arcs orbit was used for cone beam reconstruction from both the circle and arc projections. The system was first characterized in terms of the linearity and dynamic range of the detector. Then the uniformity, spatial resolution and low contrast resolution were assessed using

  16. Mandibular first molar with Vertucci type I canal confguration diagnosed with the help of cone beam computed tomography: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Ankit; Trivedi, H P; Gupta, Manju; Sharma, Anuradha; Likhyani, Lalit; Agarwal, Manoj

    2014-11-01

    The knowledge of root canal morphology and the existing anatomical variations is essential for successful endodontic therapy. This report presents an extraordinary case of unusual tooth morphology involving the mandibular first molar with a single root and a single canal in a patient. Endodontic treatment of the affected tooth 36 was performed. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images confirmed our diagnostic and therapeutic measures after endodontic management of the teeth. This morphologic variation has been reported once in the literature. The availability of three-dimensional images further provided the opportunity for the precise description of the anatomy of mandibular first molar with single roots and single canals.

  17. Three-dimensional localization of impacted canines and root resorption assessment using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhtaseb, Eyad; Mao, Jing; Mahony, Derek; Bader, Rawan; Zhang, Zhi-xing

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new way to localize the impacted canines from three dimensions and to investigate the root resorption of the adjacent teeth by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-six patients undergoing orthodontic treatments and having impacted canines in Tongji Hospital were examined. The images of CBCT scans were obtained from KaVo 3D exam vision. Angular and linear measurements of the cusp tip and root apex according to the three planes (mid-sagittal, occlusal and frontal) have been taken using the cephalometric tool of the InVivo Dental Anatomage Version 5.1.10. The measurements of the angular and linear coordinates of the maxillary and mandibular canines were obtained. Using this technique the operators could envision the location of the impacted canine according to the three clinical planes. Adjacent teeth root resorption of 28.26 % was in the upper lateral incisors while 17.39% in upper central incisors, but no lower root resorption was found in our samples. Accurate and reliable localization of the impacted canines could be obtained from the novel analysis system, which offers a better surgical and orthodontic treatment for the patients with impacted canines.

  18. Diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography on detection of mechanically-created artificial secondary caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charuakkra, Arnon; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Pongsirwet, Surawut; Verochana, Karune; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant [Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bitewing images in detection of secondary caries. One hundred and twenty proximal slots of Class II cavities were randomly prepared on human premolar and molar teeth, and restored with amalgam (n=60) and composite resin (n=60). Then, artificial secondary caries lesions were randomly created using round steel No. 4 bur. The teeth were radiographed with a conventional bitewing technique and two CBCT systems; Pax-500ECT and Promax 3D. All images were evaluated by five observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Significant difference was tested using the Friedman test (p value<0.05). The mean Az values for bitewing, Pax-500ECT, and Promax 3D imaging systems were 0.882, 0.995, and 0.978, respectively. Significant differences were found between the two CBCT systems and film (p=0.007). For CBCT systems, the axial plane showed the greatest Az value. Based on the design of this study, CBCT images were better than bitewing radiographs in detection of secondary caries.

  19. Diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography on detection of mechanically-created artificial secondary caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charuakkra, Arnon; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Pongsirwet, Surawut; Verochana, Karune; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bitewing images in detection of secondary caries. One hundred and twenty proximal slots of Class II cavities were randomly prepared on human premolar and molar teeth, and restored with amalgam (n=60) and composite resin (n=60). Then, artificial secondary caries lesions were randomly created using round steel No. 4 bur. The teeth were radiographed with a conventional bitewing technique and two CBCT systems; Pax-500ECT and Promax 3D. All images were evaluated by five observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Significant difference was tested using the Friedman test (p value<0.05). The mean Az values for bitewing, Pax-500ECT, and Promax 3D imaging systems were 0.882, 0.995, and 0.978, respectively. Significant differences were found between the two CBCT systems and film (p=0.007). For CBCT systems, the axial plane showed the greatest Az value. Based on the design of this study, CBCT images were better than bitewing radiographs in detection of secondary caries.

  20. The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Stefano; Salgarello, Matteo; Laiti, Silvia; Partelli, Stefano; Castelli, Paola; Spinelli, Antonello E; Tamburrino, Domenico; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is debated. We retrospectively assessed the value of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in addition to conventional imaging as a staging modality in pancreatic cancer. (18)Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed in 72 patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma after multi-detector computed tomography positron emission tomography was considered positive for a maximum standardized uptake value >3. Overall, 21% of patients had a maximum standardized uptake value ≤ 3, and 60% of those had undergone neoadjuvant treatment (P=0.0001). Furthermore, 11% of patients were spared unwarranted surgery since positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected metastatic disease. All liver metastases were subsequently identified with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Sensitivity and specificity of positron emission tomography/computed tomography for distant metastases were 78% and 100%. The median CA19.9 concentration was 48.8 U/mL for the entire cohort and 292 U/mL for metastatic patients (P=0.112). The widespread application of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma seems not justified. It should be considered in selected patients at higher risk of metastatic disease (i.e. CA19.9>200 U/mL) after undergoing other imaging tests. Neoadjuvant treatment is significantly associated with low metabolic activity, limiting the value of positron emission tomography in this setting. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Promising role of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in Meckel's scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anurag; Chauhan, MS; Pandit, AG; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Meckel's scan is a common procedure performed in nuclear medicine. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in a suspected case of heterotopic location of gastric mucosa can increase the accuracy of its anatomic localization. We present two suspected cases of Meckel's diverticulum in, which SPECT/CT co-registration has helped in better localization of the pathology

  2. Paradoxical emboli: demonstration using helical computed tomography of the pulmonary artery associated with abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalu, P.; Ferretti, G.R.; Bricault, I.; Ayanian, D.; Coulomb, M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with a recent history of a cerebrovascular accident. Because of clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism and negative Doppler ultrasound findings of the lower limbs, spiral computed tomography of the pulmonary artery was performed and demonstrated pulmonary emboli. We emphasize the role of computed tomography of the abdomen, performed 3 min after the thoracic acquisition, which showed an unsuspected thrombus within the abdominal aorta and the left renal artery with infarction of the left kidney. Paradoxical embolism was highly suspected on computed tomography data and confirmed by echocardiography which demonstrated a patent foramen ovale. (orig.)

  3. Cemento-Osseous Dysplasias: Imaging Features Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Henrique Pereira; Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Pontual, Maria Luiza Dos Anjos; Pontual, Andréa Dos Anjos; Marcelos, Priscylla Gonçalves Correia Leite de; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes

    2018-01-01

    Imaging exams have important role in diagnosis of cemento-osseous dysplasia (COD). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) stands out for allowing three-dimensional image evaluation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of cases diagnosed as COD on CBCT scans, as well identify the main imaging features related to these lesions. An analysis was performed in a database containing 22,400 radiological reports, in which all cases showing some type of COD were initially selected. These CBCT exams were reevaluated to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and determine the prevalence and distribution of the types of COD with regard to gender, age and preferred location, while describing its most common imaging aspects. Data were presented using descriptive analyses. There were 82 cases diagnosed as COD in the CBCT images (prevalence of 0.4%). The distribution of patients was 11 (13.4%) male and 71 (86.6%) female, with a mean age of 49.8 years (age-range 17-85 years). There were 47 (57.3%) cases of periapical COD, 23 (28%) of focal COD and 12 (14.6%) of florid COD. The mandible was more affected than the maxilla. In most cases, the lesions were mixed or hyperdense. All COD had well-defined limits and there were no cases of tooth displacement. In conclusion, periapical COD was the most common type and the most affected bone was the mandible. Imaging evaluation is critical for diagnosis and dentists should bear in mind all possible radiographic presentations of COD in order to prevent misleading diagnoses and consequently, inadequate treatments.

  4. Motion-aware temporal regularization for improved 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mory, Cyril; Janssens, Guillaume; Rit, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) of the free-breathing thorax is a valuable tool in image-guided radiation therapy of the thorax and the upper abdomen. It allows the determination of the position of a tumor throughout the breathing cycle, while only its mean position can be extracted from three-dimensional CBCT. The classical approaches are not fully satisfactory: respiration-correlated methods allow one to accurately locate high-contrast structures in any frame, but contain strong streak artifacts unless the acquisition is significantly slowed down. Motion-compensated methods can yield streak-free, but static, reconstructions. This work proposes a 4D-CBCT method that can be seen as a trade-off between respiration-correlated and motion-compensated reconstruction. It builds upon the existing reconstruction using spatial and temporal regularization (ROOSTER) and is called motion-aware ROOSTER (MA-ROOSTER). It performs temporal regularization along curved trajectories, following the motion estimated on a prior 4D CT scan. MA-ROOSTER does not involve motion-compensated forward and back projections: the input motion is used only during temporal regularization. MA-ROOSTER is compared to ROOSTER, motion-compensated Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (MC-FDK), and two respiration-correlated methods, on CBCT acquisitions of one physical phantom and two patients. It yields streak-free reconstructions, visually similar to MC-FDK, and robust information on tumor location throughout the breathing cycle. MA-ROOSTER also allows a variation of the lung tissue density during the breathing cycle, similar to that of planning CT, which is required for quantitative post-processing.

  5. A study on mechanical errors in Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yi Seong; Yoo, Eun Jeong; Choi, Kyoung Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Anyang SAM Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Woo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study investigated the rate of setup variance by the rotating unbalance of gantry in image-guided radiation therapy. The equipments used linear accelerator(Elekta Synergy ™, UK) and a three-dimensional volume imaging mode(3D Volume View) in cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) system. 2D images obtained by rotating 360°and 180° were reconstructed to 3D image. Catpan503 phantom and homogeneous phantom were used to measure the setup errors. Ball-bearing phantom was used to check the rotation axis of the CBCT. The volume image from CBCT using Catphan503 phantom and homogeneous phantom were analyzed and compared to images from conventional CT in the six dimensional view(X, Y, Z, Roll, Pitch, and Yaw). The variance ratio of setup error were difference in X 0.6 mm, Y 0.5 mm, Z 0.5 mm when the gantry rotated 360° in orthogonal coordinate. whereas rotated 180°, the error measured 0.9 mm, 0.2 mm, 0.3 mm in X, Y, Z respectively. In the rotating coordinates, the more increased the rotating unbalance, the more raised average ratio of setup errors. The resolution of CBCT images showed 2 level of difference in the table recommended. CBCT had a good agreement compared to each recommended values which is the mechanical safety, geometry accuracy and image quality. The rotating unbalance of gentry vary hardly in orthogonal coordinate. However, in rotating coordinate of gantry exceeded the ±1° of recommended value. Therefore, when we do sophisticated radiation therapy six dimensional correction is needed.

  6. Anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Arpita Rai; Burde, Krishna; Guttai, Kruthika; Naikmasu, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the general anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to determine the human anatomic variability of the nasopalatine canal in relation to age and gender. The study included 100 subjects aged between 20 and 86 years who were divided into the following 3 groups: 1) 20-34 years old; 2) 35-49 years old; 3) ≥50 years old. The subjects were equally distributed between the genders. CBCT was performed using a standard exposure and patient positioning protocol. The data of the CBCT images were sliced in three dimensions. Image planes on the three axes (X, Y, and Z) were sequentially analyzed for the location, morphology and dimensions of the nasopalatine canal by two independent observers. The correlation of age and gender with all the variables was evaluated. The present study did not reveal statistically significant differences in the number of openings at the nasal fossa; diameter of the nasal fossa openings; diameter of the incisive fossa; shape, curvature, and angulation of the canal as viewed in the sagittal sections; antero-posterior dimensions and length of the canal in the sagittal sections; or the level of division of the canal in the coronal plane by age. However, males and females showed significant differences in the length of the canal in the sagittal sections and level of the division of the canal in the coronal plane. The present study highlighted important variability observed in the anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal.

  7. Anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Arpita Rai [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia University, New Delhi (India); Burde, Krishna; Guttai, Kruthika; Naikmasu, Venkatesh [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, S.D.M. College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Dharwad (India)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the general anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to determine the human anatomic variability of the nasopalatine canal in relation to age and gender. The study included 100 subjects aged between 20 and 86 years who were divided into the following 3 groups: 1) 20-34 years old; 2) 35-49 years old; 3) ≥50 years old. The subjects were equally distributed between the genders. CBCT was performed using a standard exposure and patient positioning protocol. The data of the CBCT images were sliced in three dimensions. Image planes on the three axes (X, Y, and Z) were sequentially analyzed for the location, morphology and dimensions of the nasopalatine canal by two independent observers. The correlation of age and gender with all the variables was evaluated. The present study did not reveal statistically significant differences in the number of openings at the nasal fossa; diameter of the nasal fossa openings; diameter of the incisive fossa; shape, curvature, and angulation of the canal as viewed in the sagittal sections; antero-posterior dimensions and length of the canal in the sagittal sections; or the level of division of the canal in the coronal plane by age. However, males and females showed significant differences in the length of the canal in the sagittal sections and level of the division of the canal in the coronal plane. The present study highlighted important variability observed in the anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal.

  8. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff.

  9. Comparison of the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and medical computed tomography: implications for clinical diagnostics with guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Marcus; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Orentlicher, Gary; Wahl, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and medical-grade CT in the context of evaluating the diagnostic value and accuracy of fiducial marker localization for reference marker-based guided surgery systems. Cadaver mandibles with attached radiopaque gutta-percha markers, as well as glass balls and composite cylinders of known dimensions, were measured manually with a highly accurate digital caliper. The objects were then scanned using a medical-grade CT scanner (Philips Brilliance 64) and five different CBCT scanners (Sirona Galileos, Morita 3D Accuitomo 80, Vatech PaX-Reve3D, 3M Imtech Iluma, and Planmeca ProMax 3D). The data were then imported into commercially available software, and measurements were made of the scanned markers and objects. CT and CBCT measurements were compared to each other and to the caliper measurements. The difference between the CBCT measurements and the caliper measurements was larger than the difference between the CT measurements and the caliper measurements. Measurements of the cadaver mandible and the geometric reference markers were highly accurate with CT. The average absolute errors of the human mandible measurements were 0.03 mm for CT and 0.23 mm for CBCT. The measurement errors of the geometric objects based on CT ranged between 0.00 and 0.12 mm, compared to an error range between 0.00 and 2.17 mm with the CBCT scanners. CT provided the most accurate images in this study, closely followed by one CBCT of the five tested. Although there were differences in the distance measurements of the hard tissue of the human mandible between CT and CBCT, these differences may not be of clinical significance for most diagnostic purposes. The fiducial marker localization error caused by some CBCT scanners may be a problem for guided surgery systems.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect the...

  11. Patient Study of In Vivo Verification of Beam Delivery and Range, Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Imaging After Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Fischman, Alan J.; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3 GyE and 10 GyE (for an ocular melanoma) per fraction were delivered in 1 or 2 fields. Imaging was performed with a commercial PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting within 20 min after treatment. The same treatment immobilization device was used during imaging for all but 2 patients. Measured PET/CT images were coregistered to the planning CT and compared with the corresponding PET expectation, obtained from CT-based Monte Carlo calculations complemented by functional information. For the ocular case, treatment position was approximately replicated, and spatial correlation was deduced from reference clips visible in both the planning radiographs and imaging CT. Here, the expected PET image was obtained from an analytical model. Results: Good spatial correlation and quantitative agreement within 30% were found between the measured and expected activity. For head-and-neck patients, the beam range could be verified with an accuracy of 1-2 mm in well-coregistered bony structures. Low spine and eye sites indicated the need for better fixation and coregistration methods. An analysis of activity decay revealed as tissue-effective half-lives of 800-1,150 s. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of postradiation PET/CT for in vivo treatment verification. It also indicates some technological and methodological improvements needed for optimal clinical application

  12. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  13. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  15. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Matheus L. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Tosoni, Guilherme M. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Araraquara (Brazil); Lindsey, David H.; Mendoza, Kristopher; Tetradis, Sotirios; Mallya, Sanjay M. [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  16. Digital replacement of the distorted dentition acquired by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, N J; Ayoub, A F; Barbenel, J; Moos, K; Naudi, K; Ju, X; Khambay, B S

    2013-11-01

    During cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning, intra-oral metallic objects may produce streak artefacts, which impair the occlusal surface of the teeth. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of replacement of the CBCT dentition with a more accurate dentition and to determine the clinical feasibility of the method. Impressions of the teeth of six cadaveric skulls with unrestored dentitions were taken and acrylic base plates constructed incorporating radiopaque registration markers. Each appliance was fitted to the skull and a CBCT performed. Impressions were taken of the dentition with the devices in situ and dental models were produced. These were CBCT-scanned and the images of the skulls and models imported into computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software and aligned on the registration markers. The occlusal surfaces of each dentition were then replaced with the occlusal image of the corresponding model. The absolute mean distance between the registration markers in the skulls and the dental models was 0.09±0.02mm, and for the dentition was 0.24±0.09mm. When the method was applied to patients, the distance between markers was 0.12±0.04mm for the maxilla and 0.16±0.02mm for the mandible. It is possible to replace the inaccurate dentition on a CBCT scan using this method and to create a composite skull which is clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scintillator performance considerations for dedicated breast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) is an emerging clinical modality that can eliminate tissue superposition and has the potential for improved sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. It is performed without physical compression of the breast. Most of the dedicated BCT systems use large-area detectors operating in cone-beam geometry and are referred to as cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) systems. The large-area detectors in CBBCT systems are energy-integrating, indirect-type detectors employing a scintillator that converts x-ray photons to light, followed by detection of optical photons. A key consideration that determines the image quality achieved by such CBBCT systems is the choice of scintillator and its performance characteristics. In this work, a framework for analyzing the impact of the scintillator on CBBCT performance and its use for task-specific optimization of CBBCT imaging performance is described.

  18. Facial soft-tissue asymmetry in three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images of children with surgically corrected unilateral clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John Marlow; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a relatively common craniofacial malformation involving bony and soft-tissue disruptions of the nasolabial and dentoalveolar regions. The combination of CL/P and subsequent craniofacial surgeries to close the cleft and improve appearance of the cutaneous upper lip and nose can cause scarring and muscle pull, possibly resulting in soft-tissue depth asymmetries across the face. We tested the hypothesis that tissue depths in children with unilateral CL/P exhibit differences in symmetry across the sides of the face. Twenty-eight tissue depths were measured on cone-beam computed tomography images of children with unilateral CL/P (n = 55), aged 7 to 17 years, using Dolphin software (version 11.5). Significant differences in tissue depth symmetry were found around the cutaneous upper lip and nose in patients with unilateral CL/P.

  19. Influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis identified by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrela, Carlos; Porto, Olavo Cesar Lyra; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth [Federal University of Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dental School; Bueno, Mike Reis [University of Cuiaba (UNIC), MT (Brazil). Dental School; Pecora, Jesus Djalma, E-mail: estrela3@terra.com.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dental School

    2009-07-01

    The determination of the success of endodontic treatment has been often discussed based on outcome obtained by periapical radiography. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis detected by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A consecutive sample of 1020 images (periapical radiographs and CBCT scans) taken from 619 patients (245 men; mean age, 50.1 years) between February 2008 and September 2009 were used in this study. Presence and intracanal post length (short, medium and long) were associated with apical periodontitis (AP). Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Significance level was set at p<0.01. The kappa value was used to assess examiner variability. From a total of 591 intracanal posts, AP was observed in 15.06%, 18.78% and 7.95% using periapical radiographs, into the different lengths, short, medium and long, respectively (p=0.466). Considering the same posts length it was verified AP in 24.20%, 26.40% and 11.84% observed by CBCT scans, respectively (p=0.154). From a total of 1,020 teeth used in this study, AP was detected in 397 (38.92%) by periapical radiography and in 614 (60.19%) by CBCT scans (p<0.001). The distribution of intracanal posts in different dental groups showed higher prevalence in maxillary anterior teeth (54.79%). Intracanal posts lengths did not influenced AP. AP was detected more frequently when CBCT method was used. (author)

  20. Influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis identified by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela, Carlos; Porto, Olavo Cesar Lyra; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth; Bueno, Mike Reis; Pecora, Jesus Djalma

    2009-01-01

    The determination of the success of endodontic treatment has been often discussed based on outcome obtained by periapical radiography. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis detected by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A consecutive sample of 1020 images (periapical radiographs and CBCT scans) taken from 619 patients (245 men; mean age, 50.1 years) between February 2008 and September 2009 were used in this study. Presence and intracanal post length (short, medium and long) were associated with apical periodontitis (AP). Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Significance level was set at p<0.01. The kappa value was used to assess examiner variability. From a total of 591 intracanal posts, AP was observed in 15.06%, 18.78% and 7.95% using periapical radiographs, into the different lengths, short, medium and long, respectively (p=0.466). Considering the same posts length it was verified AP in 24.20%, 26.40% and 11.84% observed by CBCT scans, respectively (p=0.154). From a total of 1,020 teeth used in this study, AP was detected in 397 (38.92%) by periapical radiography and in 614 (60.19%) by CBCT scans (p<0.001). The distribution of intracanal posts in different dental groups showed higher prevalence in maxillary anterior teeth (54.79%). Intracanal posts lengths did not influenced AP. AP was detected more frequently when CBCT method was used. (author)

  1. [Anterior odontoid screw fixation using intra-operative cone-beam computed tomography and navigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Castro, Julián

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to asses the value of intraoperative cone-beam CT (O-arm) and stereotactic navigation for the insertion of anterior odontoid screws. this was a retrospective review of patients receiving surgical treatment for traumatic odontoid fractures during a period of 18 months. Procedures were guided with O-arm assistance in all cases. The screw position was verified with an intraoperative CT scan. Intraoperative and clinical parameters were evaluated. Odontoid fracture fusion was assessed on postoperative CT scans obtained at 3 and 6 months' follow-up Five patients were included in this series; 4 patients (80%) were male. Mean age was 63.6 years (range 35-83 years). All fractures were acute type ii odontoid fractures. The mean operative time was 116minutes (range 60-160minutes). Successful screw placement, judged by intraoperative computed tomography, was attained in all 5 patients (100%). The average preoperative and postoperative times were 8.6 (range 2-22 days) and 4.2 days (range 3-7 days) respectively. No neurological deterioration occurred after surgery. The rate of bone fusion was 80% (4/5). Although this initial study evaluated a small number of patients, anterior odontoid screw fixation utilizing the O-arm appears to be safe and accurate. This system allows immediate CT imaging in the operating room to verify screw position. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, E; Kayikcioglu, T; Kayipmaz, S

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we propose a decision support system for effective classification of dental periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) lesions obtained via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT has been effectively used in recent years for diagnosing dental pathologies and determining their boundaries and content. Unlike other imaging techniques, CBCT provides detailed and distinctive information about the pathologies by enabling a three-dimensional (3D) image of the region to be displayed. We employed 50 CBCT 3D image dataset files as the full dataset of our study. These datasets were identified by experts as periapical cyst and KCOT lesions according to the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features. Segmentation operations were performed on the CBCT images using viewer software that we developed. Using the tools of this software, we marked the lesional volume of interest and calculated and applied the order statistics and 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix for each CBCT dataset. A feature vector of the lesional region, including 636 different feature items, was created from those statistics. Six classifiers were used for the classification experiments. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier achieved the best classification performance with 100% accuracy, and 100% F-score (F1) scores as a result of the experiments in which a ten-fold cross validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM achieved the best classification performance with 96.00% accuracy, and 96.00% F1 scores in the experiments in which a split sample validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM additionally achieved the best performance of 94.00% accuracy, and 93.88% F1 in which a leave-one-out (LOOCV) method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. Based on the results, we determined that periapical cyst and KCOT lesions can be classified with a high accuracy with the models that we built using

  4. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  5. Auditory bones obtained by synchrotron radiation computed tomography at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Sugiyama, H.; Maksimenko, A.

    2005-01-01

    A series tomograms and 3D reconstructions of the inner structure of the human auditory bone were obtained for the first time by employing absorption X-ray computed tomography using a synchrotron radiation. The experiment was performed at the very long transport channel beam line BL29XUL, where X-ray were available at 1000m from the source point. This method is great worth to making anatomically auditory structure observations without bursting the specimens. (author)

  6. Binary moving-blocker-based scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography with width-truncated projections: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a binary moving-blocker (BMB)-based technique for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In concept, a beam blocker consisting of lead strips, mounted in front of the x-ray tube, moves rapidly in and out of the beam during a single gantry rotation. The projections are acquired in alternating phases of blocked and unblocked cone beams, where the blocked phase results in a stripe pattern in the width direction. To derive the scatter map from the blocked projections, 1D B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied by using the detected information in the shaded regions. The scatter map of the unblocked projections is corrected by averaging two scatter maps that correspond to their adjacent blocked projections. The scatter-corrected projections are obtained by subtracting the corresponding scatter maps from the projection data and are utilized to generate the CBCT image by a compressed-sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction algorithm. Catphan504 and pelvis phantoms were used to evaluate the method’s performance. The proposed BMB-based technique provided an effective method to enhance the image quality by suppressing scatter-induced artifacts, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area. Compared to CBCT without a blocker, the spatial nonuniformity was reduced from 9.1% to 3.1%. The root-mean-square error of the CT numbers in the regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from 30.2 HU to 3.8 HU. In addition to high resolution, comparable to that of the benchmark image, the CS-based reconstruction also led to a better contrast-to-noise ratio in seven ROIs. The proposed technique enables complete scatter-corrected CBCT imaging with width-truncated projections and allows reducing the acquisition time to approximately half. This work may have significant implications for image-guided or adaptive radiation therapy, where CBCT is often used.

  7. Florid expansile cemento-osseous dysplasia of the jaws: Cone beam computed tomography study and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Singer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An interesting case of florid expansile cemento-osseous dysplasia (FECOD of the maxilla and mandible in a 36-year-old female is being presented. The patient presented for consultation for orthognathic surgery and was unaware of these lesions. Upon clinical and radiographic examination, including cone beam computed tomography, massive cemento-osseous lesions in all quadrants were observed. The radiographic appearance of the lesions was consistent with cemento-osseous dysplasia (COD, the key difference being extreme expansion. Expansion, although not a new phenomenon, is present in all quadrants. These radiographic features suggest a variation of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and is more aptly termed FECOD. This name is proposed for its diagnostic relevance based on the radiographic features. As with similar CODs, unless the lesions are disfiguring, conservative management is the preferred approach. Biopsy was not indicated unless there are additional associated complications. A detailed review of the pertinent literature was undertaken.

  8. Management of a maxillary first molar having atypical anatomy of two roots diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sarang; Mittal, Meenu; Passi, Deepak; Grover, Shibani

    2015-01-01

    Most often, a clinician working on maxillary first molar when anticipates an aberration thinks of an extra canal but rarely does he preempt fewer canals. Maxillary first molar is a tooth, which has been extensively reviewed with respect to its external and internal morphology. Abundant literature related to its anatomy is available, but reports on incidence of two roots and two root canals in maxillary first molar are very limited. Here, a case of maxillary first molar is presented that had two roots: one palatal root with Type I canal configuration and one bulbous fused buccal root with Type V canal configuration; a unique root and canal configuration not seen in any of the earlier reported cases. Diagnosis of root canal aberrancy and subsequently, accurate management of the tooth was greatly facilitated by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. The relevance of CBCT in improving treatment prognosis is greatly emphasized in this report.

  9. Cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function analysis with electron beam computed tomography in health Chinese people (50 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Bin; Dai Ruping; Zhang Shaoxiong; Bai Hua; Jing Baolian; Cao Cheng; He Sha; Ren Li

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively measure cardiovascular diameters and function parameters by using electron beam computed tomography, EBCT. Methods: Men 50 health Chinese people accepted EBCT common transverse and short-axis enhanced movie scan (27 men, 23 women, average age 47.7 years.). The transverse scan was used to measure the diameters of the ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. The movie study was used to measure the left ventricular myocardium thickness and analysis global, sectional and segmental function of the right and left ventricles. Results: The cardiovascular diameters and cardiac functional parameters were calculated. The diameters and most functional parameters (end syspoble volume, syspole volume, ejection fraction, cardiac-output, cardiac index) of normal Chinese men were greater than those of women (P>0.05). However, the EDV and MyM(myocardium mass) of both ventricles were significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: EBCT is a minimally invasive method for cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function evaluation

  10. Visibility of lamina dura and periodontal space on periapical radiographs and its comparison with cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimish Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate the subjective quality of images of cone beam computed tomography and compare with periapical radiographs (PR to determine whether lamina dura (LD and periodontal ligament (PDL space can be detected and reported. Study Design: Sixty scans for anterior and posterior teeth with PR were included and scored on four point subjective scale. Scores assessed using Wilcoxon Signed rank test with the level of statistical significance P < 0.05. Results: Maximum number of ties for LD in anteriors was seen in coronal section (16 and in posteriors with sagittal section (17. Assessing PDL space in anteriors, high number of ties was seen with coronal section (25 and sagittal section (21, while for posteriors showed a high number of ties in all sections. Conclusions: LD could be observed and reported in coronal section for anteriors and in sagittal section for posteriors and PDL space in all the sections for both anteriors and posteriors.

  11. Computed tomography of post-traumatic orbito-palpebral emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Harumi; Kohno, Keiko

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of orbito-palpebral emphysema are described. Both having a history of recent facial trauma, emphysema occurred after blowing the nose. They were studied by computed tomography and plain x-ray film, including tomograms of the orbit. The emphysema was revealed by computed tomography and x-ray film, but more clearly by the former technique. The fracture lines of the orbit were revealed in only one case by x-ray film, but in both cases by computed tomography. The authors stress that computed tomography is the best technique for the study of orbital emphysema. (author)

  12. Three-dimentional imaging of dentomaxillofacial region using electron beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takemasa; Kanda, Shigenobu; Muranaka, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Authors reported their results of the 3-D imaging of dentomaxillofacial region mainly for jaw deformity with electron beam tomography (EBT). The EBT apparatus used was Imatron C-100 (Imatron Corp.), with which, using bremsstrahlung radiation generated from the electron beam, CT is possible with rapid scanning rate at <0.1 sec. Imaging was done with those conditions as tube voltage: 130 kV, current: 610 mA, scanning rate: 0.1 sec/slice whose thickness was 1.5 mm, feeding rate: 1.5 mm and number of slices: 40-170. Patients were 15 cases with jaw deformity. Data were processed for 3-D image by Scribe Imaging Workstation (Multi-dimensional Imaging Inc.) which giving surface rendering and further by Power Macintosh 8500 (Apple Computer Inc.) with VoxBlast 1.1.0 (VayTec Inc.) software which giving volume rendering or with Image 1.60 (NIH) which allowing multi-planar reconstruction and re-analog projection. These actual images were presented in the report. (K.H.)

  13. Quality control in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) EFOMP-ESTRO-IAEA protocol (summary report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras Gala, Hugo; Torresin, Alberto; Dasu, Alexandru; Rampado, Osvaldo; Delis, Harry; Hernández Girón, Irene; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Andersson, Jonas; Holroyd, John; Nilsson, Mats; Edyvean, Sue; Gershan, Vesna; Hadid-Beurrier, Lama; Hoog, Christopher; Delpon, Gregory; Sancho Kolster, Ismael; Peterlin, Primož; Garayoa Roca, Julia; Caprile, Paola; Zervides, Costas

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the guideline presented in this article is to unify the test parameters for image quality evaluation and radiation output in all types of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. The applications of CBCT spread over dental and interventional radiology, guided surgery and radiotherapy. The chosen tests provide the means to objectively evaluate the performance and monitor the constancy of the imaging chain. Experience from all involved associations has been collected to achieve a consensus that is rigorous and helpful for the practice. The guideline recommends to assess image quality in terms of uniformity, geometrical precision, voxel density values (or Hounsfield units where available), noise, low contrast resolution and spatial resolution measurements. These tests usually require the use of a phantom and evaluation software. Radiation output can be determined with a kerma-area product meter attached to the tube case. Alternatively, a solid state dosimeter attached to the flat panel and a simple geometric relationship can be used to calculate the dose to the isocentre. Summary tables including action levels and recommended frequencies for each test, as well as relevant references, are provided. If the radiation output or image quality deviates from expected values, or exceeds documented action levels for a given system, a more in depth system analysis (using conventional tests) and corrective maintenance work may be required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Cone-beam computed tomography for planning and assessing surgical outcomes of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Britt-Isabelle; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Goldblum, David; Kunz, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the planning, assessment, and follow-up for osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP). Six OOKP patients received a CBCT scan. CBCT scans were performed before and/or between ∼5 and 504 months after the primary OOKP intervention. Preoperative and postoperative results of the CBCT were assessed, regarding the available teeth and to assess the loss of bone in 1 patient, respectively. Resorption of the osteo-odonto-lamina was measured and graded. Five different measurements (I-V) were performed in the coronal and transversal views of CBCT. Four CBCT scans were performed preoperatively and 4 postoperatively. The follow-up time of the patients is between ∼1 to 528 months. Visualization of the potential donor teeth resulted in accurate 3-dimensional visualization of the tooth-lamina-bone complex. CBCT was found to help in the preoperative decision-making process (diameter of optical implant) and in enabling accurate postoperative evaluation of the bone volume and resorption zones of the OOKP. Loss of bone could be measured in a precise range and showed in the completed cases an average loss of 20.2%. The use of CBCT simplifies the preoperative decision making and ordering process. It also helps in determining the postoperative structure and resorption of the prosthesis.

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Byun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6–18 years of age. CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P<0.05. Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables exhibited statistically significant correlations (P<0.05. The multiple regression model with the greatest R2 had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4 as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  16. Does hyrax expansion therapy affect maxillary sinus volume? A cone-beam computed tomography report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsey, Drew M.; English, Jeryl D.; Ellis, Randy K.; Akyalcin, Sercan; Kau, Chung H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the initial effects of maxillary expansion therapy with Hyrax appliance and to evaluate the related changes in maxillary sinus volume. Thirty patients (20 females, 10 males; 13.8 years) requiring maxillary expansion therapy, as part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatment, were examined. Each patient had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before (T1) and after (T2) maxillary expansion therapy with a banded Hyrax appliance. Multiplanar slices were used to measure linear dimensions and palatal vault angle. Volumetric analysis was used to measure maxillary sinus volumes. Student t tests were used to compare the pre- and post-treatment measurements. Additionally, differences between two age groups were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. Comparison of pre-treatment to post-treatment variables revealed significant changes in the transverse dimension related to both maxillary skeletal and dental structures and palatal vault angle, resulting in a widened palatal vault (p<0.05). Hard palate showed no significant movement in the vertical and anteroposterior planes. Nasal cavity width increased on a mean value of 0.93 mm(SD=0.23, p<0.05). Maxillary sinus volume remained virtually stable. No significant age differences were observed in the sample. Hyrax expansion therapy did not have a significant impact on maxillary sinus volume.

  17. Does hyrax expansion therapy affect maxillary sinus volume? A cone-beam computed tomography report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsey, Drew M.; English, Jeryl D.; Ellis, Randy K.; Akyalcin, Sercan [School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Kau, Chung H [School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the initial effects of maxillary expansion therapy with Hyrax appliance and to evaluate the related changes in maxillary sinus volume. Thirty patients (20 females, 10 males; 13.8 years) requiring maxillary expansion therapy, as part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatment, were examined. Each patient had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before (T1) and after (T2) maxillary expansion therapy with a banded Hyrax appliance. Multiplanar slices were used to measure linear dimensions and palatal vault angle. Volumetric analysis was used to measure maxillary sinus volumes. Student t tests were used to compare the pre- and post-treatment measurements. Additionally, differences between two age groups were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. Comparison of pre-treatment to post-treatment variables revealed significant changes in the transverse dimension related to both maxillary skeletal and dental structures and palatal vault angle, resulting in a widened palatal vault (p<0.05). Hard palate showed no significant movement in the vertical and anteroposterior planes. Nasal cavity width increased on a mean value of 0.93 mm(SD=0.23, p<0.05). Maxillary sinus volume remained virtually stable. No significant age differences were observed in the sample. Hyrax expansion therapy did not have a significant impact on maxillary sinus volume.

  18. Assessment of bifid and trified mandicular canals using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashsyren, Oyuntugs [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Mongolian National University Medical Science, Ulaanbaatar (United States); Choi, Jin Woo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate the prevalence of bifid and trifid mandibular canals using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to measure their length, diameter, and angle. CBCT images of 500 patients, involving 755 hemi-mandibles, were used for this study. The presence and type of bifid mandibular canal was evaluated according to a modified classification of Naitoh et al. Prevalence rates were determined according to age group, gender, and type. Further, their diameter, length, and angles were measured using PACSPLUS Viewer and ImageJ 1.46r. Statistical analysis with chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests was performed. Bifid and trifid mandibular canals were found in 22.6% of the 500 patients and 16.2% of the 755 sides. There was no significant difference between genders and among age groups. The retromolar canal type accounted for 71.3% of the identified canals; the dental canal type, 18.8%; the forward canal type, 4.1%; and the trifid canal type, 5.8%. Interestingly, seven cases of the trifid canal type, which has been rarely reported, were observed. The mean diameter of the bifid and trifid mandibular canals was 2.2 mm and that of the main mandibular canal was 4.3 mm. Their mean length was 16.9 mm; the mean superior angle was 149.2 degrees, and the mean inferior angle was 37.7 degrees. Bifid and trifid mandibular canals in the Korean population were observed at a relatively high rate through a CBCT evaluation, and the most common type was the retromolar canal. CBCT is suggested for a detailed evaluation of bifid and trifid mandibular canals before mandibular surgery.

  19. Computed tomography of intussusception in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Cha, Soon Joo; Seol, Hae Young; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1984-01-01

    Intussusception is rare in adult and usually caused by organic lesions, although there is a significant number of so-called idiopathic cases. The diagnosis of intussusception have been made by plain abdomen, barium enema and small bowel series. But recently ultrasound and computed tomography make a contribution to diagnose intussusception. Computed tomography is not the primary means for evaluating a gastrointestinal tract abnormality but also provides valuable information in evaluating disorders affecting the hollow viscera of the alimentary tract. Computed tomography image of intussusception demonstrates a whirl like pattern of bowel loops separated by fatty stripe correlating of the intestinal walls. Abdominal ultrasonogram was used as the initial diagnostic test in 2 cases out of total 4 cases, with abdominal mass of unknown cause. It revealed a typical pattern, composed of a round or oval mass with central dense echoes and peripheral poor echoes. We report 4 all cases of intussusception in adult who were performed by computed tomography and/or ultrasound. All cases were correlated with barium enema examination and/or surgical reports.

  20. Evaluation of the accuracy of linear measurements on multi-slice and cone beam computed tomography scans to detect the mandibular canal during bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Maia, B; Machado, V deC; Valerio, C S; Custódio, A L N; Manzi, F R; Junqueira, J L C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of linear measurements of the distance between the mandibular cortical bone and the mandibular canal using 64-detector multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). It was sought to evaluate the reliability of these examinations in detecting the mandibular canal for use in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) planning. Eight dry human mandibles were studied. Three sites, corresponding to the lingula, the angle, and the body of the mandible, were selected. After the CT scans had been obtained, the mandibles were sectioned and the bone segments measured to obtain the actual measurements. On analysis, no statistically significant difference was found between the measurements obtained through MSCT and CBCT, or when comparing the measurements from these scans with the actual measurements. It is concluded that the images obtained by CT scan, both 64-detector multi-slice and cone beam, can be used to obtain accurate linear measurements to locate the mandibular canal for preoperative planning of BSSO. The ability to correctly locate the mandibular canal during BSSO will reduce the occurrence of neurosensory disturbances in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Computed tomography of surface related radionuclide distributions ('BONN'-tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Koenig, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method called the 'BONN' tomography is described to produce planar projections of circular activity distributions using standard single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical value of the method is demonstrated for bone scans of the jaw, thorax, and pelvis. Numerical or projection-related problems are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Idiosyncratic Presentation of Cemento-Osseous Dysplasia - An in Depth Analysis Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennoju, Sai Kiran; Pachigolla, Ramaswamy; Govada, Vanya Mahitha; Alapati, Satish; Balla, Smitha

    2016-05-01

    Bone dysplasias comprise of a condition where the normal bone is replaced with fibrous tissue. Periapical Cemento-Osseous Dysplasia (PCOD) is a benign fibro-osseous condition where bone tissue is supplanted with fibrous tissue and cementum-like material. This condition affects mostly mandibular anterior region and rarely occurs in the maxilla. PCOD is seen above 30 years of age and has slight female predilection. Generally the teeth related to such lesions appear to be vital and are usually asymptomatic. These lesions are mostly seen during routine radiographic examination whose presentation may vary from complete radiolucency to dense radiopacity. The advent of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has brought a massive change in the field of dentistry which has become an important tool for diagnosis. Hence we hereby present an unusual case of cemento-osseous dysplasia in an unfamiliar location with an atypical presentation. The shape of the pathology was completely idiosyncratic and different from an orthodox lesion of COD, as the lesion was observed to grow out of the palatal surface with a prominent palatal expansion. This case highlights the importance of CBCT in radiographic diagnosis and in evaluating the characteristics of such lesion, which present with high diagnostic dilemma.

  3. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (Pmicro-CT and CBCT (Pimplant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  4. Evaluation of computed tomography for obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shoji; Toda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    1980-01-01

    Findings of computed tomography were reviewed in 54 cases where obstructive jaundice was suggested by liver function studies and computed tomography was done with the diagnosis subsequently confirmed by surgery. Dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct was found in 49 (91%) of the cases and the site of obstruction was determined in 44 cases (82%). The cause was shown in 28 cases (52%). By disease, the cause was correctly diagnosed with gallbladder in 40%, bile duct cancer in 46%, pancreas cancer in 71%, and choledocal cyst in 100%, but cholelithiasis was diagnosed correctly in only 17%. Further, non-calcium cholelithiasis is very difficult to diagnose by computed tomography. Computed tomography is a useful tool for diagnosis of obstructive jaundice as a noninvasive means of evaluating the patient; however, concomitand use of other diagnostic studies is essential for greater accuracy of diagnosis. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the relationship between mandibular third molar and mandibular canal by different algorithms of cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh; Ahmadi, Navid; Jamshidi, Mahsa

    2014-11-01

    Exact location of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) bundle is very important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal by cone-beam computed tomography. This was a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling. 94 mandibular CBCTs performed with CSANEX 3D machine (Soredex, Finland) and 3D system chosen. Vertical and horizontal relationship between the mandibular canal and the third molar depicted by 3D, panoramic reformat view of CBCT and cross-sectional view. Cross-sectional view was our gold standard and other view evaluated by it. There were significant differences between the vertical and horizontal relation of nerve and tooth in all views (p < 0.001). The results showed differences in the position of the inferior alveolar nerve with different views of CBCT, so CBCT images are not quite reliable and have possibility of error.

  6. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were generated. Based on the consensus of the two observers, 15.6% of sites were of low bone density, 47.9% were of intermediate density, and 36.5% were of high density. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that CBCT intensity values had a high predictive power for predicting high density sites (area under the curve [AUC] =0.94, P < 0.005) and intermediate density sites (AUC = 0.81, P < 0.005). The best cut-off value for intensity to predict intermediate density sites was 218 (sensitivity = 0.77 and specificity = 0.76) and the best cut-off value for intensity to predict high density sites was 403 (sensitivity = 0.93 and specificity = 0.77). CBCT intensity values are considered useful for predicting bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites.

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of anomalous pulmonary venous connection by electron beam computed tomography as compared with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaoxiong; Dai Ruping; Bai Hua; He Sha; Jing Baolian

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Methods: Retrospective analysis on 14 cases with anomalous pulmonary venous connection was performed using EBCT volume scan. The slice thickness and scan time were 3 mm and 100 ms respectively. Non-ionic contrast medium was applied. Three dimensional reconstruction of EBCT images were carried out on all cases. Meanwhile, ultrasound echocardiography was performed on all patients. Conventional cardiovascular angiography was performed on 8 patients and 2 cases received operation. Results: Ten patients with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, including 6 cases of supra-cardiac type and 4 cases of cardiac type, were proved by EBCT examination. Among them, 3 cases of abnormal pulmonary venous drainage were not revealed by conventional cardiovascular angiography. Among four patients with partial pulmonary venous connection, including cardiac type in 2 cases, supra-cardiac type and infra-cardiac type in 1 case respectively, only one of them was demonstrated by echocardiography. Conclusion: EBCT has significant value in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection which may not be detectable with echocardiography or even cardiovascular angiography

  8. Analyzing Dental Implant Sites From Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans on a Tablet Computer: A Comparative Study Between iPad and 3 Display Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Jalali, Elnaz; Dhingra, Ajay; Lurie, Alan; Yadav, Sumit; Tadinada, Aditya

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a medical-grade PACS (picture archiving and communication system) monitor, a consumer-grade monitor, a laptop computer, and a tablet computer for linear measurements of height and width for specific implant sites in the posterior maxilla and mandible, along with visualization of the associated anatomical structures. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were evaluated. The images were reviewed using PACS-LCD monitor, consumer-grade LCD monitor using CB-Works software, a 13″ MacBook Pro, and an iPad 4 using OsiriX DICOM reader software. The operators had to identify anatomical structures in each display using a 2-point scale. User experience between PACS and iPad was also evaluated by means of a questionnaire. The measurements were very similar for each device. P-values were all greater than 0.05, indicating no significant difference between the monitors for each measurement. The intraoperator reliability was very high. The user experience was similar in each category with the most significant difference regarding the portability where the PACS display received the lowest score and the iPad received the highest score. The iPad with retina display was comparable with the medical-grade monitor, producing similar measurements and image visualization, and thus providing an inexpensive, portable, and reliable screen to analyze CBCT images in the operating room during the implant surgery.

  9. Design and Construction of Detector and Data Acquisition Elements for Proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermi Research Alliance; Northern Illinois University

    2015-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) offers an alternative to x-ray imaging with potential for three-dimensional imaging, reduced radiation exposure, and in-situ imaging. Northern Illinois University (NIU) is developing a second-generation proton computed tomography system with a goal of demonstrating the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging within clinically realistic imaging times. The second-generation pCT system is comprised of a tracking system, a calorimeter, data acquisition, a computing farm, and software algorithms. The proton beam encounters the upstream tracking detectors, the patient or phantom, the downstream tracking detectors, and a calorimeter. The schematic layout of the PCT system is shown. The data acquisition sends the proton scattering information to an offline computing farm. Major innovations of the second generation pCT project involve an increased data acquisition rate ( MHz range) and development of three-dimensional imaging algorithms. The Fermilab Particle Physics Division and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development at Northern Illinois University worked together to design and construct the tracking detectors, calorimeter, readout electronics and detector mounting system.

  10. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S; Miften, Moyed

    2008-01-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins

  11. Correction for polychromatic aberration in computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naparstek, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting a computed tomography image for polychromatic aberration caused by the non-linear interaction (i.e. the energy dependent attenuation characteristics) of different body constituents, such as bone and soft tissue, with a polychromatic X-ray beam are described in detail. An initial image is conventionally computed from path measurements made as source and detector assembly scan a body section. In the improvement, each image element of the initial computed image representing attenuation is recorded in a store and is compared with two thresholds, one representing bone and the other soft tissue. Depending on the element value relative to the thresholds, a proportion of the respective constituent is allocated to that element location and corresponding bone and soft tissue projections are determined and stored. An error projection generator calculates projections of polychromatic aberration errors in the raw image data from recalled bone and tissue projections using a multidimensional polynomial function which approximates the non-linear interaction involved. After filtering, these are supplied to an image reconstruction computer to compute image element correction values which are subtracted from raw image element values to provide a corrected reconstructed image for display. (author)

  12. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  13. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of pericardial heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isner, J.M.; Carter, B.L.; Bankoff, M.S.; Konstam, M.A.; Salem, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of pericardial heart disease, 53 patients were prospectively studied by computed tomography of the chest and cardiac ultrasound. A diagnostic-quality CT study was done for all patients; a technically satisfactory ultrasound examination was not possible in six patients. Of 47 patients in whom both chest scans and satisfactory ultrasound studies were obtained, computed tomography showed pericardial thickening not shown by ultrasound in five patients. Estimated size of pericardial effusion was the same for both computed tomography and ultrasound. Computed tomography provided quantifiable evaluation of the composition of pericardial fluid in seven patients with either hemopericardium or purulent pericarditis. Neoplastic pericardial heart disease was detected by CT scan in four of the 53 patients. Computed tomography of the chest provides a sensitive evaluation of the pericardium and quality of pericardial effusion, and is a valuable adjunct in patients in whom cardiac ultrasound is technically unsatisfactory

  14. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  15. A cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of buccal bone thickness following maxillary expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyalcin, Sercan; Englih, Jeryl D.; Stephens, Claude R.; Winkelmann, Sam [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Schaefer, Jeffrey S. [Todd Hughes Orthodontics, Houston (United States)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to determine the buccal alveolar bone thickness following rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-four individuals (15 females, 9 males; 13.9 years) that underwent RME therapy were included. Each patient had CBCT images available before (T1), after (T2), and 2 to 3 years after (T3) maxillary expansion therapy. Coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were used to measure the linear transverse dimensions, inclinations of teeth, and thickness of the buccal alveolar bone. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to compare the changes between the three times of imaging. Pairwise comparisons were made with the Bonferroni method. The level of significance was established at p<0.05. The mean changes between the points in time yielded significant differences for both molar and premolar transverse measurements between T1 and T2 (p<0.05) and between T1 and T3 (p<0.05). When evaluating the effect of maxillary expansion on the amount of buccal alveolar bone, a decrease between T1 and T2 and an increase between T2 and T3 were found in the buccal bone thickness of both the maxillary first premolars and maxillary first molars. However, these changes were not significant. Similar changes were observed for the angular measurements. RME resulted in non-significant reduction of buccal bone between T1 and T2. These changes were reversible in the long-term with no evident deleterious effects on the alveolar buccal bone.

  16. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos; Almeida, Solange Maria

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  17. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  18. Cone-beam computed tomography for assessment of dens invaginatus in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różyło, T Katarzyna; Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Piskórz, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    There are many developmental variations in the permanent dentition. Dens invaginatus can be recognized on many dental X-rays of affected patients, but not every image allows for assessment of the type of malformation. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of dens invaginatus with radiological features using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of 33 patients were evaluated. Age, sex, side, lateralization, occurrence in a particular group of teeth, type of invagination, differentiation, and the consequences of these factors were analyzed. Forty-one teeth with dens invaginatus met the inclusion criteria for this evaluation. Females were affected more frequently than males (57.6 vs. 42.4%, respectively). The patients' age ranged from 7 to 40 years, and the occurrence of dens invaginatus peaked from age 9 to 13 years. In total, 92.7% of affected teeth were present in the maxilla, more often unilaterally (75.8%) than bilaterally (24.2%). The most frequent tooth with dens invaginatus was the maxillary lateral incisor (53.7% of affected teeth). Almost two-thirds (63.4%) of affected teeth were found on the left side and 36.6% were found on the right. The tooth anatomy was distorted within the crown and root. Dens invaginatus sometimes affected other surrounding teeth and reduced their esthetics. The obtained data indicate that CBCT examination is an essential tool in assessing dens invaginatus and can guide dental practitioners in treating patients who exhibit characteristic features of this disorder. CBCT allows the clinician to distinguish the type of anomaly.

  19. Dosimetric study of mandible examinations performed with three cone-beam computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Helen J; Andrade, Marcos E; Araujo, Max Well; Brasileiro, Izabela V; Kramer, Richard; Huda, Amir

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the air kerma-area product (PKA) and the skin absorbed dose in the region of the eyes, salivary glands and thyroid of the patient from mandible examinations performed with three cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners, i.e. i-CAT classic, Gendex CB-500 and PreXion 3D. For the dosimetric evaluation, an anthropomorphic head phantom (model RS-250) was used to simulate an adult patient. The CBCT examinations were performed using standard and high-resolution protocols for mandible acquisitions for adult patients. During the phantom's exposure, the PKA was measured using an ionising chamber and the absorbed doses to the skin in the region of the eyes, thyroid and salivary glands were estimated using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) positioned on the phantom's surface. The PKA values estimated with the CBCT scanners varied from 26 to 138 µGy m(2). Skin absorbed doses in the region of the eyes varied from 0.07 to 0.34 mGy; at the parotid glands, from 1.31 to 5.93 mGy; at the submandibular glands, from 1.41 to 6.86 mGy; and at the thyroid, from 0.18 to 2.45 mGy. PKA and absorbed doses showed the highest values for the PreXion 3D scanner due to the use of the continuous exposure mode and a high current-time product. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores, E-mail: bastosluana@ymail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral e Maxilofacial; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Camaragibe, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral

    2013-11-15

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  1. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-01

    Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction shows a motion blur of 13 mm

  2. The role of computed tomography in the laryngeal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hoon Sik

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography of the larynx represents a major advance in laryngology. Even in severe injury the larynx can be examined easily and conveniently by CT at the same time as the brain and facial structures without moving the patient, who need only lie down and breathe quietly during the study. Computed tomography permitted a much more detailed appraisal of laryngeal dysfunction in patients with blunt laryngeal trauma (3 cases) and strangulation injury (2 cases). Computed tomography of the larynx undoubtedly played a determinant role in patient management. Computed tomography was helpful in evaluating the laryngeal cartilages and deep spaces of the larynx which was difficult to examine by the laryngoscope. Follow-up computed tomography made it possible to evaluate the postoperative results

  3. Cone-beam micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast.

    Sci