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Sample records for beam computed tomography

  1. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  2. Basic principle of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    The use of computed tomography for dental procedures has increased recently. Cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the dentomaxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing high resolution in images of high diagnostic quality. This technology allows for 3-dimensional representation of the dentomaxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion, but at lower equipment cost, simpler image acquisition and lower patient dose. Because this technology produces images with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution, it is ideally suited for dedicated dentomaxillofacial imaging. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of cone beam scanning technology and compare it with the fan beam scanning used in conventional CT and the basic principles of currently available CBCT systems

  3. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  4. A Clinical Evaluation Of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    reliability of multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofacial...A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY by Bryan James Behm, D.D.S. Lieutenant, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontic Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in

  5. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Thielen, Bert; Siguenza, Francis; Hassan, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstructions were created using specialized software. Image quality and visibility of anatomical landmarks were subjectively assessed by two observers. Good image quality was obtained for the MPR para-sagittal reconstructions through multiple teeth. The image quality of the panoramic reconstructions of dogs was moderate while the panoramic reconstructions of cats were poor since the images were associated with an increased noise level. Segmental panoramic reconstructions of the mouth seem to be useful for studying the dental anatomy especially in dogs. The results of this study using human dental CBCT technology demonstrate the potential of this scanning technology in veterinary medicine. Unfortunately, the moderate image quality obtained with the CBCT technique reported here seems to be inferior to the diagnostic image quality obtained from 2-dimensional dental radiographs. Further research is required to optimize scanning and reconstruction protocols for veterinary applications.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  7. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Electron beam computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) of the heart is a new modality which will alter the way cardiology is practised. It allows for the detection of early coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic individuals, regardless of their level of risk as assessed by traditional risk factor analysis. Compared with risk analysis ...

  9. Coronary artery fly-through using electron beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; van Geuns, R J; Rensing, B J; de Feyter, P J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality techniques have recently been introduced into clinical medicine. This study examines the possibility of coronary artery fly-through using a dataset obtained by noninvasive coronary angiography with contrast-enhanced electron-beam computed tomography. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  10. Concrescence: assessment of case by periapical radiography, cone beam computed tomography and micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Rovaris, Karla; Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Novaes, Pedro Duarte; de Freitas, Deborah Queiroz

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article was to describe imaging aspects of concrescence analyzed by three imaging modalities. A second molar joined together with a third molar was imaged using digital periapical radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT). On periapical radiograph, the mesial root of the third molar is superimposed on the distal root of the second molar. On CBCT images, a large cementum union between bulbous roots was detected, confirming the diagnosis of concrescence. On micro-CT images, the cementum union appeared limited to the apical third of the roots. In conclusion, both computed tomography modalities allowed for the diagnosis of concrescence. However, only micro-CT provided the real extension of the cementum union.

  11. Performance of an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa C.; Silva, Natália F.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mcastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Among the medical uses of ionizing radiations, the computed tomography (CT) diagnostic exams are responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. The dosimetry procedure in CT scanner beams makes use of pencil ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm. The aim of its calibration is to compare the values that are obtained with the instrument to be calibrated and a standard reference system. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam. Therefore, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI), was used to establish a CT primary standard. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests (short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, polarity effect and ion collection efficiency) in the standard X-rays beams established for computed tomography at the LCI. (author)

  12. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  13. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views

  14. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    morphology based on conventional imaging • Identification of root canal system anomalies and determination of root curvature • Diagnosis of dental ...A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY by Thomas Patrick Cairnll, D.D.S. Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in

  15. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Priyank Sethi; Ritu Tiwari; Maneesha Das; Mahesh Pratap Singh; Manish Agarwal; Alfred Joseph Ravikumar

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D) structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), a...

  16. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  17. Cone-beam computed tomography and the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, David

    2017-02-01

    Although cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is just 15 years old, it has revolutionized the practice of dentistry, so much so, there is hardly a dental specialty which has not been affected by this technology. Nevertheless, it presents the dentist with a number of important challenges. An initial steep learning curve must be addressed without unnecessary exposure to the patient. This is particularly important when the patient is a child. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 ± 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 ± 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm ± 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm ± 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm ± 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  19. Beam standardization and dosimetric methodology in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2005-01-01

    Special ionization chambers, named pencil ionization chambers, are used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT). In this work, an extensive study about pencil ionization chambers was performed, as a contribution to the accuracy of the dosimetric procedures in CT beams. The international scientific community has recently been discussing the need of the establishment of a specific calibration procedure for CT ionization chambers, once these chambers present special characteristics that differentiate them from other ionization chambers used in diagnostic radiology beams. In this work, an adequate calibration procedure for pencil ionization chambers was established at the Calibration Laboratory, of the Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, in accordance with the most recent international recommendations. Two calibration methodologies were tested and analyzed by comparative studies. Moreover, a new extended length parallel plate ionization chamber, with a transversal section very similar to pencil ionization chambers, was developed. The operational characteristics of this chamber were determined and the results obtained showed that its behaviour is adequate as a reference system in CT standard beams. Two other studies were performed during this work, both using CT ionization chambers. The first study was about the performance of a pencil ionization chamber in standard radiation beams of several types and energies, and the results showed that this chamber presents satisfactory behaviour in other radiation qualities as of diagnostic radiology, mammography and radiotherapy. In the second study, a tandem system for verification of hal'-value layer variations in CT equipment, using a pencil ionization chamber, was developed. Because of the X rays tube rotation, the determination of half-value layers in computed tomography equipment is not an easy task, and it is usually not performed within quality control programs. (author)

  20. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  1. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  2. [Role of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnostic otorhinolaryngological imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perényi, Ádám; Bella, Zsolt; Baráth, Zoltán; Magyar, Péter; Nagy, Katalin; Rovó, László

    2016-01-10

    Accurate diagnosis and preoperative planning in modern otorhinolaryngology is strongly supported by imaging with enhanced visualization. Computed tomography is often used to examine structures within bone frameworks. Given the hazards of ionizing radiation, repetitive imaging studies exponentially increase the risk of damages to radiosensitive tissues. The authors compare multislice and cone-beam computed tomography and determine the role, advantages and disadvantages of cone-beam computed tomography in otorhinolaryngological imaging. They summarize the knowledge from the international literature and their individual imaging studies. They conclude that cone-beam computed tomography enables high-resolution imaging and reconstruction in any optional plane and in space with considerably lower effective radiation dose. Cone-beam computed tomography with appropriate indications proved to be an excellent diagnostic tool in otorhinolaryngological imaging. It makes an alternative to multislice computed tomography and it is an effective tool in perioperative and postoperative follow-up, especially in those cases which necessitate repetitive imaging with computed tomography.

  3. Detection of Foreign Bodies by Spiral Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Maxillofacial Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Kaviani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The imaging techniques commonly used for foreign body detection include plain radiography, xeroradiography, computed tomography (CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasonography. The aim of the present study was to compare cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT with conventional CT scan in determination of the exact location of a foreign body in the maxillofacial area in vitro. Materials and methods. In this descriptive study, seven different materials were selected as foreign bodies with dimen-sions of approximately 2 mm, 1 mm, and 0.5 mm. These materials consisted of metal, glass, wood, stone, plastic, graphite and tooth. These foreign bodies were placed in a sheep head between the corpus of the mandible and muscle, in the tongue and in an air space. One conventional CT scan and two CBCT scans were made on the models. Results. Tooth, metal, stone and glass foreign bodies were seen clearly on CT and CBCT scans made by NewTom at the smallest size in air. However, CBCT scan by NewTom was a more effective technique for visualization of foreign bodies in air compared to conventional CT. Foreign bodies measuring 0.5 mm made of metal, stone, glass, graphite and teeth were detected by all devices in muscle tissue and adjacent bone. Conclusion. According to the results, CBCT scans of NewTom and Planmeca are appropriate tools for detecting foreign bodies with relative high density in the maxillofacial area.

  4. Comparative dosimetry of dental cone beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, and multislice computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sezgin, O.S.; Kayipmaz, S.; Yasar, D.; Yilmaz, A.B.; Ozturk, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effective organ doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), multislice computed tomography (MSCT), and panoramic radiography. The tissue-absorbed doses for the Kodak 9500 CBCT system, NewTom FP CBCT system, Morita Veraviewepocs panoramic X-ray device, and Somatom Sensation 16 MSCT system were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips placed at selected locations on a radiation analog dosimetry phantom. The tissue weighting factors recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007 were used to obtain effective doses. The effective doses from the CBCT systems were 118.65, 84.45, and 75.43 μSv for the Kodak 9500 large field of view (FOV), NewTom FP, and Kodak 9500 medium FOV, respectively. The effective doses were 11.37 μSv for the panoramic X-ray examination, 583.73 μSv for the MSCT ''Dental'' protocol, and 1983.89 μSv for the MSCT ''NeckThinSlice'' protocol. The doses from CBCT are not sufficiently low to allow its use as a routine imaging technique instead of panoramic radiography. The FOV size should be chosen carefully to prevent excessive exposure of the patient to radiation. The use of MSCT in dentistry is associated with much radiation and should be avoided in cases where CBCT is adequate for 3D evaluation. (author)

  5. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Abbas; Eskandarloo, Amir; Noruzi-Gangachin, Maruf; Khajeh, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI) radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP) radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation o...

  6. A pencil beam approach to proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, Regina, E-mail: regina.rescigno@iphc.cnrs.fr; Bopp, Cécile; Rousseau, Marc; Brasse, David [Université de Strasbourg, IPHC, 23 rue du Loess, Strasbourg 67037, France and CNRS, UMR7178, Strasbourg 67037 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A new approach to proton computed tomography (pCT) is presented. In this approach, protons are not tracked one-by-one but a beam of particles is considered instead. The elements of the pCT reconstruction problem (residual energy and path) are redefined on the basis of this new approach. An analytical image reconstruction algorithm applicable to this scenario is also proposed. Methods: The pencil beam (PB) and its propagation in matter were modeled by making use of the generalization of the Fermi–Eyges theory to account for multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS). This model was integrated into the pCT reconstruction problem, allowing the definition of the mean beam path concept similar to the most likely path (MLP) used in the single-particle approach. A numerical validation of the model was performed. The algorithm of filtered backprojection along MLPs was adapted to the beam-by-beam approach. The acquisition of a perfect proton scan was simulated and the data were used to reconstruct images of the relative stopping power of the phantom with the single-proton and beam-by-beam approaches. The resulting images were compared in a qualitative way. Results: The parameters of the modeled PB (mean and spread) were compared to Monte Carlo results in order to validate the model. For a water target, good agreement was found for the mean value of the distributions. As far as the spread is concerned, depth-dependent discrepancies as large as 2%–3% were found. For a heterogeneous phantom, discrepancies in the distribution spread ranged from 6% to 8%. The image reconstructed with the beam-by-beam approach showed a high level of noise compared to the one reconstructed with the classical approach. Conclusions: The PB approach to proton imaging may allow technical challenges imposed by the current proton-by-proton method to be overcome. In this framework, an analytical algorithm is proposed. Further work will involve a detailed study of the performances and limitations of

  7. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Puthenpurayil John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice – from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  8. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland(United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Div. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed.

  9. Accessory mental foramen assessment using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, Munetaka; Hiraiwa, Yuichiro; Aimiya, Hidetoshi; Gotoh, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the accessory mental foramen using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. A total of 157 patients were enrolled in this investigation. The mental and accessory mental foramina, which show continuity with the mandibular canal, were assessed using axial and cross-sectional, 2-dimensional CBCT images. The sizes of the mental and accessory mental foramina were measured and statistically analyzed. Also, the distance between the mental and accessory mental foramina was measured. The accessory mental foramen was observed in 7% of patients. There was no significant difference regarding the sizes of the mental foramen between accessory mental foramen presence and absence. Also, the mean distance between the mental and accessory mental foramina was 6.3 mm (SD: 1.5 mm). The accessory mental foramen, which shows continuity with the mandibular canal, could be observed in 7% of the subjects using CBCT.

  10. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Sethi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, a novel modality specifically designed to produce precise, undistorted 3D reconstructed images of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT is increasingly being embraced by various fields in dentistry, remarkably in endodontic practice. A systematic literature-based and book-based review was conducted using the keywords “CBCT in endodontics” and “endodontic applications of CBCT.” This article hereby discusses the prospects of CBCT in endodontics with an emphasis on its application in diagnosis and management along with treatment outcome assessment.

  11. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  12. Artifacts in orthodontic bracket systems in cone-beam computed tomography and multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschinger, V; Hanke, S; Hirschfelder, U; Hofmann, E

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify artifacts caused by different bracket systems in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scans. Orthodontic brackets of four different systems were consecutively bonded to the surface of a residual molar on a human cadaveric mandible. One MSCT system and three CBCT units were used to scan each of the four bonded brackets, in addition to obtaining a blank reference scan of the tooth surface. All datasets were registered to the reference dataset using visualization software (Analyze 11.0® by AnalyzeDirect). Artifact-related reductions in image quality were expressed in percent of theoretical maximum standard deviations (SD) obtained for the gray values of the adjacent voxels, with higher percentages correlating more pronounced artifacts. Both the SD percentages for three defined line profiles and their mean values were almost invariably higher with the MSCT system than with the CBCT units. Looking into the individual SD percentages, two of the CBCT units (Pax Zenith 3D® and Picasso Trio®; both Vatech) produced higher values than the MSCT system (SOMATOM Definition AS+®; Siemens) in some line profiles. The titanium bracket, in particular, was associated with marked differences between the two scanner technologies, as the mean artifact intensities from this bracket were particularly high with the MSCT unit and relatively low with the CBCT units. The artifact intensities observed with the other three bracket systems varied widely depending on which scanner was used. Different artifact intensities were noted depending on the composition of the bracket system and on the scanner technology (MSCT/CBCT). While the artifacts manifested themselves differently with different scanners, their adverse effects were comparable. However, given the variable severity of the artifacts observed depending on the materials scanned and the scanners used, a blanket recommendation for or against MSCT or CBCT

  13. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  14. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology an...

  15. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of cone beam computed tomography scanning protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Maria Rosangela

    2015-01-01

    It was evaluated the cone beam computed tomography, CBCT scanning protocols, that was introduced in dental radiology at the end of the 1990's, and quickly became a fundamental examination for various procedures. Its main characteristic, the difference of medical CT is the beam shape. This study aimed to calculate the absorbed dose in eight tissues / organs of the head and neck, and to estimate the effective dose in 13 protocols and two techniques (stitched FOV e single FOV) of 5 equipment of different manufacturers of cone beam CT. For that purpose, a female anthropomorphic phantom was used, representing a default woman, in which were inserted thermoluminescent dosimeters at several points, representing organs / tissues with weighting values presented in the standard ICRP 103. The results were evaluated by comparing the dose according to the purpose of the tomographic image. Among the results, there is a difference up to 325% in the effective dose in relation to protocols with the same image goal. In relation to the image acquisition technique, the stitched FOV technique resulted in an effective dose of 5.3 times greater than the single FOV technique for protocols with the same image goal. In the individual contribution, the salivary glands are responsible for 31% of the effective dose in CT exams. The remaining tissues have also a significant contribution, 36%. The results drew attention to the need of estimating the effective dose in different equipment and protocols of the market, besides the knowledge of the radiation parameters and equipment manufacturing engineering to obtain the image. (author)

  17. Volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Jin Ho; Seo, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Sae Rom; Kang, Ju Hee; Oh, Song Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of object shape and distance from the center of the image on the volumetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, according to different parameters of tube voltage and current. Four geometric objects (cylinder, cube, pyramid, and hexagon) with predefined dimensions were fabricated. The objects consisted of Teflon-perfluoroalkoxy embedded in a hydrocolloid matrix (Dupli-Coe-Loid TM; GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), encased in an acrylic resin cylinder assembly. An Alphard Vega Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire CBCT images. OnDemand 3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea) software was used for object segmentation and image analysis. The accuracy was expressed by the volume error (VE). The VE was calculated under 3 different exposure settings. The measured volumes of the objects were compared to the true volumes for statistical analysis. The mean VE ranged from −4.47% to 2.35%. There was no significant relationship between an object's shape and the VE. A significant correlation was found between the distance of the object to the center of the image and the VE. Tube voltage affected the volume measurements and the VE, but tube current did not. The evaluated CBCT device provided satisfactory volume measurements. To assess volume measurements, it might be sufficient to use serial scans with a high resolution, but a low dose. This information may provide useful guidance for assessing volume measurements.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota [Dept. of Endodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Paulista State University, Aracatuba(Brazil); Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores [School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Oliveira Santos, Christiano [Dept. of Stomatology, Oral Public Health, and Forensic Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Neves, Frederico Sampaio [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  19. Radiation abosorbed doses of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Tae; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To measure the absorbed doses of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), which is recently being more frequently used, and to compare them with those of panoramic radiography. To measure the absorbed doses of CBCT (PSR-9000N TM , Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Japan), we placed TLD chips on the skin regions above the parotid and thyroid glands, and on the dorsum of tongue in a dental head phantom. We used two image acquisition modes of the Dental and Panoramic codes of CBCT, which differed in the field of view. Also, panoramic radiographs (Auto IIIN, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Japan) were taken to compare with the absorbed doses of CBCT. In the Dental mode of CBCT, the absorbed doses of the parotid gland, dorsum of tongue, and thyroid gland were 3.53, 3.13, and 0.36 mGy, respectively. In the Panoramic mode of CBCT, they were 9.57, and 0.85 mGy, respectively. The panoramic mode showed higher absorbed doses than those of the Dental mode. In the panoramic radiography, the absorbed doses of the parotid gland, dorsum of tongue, and thyroid gland were 1.21, 1.91, and 0.16 mGy, respectively. And they were about 1/3 of the Dental mode and 1/9 of the Panoramic mode of CBCT. Absorbed doses of CBCT are higher than those of panoramic radiography, and dependent upon the field of view

  20. Radiation abosorbed doses of cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eui Tae; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To measure the absorbed doses of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), which is recently being more frequently used, and to compare them with those of panoramic radiography. To measure the absorbed doses of CBCT (PSR-9000N {sup TM}, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Japan), we placed TLD chips on the skin regions above the parotid and thyroid glands, and on the dorsum of tongue in a dental head phantom. We used two image acquisition modes of the Dental and Panoramic codes of CBCT, which differed in the field of view. Also, panoramic radiographs (Auto IIIN, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Japan) were taken to compare with the absorbed doses of CBCT. In the Dental mode of CBCT, the absorbed doses of the parotid gland, dorsum of tongue, and thyroid gland were 3.53, 3.13, and 0.36 mGy, respectively. In the Panoramic mode of CBCT, they were 9.57, and 0.85 mGy, respectively. The panoramic mode showed higher absorbed doses than those of the Dental mode. In the panoramic radiography, the absorbed doses of the parotid gland, dorsum of tongue, and thyroid gland were 1.21, 1.91, and 0.16 mGy, respectively. And they were about 1/3 of the Dental mode and 1/9 of the Panoramic mode of CBCT. Absorbed doses of CBCT are higher than those of panoramic radiography, and dependent upon the field of view.

  1. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota; Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Oliveira Santos, Christiano; Neves, Frederico Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  2. [External beam radiotherapy cone beam-computed tomography-based dose calculation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, A; Céleste, M; Lafond, C; Henry, O; Couespel, S; Simon, A; Acosta, O; de Crevoisier, R; Périchon, N

    2018-02-01

    In external beam radiotherapy, the dose planning is currently based on computed tomography (CT) images. A relation between Hounsfield numbers and electron densities (or mass densities) is necessary for dose calculation taking heterogeneities into account. In image-guided radiotherapy process, the cone beam CT is classically used for tissue visualization and registration. Cone beam CT for dose calculation is also attractive in dose reporting/monitoring perspectives and particularly in a context of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The accuracy of cone beam CT-based dose calculation is limited by image characteristics such as quality, Hounsfield numbers consistency and restrictive sizes of volume acquisition. The analysis of the literature identifies three kinds of strategies for cone beam CT-based dose calculation: establishment of Hounsfield numbers versus densities curves, density override to regions of interest, and deformable registration between CT and cone beam CT images. Literature results show that discrepancies between the reference CT-based dose calculation and the cone beam CT-based dose calculation are often lower than 3%, regardless of the method. However, they can also reach 10% with unsuitable method. Even if the accuracy of the cone beam CT-based dose calculation is independent of the method, some strategies are promising but need improvements in the automating process for a routine implementation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiocarpal Injuries: Cone Beam Computed Tomography Arthrography, Magnetic Resonance Arthrography, and Arthroscopic Correlation among 21 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suojärvi, N; Haapamäki, V; Lindfors, N; Koskinen, S K

    2017-06-01

    Patients with acute or chronic wrist pain often undergo wrist arthroscopy for evaluation of chondral and ligamentous abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to compare findings of wrist arthroscopy with cone beam computed tomography arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography. Altogether, 21 patients with wrist pain underwent cone beam computed tomography arthrography, magnetic resonance arthrography, and wrist arthroscopy. Chondral surfaces of the scaphoid, lunate, and radius facing the scaphoid and lunate were evaluated. The scapholunate ligament, the lunotriquetral ligament, and the triangular fibrocartilage complex were classified as either intact or torn. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy with 95% confidence intervals were assessed. For chondral lesions (n = 10), cone beam computed tomography arthrograms showed slightly higher specificity than magnetic resonance arthrography. The sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography arthrography was also better for these lesions, except for those on the chondral surface of the lunate. For triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries (n = 9), cone beam computed tomography arthrography showed a better specificity and sensitivity than magnetic resonance arthrography. For ligamentous injuries (n = 6), cone beam computed tomography arthrograms were more sensitive, but less specific than magnetic resonance arthrography images. However, the number of lesions was very small and the 95% confidence intervals are overlapping. Cone beam computed tomography is an emerging imaging modality that offers several advantages over computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Its usefulness particularly in ligamentous injuries should be further explored in a larger study. Cone beam computed tomography arthrography seems to offer similar sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to magnetic resonance arthrography and therefore serves as a valuable option in

  4. Beam Hardening Artifacts: Comparison between Two Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. At present, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has become a substitute for computed tomography (CT in dental procedures. The metallic materials used in dentistry can produce artifacts due to the beam hardening phenomenon. These artifacts decrease the quality of images. In the present study, the number of artifacts as a result of beam hardening in the images of dental implants was compared between two NewTom VG and Planmeca Promax 3D Max CBCT machines. Materials and methods. An implant drilling model was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Scanning procedures were carried out by two CBCT machines. The corresponding sections (coronal and axial of the implants were evaluated by two radiologists. The number of artifacts in each image was determined using the scale provided. Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in beam hardening artifacts in axial and coronal sections between the two x-ray machines (P<0.001, with a higher quality in the images produced by the NewTom VG. Conclusion. Given the higher quality of the images produced by the NewTom VG x-ray machine, it is recommended for imaging of patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses or previous implant treatments.

  5. Dental cone beam computed tomography: justification for use in planning oral implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Intra-oral and panoramic radiographs are most frequently used in oral health care. Yet, the inherent nature of jaws and teeth renders three-dimensional diagnosis essential, especially in relation to oral surgery. Nowadays, this can be accomplished by dental cone beam computed tomography, which provides high-quality images at low radiation doses and low costs. Nonetheless, the effective dose ranges of cone beam computed tomography machines may easily vary from 10 to 1000 μSv, this being equivalent to two to 200 panoramic radiographs, even for similar presurgical indications. Moreover, the diagnostic image quality varies massively among available machines and parameter settings. Apart from the radiodiagnostic possibilities, dental cone beam computed tomography may offer a vast therapeutic potential, including opportunities for surgical guidance and further prosthetic rehabilitation via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing solutions. These additional options may definitely explain part of the success of cone beam computed tomography for oral implant placement. In conclusion, dental cone beam computed tomography imaging could be justified for oral implant-related diagnosis, planning and transfer to surgical and further prosthetic treatment, but guidelines for justification and cone beam computed tomography optimization remain mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Single photon emission computed tomography by using fan beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihisa

    1992-01-01

    A multislice fan beam collimator which has parallel collimation along the cephalic-caudul axis of a patient and converging collimation within planes that are perpendicular to that axis was designed for a SPECT system with a rotating scintillation camera, and it was constructed by the lead casting method which was developed in recent years. A reconstruction algorithm for fan beam SPECT was formed originally by combining the reconstruction algorithm of the parallel beam SPECT with that of the fan beam X-ray CT. The algorithm for fan beam SPECT was confirmed by means of computer simulation and a head phantom filled with diluted radionuclide. Not only 99m Tc but also 123 I was used as a radionuclide. A SPECT image with the fan beam collimator was compared with that of a parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator which was routinely used for clinical and research SPECT studies. Both system resolution and sensitivity of the fan beam collimator were ∼20% better than those of the parallel hole collimator. Comparing SPECT images obtained from fan beam collimator with those of parallel hole collimator, the SPECT images using fan beam collimator had far better resolution. A fan beam collimator is a useful implement for the SPECT study. (author)

  7. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography of coronary artery bypass graft with electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Toshiko; Yamauchi, Tatsuo; Kanauchi, Tetsu; Konno, Miyuki; Imai, Kamon; Suwa, Jiro; Onoguchi, Katsuhisa; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Horie, Toshinobu [Saitama Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center, Konan (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Assessment of coronary artery bypass graft patency by three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) derived from electrocardiography-gated contrast-enhanced electron beam tomography (EBT) was evaluated. Thirty-nine patients with 99 grafts (45 arterial grafts and 54 venous grafts) underwent 3D-CTA and selective coronary angiography within a 3-week interval. 3D-CTA images of the coronary bypass grafts were compared with the coronary angiography images used as the control. 3D-CTA defined 42 of 44 arterial grafts as patent (sensitivity: 95%), all 47 venous grafts as patent (sensitivity: 100%) and all 7 venous grafts as occlusive (specificity: 100%). The overall sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 88%, respectively. 3D-CTA is an useful noninvasive technique with adequate sensitivity and specificity to assess coronary artery bypass graft patency. (author)

  8. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  9. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  10. Assessment of vertical fracture using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Madani, Zahrasadat; Alhavaz, Abdolhamid; Bijani, Ali [Dental Material Research Center, Dental School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, (Korea, Republic of); Bagheri, Mohammad [Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in a tooth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts. This study selected 96 extracted molar and premolar teeth of the mandible. These teeth were divided into six groups as follows: Groups A, B, and C consisted of teeth with vertical root fractures, and groups D, E, and F had teeth without vertical root fractures; groups A and D had teeth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts; groups B and E had teeth with gutta-percha but without prefabricated posts, and groups C and F had teeth without gutta-percha or prefabricated posts. Then, the CBCT scans were obtained and examined by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists in order to determine the presence of vertical root fractures. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 20.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). The kappa coefficient was 0.875 ± 0.049. Groups A and D showed a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 100%; groups E and B, a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100%; and groups C and F, a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 100%. The CBCT scans revealed a high accuracy in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures; the accuracy did not decrease in the presence of gutta-percha. The presence of prefabricated posts also had little effect on the accuracy of the system, which was, of course, not statistically significant.

  11. Assessment of vertical fracture using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Madani, Zahrasadat; Alhavaz, Abdolhamid; Bijani, Ali; Bagheri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in a tooth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts. This study selected 96 extracted molar and premolar teeth of the mandible. These teeth were divided into six groups as follows: Groups A, B, and C consisted of teeth with vertical root fractures, and groups D, E, and F had teeth without vertical root fractures; groups A and D had teeth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts; groups B and E had teeth with gutta-percha but without prefabricated posts, and groups C and F had teeth without gutta-percha or prefabricated posts. Then, the CBCT scans were obtained and examined by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists in order to determine the presence of vertical root fractures. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 20.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). The kappa coefficient was 0.875 ± 0.049. Groups A and D showed a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 100%; groups E and B, a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100%; and groups C and F, a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 100%. The CBCT scans revealed a high accuracy in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures; the accuracy did not decrease in the presence of gutta-percha. The presence of prefabricated posts also had little effect on the accuracy of the system, which was, of course, not statistically significant.

  12. Assessment of the Stylohyoid Complex with Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    İlgüy, Dilhan; İlgüy, Mehmet; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Dölekoğlu, Semanur

    2012-01-01

    Orientation of the stylohyoid complex (SHC) may be important for evaluation of the patient with orofacial pain or dysphagia. Our purpose was to assess the length and angulations of SHC using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, 3D images provided by CBCT of 69 patients (36 females, 33 males, age range 15-77 years) were retrospectively evaluated. All CBCT images were performed because of other indications. None of the patients had symptoms of ossified SHC. The length and the thickness of SHC ossification, the anteroposterior angle (APA) and the mediolateral angle (MLA) were measured by maxillofacial radiologists on the anteroposterior, right lateral and left lateral views of CBCT. Student’s t test, Pearson's correlation and Chi-square test tests were used for statistical analysis. According to the results, the mean length of SHC was 25.3 ± 11.3 mm and the mean thickness of SHC was 4.8 ± 1.8 mm in the study group. The mean APA value of SHCs was 25.6° ± 5.4° and the mean MLA value was 66.4° ± 6.7°. A positive correlation coefficient was found between age and APA (r = 0.335; P < 0.01); between thickness and APA (r = 0.448; P < 0.01) and also between length and thickness was found (r=0.236). The size and morphology of the SHC can be easily assessed by 3D views provided by CBCT. In CBCT evaluation of the head and neck region, the radiologist should consider SHC according to these variations, which may have clinical importance

  13. Trends in maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnheiter, C.; Scarfe, W.C.; Farman, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is making inroads into dental practice worldwide, both in terms of adding the third dimension to diagnosis, and also in terms of enabling image-guided treatment strategies. This article reports trends in the early referral pattern of patients to a CBCT facility in the United States. With institutional review board approval, a retrospective study was made of sequential CBCT radiographic reports made by a specialist oral and maxillofacial radiology service from May 2004 through January 2006 (n=329). Demographic and referral data were extracted from the reports. Descriptive statistics identified referral patterns, trends, and indications for CBCT. Comparisons were made with the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. The mean age of referred patients was 45±21 years, and there was a predominance of women (62%). Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (51%) and periodontology specialists (17%) made most patient referrals. The listed reasons for CBCT referrals were dental implant planning (40%), suspected surgical pathology (24%), and temporomandibular joint analysis (16%). Other uses included planning extraction of impacted teeth and orthodontic assessment. Over the period of the study, the numbers of pathology diagnosis cases remained relatively constant, while adoption of CBCT for dental implant planning followed closely the first three stages of the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. Alongside this increased CBCT adoption for dental implant planning, there was an associated increased demand for use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image sets for laser modeling and provision of surgical guides. Diagnosis will probably remain a constant source of referral for CBCT examination by oral and maxillofacial radiologists. Nevertheless, more specialized applications such as laser-guided model fabrication and image-guided surgery are expanding indications for CBCT referrals by dentists and also expanding the

  14. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2011-01-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most commo...

  16. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    OpenAIRE

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in ...

  17. Liabilities and risks of using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Bernard; Miles, Dale A

    2014-07-01

    The use of conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) carries with it medicolegal risks of which the practitioner should be aware. These include licensing and malpractice liability concerns. A practitioner who intends to take and/or use CBCT scans should seek advice from his malpractice carrier before doing so. All scans should be read by someone competent to interpret them. Using the services of an out-of-state radiologist to read scans poses its own set of risks. Consultation with a malpractice carrier and dental boards is advisable in this situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Observation of the pulp horn by swept source optical coherence tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Toshihiko; Hanada, Takahiro; Ebihara, Arata; Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Suda, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is one of the most useful diagnostic techniques in dentistry but it involves ionizing radiation, while swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has been introduced recently as a nondestructive, real-time, high resolution imaging technique using low-coherence interferometry, which involves no ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of SS-OCT to detect the pulp horn (PH) in comparison with that of CBCT. Ten extracted human mandibular molars were used. After horizontally removing a half of the tooth crown, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was measured using microfocus computed tomography (Micro CT) (SL) as the gold standard, by CBCT (CL) and by SS-OCT (OL). In the SS-OCT images, only when PH was observed beneath the overlying dentin, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was recorded. If the pulp was exposed, it was defined as pulp exposure (PE). The results obtained by the above three methods were statistically analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at a significance level of p PH when the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH determined by SL was 2.33 mm or less. Strong correlations of the measured values were found between SL and CL (r=0.87), SL and OL (r=0.96), and CL and OL (r=0.86). The results showed that SS-OCT images correlated closely with CBCT images, suggesting that SS-OCT can be a useful tool for the detection of PH.

  19. Metal Artifact Reduction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpics, Mark; Johnson, Paul; Patel, Rakesh; Surucu, Murat; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a method for reducing metal artifacts, arising from dental fillings, on cone-beam computed tomography images. A projection interpolation algorithm is applied to cone-beam computed tomography images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings. This technique involves identifying metal regions in individual cone-beam computed tomography projections and interpolating the surrounding values to remove the metal from the projection data. Axial cone-beam computed tomography images are then reconstructed, resulting in a reduction in the streak artifacts produced by the metal. Both phantom and patient imaging data are used to evaluate this technique. The interpolation substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in all cases. Corrected images had fewer or no streak artifacts compared to their noncorrected counterparts. Quantitatively, regions of interest containing the artifacts showed reduced variance in the corrected images versus the uncorrected images. Average pixel values in regions of interest around the metal object were also closer in value to nonmetal regions after artifact reduction. Artifact correction tended to perform better on patient images with less complex metal objects versus those with multiple large dental fillings. The interpolation substitution is potentially an efficient and effective technique for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings on cone-beam computed tomography image. This technique may be effective in reducing such artifacts in patients with head and neck cancer receiving daily image-guided radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography contrast validation of an artificial periodontal phantom for use in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Michetti, Jérôme; Basarab, Adrian; Tran, Michel; Diemer, Franck; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Validation of image processing techniques such as endodontic segmentations in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a challenging issue because of the lack of ground truth in in vivo experiments. The purpose of our study was to design an artificial surrounding tissues phantom able to provide CBCT image quality of real extracted teeth, similar to in vivo conditions. Note that these extracted teeth could be previously scanned using micro computed tomography (μCT) to ac...

  1. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  2. Quality assurance of computed tomography scanner beams in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskoug, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scanners in diagnostic radiology is increasing, to the extent that they are now found in relatively small hospitals. These hospitals do not have local physicists available and so methods must be developed to allow quality assurance to be carried out at distant laboratories. Several different types of solid water phantoms are available with various built-in test objects that may supply sufficient information about the many parameters that must be checked. The dose distributions, however, are usually not so well considered, although the connection between image quality and absorbed dose must be known for optimal use of a CT scanner. By introducing thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) into a commercial phantom (RMI), it was possible to measure the absorbed dose profile and the line integral of the absorbed dose across the slit. The computer-guided readout of the TLDs gives the absorbed dose, the average dose and half maximum width, absorbed dose curve, and also the line integral of the peak. The only modification of the phantom was five holes, drilled at strategic positions, that did not influence the built-in test objects. This single measurement provides an appropriate monthly quality assurance check of the CT scanner with little extra effort. (author)

  3. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen's Kappa analysis. CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography.

  4. Cone-beam micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Cesarelli, Mario; Bifulco, Paolo; Russo, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We developed a scanner for micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast (BµCT) with a high resolution flat-panel detector and a microfocus X-ray tube. We evaluated the system spatial resolution via the 3D modulation transfer function (MTF). In addition to conventional absorption-based X-ray imaging, such a prototype showed capabilities for propagation-based phase-contrast and related edge enhancement effects in 3D imaging. The system limiting spatial resolution is 6.2mm -1 (MTF at 10%) in the vertical direction and 3.8mm -1 in the radial direction, values which compare favorably with the spatial resolution reached by mini focus breast CT scanners of other groups. The BµCT scanner was able to detect both microcalcification clusters and masses in an anthropomorphic breast phantom at a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. The use of a breast holder is proposed in order to have 1-2min long scan times without breast motion artifacts. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography imaging with physical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratemann, S A; Huang, J C; Maki, K; Miller, A J; Hatcher, D C

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring linear distances between landmarks commonly used in orthodontic analysis on a human skull using two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems. Measurements of length were taken using volumetric data from two CBCT systems and were compared with physical measures using a calliper applied to one human adult skull. Landmarks were identified with chromium steel balls embedded at 32 cranial and 33 mandibular landmarks and the linear measures were taken with a digital calliper. The skull was then scanned with two different CBCT systems: the NewTom QR DVT 9000 (Aperio Inc, Sarasota, FL) and the Hitachi MercuRay (Hitachi Medico Technology, Tokyo, Japan). CT data including the landmark point data were threshold segmented using CyberMed's CB Works software (CB Works 1.0, CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The resulting segmentations were exported from CB Works as VRML (WRL) files to Amira software (Amira 3.1, Mercury Computer Systems GmbH, Berlin, Germany). The error was small compared with the gold standard of the physical calliper measures for both the NewTom (0.07+/-0.41 mm) and CB MercuRay (0.00+/-0.22 mm) generated data. Absolute error to the gold standard was slightly positive, indicating minor compression relative to the calliper measurement. The error was slightly smaller in the CB MercuRay than in the NewTom, probably related to a broader greyscale range for describing beam attenuation in 12-bit vs 8-bit data. The volumetric data rendered with both CBCT systems provided highly accurate data compared with the gold standard of physical measures directly from the skulls, with less than 1% relative error.

  6. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam Computed Tomography Systems for Dental Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliášová, Hana; Dostálová, Taťjana

    3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in forensic odontology has been shown to be useful not only in terms of one or a few of dead bodies but also in multiple fatality incidents. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography and digital radiography were demonstrated in a forensic examination form. 3D images of the skull and teeth were analysed and validated for long ante mortem/post mortem intervals. The image acquisition was instantaneous; the images were able to be optically enlarged, measured, superimposed and compared prima vista or using special software and exported as a file. Digital radiology and computer tomography has been shown to be important both in common criminalistics practices and in multiple fatality incidents. Our study demonstrated that CBCT imaging offers less image artifacts, low image reconstruction times, mobility of the unit and considerably lower equipment cost.

  7. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam Computed Tomography Systems for Dental Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Eliášová

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available 3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in forensic odontology has been shown to be useful not only in terms of one or a few of dead bodies but also in multiple fatality incidents. 3D Multislice and Cone-beam computed tomography and digital radiography were demonstrated in a forensic examination form. 3D images of the skull and teeth were analysed and validated for long ante mortem/post mortem intervals. The image acquisition was instantaneous; the images were able to be optically enlarged, measured, superimposed and compared prima vista or using special software and exported as a file. Digital radiology and computer tomography has been shown to be important both in common criminalistics practices and in multiple fatality incidents. Our study demonstrated that CBCT imaging offers less image artifacts, low image reconstruction times, mobility of the unit and considerably lower equipment cost.

  8. Detection and measurement of artificial periapical lesions by cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Y.H.; Jiang, L.; Gao, X.J.; Shemesh, H.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To test the ability of periapical radiography (PA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to determine the presence/absence of periapical lesions and examine the reliability of volumetric measurements of periapical lesions on CBCT scans. Methodology After tooth extractions in human mandibles,

  9. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography scans in cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Mette A. R.; Pazera, Andrzej; Admiraal, Ronald J.; Berge, Stefaan J.; Vissink, Arjan; Pazera, Pawel

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is frequently used in treatment planning for alveolar bone grafting (ABG) and orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). CBCT images may depict coincident findings. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of incidental findings

  10. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography scans in cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Pazera, A.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Berge, S.J.; Vissink, A.; Pazera, P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is frequently used in treatment planning for alveolar bone grafting (ABG) and orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). CBCT images may depict coincident findings. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of

  11. Cone-beam computed tomography: An inevitable investigation in cleidocranial dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita S Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleidocranial dysplasia is a heritable skeletal dysplasia and one of the most common features of this syndrome is multiple impacted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography, the most recent advancement in maxillofacial imaging, provides the clinician to view the morphology of the skull and the dentition in all three dimensions and help in treatment planning for the patient.

  12. Reliability of three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Hui; Aarab, Ghizlane; Parsa, Azin; de Lange, Jan; van der Stelt, Paul F.; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the localization of anatomic landmarks of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images; and (2) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway

  13. Reliability of three-dimensional measurements of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.; Aarab, G.; Parsa, A.; de Lange, J.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was (1) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the localization of anatomic landmarks of the upper airway on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images; and (2) to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the three-dimensional measurements of the

  14. Diagnosis and decision making in endodontics with the use of cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metska, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    In the current thesis the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been evaluated within the framework of ex vivo and in vivo studies. The first objective of the thesis was to examine whether CBCT scans can be used for the detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically

  15. Practical limitations of cone-beam computed tomography in 3D cephalometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damstra, Janalt; Fourie, Zacharias; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images offer a unique and new appreciation of the anatomical structures and underlying anomalies not possible with conventional radiographs. However, in almost all aspects of CBCT imaging, from utilization to application, inherent limitations and pitfalls

  16. Movement of the patient and the cone beam computed tomography scanner: objectives and possible solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzelka, T.; Dušek, J.; Ocásek, F.; Kučera, J.; Šedý, Jiří; Beneš, J.; Pavlíková, G.; Foltán, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2013), s. 769-773 ISSN 2212-4403 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cone beam computed tomography * movement artifacts * dry-run scan Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.265, year: 2013

  17. Comparison of five cone beam computed tomography systems for the detection of vertical root fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Metska, M.E.; Ozok, A.R.; van der Stelt, P.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans made by five different systems in detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs). It also assessed the influence of the presence of root canal filling (RCF), CBCT slice orientation selection, and the type of tooth

  18. Integration of digital dental casts in cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all

  19. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those...

  20. Should cavitation in proximal surfaces be reported in cone beam computed tomography examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansare, K.; Singh, D.; Sontakke, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A clinical study was done to assess the clinical diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting proximal cavitated carious lesions in order to determine whether cavitation should be reported when a CBCT examination is available. Materials and Methods: 79 adjacent...

  1. Accuracy and repeatability of anthropometric facial measurements using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of linear anthropometric measurements on the soft tissue surface model generated from cone beam computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of seven cadaver heads. The accuracy and

  2. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  3. Comparison of Swedish and Norwegian Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: a Questionnaire Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strindberg, Jerker Edén; Hol, Caroline; Torgersen, Gerald; Møystad, Anne; Nilsson, Mats; Näsström, Karin; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry can be used in some countries by other dentists than specialists in radiology. The frequency of buying cone-beam computed tomography to examine patients is rapidly growing, thus knowledge of how to use it is very important. The aim was to compare the outcome of an investigation on the use of cone-beam computed tomography in Sweden with a previous Norwegian study, regarding specifically technical aspects. The questionnaire contained 45 questions, including 35 comparable questions to Norwegian clinics one year previous. Results were based on inter-comparison of the outcome from each of the two questionnaire studies. Responses rate was 71% in Sweden. There, most of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations performed by dental nurses, while in Norway by specialists. More than two-thirds of the CBCT units had a scout image function, regularly used in both Sweden (79%) and Norway (75%). In Sweden 4% and in Norway 41% of the respondents did not wait for the report from the radiographic specialist before initiating treatment. The bilateral comparison showed an overall similarity between the two countries. The survey gave explicit and important knowledge of the need for education and training of the whole team, since radiation dose to the patient could vary a lot for the same kind of radiographic examination. It is essential to establish quality assurance protocols with defined responsibilities in the team in order to maintain high diagnostic accuracy for all examinations when using cone-beam computed tomography for patient examinations.

  4. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Ali Zakir; Alluri, LeelaSubhashini Choudary; Mallela, Dhiraj; Frazee, Troy

    2016-01-01

    Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence.

  5. In vivo assessment of three dimensional coronary anatomy using electron beam computed tomography after intravenous contrast administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); A.H.H. Bongaerts (Alfons); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIntravenous coronary angiography with electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows for the non-invasive visualisation of coronary arteries. With dedicated computer hardware and software, three dimensional renderings of the coronary arteries can be

  6. The possible usability of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, I.; Rizal, M. F.; Kiswanjaya, B.

    2017-08-01

    The innovations and advantages of three-dimensional cone beam computed dental tomography (3D CBCT) are continually growing for its potential use in dental research. Imaging techniques are important for planning research in dentistry. Newly improved 3D CBCT imaging systems and accessory computer programs have recently been proven effective for use in dental research. The aim of this study is to introduce 3D CBCT and open a window for future research possibilities that should be given attention in dental research.

  7. Evaluation of Optic Canal and Surrounding Structures Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography: Considerations for Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanoglu, Alper; Orhan, Kaan; Kursun, Sebnem; Inceoglu, Beste; Oztas, Bengi

    2016-07-01

    The optic canal connects the anterior cranial fossa and the orbit and maintains the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery. Within the extent of the surgical approach of the region, risk of iatrogenic injury of the neural and vascular structures increases. The aim of this retrospective morphometric study is to investigate the radiological anatomy of orbita, optic canal, and its surrounding using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans in a group of Turkish population.Cone beam computed tomography images of a total of 182 patients were evaluated by 2 observers. Anatomical parameters regarding optic canal and orbita were measured for all patients from axial, sagittal, and three-dimensional reconstructed images. To assess intraobserver reliability, the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was used. Pearson χ test and Student t test were performed for statistical analysis of differences, sex, localization, and measurements (P  0.05). The orbita width and height were larger for the males than females (P  0.05). Examination CBCT scans revealed that the shape of the optic canal was 70% funnel and 28% Hourglass shape, 2% amorph type round.These results provide detailed knowledge of the anatomical characteristics in the orbital area which may be of assistance for surgeons preoperatively. Cone beam computed tomography scans can be an alternative modality for multislice computed tomography with submillimeter resolution and lower dose in preoperative imaging of the orbit.

  8. Antrum approach planning for removal of impacted tooth using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos, Allex Morelli Heiderich; Queiroz, Christiano Sampaio; Santos, Pablo Leal Teixeira; de Oliviera, Adriana Borges; Oliveira, Camila; Campos, Paulo Sérgio Flores

    2012-01-01

    Due to the great number of structures in the maxillofacial region, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important procedure in presurgical planning for removal of impacted teeth. Most of the information provided by this imaging technique cannot be visualized in conventional radiographs. In addition, CBCT reduces patient exposure to radiation in comparison with helical computed tomography and provides dental practitioners with easy access. We report the clinical case of a patient who underwent a surgical procedure for removal of an impacted maxillary premolar. CBCT-assisted presurgical treatment was used, enabling a more conservative surgical access, a less traumatic and less time consuming procedure than conventional surgical intervention.

  9. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepulveda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a relatively new syndrome in the field of otology. It is of unknown etiology presenting with a variety of vestibular and auditory symptoms and radiologic findings play a crucial role in its diagnosis. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be a powerful tool in the field of otolaryngology. It is a three dimensional technique that uses lower radiation resulting in fewer artifacts and offers higher resolution when compared with multi-slice computed tomography. It is considered to be an excellent imaging modality for radiological exploration of the ear.

  10. Ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The rotatable ultrasonic divergent-beam scanner is designed for time-of-flight tomography with computer evaluation. With it there can be measured parameters that are of importance for the structure of soft tissues, e.g. time as a function of the velocity distribution along a certain path of flight(the method is analogous to the transaxial X-ray tomography). Moreover it permits to perform the quantitative measurement of two-dimensional velocity distributions and may therefore be applied to serial examinations for detecting cancer of the breast. As computers digital memories as well as analog-digital-hybrid systems are suitable. (ORU) [de

  11. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-09-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the application and advantages associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications, while reducing radiation exposure during complex endodontic procedures. The benefits of the added diagnostic information provided by intraoperative CBCT images in select cases justify the risk associated with the limited level of radiation exposure.

  12. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakir Syed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence.

  13. Detection of root perforations using conventional and digital intraoral radiography, multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Shokri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to compare the accuracy of conventional intraoral (CI radiography, photostimulable phosphor (PSP radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT for detection of strip and root perforations in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods Mesial and distal roots of 72 recently extracted molar were endodontically prepared. Perforations were created in 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm diameter around the furcation of 48 roots (strip perforation and at the external surface of 48 roots (root perforation; 48 roots were not perforated (control group. After root obturation, intraoral radiography, CBCT and MDCT were taken. Discontinuity in the root structure was interpreted as perforation. Two observers examined the images. Data were analyzed using Stata software and Chi-square test. Results The sensitivity and specificity of CI, PSP, CBCT and MDCT in detection of strip perforations were 81.25% and 93.75%, 85.42% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 72.92% and 87.50%, respectively. For diagnosis of root perforation, the sensitivity and specificity were 87.50% and 93.75%, 89.58% and 91.67%, 97.92% and 85.42%, and 81.25% and 87.50%, respectively. For detection of strip perforation, the difference between CBCT and all other methods including CI, PSP and MDCT was significant (p < 0.05. For detection of root perforation, only the difference between CBCT and MDCT was significant, and for all the other methods no statistically significant difference was observed. Conclusions If it is not possible to diagnose the root perforations by periapical radiographs, CBCT is the best radiographic technique while MDCT is not recommended.

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy for liver cancer using respiratory-correlated computed tomography and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Sweeney, Reinhart A; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Mueller, Gerd; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 +/- 4 mm and 5 +/- 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion.

  15. Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  16. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  17. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry: description and standardization of the technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Silva, Luiz A.F.; Fioravanti, Maria C. S.; Barriviera, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Eleven dogs and four cats with buccodental alterations, treated in the Centro Veterinario do Gama, in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, were submitted to cone beam computed tomography. The exams were carried out in a i-CAT tomograph, using for image acquisition six centimeters height, 40 seconds time, 0.2 voxel, 120 kilovolts and 46.72 milli amperes per second. The ideal positioning of the animal for the exam was also determined in this study and it proved to be fundamental for successful examination, which required a simple and safe anesthetic protocol due to the relatively short period of time necessary to obtain the images. Several alterations and diseases were identified with accurate imaging, demonstrating that cone beam computed tomography is a safe, accessible and feasible imaging method which could be included in the small animal dentistry routine diagnosis. (author)

  19. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Karbasi Kheir, Mitra; Hekmatian, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage.

  20. Cracked tooth: a report of two cases and role of cone beam computed tomography in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan Chakravarthy, Pishipati Vinayak; Telang, Lahari Ajay; Nerali, Jayashri; Telang, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Cracked tooth is a distinct type of longitudinal tooth fracture which occurs very commonly and its diagnosis can be challenging. This type of fracture tends to grow and change over time. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms are variable or nonspecific and may even resemble post-treatment disease following root canal treatment or periodontal disease. This variety and unpredictability make the cracked tooth a challenging diagnostic entity. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in diagnosis of complex endodontic cases has been well documented in the literature. In this paper we present two cases of cracked tooth and emphasise on the timely use of cone beam computed tomography as an aid in diagnosis and as a prognostic determinant.

  1. Cracked Tooth: A Report of Two Cases and Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishipati Vinayak Kalyan Chakravarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracked tooth is a distinct type of longitudinal tooth fracture which occurs very commonly and its diagnosis can be challenging. This type of fracture tends to grow and change over time. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms are variable or nonspecific and may even resemble post-treatment disease following root canal treatment or periodontal disease. This variety and unpredictability make the cracked tooth a challenging diagnostic entity. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT in diagnosis of complex endodontic cases has been well documented in the literature. In this paper we present two cases of cracked tooth and emphasise on the timely use of cone beam computed tomography as an aid in diagnosis and as a prognostic determinant.

  2. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.; Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januario, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  3. Quantification of bone quality using different cone beam computed tomography devices: Accuracy assessment for edentulous human mandibles

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dessel, Jeroen; Nicolielo, Laura Ferreira Pinheiro; Huang, Yan; Slagmolen, Pieter; Politis, Constantinus; Lambrichts, Ivo; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of the latest cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) machines in comparison to multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) and micro computed tomography (micro CT) for objectively assessing trabecular and cortical bone quality prior to implant placement. Materials and methods: Eight edentulous human mandibular bone samples were scanned with seven CBCT scanners (3D Accuitomo 170, i-CAT Next Generation, ProMax 3D Max, Scanora 3D, Cranex 3D, Newtom GiANO and Carestrea...

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6?18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation ...

  5. Identification of occlusal prematurity by clinical examination and cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Henriques, João César Guimarães; Lelis, Éverton Ribeiro; Tavares, Marcelo; Almeida, Guilherme de Araújo; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to identify occlusal prematurity by images from paraxial slices of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). For such purpose, a pilot study was performed in which 16 asymptomatic young patients were subjected to a clinical examination, including a careful occlusal analysis and then individual deprogrammer devices (“Lucia's JIG”) were fabricated. Premature contacts were clinically identified in centric relation (CR) for each patient by jaw manipul...

  6. Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, Irene

    2011-11-15

    There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.

  7. Evaluation of Morphology and Anatomical Measurement of Nasopalatine Canal Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Panjnoush, Mehrdad; Norouzi, Hamideh; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Mofidi, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Precise radiographic assessment of the nasopalatine canal is required to prevent implant failure. The purpose of the current study was to determine the three dimensional (3D) morphology, as well as the dimensions of the nasopalatine canal using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, maxillary CBCT images from 300 patients (150 men, 150 women) were retrospectively evaluated. Sagittal and coronal views were reviewed to ...

  8. Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Dentistry: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Sagrika; Chug, Ashi; Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning are the backbone of any medical therapy; for this reason, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was introduced and has been widely used. CBCT technology provides a three-dimensional image viewing, enabling exact location and extent of lesions or any anatomical region. For the very same reason, CBCT can not only be used for surgical fields but also for fields such as endodontics, prosthodontics, and orthodontics for appropriate treatment planning and ef...

  9. AAE and AAOMR Joint Position Statement: Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics 2015 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The following statement was prepared by the Special Committee to Revise the Joint American Association of Endodontists/American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Position on Cone Beam Computed Tomography, and approved by the AAE Board of Directors and AAOMR Executive Council in May 2015. AAE members may reprint this position statement for distribution to patients or referring dentists. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integration of Digital Dental Casts in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all reported methods have drawbacks. The aim of this feasibility study is to present a new simplified method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. In a patient scheduled for orthognathic ...

  11. Maxillary first molars with six canals confirmed with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahra Mohammad Al-Habboubi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The maxillary first molar exhibits unpredictable root canal morphology. Different number of root canals has been reported with the aids of new tools. It is very important to clinically detect all canals for better outcome results. The purpose of the present case is to present a case of the maxillary first molar in a Saudi male patient with an anatomical variation of having six root canals that were confirmed with cone-beam computed tomography.

  12. The detailed evaluation of supernumerary teeth with the aid of cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumen, E.C.; Yavuz, I.; Atakul, F.; Tumen, D.S.; Hamamci, N.; Berber, G.; Uysal, E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of a recently developed three-dimensional imaging system, cone beam computed tomography, in the detailed evaluation of supernumerary teeth. Two-hundred and twenty three patients with supernumerary teeth (68 females and 155 males) were included in this study. Patients ranged in age from 12 to 25 years. Supernumerary teeth were detected by clinical examination and traditional radiographies. Moreover, careful investigation for more details was made with the cone beam computed tomography. Supernumerary teeth which were detected with the examinations of the cone beam computed tomography images were classified according to the number, location, shape and eruption rate. The prevalence of supernumerary teeth was determined to be 1.45% of the study population. Males were affected more than females in a ratio of 2.3:1. Supernumerary teeth were most frequently located in 86.2% of the cases in the maxilla; 10.1% in the mandible and 3.7% both in the maxilla and mandible. Supernumerary teeth were most commonly conical in shape (68.8%). One supernumerary tooth was present in 67.7% of the patients, 30.9% had two, and 1.4% had three supernumeraries. Definite and early diagnosis of the supernumerary teeth is very important. Detailed examinations and evaluations of these teeth with three-dimensional images is very beneficial in terms of treatment planning and preventing complications which may occur.

  13. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were ≤ 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.)

  14. Maximal thickness of the normal human pericardium assessed by electron-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delille, J.P.; Hernigou, A.; Sene, V.; Chatellier, G.; Boudeville, J.C.; Challande, P.; Plainfosse, M.C. [Service de Radiologie Centrale, Hopital Broussais, Paris (France)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal value of normal pericardial thickness with an electron-beam computed tomography unit allowing fast scan times of 100 ms to reduce cardiac motion artifacts. Electron-beam computed tomography was performed in 260 patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension, as these pathologies have no effect on pericardial thickness. The pixel size was 0.5 mm. Measurements could be performed in front of the right ventricle, the right atrioventricular groove, the right atrium, the left ventricle, and the interventricular groove. Maximal thickness of normal pericardium was defined at the 95th percentile. Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility studies were assessed from additional CT scans by the Bland and Altman method [24]. The maximal thickness of the normal pericardium was 2 mm for 95 % of cases. For the reproducibility studies, there was no significant relationship between the inter-observer and intra-observer measurements, but all pericardial thickness measurements were {<=} 1.6 mm. Using electron-beam computed tomography, which assists in decreasing substantially cardiac motion artifacts, the threshold of detection of thickened pericardium is statistically established as being 2 mm for 95 % of the patients with hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertension. However, the spatial resolution available prevents a reproducible measure of the real thickness of thin pericardium. (orig.) With 6 figs., 1 tab., 31 refs.

  15. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C. de; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN. (author)

  16. Computed gray levels in multislice and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Fabiane; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Enciso, Reyes; Weissheimer, Andre; de Oliveira, Rogério Belle

    2013-07-01

    Gray level is the range of shades of gray in the pixels, representing the x-ray attenuation coefficient that allows for tissue density assessments in computed tomography (CT). An in-vitro study was performed to investigate the relationship between computed gray levels in 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanners and 1 multislice spiral CT device using 5 software programs. Six materials (air, water, wax, acrylic, plaster, and gutta-percha) were scanned with the CBCT and CT scanners, and the computed gray levels for each material at predetermined points were measured with OsiriX Medical Imaging software (Geneva, Switzerland), OnDemand3D (CyberMed International, Seoul, Korea), E-Film (Merge Healthcare, Milwaukee, Wis), Dolphin Imaging (Dolphin Imaging & Management Solutions, Chatsworth, Calif), and InVivo Dental Software (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The repeatability of these measurements was calculated with intraclass correlation coefficients, and the gray levels were averaged to represent each material. Repeated analysis of variance tests were used to assess the differences in gray levels among scanners and materials. There were no differences in mean gray levels with the different software programs. There were significant differences in gray levels between scanners for each material evaluated (P <0.001). The software programs were reliable and had no influence on the CT and CBCT gray level measurements. However, the gray levels might have discrepancies when different CT and CBCT scanners are used. Therefore, caution is essential when interpreting or evaluating CBCT images because of the significant differences in gray levels between different CBCT scanners, and between CBCT and CT values. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cone-beam mammo-computed tomography from data along two tilting arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Kai; Yu Hengyong; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Wang Ge

    2006-01-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for breast imaging. In this article, we propose a new scheme for theoretically exact cone-beam mammo-CT and develop a corresponding Katsevich-type reconstruction algorithm. In our scheme, cone-beam scans are performed along two tilting arcs to collect a sufficient amount of information for exact reconstruction. In our algorithm, cone-beam data are filtered in a shift-invariant fashion and then weighted backprojected into the three-dimensional space for the final reconstruction. Our approach has several desirable features, including tolerance of axial data truncation, efficiency in sequential/parallel implementation, and accuracy for quantitative analysis. We also demonstrate the system performance and clinical utility of the proposed technique in numerical simulations

  18. Quality control and radioprotection in dental cone beam computed tomography - case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Ligiane C.N.; Ferreira, Nadya M.P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The radiological protection in medical and odontologic radiology follows The Order (Portaria) 453/98 of the Ministry of Health, which presents the minimum set of tests for the constancy X-ray equipment. These tests follow the procedures set forth in the Resolution no. 64, the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance. This work aims to show a study on dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), evaluating the physical parameters that influence the performance and image quality and presenting the appropriate tests to this new system. The authors analyzed the tests specific for computed tomography (CT) of the Resolution no. 64, feasibility assessment of them and if their interpretations are compatible with CBCT. Once determined if testing is feasible, compare with those presented in the manual provided by the equipment manufacturer. The CT scanner used was the Mini-Cat Tomography Scanner Xoran Technologies of KAVO. In the study it was verified that four tests could be reproduced in CBCT: noise, accuracy and uniformity in the number of CT of water and spatial resolution. Considering experimental data, the methodology and tolerance of manufacturer for the first two tests were more appropriate. For the uniformity test of the CT number, we recommend using the phantom quality control. Three new tests were suggested to be made in the quality control of the Cone Beam: linearity, artifacts and alignment of the beam. (author)

  19. Volumetric Analysis of 700 Mandibular Condyles Based Upon Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Ali-Farid; Kauke, Martin; Grandoch, Andrea; Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Zöller, Joachim E; Kreppel, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    The authors' aim was to provide volumetric data of mandibular condyles based upon cone beam computed tomography with the means of semiautomatic segmentation.Retrospective chart review of 350 patients (700 mandibular condyles) with cone beam computerized tomography between February 2007 and December 2016. Univariate analysis was performed to analyze associations between variables. P values <0.05 were considered significant. Volume measurement was performed in a semiautomatic segmentation method with the program "ITK-Snap."The mean volume was 2.443 cm for the right condyle and 2.278 cm for the left condyle. Bivariate analysis indicated a highly significant difference between the volume of the left and right condyles (P < 0.01). Female had a significant smaller condyle volume than male (P < 0.01 left condyle; P < 0.01 right condyle). Volume and age did not significantly correlate (P = 0.939 right condyle; P = 0.798 left condyle).A detailed assessment of the volume of mandibular condyles with cone beam computed tomography can help to assess pathophysiological alterations.Hence, the volumetric measurement may improve patient's individualized treatment.

  20. [Diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and eight-slice computed tomography for evaluation of external root reabsorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Zu-yan

    2012-08-18

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and high resolution multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) with eight-detector-rows in detecting the simulated external root resorption defects. External root resorption defects of different sizes and in different locations were simulated in 40 human single rooted teeth. Cavities simulating root resorption defects of 1 mm in diameter and 0.1 mm, 0.2 mm, 0.3 mm, 0.4 mm in depth were drilled in the cervical, middle and apical thirds of lingual surfaces of the teeth. The specimens were scanned with both CBCT (Accuitomo 3DX, Morita Co., Japan) and high resolution 8-slice CT (BrightSpeed Edge, GE Co., USA). The CBCT and MSCT images were read by two experienced observers. The data were analyzed with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. ROC curves were generated and the area under ROC curve (Az) was employed to express the diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic accuracy (Az value) in detecting the simulated defects of all the locations and sizes were 0.921 for CBCT and 0.770 for MSCT. The Az values for CBCT in detecting defects located in the cervical, middle and apical thirds were 0.885, 0.991 and 0.873, while those for MSCT were 0.752, 0.844 and 0.709, respectively. The Az values for CBCT in detecting the defects of 0.1 mm, 0.2 mm, 0.3 mm and 0.4 mm in depth were 0.794, 0.934, 0.992 and 0.992, and those for MSCT were 0.592, 0.719, 0.920 and 0.990, respectively. The diagnostic ability for external root resorption of CBCT is better than that of MSCT. Smaller defects are better delineated with CBCT than with MSCT. The defects in the middle thirds of the roots are easier to be detected than those in the cervical and apical ones using both CBCT and MSCT.

  1. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  2. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  3. Assessment of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions by cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Alexandre Perez; Perrella, Andreia; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pereira, Marlene Fenyo Soeiro de Matos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso, E-mail: alexperez34@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Estomatologia

    2010-10-15

    There are many limitations to image acquisition, using conventional radiography, of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a better option, due to its higher accuracy, for purposes of diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment of bone injuries. The aim of the present study was to analyze two protocols of cone beam computed tomography for the evaluation of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Spherical lesions were simulated in 30 dry mandibular condyles, using dentist drills and drill bits sizes 1, 3 and 6. Each of the mandibular condyles was submitted to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using two protocols: axial, coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR); and sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis of the mandibular condyles. For these protocols, 2 observers analyzed the CBCT images independently, regarding the presence or not of injuries. Only one of the observers, however, performed on 2 different occasions. The results were compared to the gold standard, evaluating the percentage of agreement, degree of accuracy of CBCT protocols and observers' examination. The z test was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 protocols. There was greater difficulty in the assessment of small-size simulated lesions (drill no.1). From the results of this study, it can be concluded that CBCT is an accurate tool for analyzing mandibular condyle bone lesions, with the MPR protocol showing slightly better results than the sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis. (author)

  4. Assessment of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions by cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Alexandre Perez; Perrella, Andreia; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pereira, Marlene Fenyo Soeiro de Matos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso

    2010-01-01

    There are many limitations to image acquisition, using conventional radiography, of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a better option, due to its higher accuracy, for purposes of diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment of bone injuries. The aim of the present study was to analyze two protocols of cone beam computed tomography for the evaluation of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Spherical lesions were simulated in 30 dry mandibular condyles, using dentist drills and drill bits sizes 1, 3 and 6. Each of the mandibular condyles was submitted to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using two protocols: axial, coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR); and sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis of the mandibular condyles. For these protocols, 2 observers analyzed the CBCT images independently, regarding the presence or not of injuries. Only one of the observers, however, performed on 2 different occasions. The results were compared to the gold standard, evaluating the percentage of agreement, degree of accuracy of CBCT protocols and observers' examination. The z test was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 protocols. There was greater difficulty in the assessment of small-size simulated lesions (drill no.1). From the results of this study, it can be concluded that CBCT is an accurate tool for analyzing mandibular condyle bone lesions, with the MPR protocol showing slightly better results than the sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis. (author)

  5. General surface reconstruction for cone-beam multislice spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Laigao; Liang Yun; Heuscher, Dominic J.

    2003-01-01

    A new family of cone-beam reconstruction algorithm, the General Surface Reconstruction (GSR), is proposed and formulated in this paper for multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. It provides a general framework to allow the reconstruction of planar or nonplanar surfaces on a set of rebinned short-scan parallel beam projection data. An iterative surface formation method is proposed as an example to show the possibility to form nonplanar reconstruction surfaces to minimize the adverse effect between the collected cone-beam projection data and the reconstruction surfaces. The improvement in accuracy of the nonplanar surfaces over planar surfaces in the two-dimensional approximate cone-beam reconstructions is mathematically proved and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The proposed GSR algorithm is evaluated by the computer simulation of cone-beam spiral scanning geometry and various mathematical phantoms. The results demonstrate that the GSR algorithm generates much better image quality compared to conventional multislice reconstruction algorithms. For a table speed up to 100 mm per rotation, GSR demonstrates good image quality for both the low-contrast ball phantom and thorax phantom. All other performance parameters are comparable to the single-slice 180 deg. LI (linear interpolation) algorithm, which is considered the 'gold standard'. GSR also achieves high computing efficiency and good temporal resolution, making it an attractive alternative for the reconstruction of next generation multislice spiral CT data

  6. Electron beam computed tomography and ventilation perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettner, Beatrice I.; Sandrock, Dirk; Reisinger, Ingrid; Munz, Dieter L.; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study, performed in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE), was to compare V/Q scans and electron beam computed tomography (CT) scans on a patient-by-patient and segment-by-segment basis. Both a segment-based and a lobe-based analysis was performed in those patients positive for PE. The diagnosis of PE was assumed on the basis of a mismatch at V/Q scanning or a filling defect in a pulmonary vessel at contrast-enhanced electron beam CT. In 37/45 patients (24 female, 21 male, 58±16 years) with suspected PE, the diagnosis of PE was confirmed or excluded by both modalities, resulting in a correlation of 82% between electron beam CT and V/Q scanning. In the 28 patients positive for PE according to one or both modalities, 504 segments were evaluated. Of these 504 segments, 248 (nearly 50%) showed perfusion defects on V/Q scans, of which only 90 (36%) displayed emboli at electron beam CT. Overall, a total of only 135 of the 504 segments (27%) were abnormal at electron beam CT. More than 50% of the patients with discrepant results did not show an embolus at electron beam CT. It is concluded that there is a good correlation (82%) between V/Q scanning and electron beam CT on a patient-by-patient basis but a markedly less good correlation (62%) in a segment-based analysis. (orig.)

  7. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography contrast validation of an artificial periodontal phantom for use in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Jerome; Basarab, Adrian; Tran, Michel; Diemer, Franck; Kouame, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Validation of image processing techniques such as endodontic segmentations in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a challenging issue because of the lack of ground truth in in vivo experiments. The purpose of our study was to design an artificial surrounding tissues phantom able to provide CBCT image quality of real extracted teeth, similar to in vivo conditions. Note that these extracted teeth could be previously scanned using micro computed tomography (μCT) to access true quantitative measurements of the root canal anatomy. Different design settings are assessed in our study by comparison to in vivo images, in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) obtained between different anatomical structures. Concerning the root canal and the dentine, the best design setup allowed our phantom to provide a CNR difference of only 3% compared to clinical cases.

  8. Evaluation of Algebraic Iterative Image Reconstruction Methods for Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT performs volumetric imaging using a stack of fan beams generated by a multiple pixel X-ray source. While the TBCT system was designed to overcome the scatter and detector issues faced by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, it still suffers the same large cone angle artifacts as CBCT due to the use of approximate reconstruction algorithms. It has been shown that iterative reconstruction algorithms are better able to model irregular system geometries and that algebraic iterative algorithms in particular have been able to reduce cone artifacts appearing at large cone angles. In this paper, the SART algorithm is modified for the use with the different TBCT geometries and is tested using both simulated projection data and data acquired using the TBCT benchtop system. The modified SART reconstruction algorithms were able to mitigate the effects of using data generated at large cone angles and were also able to reconstruct CT images without the introduction of artifacts due to either the longitudinal or transverse truncation in the data sets. Algebraic iterative reconstruction can be especially useful for dual-source dual-detector TBCT, wherein the cone angle is the largest in the center of the field of view.

  9. Designing a novel dental root analogue implant using cone beam computed tomography and CAD/CAM technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moin, D.A.; Hassan, B.; Mercelis, P.; Wismeijer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study aim is to introduce a novel preemptively constructed dental root analogue implant (RAI) based on three-dimensional (3D) root surface models obtained from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, computer aided designing and computer aided manufacturing technology. Materials

  10. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-01-01

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  11. Cone beam computed tomography for diagnosis and treatment planning of supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Costa, Ana Lidia Soares; Kobayashi, Tatiana Yurico; Rios, Daniela; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifacio; Machado, Maria Aperecida de Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2012-01-01

    Conventional radiographic images are frequently used to detect supernumerary teeth. However, recent developments in 3D imaging systems have enabled dentists to better visualize supernumerary teeth, with better contrast and more details. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has improved diagnosis and treatment planning of patients with supernumerary teeth. The decision to use CBCT should be based on the diagnostic information required. This article presents three case reports of patients with supernumerary teeth to demonstrate the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning based on a comprehensive evaluation using CBCT.

  12. Role of cone beam computed tomography in the prompt diagnosis of a nasopalatine duct cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Panjwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasopalatine duct cyst (NPDC is the most common of all the developmental, epithelial, and non-odontogenic cysts of the maxilla, believed to originate from the epithelial remnants of the nasopalatine duct. Typically, the lesion is asymptomatic and is detected accidentally on a radiograph. The definite diagnosis must be based on the clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Frequently misdiagnosed, the NPDC is not rare. The motive of reporting an entity that is not very rare is that the lesion is mostly misdiagnosed, and to emphasize the importance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the diagnosis and optimized treatment planning of NPDCs.

  13. [Application of cone-beam computed tomography in the treatment of impacted maxillary teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sun; Feng, Xi-ping; Cao, Hui-zhen

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the treatment of impacted maxillary teeth with localization via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Eleven cases with impacted maxillary teeth on X-ray examination were selected from 2009 to 2010. The impacted maxillary teeth were scanned by CBCT.The three-dimensional images of impacted maxillary teeth were obtained by multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) to determine the location of impacted teeth. CBCT and MPR can demonstrate the morphology and location and growing state of the impacted maxillary teeth. CBCT and MPR are the most accurate and effective methods to localize the impacted maxillary teeth.

  14. Conservative Management of Type III Dens in Dente Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens in dente, also known as dens invaginatus, dilated composite odontoma, or deep foramen caecum, is a developmental malformation that usually affects maxillary incisor teeth, particularly lateral incisors. It may occur in teeth anywhere within the jaws, other locations are comparatively rare. It can occur within both the crown and the root, although crown invaginations are more common. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is very helpful in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. In this case we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and endodontic management of a Type III dens in dente (Oehler′s Type III.

  15. Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Dentistry: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sagrika; Chug, Ashi; Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I

    2017-11-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning are the backbone of any medical therapy; for this reason, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was introduced and has been widely used. CBCT technology provides a three-dimensional image viewing, enabling exact location and extent of lesions or any anatomical region. For the very same reason, CBCT can not only be used for surgical fields but also for fields such as endodontics, prosthodontics, and orthodontics for appropriate treatment planning and effective dental care. The aim and clinical significance of this review are to update dental clinicians on the CBCT applications in each dental specialty for an appropriate diagnosis and more predictable treatment.

  16. Practical limitations of cone-beam computed tomography in 3D cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstra, Janalt; Fourie, Zacharias; Ren, Yijin

    2011-12-01

    3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images offer a unique and new appreciation of the anatomical structures and underlying anomalies not possible with conventional radiographs. However, in almost all aspects of CBCT imaging, from utilization to application, inherent limitations and pitfalls exist. Importantly, these inherent limitations and pitfalls have practical implications which need to be addressed before the potential of this technology can be fully realized. The purpose of this review was to explore the current limitations and pitfalls associated with CBCT imaging to allow for better and more accurate understanding of the possibilities this imaging modality could offer, particularly pertaining to 3D cephalometry.

  17. Three-dimensional cephalometry: spiral multi-slice vs cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Schutyser, Filip

    2006-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial imaging techniques are becoming increasingly popular and have opened new possibilities for orthodontic assessment, treatment, and follow-up. Recently, a new 3D cephalometric method based on spiral multi-slice (MS) computed tomography (CT) was developed and validated by our research group. This innovative 3D virtual approach is a bridge between conventional cephalometry and modern craniofacial imaging techniques and provides high-quality, accurate, and reliable quantitative 3D data. The aim of this article was to describe the advantages and the disadvantages of spiral MS-CT 3D cephalometry and to discuss the potential of cone-beam CT 3D cephalometry.

  18. A rare presentation of bilateral maxillary dens invaginatus diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinapadu, Sainath; Aravelli, Swathi; Pasari, Srikanth; Marukala, Narender Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental variation in the formation of a tooth that causes changes in the internal anatomy of the tooth. The presence of double dens invaginatus is extremely rare. Understanding the type, extension, and complex morphology of dens invaginatus is essential. Diagnosis of this condition using conventional radiographic techniques is not easy. Advanced imaging techniques, such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are very helpful in diagnosis of these complex anatomic variations. In the present case report, we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and treatment planning of bilateral maxillary dens invaginatus, of which one presented as a case of double dens.

  19. Conservative treatment and follow-up of type III dens invaginatus using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhanli, Kadir T; Celik, Davut; Altintas, Subutay H; Taşdemir, Tamer; S Sezgin, Omer

    2014-12-01

    Dens invaginatus is a well-recognized phenomenon, and its endodontic treatment poses a challenge, especially for peri-invagination lesions with vital pulp. Here we describe the outcome of conservative treatment and follow-up in a case of type III dens invaginatus. Cone-beam computed tomography was used for diagnosis and follow-up. Pulp vitality was preserved with endodontic treatment of only an invaginated canal. At the 24-month follow-up examination, the tooth was asymptomatic and repair of the lesion was evident radiographically. This case was managed successfully with endodontic treatment of the invagination. (J Oral Sci 56, 307-310, 2014).

  20. A Rare Presentation of Bilateral Maxillary Dens Invaginatus Diagnosed Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainath Dinapadu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus is a developmental variation in the formation of a tooth that causes changes in the internal anatomy of the tooth. The presence of double dens invaginatus is extremely rare. Understanding the type, extension, and complex morphology of dens invaginatus is essential. Diagnosis of this condition using conventional radiographic techniques is not easy. Advanced imaging techniques, such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT are very helpful in diagnosis of these complex anatomic variations. In the present case report, we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and treatment planning of bilateral maxillary dens invaginatus, of which one presented as a case of double dens.

  1. Thickness of the Buccal Plate in Posterior Teeth: A Prospective Cone Beam Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Kayleigh Eaves; Schoolfield, John; Noujeim, Marcel E; Huynh-Ba, Guy; Lasho, David J; Mealey, Brian L

    Buccal plate thickness is an important clinical parameter for postextraction implant treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to assess buccal plate thickness of the posterior maxilla and mandible using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 265 patients and 934 teeth met the inclusion criteria for this study. CBCT volumes were taken and aligned for measurement at the ideal midsagittal cross-section. Buccal plate thickness was measured at 1, 3, and 5 mm apical to the alveolar crest. The frequency of thick (≥ 1 mm), thin (teeth.

  2. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Huanjun; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of -11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  3. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Freitas Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR and maximum intercuspation (MI, using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method. The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device and mandible manipulation were used to deprogram the habitual conditions of the jaw. The evaluations were conducted in both frontal and lateral tomographic images, showing the condyle/articular fossa relation. The images were processed in the software included in the NewTom 3G device (QR NNT software version 2.00, and 8 tomographic images were obtained per patient, four laterally and four frontally exhibiting the TMA's (in CR and MI, on both sides, right and left. By means of tools included in another software, linear and angular measurements were performed and statistically analyzed by student t test. According to the methodology and the analysis performed in asymptomatic patients, it was not possible to detect statistically significant differences between the positions of centric relation and maximum intercuspation. However, the resources of cone beam tomography are of extreme relevance to the completion of further studies that use heterogeneous groups of samples in order to compare the results.

  4. Compensators for dose and scatter management in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, S. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of compensators (e.g., bow-tie filters) designed for kV cone-beam computed tomography (CT) to reduce both scatter reaching the detector and dose to the patient is investigated. Scattered x rays reaching the detector are widely recognized as one of the most significant challenges to cone-beam CT imaging performance. With cone-beam CT gaining popularity as a method of guiding treatments in radiation therapy, any methods that have the potential to reduce the dose to patients and/or improve image quality should be investigated. Simple compensators with a design that could realistically be implemented on a cone-beam CT imaging system have been constructed to determine the magnitude of reduction of scatter and/or dose for various cone-beam CT imaging conditions. Depending on the situation, the compensators were shown to reduce x-ray scatter at the detector and dose to the patient by more than a factor of 2. Further optimization of the compensators is a possibility to achieve greater reductions in both scatter and dose

  5. Asymptomatic radiopaque lesions of the jaws. A radiographic study using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Masao; Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Ohnishi, Masaaki; Honda, Kazuya; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) were used to analyze asymptomatic radiopaque lesions in the jaw bones and determine the diagnostic relevance of the lesions based on their relationships to teeth and site of origin. One hundred radiopaque lesions detected between 1998 and 2002 were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT. On the basis of panoramic radiographs, the region was classified as periapical, body, or edentulous, and the site was classified as molar or premolar. Follow-up data from medical records were available for only 36 of these cases. The study protocol for simultaneous use of cone-beam CT was approved by the ethics review board of our institution. A large majority of radiopaque lesions were observed in premolar and molar sites of the mandible; 60% of lesions were periapical, 24% were in the body, and 16% were in the edentulous region. An interesting type of radiopaque lesion, which we named a pearl shell structure (PSS), was observed on cone-beam CT in 34 of the 100 lesions. The PSS is a distinctive structure, and this finding on cone-beam CT likely represents the start of bone formation before bone sclerosis. (author)

  6. The measurement of proton stopping power using proton-cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, P.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Gall, K.P.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system utilizing a proton beam has been developed and tested. The cone beam is produced by scattering a 160 MeV proton beam with a modifier that results in a signal in the detector system, which decreases monotonically with depth in the medium. The detector system consists of a Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb intensifying screen viewed by a cooled CCD camera. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is applied to the projection data to obtain the CT voxel data representing proton stopping power. The system described is capable of reconstructing data over a 16x16x16cm 3 volume into 512x512x512 voxels. A spatial and contrast resolution phantom was scanned to determine the performance of the system. Spatial resolution is significantly degraded by multiple Coulomb scattering effects. Comparison of the reconstructed proton CT values with x-ray CT derived proton stopping powers shows that there may be some advantage to obtaining stopping powers directly with proton CT. The system described suggests a possible practical method of obtaining this measurement in vivo. (author)

  7. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geleijns, J; Bruin, P W de; Salvado Artells, M; Mather, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI 100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D-bar 100 ). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI 300air and D-bar 100air , while CTDI 100air substantially underestimates CTDI 300air . Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI 300w , D-bar 100w and CTDI 600w , while CTDI 100w substantially underestimates CTDI 300w . D-bar 100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI 300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves

  8. Experimental study of beam hardening artifacts in photon counting breast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Lanconelli, N. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Lauria, A.; Mettivier, G. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy); Montesi, M.C. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: montesi@na.infn.it; Panetta, D. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Pani, R. [Dip. di Medicina Sperimentale, Univ. La Sapienza and INFN, Rome (Italy); Quattrocchi, M.G. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Randaccio, P. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Cagliari and INFN, Cagliari (Italy); Rosso, V. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Russo, P. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    We are implementing an X-ray breast Computed Tomography (CT) system on the gantry of a dedicated single photon emission tomography system for breast Tc-99 imaging. For the breast CT system we investigated the relevance of the beam hardening artifact. We studied the use of a single photon counting silicon pixel detector (0.3 mm thick, 256x256 pixel, 55{mu}m pitch, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 photon counting readout chip) as detector unit in our X-ray CT system. We evaluated the beam hardening 'cupping' artifact using homogeneous PMMA slabs and phantoms up to 14 cm in diameter, used as uncompressed breast tissue phantoms, imaged with a tungsten anode tube at 80 kVp with 4.2 mm Al filtration. For beam hardening evaluation we used a bimodal energy model. The CT data show a 'cupping' artifact going from 4% (4-cm thick material) to 18% (14-cm thick material). This huge artifacts is influenced by the low detection efficiency and the charge sharing effect of the silicon pixel detector.

  9. Evaluation of Root Fracture in endodontically treated Teeth using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepo, Mariana; Magrin, Gabriel; Kovalik, Ana C; Marmora, Belkiss; Silva, Milena F; Raitz, Ricardo

    2017-02-01

    Our objective was to perform an in vitro evaluation of root fracture in endodontically treated teeth using two cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) machines. The sample comprised 86 single-rooted human premolars that had been fractured by a universal testing machine. The tomographic images were acquired using an Orthopantomograph OP300 ® and an Orthophos XG 3D ® and evaluated by three examiners, by means of specific software. The teeth were classified into presence or absence of root fracture, then the root third where the fracture occurred, was determined. With regard to the detection of the fracture, the Kappa statistic was used for intra and interexaminer repro-ducibility at two distinct points in time. Chi-squared test was employed to analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the two tomographs (p beam-hardening effect, which could compromise root fracture detection.

  10. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography: case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Abella

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new method that produces three-dimensional (3D information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissue, with a lower effective radiation dose than traditional CT scans. Specific endodontic applications for CBCT are being identified as the use of this technology becomes more common. CBCT has great potential to become a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing endodontic problems, as well as for assessing root fractures, apical periodontitis, resorptions, perforations, root canal anatomy and the nature of the alveolar bone topography around teeth. This article aims to review cone beam technology and its advantages over CT scans and conventional radiography, to illustrate current and future clinical applications in endodontic practice, and to highlight areas of further research of CBCT in endodontics. Specific case examples illustrate how treatment planning has changed with the images obtained with CBCT technology compared with only periapical radiography.

  11. Cone beam computed tomography in dentistry: what dental educators and learners should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Shawn; Zhang, Wenjian; Servos, Tom; O'Neill, Paula N

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry have identified the importance of providing outcomes related to the appropriate use of this innovative technology to practitioners, educators, and investigators. To assist in determining whether and what types of evidence exist, the authors conducted PubMed, Google, and Cochrane Library searches in the spring of 2011 using the key words "cone beam computed tomography and dentistry." This search resulted in over 26,900 entries in more than 700 articles including forty-one reviews recently published in national and international journals. This article is based on existing publications and studies and will provide readers with an overview of the advantages, disadvantages, and indications/contraindications of this emerging technology as well as some thoughts on the current educational status of CBCT in U.S. dental schools. It is the responsibility of dental educators to incorporate the most updated information on this technology into their curricula in a timely manner, so that the next generation of oral health providers and educators will be competent in utilizing this technology for the best interest of patients. To do so, there is a need to conduct studies meeting methodological standards to demonstrate the diagnostic efficacy of CBCT in the dental field.

  12. Efficacy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Treating Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadooka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Michihiro; Sakata, Yoshinori; Ideguchi, Minoru; Inaba, Maki; Hadeishi, Hiromu

    2018-01-01

    Exact identification of feeding arteries, shunt points, and draining veins is essential in treating cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CS dAVF). In addition to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and 3-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA), high-resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT; especially 80-kv high-resolution cone beam computed tomography) have been performed in recent years. We evaluated the efficacy of CBCT in treating CS dAVF. Eight CS dAVFs were treated with endovascular embolization between January 2013 and December 2016. We retrospectively examined these cases regarding information from DSA, 3DRA, and CBCT with contrast medium. Although all procedures can evaluate feeding arteries, shunt points, and draining veins, CBCT can provide the best definition of feeders and their course through the bony structures and the compartment of CS. Therefore, CBCT with placed microcatheter in the CS can reveal whether the microcatheter is set at the appropriate compartment to be embolized. The efficacy of CBCT in treating dAVF is illustrating the relationships among the bony structures and feeders, compartment of CS, and the position of the microcatheter. Detailed information obtained with CBCT can lead to fewer complications and more effective treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Maxillary sinusitis as a diagnostical adverse finding of the dental cone-beam computed tomography study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreindorfer, Károly; Kiss, Ágnes; Marada, Gyula

    2017-11-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography is a frequently used diagnostical method in the head and neck region. The thickening of the maxillary sinus mucosa is often observed in these images. Determining the prevalence of teeth and roots that can be identified as cause of maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, and recording the average observed mucosa thickening on these images. The scans that give the base of the study have been performed by the Department of Dentistry of Medical University of Pécs between 2015-2016. The size of the voxels had been varied between 0.25 and 0.4 mm and the size of the image had been set up to 15×12 cm. The acquisition time had been set up to 27 seconds. 170 cases of the 260 revised records fulfilled the initial criterion conditions. The average mucosa thickness was 8.8 mm. During the present study, the upper first molars palatal and the second molars mesiobuccal roots were mainly associated with maxillary odontogenic sinusitis. Whether in the case of chronic maxillary sinusitis that is not or only temporarily responsive to conventional therapy, may it be justifiable to provide dental consultation and cone-beam computed tomography to exclude the dental origin of sinusitis. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(44): 1747-1753.

  14. A study of incisive canal using a cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To investigate the anatomical structure of the incisive canal radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. 38 persons (male 26, female 12) were chosen to take images of maxillary anterior region in dental CT mode using a cone beam computed tomography. The tube voltage were 65, 67, and 70 kVp, the tube current was 7 mA, and the exposure time was 13.3 seconds. The FH plane of each person was parallel to the floor. The images were analysed on the CRT display. The mean length of incisive canal was 15.87 mm {+-} 2.92. The mean diameter at the side of palate and nasal fossa were 3.49 mm {+-} 0.76 and 3.89 mm {+-} 1.06, respectively. In the cross-sectional shape of incisive canal, 50% were round, 34.2% were ovoid, and 15.8% were lobulated. 87% of incisive canal at the side of nasal fossa have one canal, 10.4% have two canals, and 2.6% have three canals, but these canals were merged into one canal in the middle portion of palate. The mean angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were 110.3 {+-} 6.96 and 117.45 {+-} 7.41, respectively. The angles of the long axis of incisive canal and central incisor to the FH plane were least correlated (r 0.258). This experiment suggests that a cone beam computed radiography will be helpful in surgery or implantation on the maxillary incisive area.

  15. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-07

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm(-1). For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm(-1). With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  16. Accurate technique for complete geometric calibration of cone-beam computed tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho Youngbin; Moseley, Douglas J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography systems have been developed to provide in situ imaging for the purpose of guiding radiation therapy. Clinical systems have been constructed using this approach, a clinical linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy RP) and an iso-centric C-arm. Geometric calibration involves the estimation of a set of parameters that describes the geometry of such systems, and is essential for accurate image reconstruction. We have developed a general analytic algorithm and corresponding calibration phantom for estimating these geometric parameters in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) systems. The performance of the calibration algorithm is evaluated and its application is discussed. The algorithm makes use of a calibration phantom to estimate the geometric parameters of the system. The phantom consists of 24 steel ball bearings (BBs) in a known geometry. Twelve BBs are spaced evenly at 30 deg in two plane-parallel circles separated by a given distance along the tube axis. The detector (e.g., a flat panel detector) is assumed to have no spatial distortion. The method estimates geometric parameters including the position of the x-ray source, position, and rotation of the detector, and gantry angle, and can describe complex source-detector trajectories. The accuracy and sensitivity of the calibration algorithm was analyzed. The calibration algorithm estimates geometric parameters in a high level of accuracy such that the quality of CT reconstruction is not degraded by the error of estimation. Sensitivity analysis shows uncertainty of 0.01 deg. (around beam direction) to 0.3 deg. (normal to the beam direction) in rotation, and 0.2 mm (orthogonal to the beam direction) to 4.9 mm (beam direction) in position for the medical linear accelerator geometry. Experimental measurements using a laboratory bench Cone-beam CT system of known geometry demonstrate the sensitivity of the method in detecting small changes in the imaging geometry with an uncertainty of 0.1 mm in

  17. X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Wang Jue; Chen Weimin

    2009-01-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials. (authors)

  18. Use of cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: current concepts, indications and limitations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Michael M; Horner, Keith; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential component of treatment planning in the field of implant dentistry. This narrative review will present current concepts for the use of cone beam computed tomography imaging, before and after implant placement, in daily clinical practice and research. Guidelines for the selection of three-dimensional imaging will be discussed, and limitations will be highlighted. Current concepts of radiation dose optimization, including novel imaging modalities using low-dose protocols, will be presented. For preoperative cross-sectional imaging, data are still not available which demonstrate that cone beam computed tomography results in fewer intraoperative complications such as nerve damage or bleeding incidents, or that implants inserted using preoperative cone beam computed tomography data sets for planning purposes will exhibit higher survival or success rates. The use of cone beam computed tomography following the insertion of dental implants should be restricted to specific postoperative complications, such as damage of neurovascular structures or postoperative infections in relation to the maxillary sinus. Regarding peri-implantitis, the diagnosis and severity of the disease should be evaluated primarily based on clinical parameters and on radiological findings based on periapical radiographs (two dimensional). The use of cone beam computed tomography scans in clinical research might not yield any evident beneficial effect for the patient included. As many of the cone beam computed tomography scans performed for research have no direct therapeutic consequence, dose optimization measures should be implemented by using appropriate exposure parameters and by reducing the field of view to the actual region of interest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Characteristics of x-ray beams in two commercial multidetector computed tomography simulators: Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Song, Haijun; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2012-01-01

    As multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning is routinely performed for treatment planning in radiation oncology, understanding the characteristics of the MDCT x-ray beam is essential to accurately estimate patient dose. The purpose of this study is to characterize the x-ray beams of two commercial MDCT simulators widely used in radiation oncology by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. X-ray tube systems of two wide bore MDCT scanners (GE LightSpeed RT 4 and Philips Brilliance Big Bore) were modeled in the BEAMNRC/EGSNRC MC system. All the tube components were modeled from targets to bowtie filters. To validate our MC models, the authors measured half-value layers (HVL) using aluminum sheets and multifunctional radiation detectors and compared them to those obtained from MC simulations for 120 kVp beams. The authors also compared x-ray spectra obtained from MC simulation to the data provided by manufacturers. Additionally, lateral/axial beam profiles were measured in-air using radiochromic films and compared to the MC results. To understand the scatter effect, the authors also derived the scatter-to-primary energy fluence ratio (SPR) profiles and calculated the total SPR for each CT system with the CT dose index (CTDI) head and body phantoms using the BEAMNRC system. The authors found that the HVL, x-ray spectrum and beam profiles of the MC simulations agreed well with the manufacturer-specified data within 1%-10% on average for both scanners. The total SPR were ranged from 7.8 to 13.7% for the head phantom and from 10.7 to 18.9% for the body phantom. The authors demonstrate the full MC simulations of two commercial MDCT simulators to characterize their x-ray beams. This study may be useful to establish a patient-specific dosimetry for the MDCT systems.

  20. The use of cone beam computed tomography in the conservative management of dens invaginatus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S

    2010-08-01

    To report the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the assessment of dens invaginatus. Chronic periradicular periodontitis associated with an infected invagination was diagnosed in an immature mandibular lateral incisor tooth. A CBCT scan revealed essential information for the management of the tooth. There was no communication between the invagination and the main root canal. Endodontic treatment was carried out on the invagination. The root canal with a vital pulp was left untreated, thus allowing the tooth to mature and continue to develop. * The true nature of dens invaginatus cannot always be estimated from conventional radiographs. * Cone beam computed tomography is a useful diagnostic tool in the management of dens invaginatus.

  1. Diagnosis and conservative treatment of dens invaginatus type III using cone beam computed tomography: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohenca, Nestor; Berg, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a dental anomaly that may give rise to many complex anatomical forms. The complexity of the internal anatomy creates clinical challenges directly related to debridement, disinfection, and the subsequent sealing of the canal system. Additionally, conventional periapical radiographs provide limited information regarding the anatomical configuration. The use of cone beam computed tomography allows for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning, with the subsequent development of conservative approaches with predictable outcomes. The purpose of this paper was to present 2 cases of dens invaginatus type III, both diagnosed and treatment planned using cone beam computed tomography technology and approached conservatively to treat the necrotic spaces while maintaining the pulp's vitality.

  2. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of Incidental Maxillary Sinus Pathologies in North Indian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta S Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maxillary sinus can be visualized in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. Computed tomography (CT is considered the gold standard method for the examination of maxillary sinus. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT addresses the limitation of CT and provides many dental advantages. It can provide valuable knowledge about the pathology with limited exposure and low cost compared with other imaging used for diagnostic purposes. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study is to analyze the prevalence of pathological changes in maxillary sinus of asymptomatic cases using CBCT for diagnostic purposes. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 231 patients for incidental maxillary sinus pathologies. Pathological findings were categorized as mucosal thickening, polypoid mucosal thickening, radiopacification, and no pathological findings. Evaluation of pathological findings was done using factors of age and gender. Results: The present study showed 86 cases with maxillary sinus pathology and 145 cases with no pathological findings. Patients with maxillary sinus pathology were mostly diagnosed with mucosal thickening on both sides. In right maxillary sinus, 45 cases (52.3% showed mucosal thickening, and on the left side 36 cases (41.9% were diagnosed with mucosal thickening. Among 86 cases reported, 20 right maxillary sinus (23.3% and 25 left maxillary sinus (29.1% showed no signs of pathology. Conclusion: The incidental maxillary sinus pathologies are highly prevalent in asymptomatic patients. Therefore, oral radiologists should be aware of these incidental findings which will help in early diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  4. High temporal resolution and streak-free four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Shuai; Tang Jie; Zambelli, Joseph; Nett, Brian; Chen Guanghong; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini

    2008-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been clinically used to verify patient position and to localize the target of treatment in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, when the chest and the upper abdomen are scanned, respiratory-induced motion blurring limits the utility of CBCT. In order to mitigate this blurring, respiratory-gated CBCT, i.e. 4D CBCT, was introduced. In 4D CBCT, the cone-beam projection data sets acquired during a gantry rotation are sorted into several respiratory phases. In these gated reconstructions, the number of projections for each respiratory phase is significantly reduced. Consequently, undersampling streaking artifacts are present in the reconstructed images, and the image contrast resolution is also significantly compromised. In this paper, we present a new method to simultaneously achieve both high temporal resolution (∼100 ms) and streaking artifact-free image volumes in 4D CBCT. The enabling technique is a newly proposed image reconstruction method, i.e. prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS), which enables accurate image reconstruction using vastly undersampled cone-beam projections and a fully sampled prior image. Using PICCS, a streak-free image can be reconstructed from 10-20 cone-beam projections while the signal-to-noise ratio is determined by a denoising feature of the selected objective function and by the prior image, which is reconstructed using all of the acquired cone-beam projections. This feature of PICCS breaks the connection between the temporal resolution and streaking artifacts' level in 4D CBCT. Numerical simulations and experimental phantom studies have been conducted to validate the method.

  5. Multi-mounted X-ray cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Wang, Jingzheng; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng

    2018-04-01

    As a powerful nondestructive inspection technique, X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) has been widely applied to clinical diagnosis, industrial production and cutting-edge research. Imaging efficiency is currently one of the major obstacles for the applications of X-CT. In this paper, a multi-mounted three dimensional cone-beam X-CT (MM-CBCT) method is reported. It consists of a novel multi-mounted cone-beam scanning geometry and the corresponding three dimensional statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The scanning geometry is the most iconic design and significantly different from the current CBCT systems. Permitting the cone-beam scanning of multiple objects simultaneously, the proposed approach has the potential to achieve an imaging efficiency orders of magnitude greater than the conventional methods. Although multiple objects can be also bundled together and scanned simultaneously by the conventional CBCT methods, it will lead to the increased penetration thickness and signal crosstalk. In contrast, MM-CBCT avoids substantially these problems. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed MM-CBCT prototype system. This technique will provide a possible solution for the CT inspection in a large scale.

  6. An electron beam linear scanning mode for industrial limited-angle nano-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxiang; Zeng, Li; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Lingli; Guo, Yumeng; Gong, Changcheng

    2018-01-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT), which utilizes X-rays to research the inner structure of some small objects and has been widely utilized in biomedical research, electronic technology, geology, material sciences, etc., is a high spatial resolution and non-destructive research technique. A traditional nano-CT scanning model with a very high mechanical precision and stability of object manipulator, which is difficult to reach when the scanned object is continuously rotated, is required for high resolution imaging. To reduce the scanning time and attain a stable and high resolution imaging in industrial non-destructive testing, we study an electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system that can avoid mechanical vibration and object movement caused by the continuously rotated object. Furthermore, to further save the scanning time and study how small the scanning range could be considered with acceptable spatial resolution, an alternating iterative algorithm based on ℓ0 minimization is utilized to limited-angle nano-CT reconstruction problem with the electron beam linear scanning mode. The experimental results confirm the feasibility of the electron beam linear scanning mode of nano-CT system.

  7. Accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic and periapical radiography for detection of apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Bueno, Mike Reis; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Azevedo, Bruno; Azevedo, José Ribamar

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of imaging methods for detection of apical periodontitis (AP). Imaging records from a consecutive sample of 888 imaging exams of patients with endodontic infection (1508 teeth), including cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic and periapical radiographs, were selected. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of periapical and panoramic radiographs were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the panoramic and periapical images. Prevalence of AP was significantly higher with CBCT. Overall sensitivity was 0.55 and 0.28 for periapical and panoramic radiographs, respectively. ROC curves and area under curve (AUC) with periapical radiography showed a high accuracy for the cutoff value of 5 for both periapical (AUC, 0.90) and panoramic (AUC, 0.84) radiographs. AP was correctly identified with conventional methods when showed advanced status. CBCT was proved to be accurate to identify AP.

  8. Navigated implantation after microsurgical bone transfer using intraoperatively acquired cone-beam computed tomography data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, M; Pohlenz, P; Blessmann, M; Werle, H; Fraederich, M; Schmelzle, R; Blake, F A S

    2008-01-01

    The use of a combination of intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and a navigation system via a spinal software platform for the navigated implantation of oral implants after microsurgical bone transfer is described. Intraoperative data sets were generated using Arcadis Orbic 3D (Siemens, Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and immediately transferred to the VectorVision(2) navigation system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) via the NaviLink interface. In two patients who underwent microsurgical bone transfer for midfacial reconstruction, implants were placed using intraoperatively acquired CBCT data sets for planning and navigated insertion. In both cases, successful realization of the planned implant sites was achieved by the guidance of the drill, leading to rehabilitation of both patients. CBCT data generated by mobile systems are sufficient for the planning of implant position, and can be used for navigated insertion using tools originally developed for spinal surgery.

  9. Bilateral bifid mandibular canal: a case report using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Ramón; Farfán, Constanza; Astete, Nicolás; Garay, Ivonne; Dias, Fernando; Arias, Alain

    2018-03-23

    The mandibular canal (MC) originates in the mandibular foramen and runs bilaterally through the mandibular ramus and body, ending in the mental foramen. One of the most common anatomical variations is bifid MC, the configurations of which have been classified into four categories and sub-categories. The prevalence of these variations depends on the imaging method used. Studies carried out in panoramic X-rays and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) show prevalences varying between 1% and 20%. In this case report we present the finding of a bilateral bifid MC by CBCT examination; we describe its location and morphological characteristics. The variation found was a Type 1 bilateral bifid MC, which consists in an accessory canal originating from a single mandibular foramen and extending to the third molar or its immediate surroundings. In this report we discuss the importance of detecting these anatomical variations, as well as their implications in clinical practice.

  10. Evaluation of canalis basilaris medianus using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z.; Zahedpasha, Samir [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, CWRU School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland (United States); Rathore, Sonali A. [Dept. of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, VCU School of Dentistry, Richmond (United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Dept. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this report is to present two cases of canalis basilaris medianus as identified on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the base of the skull. The CBCT data sets were sent for radiographic consultation. In both cases, multi-planar views revealed an osseous defect in the base of the skull in the clivus region, the sagittal view showed a unilateral, well-defined, non-corticated, track-like low-attenuation osseous defect in the clivus. The appearance of the defect was highly reminiscent of a fracture of the clivus. The borders of osseous defect were smooth, and no other radiographic signs suggestive of osteolytic destructive processes were noted. Based on the overall radiographic examination, a radiographic impression of canalis basilaris medianus was made. Canalis basilaris medianus is a rare anatomical variant and is generally observed on the clivus. Due to its potential association with meningitis, it should be recognized and reported to avoid potential complications.

  11. Cone-beam computed tomography exploration and surgical management of palatal, inverted, and impacted mesiodens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Omami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are extra teeth or toothlike structures which may have either erupted or unerupted in addition to the 20 deciduous teeth and the 32 permanent teeth. Mesiodens is one of these located in the midline between the two central incisors. Their presence may give rise to a variety of clinical problems. This paper describes a rare case of palatal placed, inverted and impacted mesiodens associated to two supernumerary teeth which were detected during a radiographic examination for delayed eruption of permanent central incisors in the case of a healthy 8-year-old girl monitored at the oral surgery service while discussing the usefulness of cone beam computed tomography for accurate diagnosis and management.

  12. Quantitative assessment of cervical vertebral maturation using cone beam computed tomography in Korean girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6-18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  13. Cone-beam computed tomography exploration and surgical management of palatal, inverted, and impacted mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omami, Mounir; Chokri, Abdellatif; Hentati, Hajer; Selmi, Jamil

    2015-09-01

    Supernumerary teeth are extra teeth or toothlike structures which may have either erupted or unerupted in addition to the 20 deciduous teeth and the 32 permanent teeth. Mesiodens is one of these located in the midline between the two central incisors. Their presence may give rise to a variety of clinical problems. This paper describes a rare case of palatal placed, inverted and impacted mesiodens associated to two supernumerary teeth which were detected during a radiographic examination for delayed eruption of permanent central incisors in the case of a healthy 8-year-old girl monitored at the oral surgery service while discussing the usefulness of cone beam computed tomography for accurate diagnosis and management.

  14. EFFECTIVE DOSE MEASUREMENT FOR CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY USING GLASS DOSIMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNG MIN MOON

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During image-guided radiation therapy, the patient is exposed to unwanted radiation from imaging devices built into the medical LINAC. In the present study, the effective dose delivered to a patient from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT machine was measured. Absorbed doses in specific organs listed in ICRP Publication 103 were measured with glass dosimeters calibrated with kilovolt (kV X-rays using a whole body physical phantom for typical radiotherapy sites, including the head and neck, chest, and pelvis. The effective dose per scan for the head and neck, chest, and pelvis were 3.37±0.29, 7.36±0.33, and 4.09±0.29 mSv, respectively. The results highlight the importance of the compensation of treatment dose by managing imaging dose.

  15. Effective dose measurement for cone beam computed tomography using glass dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Young Min; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kang, Yeong Rok; Lee, Man Woo; Kim, Jeong Kee; Jeong, Dong Hyeok [Research Center, Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Dong Won; Ro, Tae Ik [Dept. of physics, DongA University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    During image-guided radiation therapy, the patient is exposed to unwanted radiation from imaging devices built into the medical LINAC. In the present study, the effective dose delivered to a patient from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) machine was measured. Absorbed doses in specific organs listed in ICRP Publication 103 were measured with glass dosimeters calibrated with kilovolt (kV) X-rays using a whole body physical phantom for typical radiotherapy sites, including the head and neck, chest, and pelvis. The effective dose per scan for the head and neck, chest, and pelvis were 3.37±0.29, 7.36±0.33 and 4.09±0.29 mSv, respectively. The results highlight the importance of the compensation of treatment dose by managing imaging dose.

  16. Evaluation of canalis basilaris medianus using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, Ali Z.; Zahedpasha, Samir; Rathore, Sonali A.; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present two cases of canalis basilaris medianus as identified on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the base of the skull. The CBCT data sets were sent for radiographic consultation. In both cases, multi-planar views revealed an osseous defect in the base of the skull in the clivus region, the sagittal view showed a unilateral, well-defined, non-corticated, track-like low-attenuation osseous defect in the clivus. The appearance of the defect was highly reminiscent of a fracture of the clivus. The borders of osseous defect were smooth, and no other radiographic signs suggestive of osteolytic destructive processes were noted. Based on the overall radiographic examination, a radiographic impression of canalis basilaris medianus was made. Canalis basilaris medianus is a rare anatomical variant and is generally observed on the clivus. Due to its potential association with meningitis, it should be recognized and reported to avoid potential complications

  17. Multiple idiopathic external and internal resorption: Case report with cone-beam computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikten, Berkan; Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Kurt, Hakan [Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-12-15

    Root resorption is loss of dental hard tissue as a result of clastic activities. The dental hard tissue of permanent teeth does not normally undergo resorption, except in cases of inflammation or trauma. However, there are rare cases of tooth resorption of an unknown cause, known as 'idiopathic root resorption.' This report would discuss a rare case of multiple idiopathic resorption in the permanent maxillary and mandibular teeth of an otherwise healthy 36-year-old male patient. In addition to a clinical examination, the patient was imaged using conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The examinations revealed multiple external and internal resorption of the teeth in all four quadrants of the jaws with an unknown cause. Multiple root resorption is a rare clinical phenomenon that should be examined using different radiographic modalities. Cross-sectional CBCT is useful in the diagnosis and examination of such lesions.

  18. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT Features of a Rare Fibro-Osseous Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography is a useful technique for imaging the craniofacial lesions. It produces more realistic images that facilitate interpretation. Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF is a rare and benign fibro-osseous neoplasm that arises within the craniofacial bones, especially in the maxilla. Mandibular lesions can be seen in 10% of the cases.In both jaws, it has a predilection for the premolar and molar regions (it is mostly seen in premolar and molar regions. Radiographically, it can be present as a radiolucent, mixed or radiopaque lesion. Radiodensity varies from purely radiolucent masses to mixed densities with prominent radiopacity as the lesion matures.This case report highlights a JOF with large foci of odontome-like radiopacities in a 6-year-old boy's mandibular anterior region. The location of the lesion in the anterior mandible and comparatively rapid formation of large odontome-like radiopaque foci at this early agehas made it a rare entity.

  19. Multiple idiopathic external and internal resorption: Case report with cone-beam computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celikten, Berkan; Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Kurt, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Root resorption is loss of dental hard tissue as a result of clastic activities. The dental hard tissue of permanent teeth does not normally undergo resorption, except in cases of inflammation or trauma. However, there are rare cases of tooth resorption of an unknown cause, known as 'idiopathic root resorption.' This report would discuss a rare case of multiple idiopathic resorption in the permanent maxillary and mandibular teeth of an otherwise healthy 36-year-old male patient. In addition to a clinical examination, the patient was imaged using conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The examinations revealed multiple external and internal resorption of the teeth in all four quadrants of the jaws with an unknown cause. Multiple root resorption is a rare clinical phenomenon that should be examined using different radiographic modalities. Cross-sectional CBCT is useful in the diagnosis and examination of such lesions.

  20. Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of maxilla with its analysis on cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan R Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO is a rare mixed odontogenic tumor which shows properties of both ameloblastic fibroma and odontoma. It commonly affects children and young adults. In most cases, it is asymptomatic but may cause painless, slow growing swelling and discomfort. Radiologically, it is a well-circumscribed, mixed radiopaque and radiolucent entity consisting of radiolucency within which radiopaque foci of various sizes and shapes are seen. Histological examination shows both hard and soft tissue. The treatment of AFO usually conservative due to their benign biological behavior and consists of enucleation or surgical curettage. The purpose of this article is to present a case of an AFO in the posterior maxilla, along with discussion on clinical, radiological (including cone beam computed tomography scan, histological findings, and treatment of this tumor.

  1. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  2. Indications for cone beam computed tomography in children and young patients in a Turkish subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşman, Özlem; Yılmaz, Hasan Hüseyin; Aktan, Ali Murat; Yilmaz, Büşra

    2017-05-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is widely used in children; however, it remains controversial because of the health effects of radiation. This retrospective study investigated the indications for CBCT and dentomaxillofacial pathologies in paediatric patients. CBCT images of 329 paediatric patients (i.e., aged anomalies (38.5%), followed by the localisation of impacted teeth (33.1%). There was no relationship between sex and indications. There were significant associations between age groups and malocclusion and dentomaxillofacial anomalies, localisation of impacted teeth, and trauma. The face was the most frequently imaged region, followed by the jaws (maxilla and mandible). The most common indication for CBCT was malocclusion and dentomaxillofacial anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition age groups, whereas the localisation of impacted teeth was the most common indication in the mixed dentition age group. Generally, CBCT was indicated in orthodontics and surgery. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  4. Observation of buccal foramen in mandibular body using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Munetaka; Nakahara, Kino; Hiraiwa, Yuichiro; Aimiya, Hidetoshi; Ariji, Eiichiro; Gotoh, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    The location and course of the mandibular canal and multiple mental foramina are important in dental implant insertion and any surgical procedures involving the mandible. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess buccal foramen presence in the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. A total of 84 patients were enrolled in this investigation. Buccal foramen presence in the mandibular body, which was defined as a buccal bone defect of the bony canal penetrating through the buccal cortical bone, was assessed using two- and three-dimensional CBCT images. Buccal foramen presence, located from the median to molar regions, was observed in 44% of patients. There was no significant difference among gender and age. Also, a buccal foramen showing continuity with the mandibular canal was observed in 7.1% of patients. Buccal foramen presence in the mandibular body could be assessed in detail using CBCT images. (author)

  5. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; Valverde, Ludmila de Faro; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoé-Rebello, Iêda Margarida

    2015-03-01

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  6. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  7. Classification and volumetric analysis of temporal bone pneumatization using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Aniket B; Fellows, Douglas; Hand, Arthur R; Tadinada, Aditya; Lurie, Alan G

    2014-03-01

    This study performed volumetric analysis and classified different repeated patterns of temporal bone pneumatization in adults using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. A total of 155 temporal bones were retrospectively evaluated from 78 patients with no radiographic evidence of pathology. Two reference structures were used to classify temporal bone pneumatization into 3 groups. Volumetric analysis of the pneumatization was performed using a window thresholding procedure on multiplanar CBCT images. Correlation between direct communication of peritubal cells with the eustachian tube and the degree of pneumatization was also assessed. Using 2 reference structures, pneumatization pattern in the temporal bone can be classified into 3 groups. Statistically significant differences were present in their mean volumes between 3 groups. Statistically significant correlation was found between degree of pneumatization and presence of peritubal cells associated with ET. This study showed that CBCT can be effectively used for imaging temporal bone air cavities and for volumetric assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental salivary gland depression in the ascending mandibular ramous: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Christine A.; Ahn, Yoon Hee; Odell, Scott; Mupparapu, Mel; Graham, David Mattew [University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A static, unilateral, and focal bone depression located lingually within the ascending ramous, identical to the Stafne's bone cavity of the angle of the mandible, is being reported. During development of the mandible, submandibular gland inclusion may lead to the formation of a lingual concavity, which could contain fatty tissue, blood vessels, or soft tissue. However, similar occurrences in the ascending ramous at the level of the parotid gland are extremely rare. Similar cases were previously reported in dry, excavated mandibles, and 3 cases were reported in living patients. A 52-year-old African American male patient was seen for pain in the mandibular teeth. Panoramic radiography showed an unusual concavity within the left ascending ramous. Cone-beam computed tomography confirmed this incidental finding. The patient was cleared for the extraction of non-restorable teeth and scheduled for annual follow-up.

  9. [Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and periapical radiography in the diagnosis of periapical disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Gao; Jing, Shen

    2015-04-01

    With the development of medical radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in stomatology because of its numerous advantages, such as adequate spatial resolution, low radiation, undistorted three- dimensional tissue information, and good applicability for hard tissue imaging. Traditional periapical radiography is based on two-dimensional image which displays the three-dimensional object and its surrounding structures. Periapical radiography can only show the overlapping mesio-distally direction bone destruction, can't show buccolingual direction bone destruction. As a kind of three-dimensional imaging technology, CBCT can show three-dimensional structure of the organization from sagittal, coronal and axial direction, to overcome the defect of two-dimensional image such as overlap and deformation. CBCT has a unique advantage than periapical radiography in the diagnosis and treatment for periapical disease. This review will summarize the difference between CBCT and periapical radiography in the periapical disease.

  10. Root canal treatment of three-rooted mandibular second premolar using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ahmad Alenezi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A careful knowledge of root canals anatomy of different teeth is a corner stone for a successful outcome of root canal therapy. This reported case illustrates root canal therapy of a mandibular second premolar with three separated roots and root canals. An 18-year-old Saudi male presented for non-surgical endodontic treatment of mandibular right second premolar. Radiographic and clinical examinations revealed the presence of three roots and three root canals. The case was successfully managed with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. In conclusion, the clinicians should always suspect the event of anatomical varieties and use all the available tools to diagnose and manage their cases.

  11. Vertical measurements for planning palatal mini-implants in lateral radiography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes; Ramírez-Sotelo, Laura Ricardina; Távora, Débora de Melo; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2014-10-01

    To compare palatal bone height measurements in the region of first premolars for planning palatal mini-implant insertion on conventional lateral radiography (CLR), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and reformatted virtual lateral radiography (VLR). One hundred ten images of CLR, VLR, and CBCT from the same patient were used. Linear measurements corresponding to the relevant dimension of available bone on upper first premolar site were performed between the hard palate floor and the nasal floor. The Friedman test compared the measurements of all imaging modalities. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC values showed excellent intraobserver and interobserver agreement. VLR examination resulted in measurements statistically different from both CBCT and CLR images (P 0.05). The measurements for planning palatal mini-implants at the level of first premolars are comparable on CLR and multiplanar reconstructions of CBCT, whereas underestimated in reformatted examinations (VLR).

  12. [Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in endodontics: rational case selection criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2016-01-01

    To present rational case selection criteria for the use of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) in endodontics. This article reviews the literature concerning the benefits of CBCT in endodontics, alongside its radiation risks, and present case selection criteria for referral of endodontic patients to CBCT. Up to date, the expected ultimate benefit of CBCT to the endodontic patient is yet uncertain, and the current literature is mainly restricted to its technical efficacy. In addition, the potential radiation risks of CBCT scan are stochastic in nature and uncertain, and are worrying especially in pediatric patients. Both the efficacy of CBCT in supporting the endodontic practitioner decision making and in affecting treatment outcomes, and its long term potential radiation risks are yet uncertain. Therefore, a cautious rational decision making is essential when a CBCT scan is considered in endodontics. Risk-benefit considerations are presented.

  13. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  14. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  15. Slice image pretreatment for cone-beam computed tomography based on adaptive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kuidong; Zhang Dinghua; Jin Yanfang

    2009-01-01

    According to the noise properties and the serial slice image characteristics in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system, a slice image pretreatment for CBCT based on adaptive filter was proposed. The judging criterion for the noise is established firstly. All pixels are classified into two classes: adaptive center weighted modified trimmed mean (ACWMTM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by Gauss noise and adaptive median (AM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by impulse noise. In ACWMTM filtering algorithm, the estimated Gauss noise standard deviation in the current slice image with offset window is replaced by the estimated standard deviation in the adjacent slice image to the current with the corresponding window, so the filtering accuracy of the serial images is improved. The pretreatment experiment on CBCT slice images of wax model of hollow turbine blade shows that the method makes a good performance both on eliminating noises and on protecting details. (authors)

  16. Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, J.T.; Berndt, D.C.; Zehnder, M.; Schumacher, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate three-dimensional models based on digital volumetric data that can be used in basic and advanced education. Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan). Datasets were exported as Dicom formats and imported into Mimics and Magic software programs to separate the different tissues such as nerve, tooth and bone. These data were transferred to a Polyjet 3D Printing machine (Eden 330, Object, Israel) to generate the models. Three-dimensional prototype models of certain limited anatomical structures as acquired volumetrically were fabricated. Generating three-dimensional models based on CBCT datasets is possible. Automated routine fabrication of these models, with the given infrastructure, is too time-consuming and therefore too expensive. (orig.)

  17. Generation of three-dimensional prototype models based on cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, J.T.; Berndt, D.C.; Zehnder, M. [University of Basel, Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital for Oral Surgery, Oral Radiology and Oral Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Schumacher, R. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Institute for Medical and Analytical Technologies, Muttenz (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to generate three-dimensional models based on digital volumetric data that can be used in basic and advanced education. Four sets of digital volumetric data were established by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) (Accuitomo, J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan). Datasets were exported as Dicom formats and imported into Mimics and Magic software programs to separate the different tissues such as nerve, tooth and bone. These data were transferred to a Polyjet 3D Printing machine (Eden 330, Object, Israel) to generate the models. Three-dimensional prototype models of certain limited anatomical structures as acquired volumetrically were fabricated. Generating three-dimensional models based on CBCT datasets is possible. Automated routine fabrication of these models, with the given infrastructure, is too time-consuming and therefore too expensive. (orig.)

  18. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  19. Anatomical Variation of the Maxillary Sinus in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lupion Poleti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this paper is to report a case in which the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was important for the confirmation of the presence of maxillary sinus septum and, therefore, the absence of a suspected pathologic process. Case Description. A 27-year-old male patient was referred for the assessment of a panoramic radiograph displaying a radiolucent area with radiopaque border located in the apical region of the left upper premolars. The provisional diagnosis was either anatomical variation of the maxillary sinuses or a bony lesion. Conclusion. The CBCT was important for an accurate assessment and further confirmation of the presence of maxillary septum, avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations.

  20. Cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Yi, Huangjian; Zhang, Xianghan; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-03-01

    The appearance of x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging by x ray. In the previous XLCT system, the sample was irradiated by a sequence of narrow x-ray beams and the x-ray luminescence was measured by a highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera. This resulted in a relatively long sampling time and relatively low utilization of the x-ray beam. In this paper, a novel cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography strategy is proposed, which can fully utilize the x-ray dose and shorten the scanning time. The imaging model and reconstruction method are described. The validity of the imaging strategy has been studied in this paper. In the cone beam XLCT system, the cone beam x ray was adopted to illuminate the sample and a highly sensitive CCD camera was utilized to acquire luminescent photons emitted from the sample. Photons scattering in biological tissues makes it an ill-posed problem to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the x-ray luminescent sample in the cone beam XLCT. In order to overcome this issue, the authors used the diffusion approximation model to describe the photon propagation in tissues, and employed the sparse regularization method for reconstruction. An incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method and permissible region strategy were used for reconstruction. Meanwhile, traditional x-ray CT imaging could also be performed in this system. The x-ray attenuation effect has been considered in their imaging model, which is helpful in improving the reconstruction accuracy. First, simulation experiments with cylinder phantoms were carried out to illustrate the validity of the proposed compensated method. The experimental results showed that the location error of the compensated algorithm was smaller than that of the uncompensated method. The permissible region strategy was applied and reduced the reconstruction error to less than 2 mm. The robustness and stability were then

  1. Relationship of the Gonial Angle and Inferior Alveolar Canal Course Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Anbiaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Accurate localization of the inferior alveolar canal (IAC is extremely important in some dental treatments. Anatomical variation of the canal means that it can be difficult to locate. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of the gonial angle (GA size and IAC position using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 61 dry adult human hemi-mandibles were used. The CBCT scans were taken of all samples and GA was measured on all CBCT scans. The samples were divided into two groups of low angle (≤125° and high angle (>125°. The canal dimensions, length and course were evaluated. On the sagittal view, the IAC path was classified as type A, B or C. On the axial view, canal course was defined as A1 or A2 according to the mental foramen angle.Results: The average GA size was 121.8±7.05° at the right side and 123.8±6.32° at the left side. On the sagittal view, there was a significant correlation between the GA size and the canal course (P=0.04. In the high-angle group, type A was dominant; whereas in the low-angle group, type B was more common. On the axial view of IAC course, type A1 was more common (73.43%.Conclusion: The results showed that GA size was associated with IAC course. In cases with a larger GA, the canal runs in a more straightforward path, and at the same level as the mental foramen.Keywords: Cone Beam Computed Tomography; Mandibular Nerve; Mandible

  2. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for calculating effective dose in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes B, W. O.

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a geometry of irradiation applicable to the software PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of the Computed Tomography Cone Beam (CBCT). We evaluated two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications: Care stream Cs 9000 3-dimensional tomograph; i-CAT and GENDEX GXCB-500. Initially characterize each protocol measuring the surface kerma input and the product kerma air-area, P KA , with solid state detectors RADCAL and PTW transmission chamber. Then we introduce the technical parameters of each preset protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for 3-dimensional computer 9000 Cs; within the range 44.5 to 89 μSv for GXCB-500 equipment and in the range of 62-111 μSv for equipment Classical i-CAT. These values were compared with results obtained dosimetry using TLD implanted in anthropomorphic phantom and are considered consistent. Os effective dose results are very sensitive to the geometry of radiation (beam position in mathematical phantom). This factor translates to a factor of fragility software usage. But it is very useful to get quick answers to regarding process optimization tool conclusions protocols. We conclude that use software PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation is useful assessment protocols for CBCT tests in dental applications. (Author)

  3. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for calculating effective dose in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes B, W. O., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho 40301-015, Salvador de Bahia (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to develop a geometry of irradiation applicable to the software PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of the Computed Tomography Cone Beam (CBCT). We evaluated two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications: Care stream Cs 9000 3-dimensional tomograph; i-CAT and GENDEX GXCB-500. Initially characterize each protocol measuring the surface kerma input and the product kerma air-area, P{sub KA}, with solid state detectors RADCAL and PTW transmission chamber. Then we introduce the technical parameters of each preset protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for 3-dimensional computer 9000 Cs; within the range 44.5 to 89 μSv for GXCB-500 equipment and in the range of 62-111 μSv for equipment Classical i-CAT. These values were compared with results obtained dosimetry using TLD implanted in anthropomorphic phantom and are considered consistent. Os effective dose results are very sensitive to the geometry of radiation (beam position in mathematical phantom). This factor translates to a factor of fragility software usage. But it is very useful to get quick answers to regarding process optimization tool conclusions protocols. We conclude that use software PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation is useful assessment protocols for CBCT tests in dental applications. (Author)

  4. Peri-implant assessment via cone beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography: an ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau Silveira-Neto

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This research evaluated detail registration in peri-implant bone using two different cone beam computer tomography systems and a digital periapical radiograph. METHODS: Three different image acquisition protocols were established for each cone beam computer tomography apparatus, and three clinical situations were simulated in an ex vivo fresh pig mandible: buccal bone defect, peri-implant bone defect, and bone contact. Data were subjected to two analyses: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analyses involved a comparison of real specimen measures using a digital caliper in three regions of the preserved buccal bone – A, B and E (control group – to cone beam computer tomography images obtained with different protocols (kp1, kp2, kp3, ip1, ip2, and ip3. In the qualitative analyses, the ability to register peri-implant details via tomography and digital periapical radiography was verified, as indicated by twelve evaluators. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The quantitative assessment showed means statistically equal to those of the control group under the following conditions: buccal bone defect B and E with kp1 and ip1, peri-implant bone defect E with kp2 and kp3, and bone contact A with kp1, kp2, kp3, and ip2. Qualitatively, only bone contacts were significantly different among the assessments, and the p3 results differed from the p1 and p2 results. The other results were statistically equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: The registration of peri-implant details was influenced by the image acquisition protocol, although metal artifacts were produced in all situations. The evaluators preferred the Kodak 9000 3D cone beam computer tomography in most cases. The evaluators identified buccal bone defects better with cone beam computer tomography and identified peri-implant bone defects better with digital periapical radiography.

  5. Peri-implant assessment via cone beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Neto, Nicolau; Flores, Mateus Ericson; De Carli, João Paulo; Costa, Max Dória; Matos, Felipe de Souza; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Linden, Maria Salete Sandini

    2017-11-01

    This research evaluated detail registration in peri-implant bone using two different cone beam computer tomography systems and a digital periapical radiograph. Three different image acquisition protocols were established for each cone beam computer tomography apparatus, and three clinical situations were simulated in an ex vivo fresh pig mandible: buccal bone defect, peri-implant bone defect, and bone contact. Data were subjected to two analyses: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analyses involved a comparison of real specimen measures using a digital caliper in three regions of the preserved buccal bone - A, B and E (control group) - to cone beam computer tomography images obtained with different protocols (kp1, kp2, kp3, ip1, ip2, and ip3). In the qualitative analyses, the ability to register peri-implant details via tomography and digital periapical radiography was verified, as indicated by twelve evaluators. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The quantitative assessment showed means statistically equal to those of the control group under the following conditions: buccal bone defect B and E with kp1 and ip1, peri-implant bone defect E with kp2 and kp3, and bone contact A with kp1, kp2, kp3, and ip2. Qualitatively, only bone contacts were significantly different among the assessments, and the p3 results differed from the p1 and p2 results. The other results were statistically equivalent. The registration of peri-implant details was influenced by the image acquisition protocol, although metal artifacts were produced in all situations. The evaluators preferred the Kodak 9000 3D cone beam computer tomography in most cases. The evaluators identified buccal bone defects better with cone beam computer tomography and identified peri-implant bone defects better with digital periapical radiography.

  6. Accuracy and reliability of a novel method for fusion of digital dental casts and cone beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Breuning, K.H.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental

  7. Accuracy of linear measurements from cone-beam computed tomography-derived surface models of different voxel sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damstra, Janalt; Fourie, Zacharias; Huddleston Slater, James J R; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to determine the linear accuracy of 3-dimensional surface models derived from a commercially available cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dental imaging system and volumetric rendering software and to investigate the influence of voxel resolution on the

  8. Impacted maxillary canines and root resorptions of neighbouring teeth: a radiographic analysis using cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, C.S.; Bornstein, M.M.; Mock, L.; Heuberger, B.M.; Dietrich, T.; Katsaros, C.

    2013-01-01

    The study analyses the location of impacted maxillary canines and factors influencing root resorptions of adjacent teeth using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the interrater reliability between observers of two different dental specialties for radiographic parameters will be

  9. The Use of Laser Guidance Reduces Fluoroscopy Time for C-Arm Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, M.W.; Strijen, M.J. van; Braak, S.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Lange, F. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: When using laser guidance for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided needle interventions, planned needle paths are visualized to the operator without the need to switch between entry- and progress-view during needle placement. The current study assesses the effect of laser guidance

  10. Evaluation of the potential of automatic segmentation of the mandibular canal using cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlach, Nicolaas Lucius; Meijer, Gerrit Jacobus; Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Bronkhorst, Ewald Maria; Bergé, Stefaan Jozef; Maal, Thomas Jan Jaap

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of software for automatically tracing the mandibular canal on data from cone-beam computed tomography (CT). After the data had been collected from one dentate and one edentate fresh cadaver head, both a trained Active Shape Model (ASM) and an Active

  11. Clinical relevance of cone beam computed tomography in mandibular third molar removal: A multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaeminia, H.; Gerlach, N.L.; Hoppenreijs, T.J.; Kicken, M.; Dings, J.P.; Borstlap, W.A.; Haan, T. de; Berge, S.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Maal, T.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) compared to panoramic radiography (PR), prior to mandibular third molar removal, in reducing patient morbidity, and to identify risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve (IAN)

  12. Outcome of root canal treatment in dogs determined by periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Paula-Silva, F.W.G.; Hassan, B.; da Silva, L.A.B.; Leonardo, M.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the favorable outcome of root canal treatment determined by periapical radiographs (PRs) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Ninety-six roots of dogs' teeth were used to form four groups (n= 24). In group 1, root canal treatments were performed in

  13. The influence of the segmentation process on 3D measurements from cone beam computed tomography-derived surface models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, Willem P.; Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of linear and angular measurements between cephalometric and anatomic landmarks on surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols was the aim of this study. CBCT scans were made of cadaver heads and 3D surface

  14. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  15. Breast patient setup error assessment: comparison of electronic portal image devices and cone-beam computed tomography matching results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2010-01-01

    To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging

  16. Diagnostic value of electron-beam computed tomography (EBT). I. cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Lembcke, A.; Rogalla, P.; Taupitz, M.; Wiese, T.H.; Hammm, B.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Felix, R.; Knollmann, F.D.; Georgi, M.; Weisser, G.; Lehmann, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam tomography (EBT) directly competes with other non-invasive imaging modalities, such as multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiography, in the diagnostic assessment of cardiac diseases. EBT is the gold standard for the detection and quantification of coronary calcium as a preclinical sign of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its standardized examination protocols and the broad experience with this method favor EBT. First results with multislice CT indicate that this new technology may be equivalent to EBT for coronary calcium studies. The principal value of CT-based coronary calcium measurements continues to be an issue of controversy amongst radiologists and cardiologists due to lack of prospective randomized trials. Coronary angiography with EBT is characterized by a high negative predictive value and, in addition, may be indicated in some patients with manifest CAD. It remains to be shown whether coronary angiography with multislice CT is reliable and accurate enough to be introduced into the routine work-up, to replace some of the many strictly diagnostic coronary catheterizations in Germany and elsewhere. Assessment of coronary stent patency with EBT is associated with several problems and in our opinion cannot be advocated as a routine procedure. EBT may be recommended for the evaluation of coronary bypasses to look for bypass occlusions and significant stenoses, which, however, can be equally well achieved with multislice CT. Quantification of myocardial perfusion with EBT could not replace MRI or other modalities in this field. EBT has proven to be accurate, reliable and in some instances equivalent to MRI, which is the gold standard for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of cardiac function. Some disadvantages not the least of which is the limited distribution of electron beam scanners, favor MRI for functional assessment of the heart. (orig.) [de

  17. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  18. In Vitro Detection of Dental Root Fractures with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisekcioglu, Erdogan; Dolekoglu, Semanur; Ilguy, Mehmet; Ersan, Nilufer; Ilguy, Dilhan

    2014-01-01

    Since the diagnosis of non-displaced longitudinal fractures present difficulties for the dentist, three-dimensional evaluation is necessary. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting dental root fractures in vitro. An in vitro model consisting of 210 recently extracted human mandibular teeth was used. Root fractures were created by mechanical force. The teeth were placed randomly in the empty dental alveoli of a dry human mandible and 15 different dental arcs were created. Images were taken with a unit Iluma ultra cone-beam CT scanner (Imtec Corporation, Germany). Three dental radiologists separately evaluated the images. According to the fracture types and fracture presence, there was an overall statistically significant agreement between the key and readings. Kappa values for intra observer agreement ranged between 0.705 and 0.804 indicating that each observer gave acceptable ratings for the type and presence of fractures. Detailed information about root fractures may be obtained using CBCT

  19. A novel image-domain-based cone-beam computed tomography enhancement algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Li Tianfang; Yang Yong; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful, E-mail: lix@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image-guided radiotherapy. However, due to a large cone-beam angle, scatter effects significantly degrade the CBCT image quality and limit its clinical application. The goal of this study is to develop an image enhancement algorithm to reduce the low-frequency CBCT image artifacts, which are also called the bias field. The proposed algorithm is based on the hypothesis that image intensities of different types of materials in CBCT images are approximately globally uniform (in other words, a piecewise property). A maximum a posteriori probability framework was developed to estimate the bias field contribution from a given CBCT image. The performance of the proposed CBCT image enhancement method was tested using phantoms and clinical CBCT images. Compared to the original CBCT images, the corrected images using the proposed method achieved a more uniform intensity distribution within each tissue type and significantly reduced cupping and shading artifacts. In a head and a pelvic case, the proposed method reduced the Hounsfield unit (HU) errors within the region of interest from 300 HU to less than 60 HU. In a chest case, the HU errors were reduced from 460 HU to less than 110 HU. The proposed CBCT image enhancement algorithm demonstrated a promising result by the reduction of the scatter-induced low-frequency image artifacts commonly encountered in kV CBCT imaging.

  20. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  1. Cone beam computed tomography in paediatric dentistry: overview of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aps, J K M

    2013-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in paediatric dentistry has been mentioned in numerous publications and case reports. The indications for the use of CBCT in paediatric dentistry, however, have not yet been properly addressed. On the other hand, the three basic principles of radiation protection (justification, limitation and optimisation) should suffice. A review of the current literature was used to assess the indications and contra-indications for the use of CBCT in paediatric dentistry. Paramount is the fact that CBCT generates a higher effective dose to the tissues than traditional dental radiographic exposures do. The effective radiation dose should not be underestimated, especially not in children, who are much more susceptible to stochastic biological effects. The thyroid gland in particular should be kept out of the primary beam as much as possible. As with any other radiographical technique, routine use of CBCT is not acceptable clinical practice. CBCT certainly has a place in paediatric dentistry, but its use must be justified on a patient case individual basis.

  2. Determination and comparison of computed tomography quantities in standard beams using standard adult and pediatric phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Elaine Wirney; Potiens, Maria da Penha A., E-mail: ewmartins@ipen.br, E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The computed tomography (CT) is a segment of diagnostic radiology that uses higher radiation dose comparing to others fields of conventional radiology. In 2011, for decreasing the uncertainty in the diagnostic radiology beams dosimetry, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) published an implementation on the Technical Reports Series no. 457 from 2007, which is a code of practice recommending procedures for calibration and dosimetry in diagnostic radiology field. The objective of this study was to compare CT measurements on standards beams using adult and pediatric phantoms. The same procedure was used for two types of phantoms. Measurements were performed on the surface of the phantoms obtaining values of entrance surface air kerma (K{sub e}). Measurements were taken from 100 to 150 kV (RQT 8, 9 and RQT 10), with the center of the simulators positioned at a distance of 100 cm from the focal spot. The values for the CT quantities air kerma index (in free air, C{sub K}, and in phantom, C{sub PMMA,C} / C{sub PMMA,P}) and air kerma length product (P{sub KA}) were found. The results were significant and the largest difference between the two phantoms was found for the radiation quality RQT 10. (author)

  3. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Stern, Robin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Boone, John M., E-mail: jmboone@ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform

  4. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Jason W.; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R.; Schwarz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT. Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methyl methacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxilla segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored. In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting, cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  5. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  6. Quality assessment and enhancement for cone-beam computed tomography in dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Sung Chae

    2006-02-01

    Cone-beam CT will become increasingly important in diagnostic imaging modality in the dental practice over the next decade. For dental diagnostic imaging, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system based on large area flat panel imager has been designed and developed for three-dimensional volumetric image. The new CBCT system can provide a 3-D volumetric image during only one circular scanning with relatively short times (20-30 seconds) and requires less radiation dose than that of conventional CT. To reconstruct volumetric image from 2-D projection images, FDK algorithm was employed. The prototype of our CBCT system gives the promising results that can be efficiently diagnosed. This dissertation deals with assessment, enhancement, and optimization for dental cone-beam computed tomography with high performance. A new blur estimation method was proposed, namely model based estimation algorithm. Based on the empirical model of the PSF, an image restoration is applied to radiological images. The accuracy of the PSF estimation under Poisson noise and readout electronic noise is significantly better for the R-L estimator than the Wiener estimator. In the image restoration experiment, the result showed much better improvement in the low and middle range of spatial frequency. Our proposed algorithm is more simple and effective method to determine 2-D PSF of the x-ray imaging system than traditional methods. Image based scatter correction scheme to reduce the scatter effects was proposed. This algorithm corrects scatter on projection images based on convolution, scatter fraction, and angular interpolation. The scatter signal was estimated by convolving a projection image with scatter point spread function (SPSF) followed by multiplication with scatter fraction. Scatter fraction was estimated using collimator which is similar to SPECS method. This method does not require extra x-ray dose and any additional phantom. Maximum estimated error for interpolation was less than 7

  7. Cone-beam breast computed tomography with a displaced flat panel detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo; Lanconelli, Nico; Meo, Sergio Lo [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, and INFN, Sezione di Bologna, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and in particular in cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT), an important issue is the reduction of the image artifacts produced by photon scatter and the reduction of patient dose. In this work, the authors propose to apply the detector displacement technique (also known as asymmetric detector or ''extended view'' geometry) to approach this goal. Potentially, this type of geometry, and the accompanying use of a beam collimator to mask the unirradiated half-object in each projection, permits some reduction of radiation dose with respect to conventional CBBCT and a sizeable reduction of the overall amount of scatter in the object, for a fixed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: The authors consider a scan configuration in which the projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned detector that covers only one half of the scan field of view. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements, with their CBBCT laboratory scanner, were performed using PMMA phantoms of cylindrical (70-mm diameter) and hemiellipsoidal (140-mm diameter) shape simulating the average pendant breast, at 80 kVp. Image quality was evaluated in terms of contrast, noise, CNR, contrast-to-noise ratio per unit of dose (CNRD), and spatial resolution as width of line spread function for high contrast details. Results: Reconstructed images with the asymmetric detector technique deviate less than 1% from reconstruction with a conventional symmetric detector (detector view) and indicate a reduction of the cupping artifact in CT slices. The maximum scatter-to-primary ratio at the center of the phantom decreases by about 50% for both small and large diameter phantoms (e.g., from 0.75 in detector view to 0.40 in extended view geometry at the central axis of the 140-mm diameter PMMA phantom). Less cupping produces an increase of the CT number accuracy and an improved image detail contrast, but the associated increase of

  8. Usefulness of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Automatic Vessel Detection Software in Emergency Transarterial Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo, E-mail: gcarraf@gmail.com; Ierardi, Anna Maria, E-mail: amierardi@yahoo.it; Duka, Ejona, E-mail: ejonaduka@hotmail.com [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy); Radaelli, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.radaelli@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Netherlands); Floridi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.floridi@gmail.com [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy); Bacuzzi, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.bacuzzi@ospedale.varese.it [University of Insubria, Anaesthesia and Palliative Care (Italy); Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: maximilian.de-bucourt@charite.de [Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Marchi, Giuseppe De, E-mail: giuseppedemarchi@email.it [Insubria University, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    BackgroundThis study was designed to evaluate the utility of dual phase cone beam computed tomography (DP-CBCT) and automatic vessel detection (AVD) software to guide transarterial embolization (TAE) of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings in emergency settings.MethodsTwenty patients with an arterial bleeding at computed tomography angiography and an inconclusive identification of the bleeding vessel at the initial 2D angiographic series were included. Accuracy of DP-CBCT and AVD software were defined as the ability to detect the bleeding site and the culprit arterial bleeder, respectively. Technical success was defined as the correct positioning of the microcatheter using AVD software. Clinical success was defined as the successful embolization. Total volume of iodinated contrast medium and overall procedure time were registered.ResultsThe bleeding site was not detected by initial angiogram in 20 % of cases, while impossibility to identify the bleeding vessel was the reason for inclusion in the remaining cases. The bleeding site was detected by DP-CBCT in 19 of 20 (95 %) patients; in one case CBCT-CT fusion was required. AVD software identified the culprit arterial branch in 18 of 20 (90 %) cases. In two cases, vessel tracking required manual marking of the candidate arterial bleeder. Technical success was 95 %. Successful embolization was achieved in all patients. Mean contrast volume injected for each patient was 77.5 ml, and mean overall procedural time was 50 min.ConclusionsC-arm CBCT and AVD software during TAE of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings is feasible and may facilitate successful embolization. Staff training in CBCT imaging and software manipulation is necessary.

  9. Usefulness of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Automatic Vessel Detection Software in Emergency Transarterial Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Duka, Ejona; Radaelli, Alessandro; Floridi, Chiara; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Marchi, Giuseppe De

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThis study was designed to evaluate the utility of dual phase cone beam computed tomography (DP-CBCT) and automatic vessel detection (AVD) software to guide transarterial embolization (TAE) of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings in emergency settings.MethodsTwenty patients with an arterial bleeding at computed tomography angiography and an inconclusive identification of the bleeding vessel at the initial 2D angiographic series were included. Accuracy of DP-CBCT and AVD software were defined as the ability to detect the bleeding site and the culprit arterial bleeder, respectively. Technical success was defined as the correct positioning of the microcatheter using AVD software. Clinical success was defined as the successful embolization. Total volume of iodinated contrast medium and overall procedure time were registered.ResultsThe bleeding site was not detected by initial angiogram in 20 % of cases, while impossibility to identify the bleeding vessel was the reason for inclusion in the remaining cases. The bleeding site was detected by DP-CBCT in 19 of 20 (95 %) patients; in one case CBCT-CT fusion was required. AVD software identified the culprit arterial branch in 18 of 20 (90 %) cases. In two cases, vessel tracking required manual marking of the candidate arterial bleeder. Technical success was 95 %. Successful embolization was achieved in all patients. Mean contrast volume injected for each patient was 77.5 ml, and mean overall procedural time was 50 min.ConclusionsC-arm CBCT and AVD software during TAE of angiographically challenging arterial bleedings is feasible and may facilitate successful embolization. Staff training in CBCT imaging and software manipulation is necessary.

  10. Preliminary evaluation of cone beam computed tomography in three-dimensional cephalometry for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Hu, Bo; Mi, Fanglin; Song, Jinlin

    2017-05-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the three-dimensional (3D) cephalometry accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 40 newly diagnosed orthodontic patients (including 18 males and 22 females; age range, 12-18 years) were subjected to CBCT scanning and X-ray imaging in order to obtain lateral cephalograms. The 3D CBCT cephalograms were reconstructed and measured with in vivo 5.1 software, and compared with the results from the conventional 2D lateral cephalograms. Measurements in the two images were performed twice using the Steiner and Tweed standards and a single analyzer paired t-test was used to analyze the differences between the two cephalometric methods. The results indicated that the two methods showed significant differences in all 12 angle and 5 linear measurements (P<0.05). These findings indicated that CBCT is a more accurate technique compared with the conventional 2D method. In conclusion, CBCT may provide diagnostic and treatment information for maxillofacial deformities by using fast computer-aided analysis platform.

  11. In vitro assessment of cone beam local computed tomography for proximal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Sajitha M; Mol, André; Tyndall, Donald A; Caplan, Daniel J

    2007-11-01

    To compare the accuracy of local computed tomography (LCT) and conventional radiography for proximal caries detection and depth assessment. An in vitro model was used consisting of 20 extracted posterior teeth with 18 caries lesions. Local computed tomography slices were reconstructed in axial and parasagittal planes from 100 basis projections. Conventional radiographs were also acquired. Eight observers determined the presence and depth of caries lesions. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and weighted kappa statistics were used. Local computed tomography had a mean A(z) score of 0.82 (SD = 0.07) and conventional radiography of 0.79 (SD = 0.08; analysis of variance: P > .05). Interobserver agreement was moderate. The mean kappa for depth assessment was 0.68 (SD = 0.06) for LCT and 0.47 (SD = 0.08) for conventional radiography (analysis of variance: P proximal caries detection. Local computed tomography was more accurate for assessing caries lesion depth.

  12. Evaluation of Morphology and Anatomical Measurement of Nasopalatine Canal Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Panjnoush

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Precise radiographic assessment of the nasopalatine canal is required to prevent implant failure. The purpose of the current study was to determine the three dimensional (3D morphology, as well as the dimensions of the nasopalatine canal using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, maxillary CBCT images from 300 patients (150 men, 150 women were retrospectively evaluated. Sagittal and coronal views were reviewed to determine the nasopalatine canal morphology and dimensions. The difference in canal dimensions between men and women was evaluated using the Student’s t-test while the difference in canal morphology between the two sexes was assessed using Chi-square test.Results: A total of 199 (66.3% patients had type A canal (cylindrical without a branch, 69 (23% had type B canal (a canal with a branch in the upper part, and 32 (10.7 % had type C canal (a canal with a branch in the middle part. Incisive foramen diameter was 4.7±1.11mm on the sagittal section. Alveolar bone width in the anterior part of the canal was 12.3±1.7mm in the upper one third, 10.7±1.7mm in the middle one third, and 9.8±1.4mm in the lower one third. The angle of canal with palate was 109.5±5.7°. On the coronal sections, canal length was 14.1±3.0mm, incisive foramen diameter was 4.6±1.0mm, and canal diameter in the nasal floor was 5.1±1.0mm.                          Conclusions: Significant differences in canal morphology were observed among the patients and CBCT was useful in determining nasopalatine canal morphology and its dimensions before implant placement.Keywords: Anatomy; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography; Dental Implants; Maxilla

  13. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  14. Digital replacement of the distorted dentition acquired by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, N J; Ayoub, A F; Barbenel, J; Moos, K; Naudi, K; Ju, X; Khambay, B S

    2013-11-01

    During cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning, intra-oral metallic objects may produce streak artefacts, which impair the occlusal surface of the teeth. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of replacement of the CBCT dentition with a more accurate dentition and to determine the clinical feasibility of the method. Impressions of the teeth of six cadaveric skulls with unrestored dentitions were taken and acrylic base plates constructed incorporating radiopaque registration markers. Each appliance was fitted to the skull and a CBCT performed. Impressions were taken of the dentition with the devices in situ and dental models were produced. These were CBCT-scanned and the images of the skulls and models imported into computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software and aligned on the registration markers. The occlusal surfaces of each dentition were then replaced with the occlusal image of the corresponding model. The absolute mean distance between the registration markers in the skulls and the dental models was 0.09±0.02mm, and for the dentition was 0.24±0.09mm. When the method was applied to patients, the distance between markers was 0.12±0.04mm for the maxilla and 0.16±0.02mm for the mandible. It is possible to replace the inaccurate dentition on a CBCT scan using this method and to create a composite skull which is clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  16. Daily Online Cone Beam Computed Tomography to Assess Interfractional Motion in Patients With Intact Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Neelam; Lewis, John H.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vo, Daniel; Jiang, Steve B.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify interfraction motion in patients with intact cervical cancer and assess implications for clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and required planning margins. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 10 patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy using online cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) before each fraction. CTVs were contoured on the planning CT and on each CBCT. Each CBCT was rigidly registered to the planning CT with respect to bony anatomy. The CTV from each CBCT was projected onto the planning CT and compared to the CTV from the planning CT. Uniform three-dimensional expansions were applied to the planning CTV to assess required planning margins. For each fraction, the minimum margin required to encompass the CTV was calculated, and the volume of CTV (on the CBCT) encompassed by the PTV was determined as a function of margin size. Results: A uniform CTV planning treatment volume margin of 15 mm would have failed to encompass the CTV in 32% of fractions. The mean volume of CTV missed, however, was small (4 cc). The mean planning margin (across patients and fractions) required to encompass the CTV was 15 mm. Variation in margin estimates was high, with interpatient variation being the predominant component. Increased rectal volume was associated with posterior (p < 0.0001) and superior (p = 0.0004) shifts in the CTV, whereas increased bladder volume was associated with superior shifts (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Interfraction motion results in a high probability of missing the CTV using conventional planning margins, but the volume of CTV missed is small. Adaptive radiotherapy approaches are needed to improve treatment accuracy.

  17. Atypical aortic dissection (intramural hematoma) of aorta: diagnosis of electron beam computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jinglin; Dai Ruping; He Sha; Jing Baolian; Bai Hua

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of electron beam computer tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of atypical aortic dissection. Methods: Between May 1994 and April 2000, 236 patients with aortic dissection were scanned by electron beam CT (EBCT) from 15000 cases. Out of which, 25 patients (female 4, male 21) were atypical dissection. All patients complained of acute chest pain. Contrast-enhanced EBCT was carried out by Imatron 150-X P system. Continues volume scanning mode (CVS) was performed to obtain 140 slice from aortic arch to iliac bifurcation with slice thickness of 3 mm. Results: The EBCT angiographic (EBCTA) direct features of atypical dissection were as follows: (1) continuous low density crescentic or circle areas along the wall of aorta (25 cases) with CT value of 50-87 HU, 5-23 mm in aortic wall thickness and 16.3 cm in length; (2) displacement of intimal calcification (5 cases); (3) the change of aortic wall thickness with follow up (6/6). The indirect features included: (1) aortic atherosclerotic ulcers (7 cases); (2) atherosclerotic plaque and calcification on the aortic wall (12 cases). According to above features, EBCT can confirm the diagnosis of atypical aortic dissection when the patient has acute chest pain. Among the 25 cases, ascending aorta (Stanford A type) and descending aorta (Stanford B type) were involved in 6 and 19, respectively. In the follow up study with EBCT, intramural hematoma was completely absent in 6 patients after 3 months to 1 year. Conclusion: For the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain, EBCT can confirm the diagnosis of atypical aortic dissection. EBCT is a noninvasive and safe method and it is useful for the follow up study

  18. Image characteristics of cone beam computed tomography using a CT performance phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Choong Wan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of (widely used) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Images were obtained with CT performance phantoms (The American Association of Physicists in Medicine; AAPM). CT phantom as the destination by using PSR 9000N TM dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and i-CAT CBCT (Imaging Science International Inc., USA) that have different kinds of detectors and field of view, and compared these images with the CT number for linear attenuation, contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. CT number of both PSR 9000N TM dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT did not conform to the base value of CT performance phantom. The contrast of i-CAT CBCT is higher than that of PSR 9000N T M dental CT system. Both contrasts were increased according to thickness of cross section. Spatial resolution and shapes of reappearance was possible up to 0.6 mm in PSR 9000N T M dental CT system and up to 1.0 mm in i-CAT CBCT. Low contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity revealed low level at PSR 9000N T M dental CT system and i-CAT CBCT. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution, however, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity was the inferiority of image characteristics

  19. Accuracy of digital peripical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela [Division of Dental Diagnostic Science, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Newark (United States); Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Mcmahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio (United States); Teixeira, Fabrico B. [Dept. of Endodontics, University of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption.

  20. Accuracy of digital periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela; Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Teixeira, Fabricio B; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption.

  1. Accuracy of digital peripical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela; Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Mcmahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel; Teixeira, Fabrico B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption

  2. Sectioning of a double tooth aided by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, W F; Keightley, A J; Welbury, R R

    2013-06-01

    Double teeth present challenges for their clinical management. Recent advances in imaging, particularly cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), have aided clinicians in accurate diagnosis and management. Data from CBCT imaging can be used for three-dimensional reconstruction to further aid pre-surgical planning. A 14-year-old Caucasian male presented with an aesthetically unacceptable double tooth in the 22 region. Clinical and radiographic examination and assessment included CBCT imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction. Based on this information, together with a comprehensive assessment of the patient's motivation, a treatment plan consisting of extra-alveolar sectioning, re-implantation, endodontic therapy and composite resin restoration was carried out. The patient failed to return for follow-up at 6 months post-treatment. However, he did return at 12 months, where clinical and radiographic examination was undertaken. At this point the tooth was clinically sound and bony infill was seen radiographically. The information gained from the pre-surgical imaging with CBCT was useful in planning treatment in this case. However, this had to be combined with a careful assessment of the patient's motivation to ensure that the course of treatment embarked upon was likely to be successful whilst addressing the patient's concerns.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Byun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6–18 years of age. CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P<0.05. Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables exhibited statistically significant correlations (P<0.05. The multiple regression model with the greatest R2 had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4 as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  4. Absorbed doses in salivary and thyroid glands from panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Regina Heiden

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT are very important in the diagnosis of oral diseases, however patients are exposed to the risk of ionizing radiation. This paper describes our study aimed at comparing absorbed doses in the salivary glands and thyroid due to panoramic radiography and CBCT and estimating radiation induced cancer risk associated with those methods. Methods Absorbed doses of two CBCT equipment (i-CAT® Next Generation and SCANORA® 3D and a digital panoramic device (ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP200D were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters loaded in an anthropomorphic phantom on sublingual, submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands. Results Absorbed doses in the i-CAT® device ranged between 0.02 (+/-0.01 and 2.23 mGy (+/-0.03, in the SCANORA™ device ranged from 0.01 (+/-0.01 to 2.96 mGy (+/-0.29 and in the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP200D ranged between 0.04 mGy and 0.78 mGy. The radiation induced cancer risk was highlighted in the salivary glands, which received higher doses. The protocols that offer the highest risk of cancer are the high resolution protocols of CBCT equipment. Conclusion CBCT exposes patients to higher levels of radiation than panoramic radiography, so the risks and benefits of each method should be considered. The doses in CBCT were dependent on equipment and exposure parameters, therefore adequate selection minimizes the radiation dose.

  5. Ocular dose investigation of head and neck con-beam computed tomography (CBCT) Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Wook; Lee, Se Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Image-guided radiation therapy using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely accepted as a general approach for patient localization and verification during the course of treatment, although the additional imaging doses to patients are still remained in concern. As distinct from the organs related to the radiation induced cancer, the lens of the eye is also sensitive to the radiation exposure mainly related to the induction of a cataract in the lens. Especially, in radiation treatment, the cumulative imaging doses from the frequent CBCT scans can be additionally contributed to the treatment doses. Therefore, concerns about lens doses from CBCT has surfaced as a critical issue. In the present paper, we investigated the lens dose and the effective dose from CBCT scans. In this study, we have successfully used MC method to model Varian CBCT unit. In addition, the modified stylized phantom and MC method have been used to investigate lens doses and effective doses of patient under the CBCT scans.

  6. Maxillofacial trauma patterns associated with external auditory canal fractures: Cone beam computed tomography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ibrahim K; Sansare, Kaustubh; Karjodkar, Freny R; Salve, Prashant; Vanga, Kavita; Pawar, Ajinkya M

    2017-08-01

    There is a paucity of literature on external auditory canal (EAC) fractures secondary to maxillofacial trauma, with most of the literature on EAC fractures consisting of isolated case reports. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first study to use cone beam computed tomography to evaluate the EAC region. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of external auditory canal (EAC) fracture following maxillofacial trauma and to evaluate the association between EAC fracture and other maxillofacial fractures and the region of trauma. One hundred patients were prospectively evaluated over 6 months from February to August 2016. The patients were referred for CBCT regarding temporomandibular joint or condylar fractures following maxillofacial trauma. Two observers (both experienced radiologists) assessed the EAC and associated fractures in the maxillofacial region. External auditory canal (EAC) fracture was confirmed in 32% of the patients. Of the EAC fractures, 68.75% and 31.25% were associated with mandibular fractures and non-mandibular fractures, respectively. Of the EAC fractures, 68.75% were single fractures and 31.25% of patients had multiple comminuted fractures. Significant association was observed on cross-tabulation of the fractured region and region of trauma with the presence of EAC fracture using chi-square test. External auditory canal (EAC) fracture is associated with maxillofacial fractures with increased incidence in mandibular fractures compared to non-mandibular fractures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madani, Azam Sadat [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients.

  8. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  9. Cone beam computed tomography and ultrasonography imaging of benign intraosseous jaw lesion: a prospective radiopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakdar, Ibrahim Sevki; Yilmaz, Ahmet Berhan; Caglayan, Fatma; Ertas, Umit; Gundogdu, Cemal; Gumussoy, Ismail

    2017-10-18

    We assessed whether ultrasonography (US) can be used in combination with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to image intraosseous jaw lesions. Using CBCT and US, we evaluated 123 lytic intraosseous jaw lesions diagnosed in 121 patients with guidance from the CBCT findings. The lesions were classified into two groups based on histopathological evaluation: (1) cysts and (2) tumors and tumor-like lesions. US and histopathological findings on the lesions of the two groups and their relationships with each other were also assessed. Results are reported as means ± standard errors, and p lesions were evaluated; 74 (60.2%) were cysts and 49 (39.8%) were tumors or tumor-like lesions. The CBCT and US findings were compatible as far as dimensional measurements of the lesions in the three planes (p lesions correlated (p jaw lesions. Because it offers no valid Hounsfield unit (HU) value, it does not differentiate between solid and cystic masses. Thus, US can be used with CBCT to image intraosseous jaw lesions caused by buccal cortical thinning or perforation. US provides useful information about intraosseous jaw lesions and can be used with CBCT to image such lesions caused by buccal cortical thinning or perforation. Clinicians can take this information into consideration when evaluating intraosseous jaw pathology.

  10. Detection of Procedural Errors during Root Canal Instrumentation using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; da Costa, Marcus Vinícius Corrêa; Dorilêo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; de Oliveira, Helder Fernandes; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Álvaro Henrique

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated procedural errors made during root canal preparation with nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging method. A total of 100 human mandibular molars were divided into five groups (n = 20) according to the NiTi system used for root canal preparation: Group 1 - BioRaCe, Group 2 - K3, Group 3 - ProTaper, Group 4 - Mtwo and Group 5 - Hero Shaper. CBCT images were obtained to detect procedural errors made during root canal preparation. Two examiners evaluated the presence or absence of fractured instruments, perforations, and canal transportations. Chi-square test was used for statistical analyzes. The significance level was set at a=5%. In a total of 300 prepared root canals, 43 (14.33%) procedural errors were detected. Perforation was the procedural errors most commonly observed (58.14%). Most of the procedural errors were observed in the mesiobuccal root canal (48.84%). In the analysis of procedural errors, there was a significant difference (P procedural errors. CBCT permitted the detection of procedural errors during root canal preparation. The frequency of procedural errors was low when root canals preparation was accomplished with BioRaCe system.

  11. Three-dimensional localization of impacted canines and root resorption assessment using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhtaseb, Eyad; Mao, Jing; Mahony, Derek; Bader, Rawan; Zhang, Zhi-xing

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new way to localize the impacted canines from three dimensions and to investigate the root resorption of the adjacent teeth by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-six patients undergoing orthodontic treatments and having impacted canines in Tongji Hospital were examined. The images of CBCT scans were obtained from KaVo 3D exam vision. Angular and linear measurements of the cusp tip and root apex according to the three planes (mid-sagittal, occlusal and frontal) have been taken using the cephalometric tool of the InVivo Dental Anatomage Version 5.1.10. The measurements of the angular and linear coordinates of the maxillary and mandibular canines were obtained. Using this technique the operators could envision the location of the impacted canine according to the three clinical planes. Adjacent teeth root resorption of 28.26 % was in the upper lateral incisors while 17.39% in upper central incisors, but no lower root resorption was found in our samples. Accurate and reliable localization of the impacted canines could be obtained from the novel analysis system, which offers a better surgical and orthodontic treatment for the patients with impacted canines.

  12. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHWARTZ, João Paulo; RAVELI, Taísa Boamorte; ALMEIDA, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; SCHWARTZ-FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; RAVELI, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance. PMID:26537718

  13. Dosimetry of cone beam computed tomography scanning for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Pinto de A, E. L.; Manzi, F. R.; Goncalves Z, E. [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Jose Gaspar 500, 30535-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, M. S.; Fernandes Z, M. A., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Development Center of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The radiation dose and estimate the radiation induced risk of cancer and morpho functional alterations according to BEIR VII (2006) and recommendations of the ICRP 103 (2007) were measured in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning (Tc Kodak 9000C 3D) in different oral and maxillofacial regions for diagnosis and planning in implant dentistry for each examination protocol: jaw full, maxilla full and jaw and maxilla full associated. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD- 100 H) were placed in an Alderson-Rando in regions corresponding to the crystalline, parotid, submandibular and thyroid glands and ovaries. The highest values for entrance skin dose were observed in the region of the parotid and submandibular glands, 9.612 mGy to 7.912 mGy and 8.818 mGy to 0.483 mGy, respectively. All examination protocols presented on the right and left sides in the region of the submandibular gland the highest values for absorbed dose (D). In the jaw full exam the thyroid glands on both sides presented highest dose values than maxilla full exam. This study allowed measuring the entrance skin dose and the absorbed dose (D) highlighting a dosimetric preponderance to the salivary glands. With danger of to radiation that induces cancer risk was observed that the age group most likely to have to risk of cancer was 20 years, compared to 30, 40, 50, 60,70 and 80 years. (Author)

  14. Unusual bilateral dentigerous cysts in a nonsyndromic patient assessed by cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Sumie Imada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of syndromes, bilateral dentigerous cysts (DC located on the jaws are unusual. In English based language literature review, we only found eight reports of nonsyndromic bilateral dentigerous cyst associated with mandibular third molars. Therefore, we report the unusual occurrence of sizable nonsyndromic bilateral DC associated with mandibular impacted third molars in a 42-year-old Caucasian woman. The lesions were assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT the right lesion showed approximately 23.64 mm and the left one, 16.57 mm diameter, both located intimately next to the mandibular canal. Bilateral surgical enucleation, related teeth excision of both third molars and plate for fixation placement on the right and bigger lesion, under general anesthesia was the final treatment choice. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological features confirmed diagnose of bilateral dentigerous cyst. Now-a-days, the patient is on 18 months radiograph follow-up with favorable osseous formation with no evidence of recurrence of the cysts.

  15. The usefulness of cone beam computed tomography for treatment of complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T Y; Gurgel, C V; Cota, A L; Rios, D; Machado, M A A; Oliveira, T M

    2013-06-01

    Odontomas are odontogenic tumours, resulting from epithelial growth and differentiated mesenchymal cells, clinically asymptomatic, and often associated with changes to the eruption of the permanent dentition. In recent years, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been used in the diagnosis and treatment planning of this condition. A 9-year-old male patient, with an unerupted permanent maxillary right central incisor (tooth 11) presented to our clinic. The panoramic radiograph showed impaction of tooth 11 with incomplete root development and the suspicion of an odontome and supernumerary tooth. CBCT was performed and enabled the visualisation of a radiopaque image compatible with an odontome, confirming the presence of an impacted supernumerary tooth on the palatal surface of tooth 11. Surgical excision of the odontome and the supernumerary tooth was performed. Clinical and radiographic evaluations 2 months after the removal of the lesion showed lack of space for the eruption of tooth 11. The patient was referred for orthodontic treatment and a Hyrax appliance was fitted. The patient has been followed for 12 months. CBCT is an important auxiliary tool, aiding in both correct diagnosis and accurate treatment planning. It is currently a technology accessible to most paediatric dentists and should be beneficial considering the diagnostic information provided as well as the cost-benefit ratio for the patient.

  16. Evaluation of an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Allison K; Muller, Susan; Kalathingal, Sajitha M; Burnham, Michael A; Moore, William S

    2012-06-01

    The clinical presentation, radiographic features, and histopathological findings of a case of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma are described. The clinical and radiographic presentations of this case are typical of this benign odontogenic tumor. The patient was young and asymptomatic with the exception of the clinical absence of the permanent mandibular left first molar. Treatment consisted of simple enucleation with removal of the primary mandibular left second molar. A panoramic image and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan were acquired in order to determine the reason for clinical absence of the permanent mandibular left first molar. The CBCT image proved to be a valuable supplement to the conventional radiographic examination as it provided information not apparent on the 2-dimensional panoramic image. Both the extent of the lesion and its effects on adjacent structures were better delineated with CBCT. Additionally, the presence of calcifications, an important radiographic characteristic of this particular lesion, were visible on CBCT versus the panoramic image. This case report demonstrates that the CBCT scan provided important management and treatment planning information that was not apparent in the panoramic image.

  17. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbert, Nicholas [Private Practice, Reconstructive Dental Specialists of Utah, Salt Lake (United States); Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A. [Dept. of rosthodontics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, Memphis (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  18. Conventional frontal radiographs compared with frontal radiographs obtained from cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Metin; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Bayram, Mehmet; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Kilkis, Dogan; Sezgin, Omer Said

    2012-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is no difference between measurements performed on conventional frontal radiographs (FRs) and those performed on FRs obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This study consisted of conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs obtained from 30 young adult patients. Twenty-three landmarks were identified on both types of cephalometric radiographs. Twenty-one widely used cephalometric variables (14 linear distances, 4 angles, and 3 ratios) were calculated. Paired t-tests were performed to compare the means of corresponding measurements on two cephalometric radiographs of the same patient. Reproducibility of measurements ranged from 0.85 to 0.99 for CBCT-constructed FRs, and from 0.78 to 0.96 for conventional FRs. A statistically significant difference was observed between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for all linear measurements (eurR-eurL, loR-loL, moR-moL, zygR-zygL, lapR-lapL, mxR-mxL, maR-maL, umR-umL, lmR-lmL, agR-agL, me-ans) (P .05). However, no statistically significant differences were noted between conventional FRs and CBCT-constructed FRs for ratios and angular measurements (P > .05). The hypothesis was rejected. A difference has been noted between measurements performed on conventional FRs and those performed on CBCT-constructed FRs, particularly in terms of linear measurements.

  19. Quality control in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) EFOMP-ESTRO-IAEA protocol (summary report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras Gala, Hugo; Torresin, Alberto; Dasu, Alexandru; Rampado, Osvaldo; Delis, Harry; Hernández Girón, Irene; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Andersson, Jonas; Holroyd, John; Nilsson, Mats; Edyvean, Sue; Gershan, Vesna; Hadid-Beurrier, Lama; Hoog, Christopher; Delpon, Gregory; Sancho Kolster, Ismael; Peterlin, Primož; Garayoa Roca, Julia; Caprile, Paola; Zervides, Costas

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the guideline presented in this article is to unify the test parameters for image quality evaluation and radiation output in all types of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. The applications of CBCT spread over dental and interventional radiology, guided surgery and radiotherapy. The chosen tests provide the means to objectively evaluate the performance and monitor the constancy of the imaging chain. Experience from all involved associations has been collected to achieve a consensus that is rigorous and helpful for the practice. The guideline recommends to assess image quality in terms of uniformity, geometrical precision, voxel density values (or Hounsfield units where available), noise, low contrast resolution and spatial resolution measurements. These tests usually require the use of a phantom and evaluation software. Radiation output can be determined with a kerma-area product meter attached to the tube case. Alternatively, a solid state dosimeter attached to the flat panel and a simple geometric relationship can be used to calculate the dose to the isocentre. Summary tables including action levels and recommended frequencies for each test, as well as relevant references, are provided. If the radiation output or image quality deviates from expected values, or exceeds documented action levels for a given system, a more in depth system analysis (using conventional tests) and corrective maintenance work may be required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Assessment of the relationship between the maxillary molars and adjacent structures using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study investigated the relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and measured the distances between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus floor as well as the thickness of the bone between the root and the alveolar cortical plate. The study sample consisted of 83 patients with normally erupted bilateral maxillary first and second molars. A total of 332 maxillary molars were examined using CBCT images. The vertical relationship of each root with the maxillary sinus was classified into four types on CBCT cross-sectional images. The distance between the sinus floor and root and the bone thickness between the root and alveolar cortical plate were measured. In the buccal roots of the maxillary molars, a root protruding into the sinus occurred most frequently. A root projecting laterally along the sinus cavity was most common in the palatal roots of the maxillary first molars. The mesiobuccal roots of the maxillary second molar were closest to the sinus. The mesiobuccal roots of the first molars were closest to the cortical plate. The relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus differed between the buccal and palatal roots. A root protruding into the sinus occurred more frequent in the buccal roots of the maxillary molars. The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary second molar was closest to the maxillary sinus floor and farthest from the alveolar cortical plate.

  1. ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS FINDINGS ON CONE BEAM-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN CLEFT LIP AND PALATE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yllka DECOLLI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is frequently used in surgery treatment planning in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of different anatomical variations of patients with cleft lip and palate using CBCT images. Materials and method: CBCTs taken from consecutive patients (n =25; mean age 10.7±4 years, range 6.5–23 years with a non-syndromic cleft lip and palate (CLP, between June 2014-2015, were systematically evaluated. Sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ, maxilla and mandible were checked for incidental findings. Results: On 90.1 % of the CBCTs, incidental findings were found. The most prevalent ones were airway/sinus findings (78.1%, followed by dental problems, e.g. missing teeth (54%, nasal septum deviation (93%, middle ear and mastoid opacification, suggestive for otitis media (8% and (chronic mastoiditis (7%, abnormal TMJ anatomy (4.3%. Conclusions: Incidental findings are common on CBCTs in cleft lip and palate patients. Compared with the literature, CLP patients have more dental, nasal and ear problems. The CBCT scan should be reviewed by all specialists in the CLP team, stress being laid on their specific background knowledge concerning symptoms and treatment of these patients.

  2. Comparative assessment of subjective image quality of cross-sectional cone-beam computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamburoglu, K.; Murat, S.; Kolsuz, E.; Kurt, H.; Paksoy, C.; Yueksel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), several novel systems with different technical specifications and settings have become commercially available. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate CBCT systems for differences in the subjective quality of images obtained for various dental procedures. We evaluated the subjective image quality of cross-sectional scans obtained from various CBCT systems. Images of three cadaver mandibles were obtained from four different CBCT units: Veraviewepocs 3D 40 x 40 mm field of view (FOV) (voxel size: 0.125 x 0.125 x 0.125 mm), Iluma, low-resolution (voxel size: 0.3 x 0.3 x 0.3 mm), Kodak, 50 x 3.7 cm field of view (FOV) (voxel size: 0.076 x 0.076 x 0.076 mm), and Vatech 12 x 8.5 cm FOV (voxel size: 0.160 x 0.160 x 0.160 mm). We assessed subjective image quality and the visibility of 10 specific features, namely, caries, amalgam restoration, final implant drill, root canal filling, metal crown, mandibular canal, mental foramen, tooth (periodontal ligament space and lamina dura), trabecular pattern, and soft tissue. Images were viewed and scored by five calibrated observers, and image quality was ranked from best to worst. The Veraviewepocs 3D had the highest quality images for most of the assessed features, whereas the Iluma low-resolution scans were rated as the lowest quality images. (author)

  3. Detectability of hepatic tumors during 3D post-processed ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J; Chacko, Annamma

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate hepatic tumor detection using ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography (UCBCT) cross-sectional and 3D post-processed image datasets.657 patients were examined using UCBCT during hepatic transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and data were collected retrospectively from January 2012 to September 2014. Tumor detectability, diagnostic ability, detection accuracy and sensitivity were examined for different hepatic tumors using UCBCT cross-sectional, perfusion blood volume (PBV) and UCBCT–MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) fused image datasets. Appropriate statistical tests were used to compare collected sample data.Fused image data showed the significantly higher (all P  <  0.05) diagnostic ability for hepatic tumors compared to UCBCT or PBV image data. The detectability of small hepatic tumors (<5 mm) was significantly reduced (all P  <  0.05) using UCBCT cross-sectional images compared to MRI or fused image data; however, PBV improved tumor detectability using a color display. Fused image data produced 100% tumor sensitivity due to the simultaneous availability of MRI and UCBCT information during tumor diagnosis.Fused image data produced excellent hepatic tumor sensitivity, detectability and diagnostic ability compared to other datasets assessed. Fused image data is extremely reliable and useful compared to UCBCT cross-sectional or PBV image datasets to depict hepatic tumors during TACE. Partial anatomical visualization on cross-sectional images was compensated by fused image data during tumor diagnosis. (paper)

  4. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayram, Mehmet; Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Ömer Said; Küçük, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers’ measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers’ measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  5. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayram, Mehmet, E-mail: dtmehmetbayram@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Oemer Said [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Radiology, Trabzon (Turkey); Kuecuek, Murat [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers' measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers' measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taísa Boamorte; Almeida, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates' correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance.

  7. Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A; Critchley, S; Monsour, P A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia. Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s). In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita. In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Comparative analysis of mandibular anatomical variations between panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Nascimento, Monikelly Carmo Chagas; Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Almeida, Solange Maria; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the ability of panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting anatomical variations of the mandibular canal and mental foramen. One hundred twenty-seven preoperative panoramic and CBCT images were evaluated. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists investigated the presence of bifid mandibular canals and/or additional mental foramina on the right, left, or both sides of the mandible. Intra- and interobserver reliability was determined using Cohen's kappa coefficient. McNemar's test compared the prevalence of mandibular anatomical variations between panoramic radiography and CBCT. The significance level was set at 0.05. Additional mental foramen and bifid mandibular canal were detected in 1.2 and 7.4 % of the panoramic radiographs and 7.4 and 9.8 % of the CBCT images, respectively. The incidence of anatomical variations on the mandibular canal was not significantly different between both imaging modalities (P > 0.05). Although CBCT provides better viewing of anatomical structures, including location, shape, and relationship with the surrounding area, panoramic radiography is a conventional imaging modality that can be used in the study of the bifid mandibular canals.

  9. Digital panoramic radiography versus cone beam computed tomography in the delineation of maxillomandibular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Barros, Renata Quirino de; Abilio, Vanessa Maria Freire; Yamamoto, Angela Toshie Araki; Melo, Daniela Pita de; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Bento, Patricia Meira

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the efficacy of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for delineation of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tumors. From November 2009 through March 2011, 23 tumors in the maxillomandibular complex were diagnosed by histopathological examination. All DPRs and CBCTs were obtained and analyzed by a single previously calibrated radiologist, who considered the following radiographic aspects: clarity of the lesion edges, relation with dental elements, involvement of adjacent anatomical structures, cortical bone expansion and disruption, and, if present, type of involved anatomical structures and site of bone expansion and disruption. Of 23 patients, 15 (65.2%) were male and 8 (34.8%) were female. The tumor was classified as odontogenic in 73.9% of patients and nonodontogenic in 26.1% of patients. Analysis revealed that 56.5% of the tumors were located in the mandible, 34.8% in the maxilla, and 8.7% in both arches. For all analyzed variables, CBCTs offered more accurate details than did DPRs. Panoramic radiography should not be the examination of choice to visualize lesions in the maxillomandibular complex.

  10. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos, E-mail: ludmilapedroso@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Medicina Oral; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues [Universidade Paulista (UNIP), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Cirurgia; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Prevencao e Reabilitacao Oral

    2013-11-15

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p < 0.05). The final sample comprised 95 implants in 27 patients, distributed over the maxilla and mandible. Agreement in implant length was 50.5% between initial and final planning, and correct prediction of the actual implant length was 40.0% and 69.5%, using PAN and CBCT exams, respectively. Agreement in implant width assessment ranged from 69.5% to 73.7%. A paired comparison of the frequency of changes between initial or final planning and implant placement (McNemmar test) showed greater frequency of changes in initial planning for implant length (p < 0.001), but not for implant width (p = 0.850). The frequency of changes was not influenced by implant location at any stage of implant planning (chi-square test, p > 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  11. Assessment of maxillary third molars with panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept.of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study investigated maxillary third molars and their relation to the maxillary sinus using panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 395 maxillary third molars in 234 patients were examined using panoramic radiographs and CBCT images. We examined the eruption level of the maxillary third molars, the available retromolar space, the angulation, the relationship to the second molars, the number of roots, and the relationship between the roots and the sinus. Females had a higher frequency of maxillary third molars with occlusal planes apical to the cervical line of the second molar (Level C) than males. All third molars with insufficient retromolar space were Level C. The most common angulation was vertical, followed by buccoangular. Almost all of the Level C molars were in contact with the roots of the second molar. Erupted teeth most commonly had three roots, and completely impacted teeth most commonly had one root. The superimposition of one third of the root and the sinus floor was most commonly associated with the sinus floor being located on the buccal side of the root. Eruption levels were differently distributed according to gender. A statistically significant association was found between the eruption level and the available retromolar space. When panoramic radiographs showed a superimposition of the roots and the sinus floor, expansion of the sinus to the buccal side of the root was generally observed in CBCT images.

  12. Validation of cone-beam computed tomography as a predictor of osteoporosis using the Klemetti classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Carrazzone Cal ALONSO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed at evaluating the validity of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT for assessing mandibular bone quality using the Klemetti classification. The morphology of the endosteal mandibular cortex of 30 (60 hemi-mandibles postmenopausal women between the ages of 45 and 80 years was evaluated based on the Klemetti classification in panoramic radiographs used as reference images. Afterwards, panoramic reconstruction and cross-sectional slices of CBCT examinations of these patients were analyzed and categorized according to the same classification. All the images were assessed by two oral radiologists. The McNemar-Bowker test compared the agreement between the CBCT images and the reference images. No differences were found between the diagnostic results based on panoramic radiography and panoramic reconstruction. However, the mean scores for the cross-sectional evaluation were higher, and the results, statistically different from the others. Based on the disagreement found between the panoramic radiographs and the CBCT cross-sectional slices, the Klemetti classification is not an adequate means of assessing bone quality with CBCT. On the other hand, the higher values found for the cross-sectional slices could be associated with better visibility on the CBCT images.

  13. Absorbed and effective dose from newly developed cone beam computed tomography in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Nyeong; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2007-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides a lower dose and cost alternative to conventional CT, promising to revolutionize the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolved and effective doses of Implagraphy and VCT (Vatech Co., Hwasung, Korea) and compare them with those of panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 27 sites throughout the layers of Female ART Head and Neck Phantom for dosimetry. Implagraphy, VCT units, and Planmeca Proline XC panoramic unit were used for radiation exposure. Radiation weighted doses and effective doses were measured and calculated using 1990 and 2005 ICRP tissue weighting factors. Effective doses in Sv (ICRP 2005, ICRP 1990) were 90.19, 61.62 for Implagraphy at maxillay molar area, 123.20, 90.02 for Implagraphy at mandibular molar area, 183.55, 139.26 for VCT and 40.92, 27.16 for panoramic radiography. Effective doses for VCT and Implagraphy were only about 2.2 to 4.5 times greater than those for panoramic radiography. VCT and Implagraphy, CBCT machines recently developed in Korea, showed moderately low effective doses

  14. Absorbed and effective dose from newly developed cone beam computed tomography in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Nyeong; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides a lower dose and cost alternative to conventional CT, promising to revolutionize the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolved and effective doses of Implagraphy and VCT (Vatech Co., Hwasung, Korea) and compare them with those of panoramic radiography. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 27 sites throughout the layers of Female ART Head and Neck Phantom for dosimetry. Implagraphy, VCT units, and Planmeca Proline XC panoramic unit were used for radiation exposure. Radiation weighted doses and effective doses were measured and calculated using 1990 and 2005 ICRP tissue weighting factors. Effective doses in Sv (ICRP 2005, ICRP 1990) were 90.19, 61.62 for Implagraphy at maxillay molar area, 123.20, 90.02 for Implagraphy at mandibular molar area, 183.55, 139.26 for VCT and 40.92, 27.16 for panoramic radiography. Effective doses for VCT and Implagraphy were only about 2.2 to 4.5 times greater than those for panoramic radiography. VCT and Implagraphy, CBCT machines recently developed in Korea, showed moderately low effective doses.

  15. Detection of periapical bone defects in human jaws using cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Dawood, A; Mannocci, F; Wilson, R; Pitt Ford, T

    2009-06-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography with that of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for the detection of artificial periapical bone defects in dry human jaws. Small and large artificial periapical lesions were prepared in the periapical region of the distal root of six molar teeth in human mandibles. Scans and radiographs were taken with a charged couple device (CCD) digital radiography system and a CBCT scanner before and after each periapical lesion had been created. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves as well as the reproducibility of each technique were determined. The overall sensitivity was 0.248 and 1.0 for intraoral radiography and CBCT respectively, i.e. these techniques correctly identified periapical lesions in 24.8% and 100% of cases, respectively. Both imaging techniques had specificity values of 1.0. The ROC Az values were 0.791 and 1.000 for intraoral radiography and CBCT, respectively. With intraoral radiography, external factors (i.e. anatomical noise and poor irradiation geometry), which are not in the clinician's control, hinder the detection of periapical lesions. CBCT removes these external factors. In addition, it allows the clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of the presence and absence of artificial periapical lesions.

  16. Evaluation of cone beam computed tomography and periapical radiography in the diagnosis of root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, T F; Gamba, T O; Zaia, A A; Soares, A J

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and periapical radiography in diagnosing root resorption and verify the influence of filling material in detecting these lesions. Digital periapical radiographs and CBCT images of patients with root resorption and a history of dental trauma from a radiology clinic were reviewed retrospectively. The sample comprised 40 teeth with root resorption and 20 normal teeth as controls. Images were analysed by two radiologists and two endodontists. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were determined. The kappa coefficient assessed interobserver agreement and the t test determined significant differences between the imaging methods. The accuracy of CBCT in diagnosing external (P = 0.0144) and internal (P = 0.0038) inflammatory resorption was significantly higher than for periapical radiography. For replacement resorption, no statistical difference was noted (P > 0.05). In endodontically treated teeth, CBCT was statistically superior in diagnosing root resorption (P = 0.0138). CBCT was superior to digital periapical radiography in diagnosing external and internal inflammatory root resorption after dental trauma and can be considered in the differential diagnosis of resorptive lesions in teeth with endodontic treatment. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Comparison of cone-beam computed tomography and periapical radiography for detecting simulated apical root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyu; Chen, Jun; Deng, Feng; Zheng, Leilei; Liu, Xiong; Dong, Yanling

    2013-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and periapical radiography for detecting simulated external apical root resorption (EARR) in vitro. The study sample consisted of 160 single-rooted premolar teeth for simulating EARR of varying degrees according to four setups: no (intact teeth), mild (cavity of 1.0 mm in diameter and depth on root surface), moderate (0.4 mm, 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm, and 1.6 mm root shortening), and severe (2.4 mm, 2.8 mm, 3.2 mm, and 3.6 mm root shortening). Two groups of radiographic images were obtained via CBCT and periapical radiography. The absence or presence and the severity for all resorption lesions were evaluated blindly by two calibrated observers. With the CBCT method, the rates of correct classification of no, mild, moderate, and severe EARR were 96.3%, 98.8%, 41.3%, and 87.5%, respectively; with the periapical radiography method, the rates were 82.5%, 41.3%, 68.8%, and 92.5%, respectively. Highly significant differences were found between the two imaging methods for detection of mild (P periapical radiography. CBCT is a reliable diagnostic tool to detect simulated EARR, whereas periapical radiography underestimates it. However, if a periapical radiograph is already available to the diagnosis of EARR, CBCT should be used with extreme caution to avoid additional radiation exposure.

  18. Accuracy of digital periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Teixeira, Fabricio B.; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Materials and Methods Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. Results A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. Conclusion CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption. PMID:26389057

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Internal Root Resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Zahrasadat; Moudi, Ehsan; Bijani, Ali; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and periapical (PA) radiography in detecting internal root resorption. Methods and Materials: Eighty single rooted human teeth with visible pulps in PA radiography were split mesiodistally along the coronal plane. Internal resorption like lesions were created in three areas (cervical, middle and apical) in labial wall of the canals in different diameters. PA radiography and CBCT images were taken from each tooth. Two observers examined the radiographs and CBCT images to evaluate the presence of resorption cavities. The data were statistically analyzed and degree of agreement was calculated using Cohen’s kappa (k) values. Results: The mean±SD of agreement coefficient of kappa between the two observers of the CBCT images was calculated to be 0.681±0.047. The coefficients for the direct, mesial and distal PA radiography were 0.405±0.059, 0.421±0.060 and 0.432±0.056, respectively (P=0.001). The differences in the diagnostic accuracy of resorption of different sizes were statistically significant (Pradiography and CBCT, had no statistically significant differences in detection of internal resorption lesions in the cervical, middle and apical regions. Conclusion: Though, CBCT has a higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value in comparison with conventional radiography, this difference was not significant. PMID:26843878

  20. Does hyrax expansion therapy affect maxillary sinus volume? A cone-beam computed tomography report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsey, Drew M.; English, Jeryl D.; Ellis, Randy K.; Akyalcin, Sercan [School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Kau, Chung H [School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the initial effects of maxillary expansion therapy with Hyrax appliance and to evaluate the related changes in maxillary sinus volume. Thirty patients (20 females, 10 males; 13.8 years) requiring maxillary expansion therapy, as part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatment, were examined. Each patient had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before (T1) and after (T2) maxillary expansion therapy with a banded Hyrax appliance. Multiplanar slices were used to measure linear dimensions and palatal vault angle. Volumetric analysis was used to measure maxillary sinus volumes. Student t tests were used to compare the pre- and post-treatment measurements. Additionally, differences between two age groups were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. Comparison of pre-treatment to post-treatment variables revealed significant changes in the transverse dimension related to both maxillary skeletal and dental structures and palatal vault angle, resulting in a widened palatal vault (p<0.05). Hard palate showed no significant movement in the vertical and anteroposterior planes. Nasal cavity width increased on a mean value of 0.93 mm(SD=0.23, p<0.05). Maxillary sinus volume remained virtually stable. No significant age differences were observed in the sample. Hyrax expansion therapy did not have a significant impact on maxillary sinus volume.

  1. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo SCHWARTZ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT.Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0 and after Herbst treatment (T1. All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%.Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders.Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance.

  2. Does hyrax expansion therapy affect maxillary sinus volume? A cone-beam computed tomography report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsey, Drew M.; English, Jeryl D.; Ellis, Randy K.; Akyalcin, Sercan; Kau, Chung H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the initial effects of maxillary expansion therapy with Hyrax appliance and to evaluate the related changes in maxillary sinus volume. Thirty patients (20 females, 10 males; 13.8 years) requiring maxillary expansion therapy, as part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatment, were examined. Each patient had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before (T1) and after (T2) maxillary expansion therapy with a banded Hyrax appliance. Multiplanar slices were used to measure linear dimensions and palatal vault angle. Volumetric analysis was used to measure maxillary sinus volumes. Student t tests were used to compare the pre- and post-treatment measurements. Additionally, differences between two age groups were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. Comparison of pre-treatment to post-treatment variables revealed significant changes in the transverse dimension related to both maxillary skeletal and dental structures and palatal vault angle, resulting in a widened palatal vault (p<0.05). Hard palate showed no significant movement in the vertical and anteroposterior planes. Nasal cavity width increased on a mean value of 0.93 mm(SD=0.23, p<0.05). Maxillary sinus volume remained virtually stable. No significant age differences were observed in the sample. Hyrax expansion therapy did not have a significant impact on maxillary sinus volume.

  3. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Ryan J; Atchison, Kathryn A; White, Stuart C

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we measured the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Participant orthodontists shown traditional orthodontic records for 6 patients were asked to provide a diagnostic problem list, a hypothetical treatment plan, and a clinical certainty. They then evaluated a CBCT scan for each patient and noted any changes, confirmations, or enhancements to their diagnosis and treatment plan. The number of diagnosis and treatment plan changes varied widely by patient characteristics. The most frequently reported diagnosis and treatment plan changes occurred in patients with unerupted teeth, severe root resorption, or severe skeletal discrepancies. We found no benefit in terms of changes in treatment plan for patients when the reason for obtaining a CBCT scan was to examine for abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint or airway, or crowding. Orthodontic participants who own CBCT machines or use CBCT scans frequently in practice reported significantly more diagnosis and treatment plan changes and greater confidence after viewing the CBCT scans during the study. The results of this study support obtaining a CBCT scan before orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning when a patient has an unerupted tooth with delayed eruption or a questionable location, severe root resorption as diagnosed with a periapical or panoramic radiograph, or a severe skeletal discrepancy. We propose that CBCT scans should be ordered only when there is clear, specific, individual clinical justification. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective doxorubicin drug eluting beads chemoembolization of hypovascular hepatocellular carcinoma using cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC of the liver is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Only one-third of patients with HCC are suitable candidates for hepatic resection. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE is performed in unresectable HCC. Drug-eluting beads (DEB TACE is a modification of TACE, in which doxorubicin beads are used as embolizing material.These beads deliver the drug and embolize the vessels; however, it carries the risk of non-target embolization and it is difficult in cases with absent arterial blush on digital subtraction angiography (DSA. This is resolved using C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in the DSA suite. It identifies the tumor-feeding vessels, their area of supply, and differentiates between tumor and normal liver parenchyma. In addition, it is very useful in the embolization of hypovascular HCC. It helps and guides the radiologist in performing TACE effectively and also prevents non-target embolization of normal liver parenchyma.

  5. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  6. Clinical application of electron beam computed tomography in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gejun; Dai Ruping; Cao Cheng; Qi Xiaoou; Bai Hua; Ma Zhanhong; Chen Yao; Mu Feng; Ren Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of truncus arteriosus (TA). Methods: Ten cases of TA with age ranging from 2-month to 24 years were studied. All cases were examined and diagnosed with Imatron C-150 scanner using contrastmedia. The results of EBCT were analyzed and compared with the results of echocardiography (in 10 cases), cardiovascular angiography (in 3 cases) and surgery findings (in 1 case ). Results: EBCT yielded qualitative diagnosis and classification in all 10 cases. Echocardiography revealed qualitative diagnosis in 9 cases, however its classification was accordant to EBCT just in 5 cases. The concomitant abnormalities of TA were found more with EBCT than that with echocardiography. Cardiovascular angiography was performed in 3 cases, yielding inaccurate classification 2 cases. One case of TA was operated just based on the results of echocardiography, EBCT and catheterization. Conclusion: As a noninvasive method, EBCT could yield qualitative diagnosis of TA as well as classification. The results of EBCT examination combining echocardiography and catheterization could guide the operations. (authors)

  7. Management of Oehler’s Type III Dens Invaginatus Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Ranganathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens Invaginatus is a dental malformation that poses diagnostic difficulties in the clinical context. This anomaly may increase the risk of pulp disease and can potentially complicate endodontic procedure due to the aberrant root canal anatomy. Compared to conventional radiographs, three-dimensional images obtained with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT are invaluable in the diagnosis of the extent of this anomaly and in the appropriate treatment planning. Oehler’s classification (1957 for Dens Invaginatus (DI into three types depending on the depth of the invagination has been used for treatment planning. Of the three types Type III DI is characterized by infolding of the enamel into the tooth up to the root apex and is considered as the most severe variant of DI and hence the most challenging to treat endodontically, due to the morphological complexities. This report describes a case of Oehler’s Type III DI in a necrotic permanent maxillary lateral incisor in which CBCT images played a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. The case was managed successfully by a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic therapy with orthograde and retrograde thermoplastic gutta percha obturation.

  8. Management of Oehler's Type III Dens Invaginatus Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Jaya; Rangarajan Sundaresan, Mohan Kumar; Ramasamy, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Dens Invaginatus is a dental malformation that poses diagnostic difficulties in the clinical context. This anomaly may increase the risk of pulp disease and can potentially complicate endodontic procedure due to the aberrant root canal anatomy. Compared to conventional radiographs, three-dimensional images obtained with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) are invaluable in the diagnosis of the extent of this anomaly and in the appropriate treatment planning. Oehler's classification (1957) for Dens Invaginatus (DI) into three types depending on the depth of the invagination has been used for treatment planning. Of the three types Type III DI is characterized by infolding of the enamel into the tooth up to the root apex and is considered as the most severe variant of DI and hence the most challenging to treat endodontically, due to the morphological complexities. This report describes a case of Oehler's Type III DI in a necrotic permanent maxillary lateral incisor in which CBCT images played a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. The case was managed successfully by a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic therapy with orthograde and retrograde thermoplastic gutta percha obturation.

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography: time for an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging technology that has revolutionised dental imaging in the last decade. Although of particular value to specialists performing implant treatment, it is increasingly being adopted by general dental practitioners. As the radiation dose is higher than that of conventional radiography, it is important to consider its diagnostic efficacy for the common tasks performed in general dental practice, such as caries diagnosis, endodontics and the detection of periapical pathosis. Any new imaging technique needs to have proven advantages over existing techniques before it is adopted, yet the evidence remains quite limited. Furthermore, image quality and radiation doses vary enormously between different manufacturers' equipment, so that extrapolating results of one piece of research from one CBCT machine to another is fraught with pitfalls. Radiation doses with CBCT are typically an order of magnitude higher than conventional radiography. There is scope, however, for reducing these doses by judicious adjustment of exposure factors and limiting the field of view to the smallest dimensions consistent with the clinical situation. There is still a long way to go before we understand the value of CBCT in dentistry. High quality research evidence is needed, particularly with regard to assessing whether using BCT improves patient outcomes.

  10. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for diagnosis and treatment planning in periodontology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Clemens; Schmidt, Julia C; Dula, Karl; Sculean, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The improvement in diagnostic accuracy and optimization of treatment planning in periodontology through the use of three-dimensional imaging with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is discussed controversially in the literature. The objective was to identify the best available external evidence for the indications of CBCT for periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning in specific clinical situations. A systematic literature search was performed for articles published by 2 March 2015 using electronic databases and hand search. Two reviewers performed the study selection, data collection, and validity assessment. PICO and PRISMA criteria were applied. From the combined search, seven studies were finally included. The case series were published from the years 2009 to 2014. Five of the included publications refer to maxillary and/or mandibular molars and two to aspects related to vertical bony defects. Two studies show a high accuracy of CBCT in detecting intrabony defect morphology when compared to periapical radiographs. Particularly, in maxillary molars, CBCT provides high accuracy for detecting furcation involvement and morphology of surrounding periodontal tissues. CBCT has demonstrated advantages, when more invasive treatment approaches were considered in terms of decision making and cost benefit. Within their limits, the available data suggest that CBCT may improve diagnostic accuracy and optimize treatment planning in periodontal defects, particularly in maxillary molars with furcation involvement, and that the higher irradiation doses and cost-benefit ratio should be carefully analyzed before using CBCT for periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning.

  11. Comprehensive evaluation of anomalous pulmonary venous connection by electron beam computed tomography as compared with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaoxiong; Dai Ruping; Bai Hua; He Sha; Jing Baolian

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Methods: Retrospective analysis on 14 cases with anomalous pulmonary venous connection was performed using EBCT volume scan. The slice thickness and scan time were 3 mm and 100 ms respectively. Non-ionic contrast medium was applied. Three dimensional reconstruction of EBCT images were carried out on all cases. Meanwhile, ultrasound echocardiography was performed on all patients. Conventional cardiovascular angiography was performed on 8 patients and 2 cases received operation. Results: Ten patients with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, including 6 cases of supra-cardiac type and 4 cases of cardiac type, were proved by EBCT examination. Among them, 3 cases of abnormal pulmonary venous drainage were not revealed by conventional cardiovascular angiography. Among four patients with partial pulmonary venous connection, including cardiac type in 2 cases, supra-cardiac type and infra-cardiac type in 1 case respectively, only one of them was demonstrated by echocardiography. Conclusion: EBCT has significant value in diagnosis of anomalous pulmonary venous connection which may not be detectable with echocardiography or even cardiovascular angiography

  12. Immediate implant placement: the fate of the buccal crest. A retrospective cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, E; Staas, T A; Graauwmans, F E J; Bronkhorst, E; Verhamme, L; Maal, T; Meijer, G J

    2017-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to analyse the fate of the buccal crest after immediate implant placement (IIP) through the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In 16 consecutive patients, an implant was placed in a more palatal position after extraction, thereby creating a gap of at least 2mm between the implant and the buccal crest. Subsequently, this gap was filled with a bone substitute. Preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and late postoperatively, a CBCT was made to measure the thickness of the buccal crest. After application of the bone substitute, the buccal crest increased in thickness from 0.9mm to 2.4mm (mean). At a mean of 103 weeks after IIP, late postoperative CBCT scans showed that the thickness of the buccal crest was compacted to 1.8mm. In the same period, the height of the buccal crest increased by 1.6mm (mean) to, on average, 1.2mm above the implant shoulder. The aesthetic outcome was analysed using the White and Pink Esthetic Score (WES and PES). Both scored high: 8.4 and 11.8, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, the results of this IIP protocol are promising. Long-term prospective research on this topic on a large number of patients is necessary. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oropharyngeal airway in children with Class III malocclusion evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomonori; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Kanomi, Ryuzo; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2009-09-01

    Upper airway size is increasingly recognized as an important factor in malocclusion. However, children with Class III malocclusion are somewhat neglected compared with those with a Class II skeletal pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the characteristic shape of the oropharyngeal airway (OA) in children with Class III malocclusion. The sample comprised 45 children (average age, 8.6 +/- 1.0 years) divided into 2 groups: 25 with Class I and 20 with Class III malocclusions. OA size of each group was evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography. Cluster analysis, based on OA shape, redivided the subjects into wide, square, and long types. The distributions of Class I and Class III subjects were compared among the types. The Class III group showed statistically larger OA area and width compared with the Class I group. Area was positively correlated with Class III severity. The square type included 84% of the Class I malocclusions but only 30% of the Class III malocclusions, indicating that the OA in Class III malocclusion tends to be flat. The Class III malocclusion is associated with a large and flat OA compared with the Class I malocclusion.

  14. Articular Eminence Inclination, Height, and Condyle Morphology on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilhan İlgüy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between articular eminence inclination, height, and thickness of the roof of the glenoid fossa (RGF according to age and gender and to assess condyle morphology including incidental findings of osseous characteristics associated with osteoarthritis (OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods. CBCT images of 105 patients were evaluated retrospectively. For articular eminence inclination and height, axial views on which the condylar processes were seen with their widest mediolateral extent being used as a reference view for secondary reconstruction. Condyle morphology was categorized both in the sagittal and coronal plane. Results. The mean values of eminence inclination and height of males were higher than those of females (P<0.05. There were significant differences in the RGF thickness in relation to sagittal condyle morphology. Among the group of OA, the mean value of the RGF thickness for “OA-osteophyte” group was the highest (1.59 mm, whereas the lowest RGF values were seen in the “OA-flattening.” Conclusion. The sagittal osteoarthritic changes may have an effect on RGF thickness by mechanical stimulation and changed stress distribution. Gender has a significant effect on eminence height (Eh and inclination.

  15. Detection of vertical root fractures by using cone-beam computed tomography: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Mitchell; Nair, Madhu K; Nair, Umadevi P

    2011-06-01

    Vertical root fractures of teeth (VRFs) often pose a diagnostic dilemma because of the difficulty in detection of these in intraoral radiographs except in certain cases with very distinct clinical findings. This often leads to unwarranted extraction of the tooth. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces three-dimensional images and allows precise visualization and evaluation of VRFs or cracks in extracted teeth, as reported previously. This clinical pilot study was designed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive CBCT for detection of suspected VRFs in endodontically treated teeth by using exploratory surgery to confirm the presence or absence of a fracture. Thirty-two teeth in 29 patients with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of VRF were included in the study after informed consent was obtained. They underwent a limited area CBCT evaluation. All CBCT studies were blinded, and 2 board-certified oral and maxillofacial radiologists assessed the presence or absence of VRF through sequential evaluation of the three-dimensional volume. Subjects underwent surgical exploration as part of treatment, which helped establish the presence or absence of VRF. Pearson correlation coefficient by using surgical finding to confirm presence/absence of fracture was 0.602, positive predictive value was 91%, and negative predictive value was 67%. The sensitivity was 88%, and specificity was 75%. This study revealed the superior diagnostic accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRF. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosis of jaw and dentoalveolar fractures in a traumatized patient with cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Ilgüy, Dilhan; Ilgüy, Mehmet; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this case report is to discuss and illustrate the clinical usage of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for the diagnosis of maxillofacial fractures in a traumatized patient. In this presentation, a 30-year-old male patient who was referred to Oral Diagnosis and Radiology Department with a limitation of mouth opening was reported. The history of the patient revealed a traumatic injury on his face because of a fall. The patient was initially examined by a medical practitioner in the emergency department of a public hospital. According to 2D cephalometric analysis, no fracture existed. Panoramic radiograph and postero-anterior reverse-town showed bilateral condyle fractures. In addition, a fracture in the left mandibular incisor region could clearly be detected on the panoramic radiograph. For further diagnosis, digital images were taken with CBCT. Cross-sectional views showed two vertical fracture lines on the alveolar bone between teeth numbers 17, 18 and 14, 15. A palatal root fracture was observed associated with tooth number 18. A fracture line in the left mandibular incisor region as well as bilateral condyle fractures could be seen clearly on CBCT views. CBCT is becoming a popular tool in modern dental practise. In the diagnosis of dentoalveolar fractures, CBCT has made it possible for the practitioner to get more detailed information.

  17. Cone beam computed tomography evaluation of maxillary molar root canal morphology in a Turkish Cypriot population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Atakan; Aksoy, Umut; Basmaci, Fatma; Celikten, Berkan; Tufenkci, Pelin; Kelahmet, Umay; Orhan, Kaan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to review, analyse and characterize the root canal morphology of maxillary molars, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in a group of the Turkish Cypriot population. The sample for this cross-sectional study consisted of retrospective evaluation of CBCT scans of 290 adult patients (age range 1680). The number of roots and their morphology, the number of canals per tooth and the root canal configurations were also classified according to the method of Vertucci. Pearson’s chi-square test was performed for canal configurations, sides and gender (p < 0.05). Among the 373 first molars, there was no single-rooted specimen, 2 (0.53%) teeth had 2 roots, 365 (97.8%) teeth had 3 roots and 6 ones (1.6%) had 4 roots. Among the 438 second molars, 14 (3.1%) were single-rooted, 26 (5.9%) teeth had 2 roots, 392 (89.4%) teeth had 3 roots and 6 teeth (1.3%) had 4 roots. No sex difference was found in the frequency of additional canals both in the maxillary first and second molars. Occurrence of additional canals did not differ with age. These results provide detailed knowledge of the root canal anatomy of the maxillary molar teeth in this particular population, which is of clinical importance for dental professionals when performing endodontic treatment

  18. Integration of Digital Dental Casts in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all reported methods have drawbacks. The aim of this feasibility study is to present a new simplified method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. In a patient scheduled for orthognathic surgery, titanium markers were glued to the gingiva. Next, a CBCT scan and dental impressions were made. During the impression-taking procedure, the titanium markers were transferred to the impression. The impressions were scanned, and all CBCT datasets were exported in DICOM format. The two datasets were matched, and the dentition derived from the scanned impressions was transferred to the CBCT of the patient. After matching the two datasets, the average distance between the corresponding markers was 0.1 mm. This novel method allows for the integration of digital dental casts into CBCT scans, overcoming problems such as unwanted extra radiation exposure, distortion of soft tissues due to the use of bite jigs, and time-consuming digital data handling. PMID:23050159

  19. Cone-beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography based on x-ray absorption dosage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianshuai; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Wenlei; Zhang, Yuanke; Lu, Hongbing

    2018-02-01

    With the advances of x-ray excitable nanophosphors, x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) has become a promising hybrid imaging modality. In particular, a cone-beam XLCT (CB-XLCT) system has demonstrated its potential in in vivo imaging with the advantage of fast imaging speed over other XLCT systems. Currently, the imaging models of most XLCT systems assume that nanophosphors emit light based on the intensity distribution of x-ray within the object, not completely reflecting the nature of the x-ray excitation process. To improve the imaging quality of CB-XLCT, an imaging model that adopts an excitation model of nanophosphors based on x-ray absorption dosage is proposed in this study. To solve the ill-posed inverse problem, a reconstruction algorithm that combines the adaptive Tikhonov regularization method with the imaging model is implemented for CB-XLCT reconstruction. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments indicate that compared with the traditional forward model based on x-ray intensity, the proposed dose-based model could improve the image quality of CB-XLCT significantly in terms of target shape, localization accuracy, and image contrast. In addition, the proposed model behaves better in distinguishing closer targets, demonstrating its advantage in improving spatial resolution.

  20. Analisis gambaran histogramdan densitas kamar pulpa pada gigi suspek pulpitis reversibel dan ireversibel dengan menggunakan radiografi cone beam computed tomography (Histogram and density analysis of irreversible and reversible pulpitissuspected tooth using cone beam computed tomography radiography)

    OpenAIRE

    Lusi Epsilawati; Suhardjo Sitam; Sam Belly; Fahmi Oscandar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the pulp is most common and difficult to diagnose. For it radiographs is necessary. One attempt to do is to assess its histogram and density. Radiography equipment that has the ability to analyze is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study is to analyze radiograph of the pulp chamber histogram: peak value, grayscale and trends , as well as the density on the condition reversible and irreversible pulpitis condition. The population of this ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  2. Biomonitoring of DNA damage and cytotoxicity in individuals exposed to cone beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, V; Artioli, AJ; Matsumoto, MA; Filho, HN; Borgo, E; Oshima, CTF; Ribeiro, DA

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells from adults following cone beam CT exposure. Methods A total of 19 healthy adults (10 men and 9 women) submitted to cone beam CT were included. Results No significant statistically differences (P > 0.05) in micronucleus frequency were seen before and after cone beam CT exposure. In contrast, the tomography was able to increase other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity such as karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis (P < 0.05). Conclusion In summary, these data indicate that cone beam CT may not be a factor that induces chromosomal damage, but it is able to promote cytotoxicity. PMID:20587654

  3. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1year after BPA. Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Golamian, Masoud; Shahrzad, Maryam; Hajalioghli, Parisa; Shahmorady, Zahra; Fouladi, Daniel F; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Akhoundzadeh, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trabecular bone structural parameters evaluated using dental cone-beam computed tomography: cellular synthetic bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jung-Ting; Wu, Jay; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Michael Y c; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2013-11-09

    This study compared the adequacy of dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT) in evaluating the structural parameters of trabecular bones. The cellular synthetic bones in 4 density groups (Groups 1-4: 0.12, 0.16, 0.20, and 0.32 g/cm3) were used in this study. Each group comprised 8 experimental specimens that were approximately 1 cm3. Dental CBCT and micro-CT scans were conducted on each specimen to obtain independent measurements of the following 4 trabecular bone structural parameters: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), specific bone surface (BS/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp.). Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to compare the measurement variations between the dental CBCT and micro-CT scans. A Spearman analysis was conducted to calculate the correlation coefficients (r) of the dental CBCT and micro-CT measurements. Of the 4 groups, the BV/TV and Tb.Th. measured using dental CBCT were larger compared with those measured using micro-CT. By contrast, the BS/BV measured using dental CBCT was significantly less compared with those measured using micro-CT. Furthermore, in the low-density groups (Groups 1 and 2), the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was smaller compared with those measured using micro-CT. However, the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was slightly larger in the high-density groups (Groups 3 and 4) than it was in the low density groups. The correlation coefficients between the BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., and Tb.Sp. values measured using dental CBCT and micro-CT were 0.9296 (p < .001), 0.8061 (p < .001), 0.9390 (p < .001), and 0.9583 (p < .001), respectively. Although the dental CBCT and micro-CT approaches exhibited high correlations, the absolute values of BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., Tb.Sp. differed significantly between these measurements. Additional studies must be conducted to evaluate using dental CBCT in clinical practice.

  6. The growth of Medicare rebatable cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L F; Monsour, P

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of objective data documenting the growth of cone beam radiology in Australia. Medicare rebates for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans have been available since 1 July 2011. The aim of this study was to examine the Medicare data on the use of CBCT in order to quantify the growth of this technology over a three-year period and to assess if the growth of CBCT was impacting upon the use of dental panoramic radiology. The Medicare dataset was accessed, and data relating to the number and distribution of CBCTs and panoramic radiographs (PRs) were extracted. The data were broken down by state and territory, as well as by age group and gender of the patient, for the financial year periods July 2011 to June 2012, July 2012 to June 2013 and July 2013 to June 2014. Items relating to PRs were also extracted for the periods 2005-2008 and 2008-2011. In the period July 2011 to June 2014, a total of 226 232 CBCTs and 2 881 351 PRs were rebated through Medicare. The rate of CBCT services provided per 100 000 population increased by 42.3% over the three-year period, whereas the rate of PRs remained fairly constant. From the age group 5-14 years through to 55-64 years, females received more CBCTs and PRs than males. The total number of PRs rebated through Medicare increased slightly over each previous three-year period (2005-2008 and 2008-2011). There has been rapid growth of the use of CBCT over a three-year period, most marked in the State of Victoria. The higher number of CBCT examinations in females across almost all age groups, but most notably in the 15-24 years age group, raises questions about clinical decision making in the selection of cone beam imaging. There was little evidence that CBCTs were being used as a substitute for PRs, except for a small but consistent drop in the number of PRs being requested for diagnosis of surgically related dental conditions. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Maxillary First Molars with Six Canals Diagnosed with the Aid of Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The case reports present the endodontic management of two maxillary first molars with six canals. The diagnosis of morphology of multiple canal systems was identified under magnification of the dental operating microscope and was confirmed with the help of cone beam computed tomography. This paper discusses the variations in the canal morphology and the use of the latest adjuncts in successfully diagnosing and treating unusual canal anatomy.

  8. Mandibular cortical bone evaluation on cone beam computed tomography images of patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Sandra R.; Chen, Curtis S. K.; Leroux, Brian G.; Lee, Peggy P.; Hollender, Lars G.; Santos, Eduardo C. A. [UNESP; Drew, Shane P.; Hung, Kuei-Ching; Schubert, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to develop a technique for detecting cortical bone dimensional changes in patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ).Study Design. Subjects with BRONJ who had cone-beam computed tomography imaging were selected, with age- and gender-matched controls. Mandibular cortical bone measurements to detect bisphosphonate-related cortical bone changes were made inferior to mental foramen, in 3 different ways: within a fixed sized re...

  9. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions wer...

  10. Three-dimensional evaluation of pharyngeal airway in individuals with varying growth patterns using cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan Diwakar; Maninder Singh Sidhu; Mona Prabhakar; Seema Grover; Ritu Phogat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharyngeal airway volume in individuals with different vertical growth patterns. Methods: Cone beam computed tomography scans were evaluated of 40 subjects with the age range from 14 to 25 years and were divided into three groups. Horizontal growers consisted of 13 subjects, normal growers consisted of 14 subjects, and the vertical growers consisted of 13 subjects. The pharyngeal airway volume was measured using In Vivo Dental 5.1 so...

  11. Predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography intensity values

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhader, Mustafa; Hudieb, Malik; Khader, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictability of bone density at posterior mandibular implant sites using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) intensity values. Materials and Methods: CBCT cross-sectional images for 436 posterior mandibular implant sites were selected for the study. Using Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, California, USA), two observers classified the bone density into three categories: low, intermediate, and high, and CBCT intensity values were g...

  12. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  13. Determination of Proximity of Mandibular Third Molar to Mandibular Canal Using Panoramic Radiography and Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Darshana S Nayak; Shubhasini A Raghavan; Praveen Birur; Shubha Gurudath; Gurushanth Keerthi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Position of inferior alveolar canal with respect to an impacted third molar reveals certain radiographic signs, but three-dimensional relationship to the canal can be provided with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study was to determine which radiographic signs on panoramic radiography indicate a true relationship on CBCT. Materials and Methods: Forty samples with signs or symptoms of impacted mandibular third molar and panoramic radiograph showing signs o...

  14. Identification and Endodontic Management of Middle Mesial Canal in Mandibular Second Molar Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatments are routinely done with the help of radiographs. However, radiographs represent only a two-dimensional image of an object. Failure to identify aberrant anatomy can lead to endodontic failure. This case report presents the use of three-dimensional imaging with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT as an adjunct to digital radiography in identification and management of mandibular second molar with three mesial canals.

  15. [The potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpishchenko, S A; Zubareva, A A; Filimonov, V N; Shavgulidze, M A; Azovtseva, E A

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis for the detection of surgically significant specific structural features of the labyrinth wall of the tympanic cavity. More than 400 tomograms of the temporal bones were obtained with the use of a cone beam tomographwere available for the investigation during the period from 2012 till 2016. The study was carried out in several steps, viz. the search for the optimal (for the given instrument) position of the patient, the experimental stage, the retrospective analysis of the tomograms and the comparison of the temporal bones of different types (pneumatic, mixed, and sclerotic) in individual patients, the comparison of the results of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with the intraoperative observations, and the modification of the algorithm for the analysis of temporal bone cone beam tomograms. The study included a total of 16 patients (15 women at the age from 32 to 56 years and one managed 58 years) presenting with the clinical diagnosis of otosclerosis. The results of the study were used to elaborate the algorithm for the analysis of cone beam tomograms of the temporal bones to be performed inthe stage by stage manner including the qualitative analysis of tomograms, evaluation of their quantitative parameters and additional characteristics to be taken into consideration when planning the surgical interventions on the labyrinth wall and the tympanic cavity as a preparation for the stapedoplastic treatment. The results of CBCT obtained in the present study were compared with the surgical observations. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the method were estimated to be 100% and 83% respectively. It is concluded that cone beam computed tomography can be employed as a component of the diagnostic algorithm prior to the planning of surgical interventions onthe medial wall of the tympanic cavity

  16. Is the Schneiderian membrane thickness affected by periodontal disease? A cone beam computed tomography-based extended case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea C; Zitzmann, Nicola U; Lambrecht, J Thomas; Weiger, Roland; Walter, Clemens

    2013-07-01

    The aim was to assess the thickness of Schneiderian membranes (SM) in patients with advanced periodontal disease. 17 dentate patients (DG) scheduled for periodontal surgery on maxillary molars were consecutively recruited and cone beam computed tomographies performed for preoperative diagnosis. Twenty-one patients (EG) requiring cone beam computed tomography-based planning of implant placement in the edentulous posterior maxilla served as controls. Schneiderian membrane thickness measured from cone beam computed tomography was significantly greater in the dentate group compared to the edentulous group, both in the first (p = 0.028) and second (p periodontal destruction (increased probing pocket depth or furcation involvement) were not associated with Schneiderian membrane thickness. Additional findings, such as periapical lesions (p = 0.008), and the distance between root tips and maxillary sinus revealed a significant association (p = 0.036) with Schneiderian membrane thickness. In molar regions with periodontal destruction, Schneiderian membrane thickening occurred, particularly in combination with small bone layers above the root tips or periapical lesions.

  17. Reliability and validity of mandibular posterior vertical asymmetry index in panoramic radiography compared with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Sub; Chung, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Jin-Woo; Lee, Sang-Min

    2018-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the asymmetry index using panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for detecting mandibular posterior asymmetry and to evaluate the diagnostic value of the asymmetry index on panoramic radiography. A total of 43 patients were included in this study. Ten mandibular posterior distances were measured using panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography, and 10 asymmetry index values were calculated. The reliability of each asymmetry index was assessed. For evaluating validity of each asymmetry index using panoramic radiography, the paired t test and the Bland-Altman analysis were used. The accuracy of the asymmetry index and the area under the curve of receiver operator characteristic were calculated. The asymmetry index of total ramal height showed good reliability (ICC, >0.888). In condylar height 1, specificity and negative predictive value were low (0.08 and 0.17, respectively), 95% limits of agreement were ±17.9%, and area under the curve was 0.484. In total, ramal height accuracy was 0.86, and areas under the curve were 0.926 to 0.957. For detecting asymmetry of the condyle region, the asymmetry index using panoramic radiography had little diagnostic value, and we recommend using cone-beam computed tomography images. However, the asymmetry index for total ramal height showed good reliability and relatively higher validity, and its diagnostic value was excellent. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: a comprehensive review. Part 2: applications associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohenca, N.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript

  19. Computed tomography from photon statistics to modern cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Buzug, T M

    2008-01-01

    Tis book provides an overview of X-ray technology, the historic developmental milestones of modern CT systems, and gives a comprehensive insight into the main reconstruction methods used in computed tomography. Te basis of reconstr- tion is, undoubtedly, mathematics. However, the beauty of computed tomography cannot be understood without a detailed knowledge of X-ray generation, photon- matter interaction, X-ray detection, photon statistics, as well as fundamental signal processing concepts and dedicated measurement systems. Terefore, the reader will ?nd a number of references to these basic d

  20. A local region of interest image reconstruction via filtered backprojection for fan-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has been experimentally implemented using a conventional source combined with several gratings. Images were reconstructed using a parallel-beam reconstruction formula. However, parallel-beam reconstruction formulae are not directly applicable for a large image object where the parallel-beam approximation fails. In this note, we present a new image reconstruction formula for fan-beam DPC-CT. There are two major features in this algorithm: (1) it enables the reconstruction of a local region of interest (ROI) using data acquired from an angular interval shorter than 180 0 + fan angle and (2) it still preserves the filtered backprojection structure. Numerical simulations have been conducted to validate the image reconstruction algorithm. (note)

  1. Detection and measurement of artificial periapical lesions by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y-H; Jiang, L; Gao, X-J; Shemesh, H; Wesselink, P R; Wu, M-K

    2014-04-01

    To test the ability of periapical radiography (PA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to determine the presence/absence of periapical lesions and examine the reliability of volumetric measurements of periapical lesions on CBCT scans. After tooth extractions in human mandibles, bone defects were cut at the base of extraction sockets to mimic periapical bone lesions. The teeth were then returned into the extraction sockets. Sixty-three roots of anterior teeth, premolars and molars with artificial periapical lesions and 37 roots without lesions were examined with PA and CBCT. Presence/absence of periapical lesion was noted. The CBCT-based volume of each lesion (Vct) was measured using Amira software 5.4 (Visage Imaging GmbH, Berlin, Germany). A replica of each lesion was created using silicone impression material, and the volume of the replica was measured using a water displacement method, representing the physical volume of the lesion (Vp). Regression analysis was used to test the correlation between the Vp and Vct values. The positive and negative predictive values and accuracy for CBCT in diagnosing periapical lesions were all 1, compared with 1, 0.64 and 0.79 for PA diagnosis. Twenty-one (33%) lesions were undetected by PA. The Vp (21.5 ± 11.0 mm(3) ) and Vct (21.4 ± 11.5 mm(3) ) values of 63 lesions were highly correlated (R(2) = 96.9%, P periapical lesions associated with mandibular teeth. The volumes of artificial mandibular periapical lesions were accurately measured with CBCT data. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Value of two cone-beam computed tomography systems from an orthodontic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbmacher, Heike; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Schöllchen, Max; Heiland, Max

    2007-07-01

    Since its introduction in dental radiology in 1998, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has found increasing acceptance in clinical routine. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate this imaging modality from an orthodontic point of view. Two systems formed the basis of this investigation: the NewTom 9000 (NewTom Germany AG, Marburg, Germany), in use at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf since October 2002, and the mobile Arcadis Orbic 3D system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany), which was introduced in February 2005. Two independent examiners evaluated a total of 68 NewTom and 15 Arcadis Orbic 3D images involving orthodontic indications. The images were categorized according to their indications and diagnostic value assessed according to a predefined and quantifiable protocol. Information obtained from the CBCT was also compared to that gleaned from conventional radiographs. The indication for the NewTom images in cleft patients as well as for all Arcadis Orbic 3D images was considered justified. The osseous morphology of the cleft and position of osteosynthetic screws and plates were particularly well visualized. CBCT implementation in cases of tooth impaction or for assessing third molars was considered justified, although its value was judged differently by the two examiners. CBCT did not provide more information than conventional imaging regarding cartilaginous joint structures. In complex orthodontic cases in which 3D imaging is mandatory, CBCT is the method of choice. Furthermore, in cleft patients and those undergoing combined orthodontic and maxillofacial therapy, CBCT proved advantageous, providing more information than conventional images.

  3. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); NECTAR Imaging srl Imola (Italy); Casali, F. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, M. [CEFLA Dental Group Imola (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  4. Prevalence and location of the posterior superior alveolar artery using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranchi, Maryam; Taleghani, Ferial; Shahab, Shahriar [Faculty of Dentistry, Shahed University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nouri, Arash [Nouri' s Dental Clinic, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Insufficient knowledge of the anatomy of the maxillary sinuses prior to sinus graft surgery may lead to perioperative or postoperative complications. This study sought to characterize the position of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) within the maxillary sinuses using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 300 patients with edentulous posterior maxillae, including 138 females and 162 males with an age range of 33-86 years, who presented to a radiology clinic between 2013 and 2015 were enrolled in this retrospective cross-sectional study. The distance from the inferior border of the PSAA to the alveolar crest according to the residual ridge classification by Lekholm and Zarb, the distance from the PSAA to the nasal septum and zygomatic arch, and the diameter and position of the PSAA were all assessed on patients' CBCT scans. The data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test and the t-test. The PSAA was detected on the CBCT scans of 87% of the patients; it was located beneath the sinus membrane in 47% of cases and was intraosseous in 47% of cases. The diameter of the artery was between 1 and 2 mm in most patients (72%). The mean diameter of the artery was 1.29±0.39 mm, and the mean distances from the PSAA to the zygomatic arch, nasal septum, and alveolar crest were 22.59±4.89 mm, 26.51±3.52 mm, and 16.7±3.96 mm, respectively. The likelihood of detecting the PSAA on CBCT scans is high; its location is intraosseous or beneath the sinus membrane in most patients. Determining the exact location of the PSAA on CBCT scans preoperatively can help prevent it from being damaged during surgery.

  5. Accuracy of linear measurement using cone-beam computed tomography at different reconstruction angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikneshan, Nikneshan; Aval, Shadi Hamidi; Bakhshalian, Neema; Shahab, Shahriyar; Mohammadpour, Mahdis; SarikhanI, Soodeh

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of changing the orientation of a reconstructed image on the accuracy of linear measurements using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-two titanium pins were inserted in seven dry sheep mandibles. The length of these pins was measured using a digital caliper with readability of 0.01 mm. Mandibles were radiographed using a CBCT device. When the CBCT images were reconstructed, the orientation of slices was adjusted to parallel (i.e., 0 degrees), +10 degrees, +12 degrees, -12 degrees, and -10 degrees with respect to the occlusal plane. The length of the pins was measured by three radiologists, and the accuracy of these measurements was reported using descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The differences in radiographic measurements ranged from -0.64 to +0.06 at the orientation of -12 degrees, -0.66 to -0.11 at -10 degrees, -0.51 to +0.19 at 0 degrees, -0.64 to +0.08 at +10 degrees, and -0.64 to +0.1 at +12 degrees. The mean absolute values of the errors were greater at negative orientations than at the parallel position or at positive orientations. The observers underestimated most of the variables by 0.5-0.1 mm (83.6%). In the second set of observations, the reproducibility at all orientations was greater than 0.9. Changing the slice orientation in the range of -12 degrees to +12 degrees reduced the accuracy of linear measurements obtained using CBCT. However, the error value was smaller than 0.5 mm and was, therefore, clinically acceptable.

  6. Cone-beam computed tomography in pediatric dentistry, a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Jakob W G; Martens, Luc C; Aps, Johan K M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to find the reasons for referral and their correlation with age, gender, field of view, and resolution for all patients under the age of 18 who underwent a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan between 1 May 2010 and 1 May 2012 in the dental out-patient clinic of the University Hospital Ghent. From the local CBCT database, 79 pediatric patients gave their consent. Subsequently age, gender, reason for referral, external or internal referral, field of view (FOV), and resolution data were collected. Descriptive and comparative statistical analysis was performed. There seemed to be a correlation between orthodontic referrals and female patients. The majority of patients referred for trauma follow-up were 12 years and older. Fourteen percent of referrals were for dento-alveolar trauma, 18 % for other dento-alveolar reasons, 4 % for developing dentition-generalized, 36 % for developing dentition-localized, 10 % for endodontics, 1 % for periodontics, 16 % for surgical applications, and 1 % was for the visualization of the TMJ. Eighty percent of the CBCTs were taken at a FOV 50 × 55 mm. Larger FOV was used for surgical planning or follow-up reasons. The majority of the CBCTs was taken at a resolution of 200 μm, while a resolution of 150 μm was used for endodontic issues. From these results, a classification system for referral was developed. From the present study, it can be concluded that a referral pattern could be detected which was correlated with gender, age group, FOV, and resolution. These results can help practitioners make the decision to refer for CBCT when extra three dimensional imaging is expected to have a benefit in therapeutic value for a pediatric or adolescent patient. This study can guide dental professionals referring pediatric and adolescent patients for CBCT.

  7. Quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography gated by active breathing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Bria P.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) gated by active breathing control (ABC), which may be useful for image guidance in the presence of respiration. Comparisons were made between conventional ABC-CBCT (stop and go), fast ABC-CBCT (a method to speed up the acquisition by slowing the gantry instead of stopping during free breathing), and free breathing respiration correlated CBCT. Image quality was assessed in phantom. Accuracy of reconstructed voxel intensity, uniformity, and root mean square error were evaluated. Registration accuracy (bony and soft tissue) was quantified with both an anthropomorphic and a quality assurance phantom. Gantry angle accuracy was measured with respect to gantry speed modulation. Conventional ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 2.3 to 5.8 min. Fast ABC-CBCT scan time ranged from 1.4 to 1.8 min, and respiratory correlated CBCT scans took 2.1 min to complete. Voxel intensity value for ABC gated scans was accurate relative to a normal clinical scan with all projections. Uniformity and root mean square error performance degraded as the number of projections used in the reconstruction of the fast ABC-CBCT scans decreased (shortest breath hold, longest free breathing segment). Registration accuracy for small, large, and rotational corrections was within 1 mm and 1 degree sign . Gantry angle accuracy was within 1 degree sign for all scans. For high-contrast targets, performance for image-guidance purposes was similar for fast and conventional ABC-CBCT scans and respiration correlated CBCT.

  8. Clinical Application of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 1 - Normal Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, G G; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Hatcher, David C; Kass, Philip H; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ) are increasingly popular as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental diseases. Diagnostic approaches for dental disease include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). CT overcomes many limitations of standard radiography by permitting cross-sectional images of the rabbit head in multiple planes without superimposition of anatomic structures. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that produces high-resolution images. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the normal anatomic features of the dentition and surrounding maxillofacial structures in healthy rabbits on CBCT and conventional CT. Ten New Zealand white rabbit cadaver heads were scanned using CBCT and conventional CT. Images were evaluated using Anatomage Invivo 5 software. The maxillofacial anatomy was labeled on CBCT images, and the mean lengths and widths of the teeth were determined. The visibility of relevant dental and anatomic features (pulp cavity, germinal center, tooth outline, periodontal ligament) were scored and compared between conventional CT and CBCT. The thinnest teeth were the maxillary second incisor teeth at 1.29 ± 0.26 mm and the maxillary third molar teeth at 1.04 ± 0.10 mm. In general, it was found that CBCT was superior to conventional CT when imaging the dentition. Importantly, the periodontal ligament was significantly ( P  < 0.01) more visible on CBCT than on conventional CT. Ability to see the periodontal ligament with such detail may allow earlier detection and treatment of periodontal disease in rabbits. This study is the first of its kind and shows the feasibility and yield of CBCT when evaluating the maxillofacial features and dentition in rabbits.

  9. Comparison of mesiodistal root angulation with posttreatment panoramic radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Daniel G; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ludlow, John B; Phillips, Ceib

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontists assess mesiodistal root angulations before, during, and after orthodontic treatment as an aid in establishing proper root position. Panoramic imaging has been useful for this purpose and is a valuable screening tool in diagnosis and planning treatment of orthodontic patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for imaging of the craniofacial complex creates the opportunity to evaluate 3-dimensional images compared with traditional 2-dimensional images. The purpose of this project was to compare mesiodistal root angulations by using posttreatment panoramic radiographic images and CBCT scans. Mesiodistal root angulations from panoramic images and CBCT scans of 35 orthognathic surgery patients after orthodontic treatment were compared. The panoramic images were measured by using VixWin (Gendex Dental Systems, Des Plaines, Ill), and the CBCT scans by using InvivoDental 3D (version 4.1, Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The mesiodistal root angulation of each maxillary and mandibular tooth was measured by using the occlusal plane as the reference line. With an intercept-only linear regression for correlated data (with an unstructured covariance structure), the global test of whether the mean vector of all differences for the teeth is zero was performed separately for the 2 arches. The global test for both arches was statistically significant (P <0.001), indicating an overall difference in root angulation between measurements from panoramic and CBCT images. There was no discernible pattern in the average differences between panoramic and CBCT measurements. The assessment of mesiodistal tooth angulation with panoramic radiography should be approached with caution and reinforced by a thorough clinical examination of the dentition. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Application of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 1 - Normal Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GG Comet Riggs

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus are increasingly popular as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental diseases. Diagnostic approaches for dental disease include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT. CT overcomes many limitations of standard radiography by permitting cross-sectional images of the rabbit head in multiple planes without superimposition of anatomic structures. Cone-beam CT (CBCT is an oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that produces high-resolution images. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the normal anatomic features of the dentition and surrounding maxillofacial structures in healthy rabbits on CBCT and conventional CT. Ten New Zealand white rabbit cadaver heads were scanned using CBCT and conventional CT. Images were evaluated using Anatomage Invivo 5 software. The maxillofacial anatomy was labeled on CBCT images and the mean lengths and widths of the teeth were determined. The visibility of relevant dental and anatomic features (pulp cavity, germinal center, tooth outline, periodontal ligament were scored and compared between conventional CT and CBCT. The thinnest teeth were the maxillary second incisor teeth at 1.29 ± 0.26 mm and the maxillary third molar teeth at 1.04 ±0.10 mm. In general, it was found that CBCT was superior to conventional CT when imaging the dentition. Importantly, the periodontal ligament was significantly (P<0.01 more visible on CBCT than on conventional CT. Ability to see the periodontal ligament with such detail may allow earlier detection and treatment of periodontal disease in rabbits. This study is the first of its kind and shows the feasibility and yield of CBCT when evaluating the maxillofacial features and dentition in rabbits.

  11. Assessment of bifid and trified mandicular canals using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashsyren, Oyuntugs [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Mongolian National University Medical Science, Ulaanbaatar (United States); Choi, Jin Woo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate the prevalence of bifid and trifid mandibular canals using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to measure their length, diameter, and angle. CBCT images of 500 patients, involving 755 hemi-mandibles, were used for this study. The presence and type of bifid mandibular canal was evaluated according to a modified classification of Naitoh et al. Prevalence rates were determined according to age group, gender, and type. Further, their diameter, length, and angles were measured using PACSPLUS Viewer and ImageJ 1.46r. Statistical analysis with chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests was performed. Bifid and trifid mandibular canals were found in 22.6% of the 500 patients and 16.2% of the 755 sides. There was no significant difference between genders and among age groups. The retromolar canal type accounted for 71.3% of the identified canals; the dental canal type, 18.8%; the forward canal type, 4.1%; and the trifid canal type, 5.8%. Interestingly, seven cases of the trifid canal type, which has been rarely reported, were observed. The mean diameter of the bifid and trifid mandibular canals was 2.2 mm and that of the main mandibular canal was 4.3 mm. Their mean length was 16.9 mm; the mean superior angle was 149.2 degrees, and the mean inferior angle was 37.7 degrees. Bifid and trifid mandibular canals in the Korean population were observed at a relatively high rate through a CBCT evaluation, and the most common type was the retromolar canal. CBCT is suggested for a detailed evaluation of bifid and trifid mandibular canals before mandibular surgery.

  12. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  13. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores, E-mail: bastosluana@ymail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral e Maxilofacial; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Camaragibe, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral

    2013-11-15

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  14. A cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of buccal bone thickness following maxillary expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyalcin, Sercan; Englih, Jeryl D.; Stephens, Claude R.; Winkelmann, Sam [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Schaefer, Jeffrey S. [Todd Hughes Orthodontics, Houston (United States)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to determine the buccal alveolar bone thickness following rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-four individuals (15 females, 9 males; 13.9 years) that underwent RME therapy were included. Each patient had CBCT images available before (T1), after (T2), and 2 to 3 years after (T3) maxillary expansion therapy. Coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were used to measure the linear transverse dimensions, inclinations of teeth, and thickness of the buccal alveolar bone. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to compare the changes between the three times of imaging. Pairwise comparisons were made with the Bonferroni method. The level of significance was established at p<0.05. The mean changes between the points in time yielded significant differences for both molar and premolar transverse measurements between T1 and T2 (p<0.05) and between T1 and T3 (p<0.05). When evaluating the effect of maxillary expansion on the amount of buccal alveolar bone, a decrease between T1 and T2 and an increase between T2 and T3 were found in the buccal bone thickness of both the maxillary first premolars and maxillary first molars. However, these changes were not significant. Similar changes were observed for the angular measurements. RME resulted in non-significant reduction of buccal bone between T1 and T2. These changes were reversible in the long-term with no evident deleterious effects on the alveolar buccal bone.

  15. Morphometric Analysis of the Mental Foramen Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyard dos Santos Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of age and sex on the location and size of the mental foramen (MF. A total of 104 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT scans from patients’ aged 18–80 years were selected. Images were evaluated using the following parameters: position and size of the MF, and Distances A (distance from the upper limit of the MF to the apex of the first lower premolar, B (distance from the upper cortical border of the MF to the alveolar crest, and C (distance from the border of the MF to the base of the mandible. Results revealed that the location of the MF was predominantly apical (44.4%, between the long axes of the premolars, at an average distance of 4.92 mm from the root of the first lower premolar. The height of the MF was significantly different between both sexes (3.41 and 2.99 mm, resp.; mean height: 3.11 mm; P=0.003. The MF was located on average at 11.21 mm from the alveolar crest and 12.31 mm from the base of the mandible; the former measurement was significantly different between both sexes (13.13 and 11.98 mm, resp.; P≤0.001. In conclusion, the location of the MF was predominantly apical between the long axes of the premolars, and the mean size and distance of the MF were greater in men.

  16. Evaluation of the accessory mental foramen in a pediatric population using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, K; Şekerci, Ae

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the occurrence, diameter, and location of the accessory mental foramen (AMF) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from a sample of Turkish children. This retrospective was carried out using a total of 275 CBCT images from child and adolescent patients were randomly selected from existing records in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Erciyes, Kayseri, Turkey. The mental foramen (MF) and AMF were assessed on axial, sagittal, and coronal CBCT slices. The mean age was 10.51 ± 3.32 years, consisting of 139 males (mean age 10.64 ± 3.42) and 126 females (mean age 10.38 ± 3.18). Twenty-one AMFs were observed in 18 of 275 patients (6.5%, 10 boys and eight girls). There was no significant difference in gender in relation to the prevalence of AMF (p = 0.65). The mean area of the 21 AMFs and the MF on the side with the AMF were 0.7 mm² (SD ± 0.5) and 3.8 mm² (SD ± 2.2), respectively. It is important to stress that detecting the AMN using CBCT with 3D reconstructions may reduce the risk of paralysis, hemorrhage, and postoperative pain in this region. Our study presents the first report assessing the occurrence, diameter, and location of the AMF in the pediatric population using CBCT images. In this respect, not surprisingly, the mean size of the AMF of our population is smaller than other reports in the literature that involve adult populations.

  17. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Hassan, Bassam; Li Limin; Pauwels, Ruben; Corpas, Livia; Souza, Paulo Couto; Martens, Wendy; Shahbazian, Maryam; Alonso, Arie

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT system (Somatom Sensation 16) using 13 different scan protocols. Visibility of 11 anatomical structures and overall image noise were compared between CBCT and MSCT. Five independent observers reviewed the CBCT and the MSCT images in the three orthographic planes (axial, sagittal and coronal) and assessed image quality on a five-point scale. Results: Significant differences were found in the visibility of the different anatomical structures and image noise level between MSCT and CBCT and among the five CBCT systems (p = 0.0001). Delicate structures such as trabecular bone and periodontal ligament were significantly less visible and more variable among the systems in comparison with other anatomical structures (p = 0.0001). Visibility of relatively large structures such as mandibular canal and mental foramen was satisfactory for all devices. The Accuitomo system was superior to MSCT and all other CBCT systems in depicting anatomical structures while MSCT was superior to all other CBCT systems in terms of reduced image noise. Conclusions: CBCT image quality is comparable or even superior to MSCT even though some variability exists among the different CBCT systems in depicting delicate structures. Considering the low radiation dose and high-resolution imaging, CBCT could be beneficial for dentomaxillofacial radiology.

  18. Predictive factors of the dimensions and location of mental foramen using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muinelo-Lorenzo, Juan; Fernández-Alonso, Ana; Smyth-Chamosa, Ernesto; Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan Antonio; Varela-Mallou, Jesús; Suárez-Cunqueiro, María Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    The mental foramen (MF) hosts main neurovascular structures, making it of crucial importance for surgical procedures. This study aimed to analyze the factors influencing the dimensions and location of the MF. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of 344 patients were examined for MF dimensions, as well as for the distances from the MF to the alveolar crest (MF-MSB), and to the inferior mandibular border (MF-MIB). Gender, mandibular side and presence of accessory mental foramina (AMF) significantly influence MF area. Males, left hemimandibles, and hemimandibles with no AMF had a higher rate of large MF areas (B = - 0.60; p = 0.003, females; B = 0.55; p = 0.005; B = 0.85; p = 0.038). Age, gender and dental status significantly influence MF-MSB distance. The distance decreased as age increased (B = -0.054; p = 0.001), females showed a lower rate of long MF-MSB distances (B = -0.94, p = 0.001), and dentate patients showed a higher rate of long MF-MSB distances (B = 2.27; p = 0.001). Age, gender and emerging angle significantly influenced MF-MIB distance. The distance decreased as age and emerging angle increased (B = -0.01; p = 0.001; B = -0.03; p = 0.001), and females had a lower rate of long MF-MIB distances (B = -1.94, p = 0.001). General and local factors influence the dimensions and location of MF. MF dimensions are influenced by gender, mandibular side, anteroposterior position, and the presence of AMF. Distance from MF to alveolar crest is influenced by gender, age and dental status, while the relative MF position is influenced by age and dental status. CBCT images make it possible to analyze the MF in order to avoid complications during surgical procedures.

  19. Assessment of the Mandibular Incisive Canal by Panoramic Radiograph and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

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    Ricardo Raitz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The region between mental foramens is considered as a zone of choice for implants. However, complications may arise due to an extension anterior to the mental foramen that forms the mandible incisive canal [MIC]. Our goal is to evaluate identification of MIC by both panoramic radiograph [PAN] and cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]. Methods. 150 cases with bilateral MIC were analyzed. Images of a radiolucent canal, within the trabecular bone, surrounded by a radiopaque cortical bone representing the canal walls, and extending to the anterior portion beyond the mental foramen, were considered by two independent radiologists as being images of MIC. PAN and CBCT of these cases were evaluated by 2 other radiologists at different times. Agreement between results of examination methods was assessed by the Kappa coefficient. The interexaminer and intramethod rates for detection of MIC were analyzed by the McNemar test. Gender, mandible side, examiner, and type of method were analyzed by the generalized estimating equations [GEE] model. Results. significant difference between examiners [PAN:  P=0.146; CBCT: P=0.749] was not observed. Analysis by GEE model showed no significant difference between genders [P=0.411] and examiners [P=0.183]. However, significant difference was observed for identification in both mandible right side [P=0.001], where the identification frequency was higher, and CBCT method [P<0.001]. Conclusions. PAN was not shown to be a safe examination to identify MIC. CBCT should always be used in preoperative planning and to reduce the number of complications in implant surgeries.

  20. Predictive factors of the dimensions and location of mental foramen using cone beam computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Muinelo-Lorenzo

    Full Text Available The mental foramen (MF hosts main neurovascular structures, making it of crucial importance for surgical procedures. This study aimed to analyze the factors influencing the dimensions and location of the MF.Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scans of 344 patients were examined for MF dimensions, as well as for the distances from the MF to the alveolar crest (MF-MSB, and to the inferior mandibular border (MF-MIB.Gender, mandibular side and presence of accessory mental foramina (AMF significantly influence MF area. Males, left hemimandibles, and hemimandibles with no AMF had a higher rate of large MF areas (B = - 0.60; p = 0.003, females; B = 0.55; p = 0.005; B = 0.85; p = 0.038. Age, gender and dental status significantly influence MF-MSB distance. The distance decreased as age increased (B = -0.054; p = 0.001, females showed a lower rate of long MF-MSB distances (B = -0.94, p = 0.001, and dentate patients showed a higher rate of long MF-MSB distances (B = 2.27; p = 0.001. Age, gender and emerging angle significantly influenced MF-MIB distance. The distance decreased as age and emerging angle increased (B = -0.01; p = 0.001; B = -0.03; p = 0.001, and females had a lower rate of long MF-MIB distances (B = -1.94, p = 0.001.General and local factors influence the dimensions and location of MF. MF dimensions are influenced by gender, mandibular side, anteroposterior position, and the presence of AMF. Distance from MF to alveolar crest is influenced by gender, age and dental status, while the relative MF position is influenced by age and dental status. CBCT images make it possible to analyze the MF in order to avoid complications during surgical procedures.

  1. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT)

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    Liang Xin, E-mail: Xin.Liang@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University (China); Jacobs, Reinhilde, E-mail: Reinhilde.Jacobs@uz.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Hassan, Bassam, E-mail: b.hassan@acta.n [Department of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li Limin, E-mail: Limin.Li@uz.kuleuven.b [Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Special Dental Care, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Pauwels@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Corpas, Livia, E-mail: LiviaCorpas@gmail.co [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Souza, Paulo Couto, E-mail: Paulo.CoutoSouza@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Wendy, E-mail: wendy.martens@uhasselt.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasselt, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Shahbazian, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahbazian@student.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Alonso, Arie, E-mail: ariel.alonso@uhasselt.b [Department of Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics, Universiteit Hasselt (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT system (Somatom Sensation 16) using 13 different scan protocols. Visibility of 11 anatomical structures and overall image noise were compared between CBCT and MSCT. Five independent observers reviewed the CBCT and the MSCT images in the three orthographic planes (axial, sagittal and coronal) and assessed image quality on a five-point scale. Results: Significant differences were found in the visibility of the different anatomical structures and image noise level between MSCT and CBCT and among the five CBCT systems (p = 0.0001). Delicate structures such as trabecular bone and periodontal ligament were significantly less visible and more variable among the systems in comparison with other anatomical structures (p = 0.0001). Visibility of relatively large structures such as mandibular canal and mental foramen was satisfactory for all devices. The Accuitomo system was superior to MSCT and all other CBCT systems in depicting anatomical structures while MSCT was superior to all other CBCT systems in terms of reduced image noise. Conclusions: CBCT image quality is comparable or even superior to MSCT even though some variability exists among the different CBCT systems in depicting delicate structures. Considering the low radiation dose and high-resolution imaging, CBCT could be beneficial for dentomaxillofacial radiology.

  2. Detection and characterization of the accessory mental foramen using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihan; Yang, Xiangwen; Zhang, Bichu; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the frequency and characteristics of accessory mental foramina (AMFs) and their bony canals in a selected Chinese population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Reconstructed CBCT images of the mandible in 784 Chinese patients (305 males and 479 females) were retrospectively analysed to identify the AMF. The presence, dimension and location of the AMF as well as the origin and course of the associated bony canal were evaluated and classified. Variations in these characteristics were analysed according to gender, side and age. A total of 66 AMFs were found in 57 (7.3%) of the 784 patients. The frequency of AMFs was significantly influenced by gender and side of the mandible (p mental foramen) accounted for 54.5% of the total. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of the AMF were 1.38 ± 0.47 and 1.23 ± 0.37 mm, respectively. Two typical types of the bony canal leading to the AMF were identified according to their bifurcation site from the mandibular canal. Most bony canals originated from the anterior loop of the mental canal (56.1%) and coursed posterosuperiorly (36.3%). The mean length of the bony canals was 5.78 ± 2.31 mm. This study presents a considerable frequency of AMFs in a Chinese population. The high-position AMF and the associated bony canal coursing in the oblique upward direction appear frequently. Thus, clinicians should be alert to the presence of the AMF to avoid neurovascular complications especially when dental procedures require periosteum detachment and implant insertion in the mental region.

  3. Automatic Synthesis of Panoramic Radiographs from Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Data.

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    Ting Luo

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an automatic method of synthesizing panoramic radiographs from dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT data for directly observing the whole dentition without the superimposition of other structures. This method consists of three major steps. First, the dental arch curve is generated from the maximum intensity projection (MIP of 3D CBCT data. Then, based on this curve, the long axial curves of the upper and lower teeth are extracted to create a 3D panoramic curved surface describing the whole dentition. Finally, the panoramic radiograph is synthesized by developing this 3D surface. Both open-bite shaped and closed-bite shaped dental CBCT datasets were applied in this study, and the resulting images were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. With the proposed method, a single-slice panoramic radiograph can clearly and completely show the whole dentition without the blur and superimposition of other dental structures. Moreover, thickened panoramic radiographs can also be synthesized with increased slice thickness to show more features, such as the mandibular nerve canal. One feature of the proposed method is that it is automatically performed without human intervention. Another feature of the proposed method is that it requires thinner panoramic radiographs to show the whole dentition than those produced by other existing methods, which contributes to the clarity of the anatomical structures, including the enamel, dentine and pulp. In addition, this method can rapidly process common dental CBCT data. The speed and image quality of this method make it an attractive option for observing the whole dentition in a clinical setting.

  4. The prevalence of mandibular retromolar canals on cone beam computed tomography and its clinical repercussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Borja de FREITAS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Knowledge on the normal morphology of the human mandible and its possible anatomical variations are of fundamental importance in dental practice, especially in the areas of surgery and implantodontics. The retromolar region is delimited by the anterior margin of the ramus of the mandible, the temporal crest and the distal surface of the last lower molar. In this area, a retromolar canal may be observed emerging through the retromolar foramen. Objective This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of retromolar canals in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images and to correlate it with their possible clinical repercussions. Material and method 300 CBCT images were selected from the Department of Radiology of the São Leopoldo Mandic Dental School. This was an observational descriptive study and all the images were processed and analyzed on XoranCat®. Result Of the 300 CFCT scans analyzed, a single mandibular canal was observed in 210 (70.0%. In the remaining 90 cases, anatomical changes were observed relating to this canal, indicating that the prevalence of this condition in this sample was 30%. The prevalence of retromolar canals was observed in 15 patients (5.0%, of which 06 were in males and 09 in females. Conclusion The importance of a full knowledge on the anatomy of the retromolar region is herein reiterated due to the high prevalence of surgical procedures in the posterior region of the mandible, which could optimize predictability at treatment planning as well as anesthetic and surgical outcomes, thus minimizing anesthetic failures and surgical accidents.

  5. Influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis identified by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela, Carlos; Porto, Olavo Cesar Lyra; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth; Bueno, Mike Reis; Pecora, Jesus Djalma

    2009-01-01

    The determination of the success of endodontic treatment has been often discussed based on outcome obtained by periapical radiography. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis detected by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A consecutive sample of 1020 images (periapical radiographs and CBCT scans) taken from 619 patients (245 men; mean age, 50.1 years) between February 2008 and September 2009 were used in this study. Presence and intracanal post length (short, medium and long) were associated with apical periodontitis (AP). Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Significance level was set at p<0.01. The kappa value was used to assess examiner variability. From a total of 591 intracanal posts, AP was observed in 15.06%, 18.78% and 7.95% using periapical radiographs, into the different lengths, short, medium and long, respectively (p=0.466). Considering the same posts length it was verified AP in 24.20%, 26.40% and 11.84% observed by CBCT scans, respectively (p=0.154). From a total of 1,020 teeth used in this study, AP was detected in 397 (38.92%) by periapical radiography and in 614 (60.19%) by CBCT scans (p<0.001). The distribution of intracanal posts in different dental groups showed higher prevalence in maxillary anterior teeth (54.79%). Intracanal posts lengths did not influenced AP. AP was detected more frequently when CBCT method was used. (author)

  6. Accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography and periapical radiography in apical periodontitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernanda Ullmann; Kopper, Patrícia Maria Poli; Cucco, Carolina; Della Bona, Alvaro; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana Vieira

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation and the agreement between periapical radiography (PR) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) correlating to histologic findings in the diagnosis of apical periodontitis (AP). One hundred thirty-four premolar root canals from 10 dogs were treated after AP induction. Four months later, the animals were killed, and standard digital PRs were obtained. The area of AP was measured by using ImageJ software. CBCT (i-CAT) images from each arch were obtained, and AP area and volume were measured by using Osiri-X software. The apical inflammatory infiltrate was evaluated under light microscopy. The correlation between imaging methods was evaluated by using the Pearson coefficient. The Bland-Altman method was used to assess the agreement between PR and CBCT data. The Spearman coefficient was used to correlate the imaging data and histologic findings. Despite a strong correlation between PR and CBCT areas, the agreement limits were very broad (95% limits of agreement, 0.19-1.08). PR only measured, on average, 63% of CBCT values. Although there was a strong correlation between PR area and CBCT volume, the Bland-Altman method suggests that the larger the CBCT volume, the more underestimated the PR value. When APs had a volume smaller than 6 mm(3), the PR estimation of CBCT data was unpredictable. A positive correlation was found for PR area, CBCT area, CBCT volume, and histology data. The diagnosis of AP based on PR data is clinically limited, and it should not be used for scientific investigations. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography and periapical radiography in detecting small periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Patrick; Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Rice, Dwight; Azevedo, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 2 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) machines and periapical (PA) radiography in detecting simulated apical lesions created with the smallest dental burs available. By using mandibles from human cadavers, simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged in 16 roots by using sizes #1/4, #1/2, #1, #2, #4, and #6 round burs. Imaging was obtained after each enlargement with a Kodak 9000 3D (Kodak) CBCT, a Veraviewpocs 3De (Morita) CBCT, and intraoral digital PA radiography. Specificity and sensitivity at variable decision thresholds were calculated and plotted on receiver operator characteristic curves. The area under the curve (AUC) served as an estimate of diagnostic accuracy. The overall AUCs for Kodak, Morita, and PA radiography were 0.767 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.743-0.792), 0.753 (95% CI, 0.728-0.779), and 0.584 (95% CI, 0.554-0.615), respectively. The AUCs for Kodak and Morita were both statistically significantly larger than the AUC for all corresponding simulated lesion sizes imaged with PA radiography. Between Kodak and Morita, there were no statistically significant differences in AUCs for any of the corresponding simulated lesion sizes. Both CBCT devices demonstrated poor accuracy in detecting simulated lesions smaller than 0.8 mm in diameter, fair to good accuracy when simulated lesion diameter was between 0.8-1.4 mm, and excellent accuracy when simulated lesions were larger than 1.4 mm in diameter. PA radiography, at best, demonstrated poor diagnostic accuracy for all simulated lesion sizes. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Cephalometry Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Michele, Cassetta; Altieri, Federica; Federica, Altieri; Di Giorgio, Roberto; Roberto, Di Giorgio; Silvestri, Alessandro; Alessandro, Silvestri

    2015-06-01

    Lateral cephalometric radiograph produces a two-dimensional image with several drawbacks. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows obtaining a three-dimensional representation of the craniofacial structures and seems to overcome the problems of superimposition and magnification, providing more precision than two-dimensional methods. The aim of the current study was to test the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of linear and angular measurements performed on two-dimensional conventional cephalometric images and CBCT-generated cephalograms, and to evaluate if there is a statistically significant difference between the 2 methods of measurements. The sample group consisted of 24 adolescents with a pretreatment digital lateral radiograph and a corresponding CBCT image. A total of 16 cephalometric landmarks were identified and 17 widely used measurements (9 angular and 8 linear) were recorded by 2 independent observers. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were assessed by calculating Pearson correlation coefficient. Student t-test was used to compare the 2 methods. The threshold for significance was set at P ≤ 0.05.Concerning the intraobserver and interobserver reliability, data showed a statistically significant correlation between all two-dimensional and three-dimensional measurements. The linear and angular measurements of two-dimensional and three-dimensional cephalometry were not statistically different. The results of the current study showed the reliability of both conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional cephalometry. Linear and angular measurements from CBCT were found also to be similar to conventional measurements. Considering that conventional images deliver the lowest radiation doses to patients, the use of CBCT for orthodontic purposes should be limited.

  9. Study between anb angle and wits appraisal in cone beam computed tomography (cbct)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibrián, Rosa; Gandia, Jose L.; Paredes, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse the ANB and Wits values and to study correlations between those two measurements and other measurements in diagnosing the anteroposterior maxilo-mandibular relationship with CBCT. Study Design: Ninety patients who had previously a CBCT (i-CAT®) as a diagnostic register were selected. A 3D cephalometry was designed using one software package, InVivo5®. This cephalometry included 3 planes of reference, 3 angle measurements and 1 linear measurement. The means and standard deviations of the mean of each measurement were assessed. After that, a Pearson´s correlation coefficient has been performed to analyse the significance of each relationship. Results: When classifying the sample according to the anteroposterior relationship, the values obtained of ANB (Class I: 53%; Class II: 37%; Class III: 10%) and Wits (Class I: 35%; Class II: 56%; Class III: 9%) did not coincide, except for the Class III group. However, of the patients classified differently (Class I and Class II patients) by ANB and Wits, a high percentage of individuals (n=22; 49%), had a mesofacial pattern with a mandibular plane angle within normal values. A correlation has been found between ANB and Wits (r=0,262), occlusal plane angle and ANB (r=0,426), and mandibular plane angle and Wits (r=0,242). No correlation was found between either Wits or ANB in relation with the age of the individuals. Conclusions: ANB and Wits must be included in 3D cephalometric analyses as both are necessary to undertake a more accurate diagnosis of the maxillo-mandibular relationship of the patients. Key words:Cone beam computed tomography, ANB, Wits, cephalometrics. PMID:23722136

  10. Anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Arpita Rai; Burde, Krishna; Guttai, Kruthika; Naikmasu, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the general anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to determine the human anatomic variability of the nasopalatine canal in relation to age and gender. The study included 100 subjects aged between 20 and 86 years who were divided into the following 3 groups: 1) 20-34 years old; 2) 35-49 years old; 3) ≥50 years old. The subjects were equally distributed between the genders. CBCT was performed using a standard exposure and patient positioning protocol. The data of the CBCT images were sliced in three dimensions. Image planes on the three axes (X, Y, and Z) were sequentially analyzed for the location, morphology and dimensions of the nasopalatine canal by two independent observers. The correlation of age and gender with all the variables was evaluated. The present study did not reveal statistically significant differences in the number of openings at the nasal fossa; diameter of the nasal fossa openings; diameter of the incisive fossa; shape, curvature, and angulation of the canal as viewed in the sagittal sections; antero-posterior dimensions and length of the canal in the sagittal sections; or the level of division of the canal in the coronal plane by age. However, males and females showed significant differences in the length of the canal in the sagittal sections and level of the division of the canal in the coronal plane. The present study highlighted important variability observed in the anatomy and morphology of the nasopalatine canal.

  11. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia; Poulsen, Per; Parikh, Parag

    2016-03-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those in the planning CT. This step is time-intensive and user-dependent, and often results in a suboptimal patient setup. We propose a fully automated, robust method based on dynamic programming (DP) for segmenting radiopaque fiducial markers in CBCT projection images, which are then used to automatically optimize the treatment couch position and/or gating window bounds. The mean of the absolute 2D segmentation error of our DP algorithm is 1.3+/- 1.0 mm for 87 markers on 39 patients. Intrafraction images were acquired every 3 s during treatment at two different institutions. For gated patients from Institution A (8 patients, 40 fractions), the DP algorithm increased the delivery accuracy (96+/- 6% versus 91+/- 11% , p  manual setup using kV fluoroscopy. For non-gated patients from Institution B (6 patients, 16 fractions), the DP algorithm performed similarly (1.5+/- 0.8 mm versus 1.6+/- 0.9 mm, p  =  0.48) compared to the manual setup matching the fiducial markers in the CBCT to the mean position. Our proposed automated patient setup algorithm only takes 1-2 s to run, requires no user intervention, and performs as well as or better than the current clinical setup.

  12. Measurement of skin dose from cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To measure surface skin dose from various cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners using point-dosimeters. Materials & methods A head anthropomorphic phantom was used with nanoDOT optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters (Landauer Corp., Glenwood, IL) attached to various anatomic landmarks. The phantom was scanned using multiple exposure protocols for craniofacial evaluations in three different CBCT units and a conventional x-ray imaging system. The dosimeters were calibrated for each of the scan protocols on the different imaging systems. Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, submandibular and parotid gland levels were measured. Results The measured skin doses ranged from 0.09 to 4.62 mGy depending on dosimeter positions and imaging systems. The average surface doses to the lens locations were ~4.0 mGy, well below the threshold for cataractogenesis (500 mGy). The results changed accordingly with x-ray tube output (mAs and kV) and also were sensitive to scan field of view (SFOV). As compared to the conventional panoramic and cephalometric imaging system, doses from all three CBCT systems were at least an order of magnitude higher. Conclusions Peak skin dose and surface doses at the eye lens, thyroid, and salivary gland levels measured from the CBCT imaging systems were lower than the thresholds to induce deterministic effects. However, our findings do not justify the routine use of CBCT imaging in orthodontics considering the lifetime-attributable risk to the individual. PMID:24192155

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Based Three-Dimensional McNamara Cephalometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo Mologni Gonçalves Dos; De Martino, José Mario; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Passeri, Luis Augusto

    2018-01-19

    This article introduces a method that extends the McNamara cephalometric analysis to produce 3-dimensional (3D) measurement values from cone-beam computed tomography images. In the extended method, the cephalometric landmarks are represented by 3D points; the bilateral cephalometric landmarks are identified on both sides of the skull; the cephalometric lines, with the exception of the facial axis, are represented by 3D lines; the cephalometric planes, with the exception of the facial plane, are represented by planes; the effective mandibular length, the effective midfacial length, and the lower anterior facial height are measured as 3D point-to-point distances; the nasion perpendicular to point A, the pogonion to nasion perpendicular, the upper incisor to point A vertical, and the lower incisor to point A-pogonion line are measured each as components of a vector; the facial axis angle is measured as a line-to-plane angle; and the mandibular plane angle is measured as a plane-to-plane angle. As a result, the method provides real effective lengths of the maxilla and mandible on both sides of the skull; real height of the lower anterior face; directed distances from the point A to the nasion perpendicular, from the pogonion to the nasion perpendicular, from the left and right upper incisor to the point A vertical, and from the left and right lower incisor to the point A-pogonion line for both the lateral and posteroanterior views of the skull; and real angles of the facial axis and the mandibular plane. Additionality, the method enables the identification of craniofacial asymmetries.

  14. Cone-beam computed tomography for assessment of dens invaginatus in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różyło, T Katarzyna; Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Piskórz, Magdalena

    2018-01-01

    There are many developmental variations in the permanent dentition. Dens invaginatus can be recognized on many dental X-rays of affected patients, but not every image allows for assessment of the type of malformation. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of dens invaginatus with radiological features using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of 33 patients were evaluated. Age, sex, side, lateralization, occurrence in a particular group of teeth, type of invagination, differentiation, and the consequences of these factors were analyzed. Forty-one teeth with dens invaginatus met the inclusion criteria for this evaluation. Females were affected more frequently than males (57.6 vs. 42.4%, respectively). The patients' age ranged from 7 to 40 years, and the occurrence of dens invaginatus peaked from age 9 to 13 years. In total, 92.7% of affected teeth were present in the maxilla, more often unilaterally (75.8%) than bilaterally (24.2%). The most frequent tooth with dens invaginatus was the maxillary lateral incisor (53.7% of affected teeth). Almost two-thirds (63.4%) of affected teeth were found on the left side and 36.6% were found on the right. The tooth anatomy was distorted within the crown and root. Dens invaginatus sometimes affected other surrounding teeth and reduced their esthetics. The obtained data indicate that CBCT examination is an essential tool in assessing dens invaginatus and can guide dental practitioners in treating patients who exhibit characteristic features of this disorder. CBCT allows the clinician to distinguish the type of anomaly.

  15. Malocclusion Class II division 1 skeletal and dental relationships measured by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiling; Oh, Heesoo; Lagravère, Manuel O

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to locate traditionally-used landmarks in two-dimensional (2D) images and newly-suggested ones in three-dimensional (3D) images (cone-beam computer tomographies [CBCTs]) and determine possible relationships between them to categorize patients with Class II-1 malocclusion. CBCTs from 30 patients diagnosed with Class II-1 malocclusion were obtained from the University of Alberta Graduate Orthodontic Program database. The reconstructed images were downloaded and visualized using the software platform AVIZO ® . Forty-two landmarks were chosen and the coordinates were then obtained and analyzed using linear and angular measurements. Ten images were analyzed three times to determine the reliability and measurement error of each landmark using Intra-Class Correlation coefficient (ICC). Descriptive statistics were done using the SPSS statistical package to determine any relationships. ICC values were excellent for all landmarks in all axes, with the highest measurement error of 2mm in the y-axis for the Gonion Left landmark. Linear and angular measurements were calculated using the coordinates of each landmark. Descriptive statistics showed that the linear and angular measurements used in the 2D images did not correlate well with the 3D images. The lowest standard deviation obtained was 0.6709 for S-GoR/N-Me, with a mean of 0.8016. The highest standard deviation was 20.20704 for ANS-InfraL, with a mean of 41.006. The traditional landmarks used for 2D malocclusion analysis show good reliability when transferred to 3D images. However, they did not reveal specific skeletal or dental patterns when trying to analyze 3D images for malocclusion. Thus, another technique should be considered when classifying 3D CBCT images for Class II-1malocclusion. Copyright © 2017 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To compare and evaluate the diagnostic ability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). CBCT and MRI of 46 TMJs of 23 patients with TMJ disorders were evaluated. They were divided into 3 groups according to the position of the articular disc of the TMJ at closed mouth position and the reduction of the disc during open mouth position on MRI: no disc displacement group (NDD), disc displacement with reduction group (DDR), and disc displacement without reduction group (DDWR). With PACS viewing software, position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa, osseous change of mandibular condyle, shape of articular fossa, and mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of mandibular condyle were evaluated on CBCT and MRI. Each value was tested statistically. The position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa were concentric in the NDD, DDR, and DDWR of CBCT and NDD of MRI. However, condyle was positioned posteriorly in DDR and DDWR of MRI. Flattening, sclerosis and osteophyte of the mandibular condyle were much more apparent on DDR of CBCT than MRI. And the erosion of the condyle was much more apparent on DDWR of MRI than CBCT. Box and Sigmoid types of articular fossa were found most frequently in DDR of MRI. Flattened type was found most frequently in DDR of CBCT and deformed type was found most frequently in DDWR of CBCT. No significant difference in mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions were shown on CBCT and MRI. Since MRI and CBCT has unique diagnostic imaging ability, both modalities should be used together to supplement each other to evaluate TMJ.

  17. Osteoporosis prediction from the mandible using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barngkgei, Imad; Al Haffar, Iyad [Dept. of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Khattab, Razan [Dept. of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2014-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis among menopausal and postmenopausal women by using only a CBCT viewer program. Thirty-eight menopausal and postmenopausal women who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination for hip and lumbar vertebrae were scanned using CBCT (field of view: 13 cmx15 cm; voxel size: 0.25 mm). Slices from the body of the mandible as well as the ramus were selected and some CBCT-derived variables, such as radiographic density (RD) as gray values, were calculated as gray values. Pearson's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) evaluation based on linear and logistic regression were performed to choose the variable that best correlated with the lumbar and femoral neck T-scores. RD of the whole bone area of the mandible was the variable that best correlated with and predicted both the femoral neck and the lumbar vertebrae T-scores; further, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.5/0.6 (p value=0.037/0.009). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy based on the logistic regression were 50%, 88.9%, and 78.4%, respectively, for the femoral neck, and 46.2%, 91.3%, and 75%, respectively, for the lumbar vertebrae. Lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck osteoporosis can be predicted with high accuracy from the RD value of the body of the mandible by using a CBCT viewer program.

  18. Nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To evaluate location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region using a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Mandibular CBCT was performed on 33 adults (18 males and 15 female) with no history of systemic disease, and any other dental surgery history. Location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region were radiographically evaluated. A statistical comparison was done by SPSS. In the location and distribution of nutrient canals, they were found in 6.8% at labial portion above root apex, in 93.28% at lingual portion above root apex in 46.2% at labial portion below root apex, and in 53.6% at lingual portion below root apex. Nutrient canals at lingual portion above root apex were most frequently observed between central and lateral incisors, and those at labial and lingual portion below root apex were most frequently observed between central incisors. The mean diameters of nutrient canals were 0.54 mm at labial portion above root apex, 0.61 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 0.66 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 0.76 mm at lingual portion below root apex. The mean lengths of nutrient canals were 2.63 mm at labial portion above root apex, 3.74 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 4.51 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 6.77 mm at lingual portion below root apex. CBCT is useful device to evaluate the anatomical structure of nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region.

  19. Evaluation of Osseointegration in Implants using Digital Orthopantomogram and Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Aastha; Mhapuskar, Amit A; Marathe, Swati; Nisa, Shams U; Thopte, Shameeka; Saddiwal, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of osseointegration in dental implants requires precise radiographic visualization of pathologic conditions as well as anatomical structures. The present study aimed to evaluate the formation of bony tissue (osseointegration) using digital orthopantomogram (OPG) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) immediately after implant insertion (within 7 days) and 3 months postinsertion. Twenty single-implant sites on mandi-bular posterior regions were selected on patients irrespective of their gender. Both digital OPG and CBCT were done within a week and again after 3 months of implant insertion surgery, using the same exposure parameters. Three of the 20 implants were submerged and were excluded as the crestal bone height could not be measured. The participants were recalled for radiographic measurements after 3 months of implant placement. On an average, there was 0.03 mm of osseointegration at the apical portion after 3 months of implant insertion on digital OPG; 0.04 mm of osseointegration at the crestal bone height after 3 months on digital OPG; and 0.01 mm of osseointegration at the apical portion after 3 months on CBCT. No change or ≤0.02 mm of osseointegration at crestal bone height after 3 months on CBCT. Both digital OPG and CBCT are significant for the assessment of osseointegration in implants, and hence, endow definite benefit for accurate assessment in terms of the success of the implant placement. However, CBCT is a better mode of evaluating dental implants but one should keep in mind that radiographic examination must be conducted to the benefit of the patient by application of the lowest achievable dose.

  20. Nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jung Ho; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region using a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Mandibular CBCT was performed on 33 adults (18 males and 15 female) with no history of systemic disease, and any other dental surgery history. Location, distribution, diameter, and length of the nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region were radiographically evaluated. A statistical comparison was done by SPSS. In the location and distribution of nutrient canals, they were found in 6.8% at labial portion above root apex, in 93.28% at lingual portion above root apex in 46.2% at labial portion below root apex, and in 53.6% at lingual portion below root apex. Nutrient canals at lingual portion above root apex were most frequently observed between central and lateral incisors, and those at labial and lingual portion below root apex were most frequently observed between central incisors. The mean diameters of nutrient canals were 0.54 mm at labial portion above root apex, 0.61 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 0.66 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 0.76 mm at lingual portion below root apex. The mean lengths of nutrient canals were 2.63 mm at labial portion above root apex, 3.74 mm at lingual portion above root apex, 4.51 mm at labial portion below root apex, and 6.77 mm at lingual portion below root apex. CBCT is useful device to evaluate the anatomical structure of nutrient canals on mandibular anterior region

  1. Influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis identified by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrela, Carlos; Porto, Olavo Cesar Lyra; Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth [Federal University of Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Dental School; Bueno, Mike Reis [University of Cuiaba (UNIC), MT (Brazil). Dental School; Pecora, Jesus Djalma, E-mail: estrela3@terra.com.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dental School

    2009-07-01

    The determination of the success of endodontic treatment has been often discussed based on outcome obtained by periapical radiography. The aim of this study was to verify the influence of intracanal post on apical periodontitis detected by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A consecutive sample of 1020 images (periapical radiographs and CBCT scans) taken from 619 patients (245 men; mean age, 50.1 years) between February 2008 and September 2009 were used in this study. Presence and intracanal post length (short, medium and long) were associated with apical periodontitis (AP). Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Significance level was set at p<0.01. The kappa value was used to assess examiner variability. From a total of 591 intracanal posts, AP was observed in 15.06%, 18.78% and 7.95% using periapical radiographs, into the different lengths, short, medium and long, respectively (p=0.466). Considering the same posts length it was verified AP in 24.20%, 26.40% and 11.84% observed by CBCT scans, respectively (p=0.154). From a total of 1,020 teeth used in this study, AP was detected in 397 (38.92%) by periapical radiography and in 614 (60.19%) by CBCT scans (p<0.001). The distribution of intracanal posts in different dental groups showed higher prevalence in maxillary anterior teeth (54.79%). Intracanal posts lengths did not influenced AP. AP was detected more frequently when CBCT method was used. (author)

  2. Imaging doses in radiation therapy from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Daniel Ellis

    Advances in radiation treatment delivery, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), have made it possible to deliver large doses of radiation with a high degree of conformity. While highly conformal treatments offers the advantage of sparing surrounding normal tissue, this benefit can only be realized if the patient is accurately positioned during each treatment fraction. The need to accurately position the patient has led to the development and use of gantry mounted kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) systems. These systems are used to acquire high resolution volumetric images of the patient which are then digitally registered with the planning CT dataset to confirm alignment of the patient on the treatment table. While kV-CBCT is a very useful tool for aligning the patient prior to treatment, daily use in a high fraction therapy regimen results in a substantial radiation dose. In order to quantify the radiation dose associated with CBCT imaging, an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 50th percentile adult male and a fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimetry system were both constructed as part of this dissertation. These tools were then used to directly measure organ doses incurred during clinical protocols for the head, chest, and pelvis. For completeness, the dose delivered from both the X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) and the On-Board Imager (OBI, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were investigated. While this study provided a direct measure of organ doses for estimating risk to the patient, a practical method for estimating organ doses that could be performed with phantoms and dosimeters currently available at most clinics was also desired. To accomplish this goal, a 100 mm pencil ion chamber was used to measure the "cone beam dose index" (CBDI) inside standard CT dose index (CTDI) acrylic phantoms. A weighted CBDI (CBDIw), similar to the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), was then calculated to

  3. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  4. Cone beam computed tomography for dental and maxillofacial imaging: technique improvement and low-dose protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feragalli, Beatrice; Rampado, Osvaldo; Abate, Cecilia; Macrì, Monica; Festa, Felice; Stromei, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate images quality and radiation doses of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for dental and maxillofacial imaging testing five different acquisition protocols. Dose measurements of different acquisition protocols were calculated for Pax Zenith three-dimensional (3D) Cone Beam (Vatech, Korea) and for conventional orthopantomography (OPT) and cephalometric skull imaging Ortophos (Sirona Dental Systems, Bernsheim, Germany). The absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom loaded with thermoluminescent dosimeters at 58 sites related to sensitive organs. Five different CBCT protocols were evaluated for image quality and radiation doses. They differed in FOV, image resolution, kVp, mA, acquisition time in seconds and radiation dose. Measurements were then carried out with the orthopantomograph. Equivalent and effective doses were calculated. The reference protocol with large FOV, high resolution quality images, 95 kVp, 5 mA and acquisition time of 24 s resulted in a DAP value of 1556 mGy cm 2 instead the protocol with reduced kVp from 95 to 80 kVp translated into a value of DAP inferior to 35% (from 1556 to 1013 mGy cm 2 ). Going from a high resolution to a normal resolution, there was a reduction of the acquisition time to 15 s which allowed further dose reduction of approximately 40% (628 mGy cm 2 ); this protocol resulted in a value of effective dose of 35 microSievert (μSv). Moreover, the effect of changing FOV has been evaluated, considering two scans with a reduced FOV (160 × 140  and 120 × 90 mm, respectively). CBCT low-dose protocol with large FOV, normal resolution quality images, 80 kVp, 5 mA and acquisition time of 15 s resulted in a value of effective dose of 35 microSievert (μSv). This protocol allows the study of maxillofacial region with high quality of images and a very low radiation dose and, therefore, could be proposed in selected case where a complete assessment of

  5. Three-dimensional cephalometry: spiral multi-slice vs cone-beam computed tomography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial imaging techniques are becoming increasingly popular and have opened new possibilities for orthodontic assessment, treatment, and follow-up. Recently, a new 3D cephalometric method based on spiral multi-slice (MS) computed tomography (CT) was developed and

  6. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    Full Text Available Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  7. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  8. Comparison of image validity between cone beam computed tomography for dental use and multidetector row helical computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K; Kawashima, S; Kameoka, S; Akiyama, Y; Honjoya, T; Ejima, K; Sawada, K

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the image validity of a cone beam CT machine for dental use (3DX) and the latest medical CT system, multidetector row helical CT (MDCT). A dried right maxilla of an Asian adult was used as a phantom. It was cut from the zygomatic process towards the midline, parallel to the midline plane, into eight slices of 2 mm thickness. This phantom was imaged with the 3DX and MDCT machines. Images were evaluated by comparing them with one selected bone slice from the phantom. In this comparison, two types of MDCT images were used: one with the window level (WL) and window width (WW) suitable for observing teeth (MDCT tooth image), and the other appropriate for observing bone (MDCT bone image). Three dentists and one radiographer then used our reported subjective five-level scale to evaluate and compare images generated by the two systems in terms of validity. Cancellous bone as well as enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura and overall impression were evaluated. Statistically significant differences (Pvalidity. Few significant intra- or interevaluator errors were found. Our subjective evaluation of image validity clarified 3DX as being superior to MDCT. Taken together with the low skin dose we previously reported for 3DX, the results demonstrate 3DX to be beneficial for imaging diagnosis of hard tissues in the maxillofacial region.

  9. [Accuracy of computer aided measurement for detecting dental proximal caries lesions in images of cone-beam computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z L; Li, J P; Li, G; Ma, X C

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To establish and validate a computer program used to aid the detection of dental proximal caries in the images cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Methods: According to the characteristics of caries lesions in X-ray images, a computer aided detection program for proximal caries was established with Matlab and Visual C++. The whole process for caries lesion detection included image import and preprocessing, measuring average gray value of air area, choosing region of interest and calculating gray value, defining the caries areas. The program was used to examine 90 proximal surfaces from 45 extracted human teeth collected from Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. The teeth were then scanned with a CBCT scanner (Promax 3D). The proximal surfaces of the teeth were respectively detected by caries detection program and scored by human observer for the extent of lesions with 6-level-scale. With histologic examination serving as the reference standard, the caries detection program and the human observer performances were assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Student t -test was used to analyze the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) for the differences between caries detection program and human observer. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the detection accuracy of caries depth. Results: For the diagnosis of proximal caries in CBCT images, the AUC values of human observers and caries detection program were 0.632 and 0.703, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the AUC values ( P= 0.023). The correlation between program performance and gold standard (correlation coefficient r (s)=0.525) was higher than that of observer performance and gold standard ( r (s)=0.457) and there was a statistically significant difference between the correlation coefficients ( P= 0.000). Conclusions: The program that automatically detects dental proximal caries lesions could improve the

  10. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Correlates with Conventional Helical Computed Tomography in Evaluation of Lipiodol Accumulation in HCC after Chemoembolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The amount of drug-loaded lipiodol in an HCC tumor post-transarterial chemoembolization (TACE correlates with the risk of local tumor recurrence. Lipiodol enhancement of a tumor on conventional CT, measured in Hounsfield units (HU, can predict tumor response. Here we investigate whether cone-beam CT (CBCT can also be used to predict tumor response, providing the benefit of being able to optimize the patient's treatment plan intra-procedurally.A total of 82 HCC nodules (82 patients, ≤5 cm in diameter, were treated with balloon-occluded TACE using miriplatin between December 2013 and November 2014. For each patient, both CBCT and conventional CT images were obtained post-TACE. The degree of correlation between CBCT and conventional CT was determined by comparing identical regions of interest for each imaging modality using pixel values.The pixel values from conventional CT and CBCT were highly correlated, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.912 (p<0.001. The location of the nodules within the liver did not affect the results; the correlation coefficient was 0.891 (p<0.001 for the left lobe and 0.926 (p<0.001 for the right lobe. The mean pixel value for conventional CT was 439 ± 279 HU, and the mean pixel value for CBCT was 416 ± 311 HU.CBCT may be used as a substitute for conventional CT to quantitatively evaluate the amount of drug-loaded lipiodol within an HCC nodule and, hence, the efficacy of TACE treatment. The major benefit of using CBCT is the ability to predict the likelihood of local recurrence intra-procedurally, enabling subsequent treatment optimization.

  11. Late enhancement of the left ventricular myocardium in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by electron beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Kenichi; Yoshibayashi, Muneo; Tsukano, Shinya; Ono, Yasuo; Arakaki, Yoshio; Naito, Hiroaki; Echigo, Shigeyuki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    In the assessment of myocardial characteristics with computed tomography, late enhancement (intense stain in delayed phase image of contrast enhancement) is an abnormal finding and thought to represent fibrotic change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of late enhancement in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty-five patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aged 1 to 24 years, were examined by electron beam computed tomography. We also assessed the clinical data on these patients. Late enhancement was found in 29 (64%) patients, usually as a patchy, stained area in the myocardium. In 29 patients with late enhancement, seven (24%) has syncopal episode and seven (24%) had a family history of sudden death. In contrast, none (0%) of 16 patients without late enhancement had syncopal episode nor a family history of sudden death (p<0.05). Twenty-four hour electrocardiographic monitoring was performed for 31 patients. Al patients with ventricular tachycardia were in the group with late enhancement [10/23 (43%) vs 0/8 (0%), p<0.05]. Thirty-seven patients were examined by thallium scintigraphy. The perfusion defect was more frequently found in patients with late enhancement than in patients without [14/26 (54%) vs 2/11 (18%), p<0.05]. These data suggest that late enhancement shown with electron beam computed tomography is related to syncopal episode, family history of sudden death, ventricular tachycardia, and myocardial damage in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  12. Late enhancement of the left ventricular myocardium in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by electron beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Kenichi; Yoshibayashi, Muneo; Tsukano, Shinya; Ono, Yasuo; Arakaki, Yoshio; Naito, Hiroaki; Echigo, Shigeyuki

    2001-01-01

    In the assessment of myocardial characteristics with computed tomography, late enhancement (intense stain in delayed phase image of contrast enhancement) is an abnormal finding and thought to represent fibrotic change. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of late enhancement in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty-five patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, aged 1 to 24 years, were examined by electron beam computed tomography. We also assessed the clinical data on these patients. Late enhancement was found in 29 (64%) patients, usually as a patchy, stained area in the myocardium. In 29 patients with late enhancement, seven (24%) has syncopal episode and seven (24%) had a family history of sudden death. In contrast, none (0%) of 16 patients without late enhancement had syncopal episode nor a family history of sudden death (p<0.05). Twenty-four hour electrocardiographic monitoring was performed for 31 patients. Al patients with ventricular tachycardia were in the group with late enhancement [10/23 (43%) vs 0/8 (0%), p<0.05]. Thirty-seven patients were examined by thallium scintigraphy. The perfusion defect was more frequently found in patients with late enhancement than in patients without [14/26 (54%) vs 2/11 (18%), p<0.05]. These data suggest that late enhancement shown with electron beam computed tomography is related to syncopal episode, family history of sudden death, ventricular tachycardia, and myocardial damage in young patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  13. Performance of cone-beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in diagnostic imaging of the midface: A comparative study on Phantom and cadaver head scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Schoellchen, Maximilian; Hanken, H.; Precht, C.; Heiland, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Oral- and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Henes, F.O.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schoen, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Hamburg (Germany); Nagel, H.D. [Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany); Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Institute of Anatomy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) regarding radiation, resolution, image noise, and image quality. CBCT and 256-MDCT were compared based on three scan protocols: Standard-dose (∼24 mGy), reduced-dose (∼9 mGy), and low-dose (∼4 mGy). MDCT images were acquired in standard- and high-resolution mode (HR-MDCT) and reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR). Spatial resolution in linepairs (lp) and objective image noise (OIN) were assessed using dedicated phantoms. Image quality was assessed in scans of 25 cadaver heads using a Likert scale. OIN was markedly higher in FBP-MDCT when compared to CBCT. IR lowered the OIN to comparable values in standard-mode MDCT only. CBCT provided a resolution of 13 lp/cm at standard-dose and 11 lp/cm at reduced-dose vs. 11 lp/cm and 10 lp/cm in HR-MDCT. Resolution of 10 lp/cm was observed for both devices using low-dose settings. Quality scores of MDCT and CBCT did not differ at standard-dose (CBCT, 3.4; MDCT, 3.3-3.5; p > 0.05). Using reduced- and low-dose protocols, CBCT was superior (reduced-dose, 3.2 vs. 2.8; low dose, 3.0 vs. 2.3; p < 0.001). Using the low-dose protocol, the assessed CBCT provided better objective and subjective image quality and equality in resolution. Similar image quality, but better resolution using CBCT was observed at higher exposure settings. (orig.)

  14. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogo, Takeshi, E-mail: ogo.takeshi.hp@mail.ncvc.go.jp [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Department of Advanced Mediccal Research for Pulmonary Hypertension, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Tetsuya [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Sanda, Yoshihiro [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Morita, Yoshiaki [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Yasuda, Satoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  15. Comparison of gray values of cone-beam computed tomography with hounsfield units of multislice computed tomography: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Hounsfield unit (HU provides a quantitative evaluation of bone density. The assessment of bone density is essential for successful treatment plan. Although, multislice computed tomography (MSCT is considered as gold standard in evaluating bone density, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is frequently used in dentomaxillofacial imaging due to lower radiation dose, less complex device, and images with satisfactory resolution. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine and compare the gray value and HU value of hypodense and hyperdense structures on CBCT and MSCT, respectively. The study also evaluated and compared the gray values in different field of views within CBCT. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 dry human mandibles were obtained. The gray values and HU values of hypodense structures (extraction socket, inferior alveolar canal, and mental foramen and hyperdense structures (enamel, cancellous, and cortical bone were evaluated and compared between CBCT and MSCT images, respectively. The obtained data were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis: One-way analyses of variance, ANOVA F-test. Results: The gray value for hypodense structures in large volume CBCT scans resembled the HU value. The study showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.001 in gray values for all the hyperdense structures in CBCT when compared to HU values of MSCT scans. Conclusion: The gray value for hypodense structures in large volume CBCT scan was more reliable and analogous to HU value in MSCT. The determination of grey values in CBCT may not be as accurate as HU value in CT for hyperdense structures.

  16. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  17. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO(4) scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm(2) using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  18. A beam optics study of a modular multi-source X-ray tube for novel computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brandon J.; Radtke, Jeff; Chen, Guang-Hong; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    A modular implementation of a scanning multi-source X-ray tube is designed for the increasing number of multi-source imaging applications in computed tomography (CT). An electron beam array coupled with an oscillating magnetic deflector is proposed as a means for producing an X-ray focal spot at any position along a line. The preliminary multi-source model includes three thermionic electron guns that are deflected in tandem by a slowly varying magnetic field and pulsed according to a scanning sequence that is dependent on the intended imaging application. Particle tracking simulations with particle dynamics analysis software demonstrate that three 100 keV electron beams are laterally swept a combined distance of 15 cm over a stationary target with an oscillating magnetic field of 102 G perpendicular to the beam axis. Beam modulation is accomplished using 25 μs pulse widths to a grid electrode with a reverse gate bias of -500 V and an extraction voltage of +1000 V. Projected focal spot diameters are approximately 1 mm for 138 mA electron beams and the stationary target stays within thermal limits for the 14 kW module. This concept could be used as a research platform for investigating high-speed stationary CT scanners, for lowering dose with virtual fan beam formation, for reducing scatter radiation in cone-beam CT, or for other industrial applications.

  19. Comparative evaluation of modified canal staining and clearing technique, cone-beam computed tomography, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, spiral computed tomography, and plain and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiography in studying root canal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Prasanna; Subbarao, Chandana; Subbarao, Chandragiri V

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), spiral computed tomography (SCT), plain (plain digi), and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiographs (contrast digi) in studying root canal morphology. The root canal anatomy was analyzed in 95 teeth using CBCT, pQCT, SCT, plain digi, and contrast digi. After flushing out the radiopaque dye, access cavities were sealed, and the teeth were subject to the modified canal staining and clearing technique. The number of root canals (Vertucci classification and Gulabivala's additional classes) was calculated by three calibrated endodontists and two maxillofacial radiologists. Erroneous or unsuccessful identifications of root canals were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (p = 0.05). The modified canal staining and clearing technique identified an average of 1.8 root canals per mandibular central incisor, 2.3 per maxillary first premolar, 3.9 per maxillary first molar, 3.8 per maxillary and mandibular second molar, and 4.3 per mandibular first molar. CBCT and pQCT were erroneous in 0.29% and 2.05% cases, whereas SCT, contrast digi, and plain digi were unsuccessful in 15.58%, 14.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. There was a significant difference between all the methods (p technique where there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). CBCT and pQCT were as accurate as the modified canal staining and tooth clearing technique in identifying root canal systems. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography in predicting the diameter of unerupted teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Emerald; Boychuk, Darrell; Orellana, Maria

    2011-08-01

    An accurate prediction of the mesiodistal diameter (MDD) of the erupting permanent teeth is essential in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning during the mixed dentition period. Our objective was to test the accuracy and reproducibility of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in predicting the MDD of unerupted teeth. Our secondary objective was to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of 3 viewing methods by using 2 CBCT software programs, InVivoDental (version 4.0; Anatomage, San Jose, Calif) and CBWorks (version 3.0, CyberMed, Seoul, Korea) in measuring the MDD of teeth in models simulating unerupted teeth. CBCT data were collected on the CB MercuRay (Hitachi Medical Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Models of unerupted teeth (n = 25), created by embedding 25 tooth samples into a polydimethylsiloxane polymer with a similar density to tissues surrounding teeth, were scanned and measured by 2 investigators. Repeated MDD measurements of each sample were made by using 3 CBCT viewing methods: InVivo Section, InVivo Volume Render (both Anatomage), and CBWorks Volume Render (version 3.0, CyberMed). These measurements were then compared with the MDD physically measured by digital calipers before the teeth were embedded and scanned. All 3 of the new methods had mean measurements that were statistically significantly less (P <0.0001) than the physical method, adjusting for investigator and tooth effects. Specifically, InVivo Section measurements were 0.3 mm (95% CI, -0.4 to -0.2) less than the measurements with calipers, InVivo Volume Render measurements were 0.5 mm less (95% CI, -0.6 to -0.4) than those with calipers, and CBWorks Volume Render measurements were 0.4 mm less (95% CI, -0.4 to -0.3) than those with calipers. Overall, there were high correlation values among the 3 viewing methods, indicating that CBCT can be used to measure the MDD of unerupted teeth. The InVivo Section method had the greatest correlation with the calipers. Copyright © 2011 American

  1. Assessment of equivalent dose on the lens in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M. V. L.; Campos, P. S. F. [Federal University of Bahia, Department of Health Sciences, Salvador (Brazil); Andrade, M. E. A. [Federal University of Pernambuco, Department of Nuclear Energy, Recife (Brazil); Soares, M. R. [Federal University of Sergipe, Department of Physics, Sao Cristovao (Brazil); Batista, W. O., E-mail: marcusradiology@gmail.com [Federal Institute of Bahia, Department of Applied Sciences, 40.301-015 Salvador (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is presented as a useful test method for the evaluation of craniofacial structures. Among them stands the temporomandibular joint (T MJ) imaging as complementary to clinical evaluation. It must be considered that there is no reference levels established for diagnosis of this imaging modality. In this same context, recently the limit for crystalline lens was reviewed by ICRP which set new values to the equivalent dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kerma at the surface of the crystalline lens in T MJ CBCT and derive the equivalent dose. It was used an anthropomorphic phantom of the head and neck (manufactured by: Radiation Support Devices, model; Rs-230) containing equivalent tissue with dimensions of a typical patient. The dosimetric measurements were obtained by using seven pairs of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti) positioned on the surface of the crystalline lens, divided into two pairs (one pair for each eye) per scanner evaluated. The tomographic images were obtained in three CBCT equipment s (Kodak 9000, Gendex GXCB 500 and i-Cat). Values of equivalent dose obtained were: 5.82 mSv (Kodak 9000); 5.38 mSv (Gendex GXCB 500) and 7.98 mSv (i-Cat). These results demonstrate that for this type of procedure the doses are below the annual limit but may vary in accordance with the scanner and the exposure factors used in the image acquisition. The Gendex GXCB500 uses larger Fov and higher kV. It results in levels close to those obtained on Kodak 9000. Larger doses are associated with the i-Cat. Another factor that rises is the repetition of examinations due to positioning errors and / or patient movement, which may exceed the annual limit established by ICRP. Although the ICRP limits are not applied to medical exposures, it is advisable to consider the sensitivity of the organ. For this reason, it is concluded that doses per T MJ procedure on CBCT are below the annual limit and may vary

  2. Accuracy of Linear Measurements in Stitched Versus Non-Stitched Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srimawong, P.; Krisanachinda, A.; Chindasombatjaroen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography images are useful in clinical dentistry. Linear measurements are necessary for accurate treatment planning.Therefore, the accuracy of linear measurements on CBCT images is needed to be verified. Current program called stitching program in Kodak 9000C 3D systems automatically combines up to three localized volumes to construct larger images with small voxel size.The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of linear measurements from stitched and non-stitched CBCT images in comparison to direct measurements.This study was performed in 10 human dry mandibles. Gutta-percha rods were marked at reference points to obtain 10 vertical and horizontal distances. Direct measurements by digital caliper were served as gold standard. All distances on CBCT images obtained by using and not using stitching program were measured, and compared with direct measurements.The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated.The ICC of direct measurements were 0.998 to 1.000.The ICC of intraobserver of both non-stitched CBCT images and stitched CBCT images were 1.000 indicated strong agreement made by a single observer.The intermethod ICC between direct measurements vs non-stitched CBCT images and direct measurements vs stitched CBCT images ranged from 0.972 to 1.000 and 0.967 to 0.998, respectively. No statistically significant differences between direct measurements and stitched CBCT images or non-stitched CBCT images (P > 0.05). The results showed that linear measurements on non-stitched and stitched CBCT images were highly accurate with no statistical difference compared to direct measurements. The ICC values in non-stitched and stitched CBCT images and direct measurements of vertical distances were slightly higher than those of horizontal distances. This indicated that the measurements in vertical orientation were more accurate than those in horizontal orientation. However, the differences were not statistically significant. Stitching

  3. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Letourneau, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1–T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins ± 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9° to 1.6°, respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup

  4. Comparison of surface detection methods to evaluate cone beam computed tomography data for three dimensional metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzl, Ch.; Kastner, J.; Georgi, B.; Lettenbauer, H.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well established method for non-destructive testing. In recent years the application of CT for three dimensional measurements and variance comparison became more and more important, since CT can measure both outer and inner geometries within a rather short time. Because of the much higher measurement speed and thus lower costs especially cone beam CT is an important issue of research in the field of dimensional metrology. One of the biggest challenges for the application of CT for metrology is the accurate detection of the surface between material and air or the interface between two different materials. By using a test-body various algorithms and data evaluation methods are compared and discussed within this paper. The investigated methods are: 1. Common methods: Otsu global threshold and an empirically determined best iso-surface. 2. Pipeline model: The pipeline model uses common 3D image processing filters and consists of three major steps: a.) an edge preserving diffusion filter to reduce noise without blurring the edges of the specimen. b.) A watershed segmentation filter is applied to the gradient image of the dataset to extract a fully connected binary volume. c.) The object surface is constructed using elastic surface nets. 3. Calypso R : Evaluation of inspection features by introduction of additional geometry information. The geometrical value is directly derived from the volume data without extracting a surface model, supposing a predefined geometry of a feature. For this purpose the commercial software Calypso R was used. By defining a geometrical feature e.g. a diameter or a distance optimised algorithms evaluate the CT - volume data to get the geometrical feature without a transformation to surface data. Common methods usually lead to no satisfactory results. The achieved accuracy is rather low, if the material thickness in the sample changes. The pipeline model and CT- Calypso R lead to much better results. Using

  5. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Retrospective review. To report our early clinical experience using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (C-arm CBCT) with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. C-arm CBCT is advanced three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat panel based angiography systems. The imaging information provided by C-arm CBCT allows for the acquisition and reconstruction of "CT-like" images in flat panel based angiography/interventional suites. As part of the evolution of this technology, enhancements allowing the overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real time fluoroscopy. We report our early clinical experience with C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive oncology patients who underwent vertebroplasty of 13 vertebral levels using C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance from November 2007 to December 2008. Procedural data including vertebral level, approach (transpedicular vs. extrapedicular), access (bilateral vs. unilateral) and complications were recorded. Technical success with the overlay technology was assessed based on accuracy which consisted of 4 measured parameters: distance from target to needle tip, distance from planned path to needle tip, distance from midline to needle tip, and distance from the anterior 1/3 of the vertebral body to needle tip. Success within each parameter required that the distance between the needle tip and parameter being evaluated be no more than 5 mm on multiplanar CBCT or fluoroscopy. Imaging data for 12 vertebral levels was available for review. All vertebral levels were treated using unilateral access and 9 levels were treated with an extrapedicular approach. Technical success rates were 92% for both distance from planned path and distance from midline to final needle tip, 100% when distance from needle tip to the anterior 1

  6. Cone-beam computed tomography in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrosso Gianluca

    2012-04-01

    setup; image-guided radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography improves the accuracy of the treatment delivery reducing set-up uncertainty, giving the possibility of 3-dimensional anatomic informations in the treatment position.

  7. PI-line-based image reconstruction in helical cone-beam computed tomography with a variable pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yu; Pan Xiaochuan; Xia Dan; Wang Ge

    2005-01-01

    Current applications of helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT) involve primarily a constant pitch where the translating speed of the table and the rotation speed of the source-detector remain constant. However, situations do exist where it may be more desirable to use a helical scan with a variable translating speed of the table, leading a variable pitch. One of such applications could arise in helical cone-beam CT fluoroscopy for the determination of vascular structures through real-time imaging of contrast bolus arrival. Most of the existing reconstruction algorithms have been developed only for helical cone-beam CT with constant pitch, including the backprojection-filtration (BPF) and filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms that we proposed previously. It is possible to generalize some of these algorithms to reconstruct images exactly for helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. In this work, we generalize our BPF and FBP algorithms to reconstruct images directly from data acquired in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. We have also performed a preliminary numerical study to demonstrate and verify the generalization of the two algorithms. The results of the study confirm that our generalized BPF and FBP algorithms can yield exact reconstruction in helical cone-beam CT with a variable pitch. It should be pointed out that our generalized BPF algorithm is the only algorithm that is capable of reconstructing exactly region-of-interest image from data containing transverse truncations

  8. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  9. Histological validation of cone-beam computed tomography versus laser fluorescence and conventional diagnostic methods for occlusal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Sinanoglu, Alper

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of visual (VE), radiological (RE), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and laser fluorescence (LFE) examination methods for the detection of the occlusal noncavitated caries in permanent posterior teeth. Two examiners assessed 121 selected sites on the occlusal surfaces of 44 molar teeth by visual (International Caries Assessment and Detection System II [ICDAS]), radiographic (bite-wing projection) cone-beam computed tomography, and laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent Pen) examination methods. After a 1-week interval, each measurement was repeated by two examiners. Then, the teeth were sectioned, and histological evaluation was performed, which serves as the gold standard. The lesion depths were classified and correlated with the methods evaluated for validation. The intra- and inter-examiner reliability (sensitivity, specificity) and reproducibility of all examination methods were calculated using a weighted Cohen's κ statistic. The correlation between the examination methods was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicating the area under the curve (AUC). CBCT exhibited excellent intra-examiner (0.76 for examiner 1, 0.78 for examiner 2) and fair to good inter-examiner (0.63 for the first, 0.64 for the second measurements) reproducibility. The intra-examiner reproducibility was excellent for the LFE method according to the weighted κ values of examiners 1 (0.90) and 2 (0.79). Among the combined methods, the highest AUC values (0.81-0.95) were obtained for the CBCT examination method performed by the two examiners at both the first and second measurements. Cone beam computed tomography showed better performance than other diagnostic methods.

  10. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90 o within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180 o -kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  11. Accuracy of Digital Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Periapical Radiolucency Detection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Venskutonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. Results: In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42 and radiographic (n = 24 examinations (P < 0.05. In molar teeth, CBCT identify a significantly higher amount of periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P < 0.05. There were significant differences between CBCT and PR in the mean number of lesions identified per tooth (1.2 vs 0.66, P = 0.03, number of teeth with lesions (0.71 vs 0.46, P = 0.03 and number of lesions identified per canal (0.57 vs 0.33, P = 0.005. Considering CBCT as “gold standard” in lesion detection with the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy considering as score 1, then the same parameters of PR were 0.57, 1 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  12. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Heralding New Vistas in Appropriate Diagnosis and Efficient Management of Incidentally Found Impacted Mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Vikrant Dilip; Chandan, Sanjay; Patil, Sujay; Patil, Krishna

    2017-03-01

    As dentistry continues to go "digital," the field has seen a phenomenal increase in the use of digital imaging in dental practice. Complex impacted mesiodens present potential treatment complications and sometimes possible patient morbidity. Objectives of diagnostic imaging are to aid in diagnosis, decision making, and enhance treatment outcomes. As cases become more complex, sophisticated multiplane imaging methods allowing for a three-dimensional view are more likely to meet these objectives as opposed to traditional two-dimensional radiography. The clinical report elucidates with the help of an illustrative patient how cone beam computed tomography imaging can assist the surgeon during surgical treatment planning, risk assessment, and treatment outcomes of impacted mesiodens.

  13. Importance of cone beam computed tomography for diagnosis of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour associated to odontoma. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Yonara-Maria-Freire-Soares; Botelho, Tessa-de Lucena; Xavier, Flávia-Caló-de Aquino; Rangel, Andrea-Leão; Rege, Inara-Carneiro-Costa; Mantesso, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a rare benign cystic neoplasm not infrequently associated with odontoma. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with compound odontoma arising in the anterior maxilla in a 25-year-old woman. Conventional radiographs showed a large calcified mass with poorly visualized radiolucent margins. The extent and condition of the internal structure of the CCOT associated with odontoma was able to be determined based on radiographic findings from cone beam computed tomography. This advanced image technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment of this particular neoplasm of the jawbones.

  14. The use of cone-beam computed tomography in an orthodontic department in between research and daily clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M; Melsen, Birte

    2008-01-01

    A correct orthodontic diagnosis needs to be based on accurate images of the craniofacial region and is crucial for the development of a valid treatment plan. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner allows 3D imaging of the craniofacial complex. CBCT scanners represent a significant advantage in imaging capabilities for dentistry and orthodontics, replacing conventional 2D radiographic images with 3D data sets and only a small increase in radiation. The present study surveys the rationale, advantages, and disadvantages of the available CBCT appliances and presents answers to questions often asked in relation to this technology.

  15. Image quality assessment of three limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography devices in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in dento-maxillo-facial radiology, many CBCT devices with different technical aspects and characteristics were produced. Technical variations between CBCT and acquisition settings could involve image quality differences. In order to compare the performance of three limited field-of-view CBCT devices, an objective and subjective evaluation of image quality was carried out using an ex-vivo phantom, which combines both diagnostic and technical features. A significant difference in image quality was found between the five acquisition protocols of the study. (author) [fr

  16. Comparison of periapical radiography with cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in teeth with metallic post

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Iwaki, Lilian Cristina Vessoni; da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Sabio, Sergio; Albino, Paulo Ricardo Febrairo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting vertical root fracture (VRF) in tooth with metallic post (MP). Materials and Methods: Twenty endodontically-treated teeth received MPs, artificial fractures were created in 10 teeth, and they were all examined with tomography and radiography. The sample consisted of periapical radiography with post and without post, and tomography with post and without post;...

  17. Cracked Tooth: A Report of Two Cases and Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyan Chakravarthy, Pishipati Vinayak; Telang, Lahari Ajay; Nerali, Jayashri; Telang, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Cracked tooth is a distinct type of longitudinal tooth fracture which occurs very commonly and its diagnosis can be challenging. This type of fracture tends to grow and change over time. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms are variable or nonspecific and may even resemble post-treatment disease following root canal treatment or periodontal disease. This variety and unpredictability make the cracked tooth a challenging diagnostic entity. The use of cone beam computed...

  18. Clinical indications and perspectives for intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Heinrich, Sven; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2007-03-01

    Intraoperative cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging has been introduced in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Using midfacial fractures as the pioneer model, this study describes the spectrum of further promising clinical indications for intraoperative CBCT and a clinical combination with intraoperative navigation. One hundred seventy-nine patients admitted for surgical treatment of the facial skeleton were included in the study. Intraoperatively, 3-dimensional images were generated with the mobile CBCT scanner Arcadis Orbic 3D, obtained from Siemens Medical Solutions, in a variety of indications. The acquisition of the data sets was uncomplicated, and image quality was sufficient to assess the postoperative result in all cases. In the example of a facial gunshot injury, a navigation system for intraoperative localization of the metal foreign bodies was used.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography ( ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  1. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications.

  2. Mandibular dimensions of subjects with asymmetric skeletal class III malocclusion and normal occlusion compared with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyoYeon; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Ki Beom; Behrents, Rolf G; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use cone-beam computed tomography to compare mandibular dimensions in subjects with asymmetric skeletal Class III malocclusion and those with normal occlusion. Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 38 subjects with normal occlusion and 28 patients with facial asymmetry were evaluated and digitized with Invivo software (Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). Three midsagittal and 13 right and left measurements were taken. The paired t test was used to compare the right and left sides in each group. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the midsagittal variables and the differences between the 2 sides of the group with normal occlusion with those of asymmetry patients. The posterior part of the mandibular body showed significant differences between the deviated and nondeviated sides in asymmetric Class III patients. The difference of the asymmetry group was significantly greater than that of the normal occlusion group for the mediolateral ramal and the anteroposterior condylar inclinations (P = 0.007 and P = 0.019, respectively). The asymmetric skeletal Class III group showed significant differences in condylar height, ramus height, and posterior part of the mandibular body compared with the subjects with normal occlusion. These results might be useful for diagnosis and treatment planning of asymmetric Class III patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential diagnosis of endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia with cone beam computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Plotino, G; Grande, N M; Testarelli, L; Prencipe, M; Messineo, D; Fratini, L; D'Ambrosio, F

    2011-02-01

    To discuss the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the differential diagnosis of a case of labiomandibular paraesthesia caused by extrusion of endodontic sealer into the mandibular canal. A 59-year-old woman suffering from a paraesthesia on the left posterior mandible and numbness on the left side of the lower lip was referred to an endodontic specialist 1 month after multiple root canal treatments. A panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of extruded root filling material beyond the apex of the mesial root of the mandibular left second molar and also beyond the apex of the first premolar. A cone beam computed tomography examination was undertaken, which confirmed the presence of radiopaque root canal filling material in the periapical area of the second molar, and revealed that the material was inside the mandibular canal. No extruded filling material was found inside the mental foramen beyond the apex of the first premolar tooth. Small field of view CBCT (where possible) can be considered an effective radiographic diagnostic device when endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve or mental foramen paraesthesia are suspected. CBCT is able to provide detailed three-dimensional images of the tooth, the root canal system and the surrounding tissue. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  4. Accuracy of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography on periapical radiolucency detection in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Daugela, Povilas; Strazdas, Marijus; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images) from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women) a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible) were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42) and radiographic (n = 24) examinations (P periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  5. The importance of cone-beam computed tomography in the management of endodontic problems: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Mickevičienė, Lina

    2014-12-01

    To obtain essential information in clinical endodontics, cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging can be used in all phases of treatment including diagnosis, treatment planning, during the treatment phase, and through post-treatment assessment and follow-up. The purpose of this article was to review the use of CBCT imaging in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessing the outcome of endodontic complications. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases for the following keywords: tooth root injuries, tooth root radiography, tooth root perforation, tomography, cone-beam computed tomography, endodontic complications, tooth root internal/external resorption, root fractures, and broken instruments. The research was restricted to articles published in English. One hundred twelve articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Currently, intraoral radiography is the imaging technique of choice for the management of endodontic disease, but CBCT imaging appears to have a superior validity and reliability in the management of endodontic diagnosis and complications. Endodontic cases should be judged individually, and CBCT imaging should be considered in situations in which information from conventional imaging systems may not yield an adequate amount of information to allow the appropriate management of endodontic problems. CBCT imaging has the potential to become the first choice for endodontic treatment planning and outcome assessment, especially when new scanners with lower radiation doses will be available. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Root and canal morphology of maxillary second molars by cone-beam computed tomography in a native Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Daming; Zhang, Guangdong; Liang, Ruizhen; Zhou, Guangchao; Wu, Younong; Sun, Chao; Fan, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Objective To evaluate the root and root canal morphology of the maxillary second molars (MSMs) in a native Chinese population by cone-beam computed tomography. Methods Cone-beam computed tomography images of 2412 MSMs from 1294 Chinese patients were analyzed to determine the number and morphology of the roots, the root canal morphology, the bilateral symmetry, and the correlations of these parameters with sex and age. Results The percentage of fused roots increased with age, while the percentage of fused roots in women was higher than that in men. The percentage of second mesiobuccal (MB2) canals in MSMs with three separate roots was higher in men than women. Patients aged 31 to 40 years showed a higher prevalence of MB2 canals, while those aged ≥51 years showed the lowest prevalence of MB2 canals among both men and women. There was a significant difference in bilateral symmetry of MSMs between men and women. Conclusion Root fusion of MSMs increased with age, while the root canal morphology was more complex in patients of intermediate ages.

  7. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on computed tomographic (CT) scanning which has improved computer-assisted imaging modalities for radiologic diagnosis. The advantage of this modality is its ability to image thin cross-sectional planes of the body, thus uncovering density information in three dimensions without tissue superposition problems. Because this enables vastly superior imaging of soft tissues in the brain and body, CT scanning was immediately successful and continues to grow in importance as improvements are made in speed, resolution, and cost efficiency. CT scanners are used for general purposes, and the more advanced machines are generally preferred in large hospitals, where volume and variety of usage justifies the cost. For imaging in the abdomen, a scanner with a rapid speed is preferred because peristalsis, involuntary motion of the diaphram, and even cardiac motion are present and can significantly degrade image quality. When contrast media is used in imaging to demonstrate scanner, immediate review of images, and multiformat hardcopy production. A second console is reserved for the radiologist to read images and perform the several types of image analysis that are available. Since CT images contain quantitative information in terms of density values and contours of organs, quantitation of volumes, areas, and masses is possible. This is accomplished with region-of- interest methods, which involve the electronic outlining of the selected region of the television display monitor with a trackball-controlled cursor. In addition, various image- processing options, such as edge enhancement (for viewing fine details of edges) or smoothing filters (for enhancing the detectability of low-contrast lesions) are useful tools

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography ( ...

  9. Reproducibility of three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks in cone-beam and low-dose computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, R; Frison, L; Wisniewski, M; Denis, J M; Vynckier, S; Cosnard, G; Zech, F; Reychler, H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the reproducibility of three-dimensional cephalometric landmarks on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) surface rendering using clinical protocols based on low-dose (35-mAs) spiral CT and cone-beam CT (I-CAT). The absorbed dose levels for radiosensitive organs in the maxillofacial region during exposure in both 3D-CT protocols were also assessed. The study population consisted of ten human dry skulls examined with low-dose CT and cone-beam CT. Two independent observers identified 24 cephalometric anatomic landmarks at 13 sites on the 3D-CT surface renderings using both protocols, with each observer repeating the identification 1 month later. A total of 1,920 imaging measurements were performed. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed at six sites around the thyroid gland, the submandibular glands, and the eyes in an Alderson phantom to measure the absorbed dose levels. When comparing low-dose CT and cone-beam CT protocols, the cone-beam CT protocol proved to be significantly more reproducible for four of the 13 anatomical sites. There was no significant difference between the protocols for the other nine anatomical sites. Both low-dose and cone-beam CT protocols were equivalent in dose absorption to the eyes and submandibular glands. However, thyroid glands were more irradiated with low-dose CT. Cone-beam CT was more reproducible and procured less irradiation to the thyroid gland than low-dose CT. Cone-beam CT should be preferred over low-dose CT for developing three-dimensional bony cephalometric analyses.

  10. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: role of cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; Pinto, Antonione Bezerra; Costa, Andre Luiz; Moraes, Mari Eli; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are known for unique and varied behavior, high recurrence rates, and distinctive histopathologic findings. Differential diagnosis and management of KCOTs may be challenging because other jaw lesions may present similar characteristics. Careful interpretation of cone beam computed tomograms and magnetic resonance images has great significance for precise assessment of KCOTs and their relationships to adjacent anatomic structures as well as for treatment planning. This case report describes a KCOT that developed in the left angle and mandibular ramus in association with a semierupted third molar.

  11. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  12. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busser, Wendy M. H.; Arntz, Mark J.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Deinum, Jaap; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeWe assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation dose.Materials and Methods CBCT scans were acquired in the interventional suite (Philips Allura Xper FD20) and rigidly registered to the vertebra in previously acquired CE-CT. Adrenal vein locations were marked on the CT image and superimposed with live fluoroscopy and digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide the AVS. Seventeen first attempts at AVS were performed with image registration and retrospectively compared with 15 first attempts without image registration performed earlier by the same 2 interventional radiologists. First-attempt AVS was considered successful when both adrenal vein samples showed representative cortisol levels. Sampling time, dose-area product (DAP), number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time, and skin dose were recorded.ResultsWithout image registration, the first attempt at sampling was successful in 8 of 15 procedures indicating a success rate of 53.3 %. This increased to 76.5 % (13 of 17) by adding CBCT and CE-CT image registration to AVS procedures (p = 0.266). DAP values (p = 0.001) and DSA runs (p = 0.026) decreased significantly by adding image registration guidance. Sampling and fluoroscopy times and skin dose showed no significant changes.ConclusionGuidance based on registration of CBCT and previously acquired diagnostic CE-CT can aid in enhancing localization of the adrenal veins thereby increasing the success rate of first-attempt AVS with a significant decrease in the number of used DSA runs and, consequently, radiation dose required

  13. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busser, Wendy M. H., E-mail: wendy.busser@radboudumc.nl; Arntz, Mark J.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Deinum, Jaap [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of General Internal Medicine (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeWe assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation dose.Materials and Methods CBCT scans were acquired in the interventional suite (Philips Allura Xper FD20) and rigidly registered to the vertebra in previously acquired CE-CT. Adrenal vein locations were marked on the CT image and superimposed with live fluoroscopy and digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide the AVS. Seventeen first attempts at AVS were performed with image registration and retrospectively compared with 15 first attempts without image registration performed earlier by the same 2 interventional radiologists. First-attempt AVS was considered successful when both adrenal vein samples showed representative cortisol levels. Sampling time, dose-area product (DAP), number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time, and skin dose were recorded.ResultsWithout image registration, the first attempt at sampling was successful in 8 of 15 procedures indicating a success rate of 53.3 %. This increased to 76.5 % (13 of 17) by adding CBCT and CE-CT image registration to AVS procedures (p = 0.266). DAP values (p = 0.001) and DSA runs (p = 0.026) decreased significantly by adding image registration guidance. Sampling and fluoroscopy times and skin dose showed no significant changes.ConclusionGuidance based on registration of CBCT and previously acquired diagnostic CE-CT can aid in enhancing localization of the adrenal veins thereby increasing the success rate of first-attempt AVS with a significant decrease in the number of used DSA runs and, consequently, radiation dose required.

  14. Evaluation of imaging reformation for root and pulp canal shapes of permanent teeth using a cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Hyun; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To estimate the shape of root and pulp canal using a dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to evaluate the accuracy of imaging reformation. CBCT images were obtained with incisors, premolars, and molars as the destination by using PSR 9000N {sup TM} Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Kyoto, Japan) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Inc, USA) cone beam CT unit that have different kind of detector and field of view, and compared these with the shape and the size of actual root and root canal. When the measuring value of cone beam computed tomography concerning to each root's bucco-lingual diameter and mesio-distal diameter was compared with the value of the actual root, it reveals an error range -0.49 {approx} +0.63 mm at PSR900N and -0.97 {approx} +1.14 mm at i-CAT (P>0.05). It was possible to identify and measure PSR 9000N {sup T}M Dental CT system to the limit 0.48{+-}0.06 mm (P>0.05) and i-CAT CBCT to the limit 0.86{+-}0.09 mm (P<0.05) on estimating the size and the shape of root canal. Two kinds of CBCT images revealed the useful reproducibility to estimate the shape of root, but there was the difference to estimate the shape of root according to apparatus. The reproducibility of root shape in the image of three-dimensions at PSR 900N is low such as 0.65 mm in a case of minute root canal. CBCT images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation for root and pulp and clinically CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of root and canal. However, these are different qualities of imaging reformation according to CBCT apparatus and limitation of reproducibility for minute root canals.

  15. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  16. Maxillary first molar with 7 root canals diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Root canal anatomy is complex, and the recognition of anatomic variations could be a challenge for clinicians. This case report describes the importance of cone beam computed tomographyic (CBCT imaging during endodontic treatment. A 23 year old woman was referred by her general dental practitioner with the chief complaint of spontaneous pain in her right posterior maxilla. From the clinical and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis was made and endodontic treatment was suggested to the patient. The patient underwent CBCT examination, and CBCT scan slices revealed seven canals: three mesiobuccal (MB1, MB2, and MB3, two distobuccal (DB1 and DB2, and two palatal (P1 and P2. Canals were successfully treated with reciprocating files and filled using single-cone filling technique. Precise knowledge of root canal morphology and its variation is important during root canal treatment. CBCT examination is an excellent tool for identifying and managing these complex root canal systems.

  17. Development and implementation of a low-cost phantom for quality control in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, W. O.; Navarro, M. V. T.; Maia, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    A phantom for quality control in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners was designed and constructed, and a methodology for testing was developed. The phantom had a polymethyl methacrylate structure filled with water and plastic objects that allowed the assessment of parameters related to quality control. The phantom allowed the evaluation of essential parameters in CBCT as well as the evaluation of linear and angular dimensions. The plastics used in the phantom were chosen so that their density and linear attenuation coefficient were similar to those of human facial structures. Three types of CBCT equipment, with two different technological concepts, were evaluated. The results of the assessment of the accuracy of linear and angular dimensions agreed with the existing standards. However, other parameters such as computed tomography number accuracy, uniformity and high-contrast detail did not meet the tolerances established in current regulations or the manufacturer's specifications. The results demonstrate the importance of establishing specific protocols and phantoms, which meet the specificities of CBCT. The practicality of implementation, the quality control test results for the proposed phantom and the consistency of the results using different equipment demonstrate its adequacy. (authors)

  18. Vertical palatal bone dimensions on lateral cephalometry and cone-beam computed tomography: implications for palatal implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Britta A; Wehrbein, Heinrich; Heuser, Lothar; Kunkel, Martin

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the necessity of three-dimensional imaging (computed tomography [CT]/cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for paramedian insertion of palatal implants. Lateral radiographs and CBCT scans were performed from 18 human skulls. For lateral cephalometry, the nasal floor (right/left) and the oral hard palate of all skulls were lined with a tin foil for contrast enhancement. The quantity of vertical bone as measured on lateral radiographs was compared with CBCT measurements obtained in median and parasagittal planes and at minimum bone height. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were determined for bivariate correlation analysis. The median palatal bone height on CBCT (mean 8.98 mm; standard deviation [SD] 3.4) was markedly higher than the vertical height seen on lateral radiographs (mean 6.6 mm; SD 3.2). Comparing lateral cephalometry with CBCT, the strongest association was observed at the minimum palatal bone height (r=0.926; Pcephalometry reflects the minimum bone height rather than maximum bone in the median plane. Therefore, a preoperative CT or CBCT is only indicated when the lateral cephalometry reveals a marginal quantity of bone. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Osteogenesis effect of guided bone regeneration combined with alveolar cleft grafting: assessment by cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W-L; Zhang, D-Z; Chen, X-J; Yuan, C; Xue, L-F

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows for a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography (CT) scans and provides accurate images of the alveolar cleft area. The osteogenic effect of guided bone regeneration (GBR) vs. conventional alveolar bone grafting alone for alveolar cleft defects was evaluated in this study. Sixty alveolar cleft patients were divided randomly into two groups. One group underwent GBR using acellular dermal matrix film combined with alveolar bone grafting using iliac crest bone grafts (GBR group), while the other group underwent alveolar bone grafting only (non-GBR group). CBCT images were obtained at 1 week and at 3 months following the procedure. Using Simplant 11.04 software, the bone resorption rate was calculated and compared between the two groups. The bone resorption rate from 1 week to 3 months following bone grafting without the GBR technique was 36.50±5.04%, whereas the bone resorption rate using the GBR technique was 31.69±5.50% (P=0.017). The application of autogenous iliac bone combined with the GBR technique for alveolar bone grafting of alveolar cleft patients can reduce bone resorption and result in better osteogenesis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Impact of Intraoperative Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Reduction Quality and Implant Position in Treatment of Tibial Plafond Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Sven Yves; Euler, Finn; von Recum, Jan; Wendl, Klaus; Grützner, Paul Alfred; Franke, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    The intraoperative assessment of the articular surface in displaced intra-articular distal tibia fractures can be challenging using conventional fluoroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and the method of intraoperative corrections of fracture reductions or implant placements during open reduction, internal fixation by using cone beam computed tomography (CT) after conventional fluoroscopy. Displaced intra-articular distal tibia fractures were retrospectively analyzed from August 2001 until December 2011. The fractures were classified according to the standards of the AO/OTA as type B or C and treated with open reduction and internal plate fixation. After primary reduction using conventional fluoroscopy, an additional cone beam CT scan was used to determine the alignment of the joint line and the implant position. The number of intraoperative revisions of the primary reduction due to the use of cone beam CT was analyzed. A total of 143 patients with an intra-articular tibial plafond fracture were included in the analysis. In 43 patients (30%), an intraoperative correction was performed after the cone beam CT scan. In 34 (24%) of these cases, intraoperative correction was required because of inadequate joint line reduction. Nine (6%) corrections were required as a result of a malposition of the implant. The revision rate did not differ by fracture classification. Despite its acceptance as the standard method of imaging, intraoperative conventional fluoroscopy for the assessment of implant positioning and fracture reduction of tibial plafond fractures is limited. The intraoperative utilization of cone beam CT provided additional information for the surgeon to detect insufficient reduction or implant malposition. Level III, retrospective comparative series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Tilting the jaw to improve the image quality or to reduce the dose in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckow, Marlen; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Müller, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be improved tilting the mandible that contains two dental titanium implants, within the relevant range of motion. Materials and methods: Using the mandible of a five-month-old pig, CBCT was performed varying the accelerating voltage, beam current, the starting rotation angle of the mandible in the source-detector plane and the tilt angles of the jaw with respect to the source-detector plane. The different datasets were automatically registered with respect to micro CT data to extract the common volume and the deviance to the pre-defined standard that characterizes the image quality. Results: The variations of the accelerating voltage, beam current and the rotation within the source-detection plane provided the expected quantitative behavior indicating the appropriate choice of the imaging quality factor. The tilting of the porcine mandible by about 14° improves the image quality by almost a factor of two. Conclusions: The tilting of the mandible with two dental implants can be used to significantly reduce the artifacts of the strongly X-ray absorbing materials in the CBCT images. The comparison of 14° jaw tilting with respect to the currently recommended arrangement in plane with the teeth demonstrates that the applied exposure time and the related dose can be reduced by a factor of four without decreasing the image quality.

  2. Effect of field-of-view size on gray values derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with the Hounsfield unit values from multidetector computed tomography scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Abbas; Ramezani, Leila; Bidgoli, Mohsen; Akbarzadeh, Mahdi; Ghazikhanlu-Sani, Karim; Fallahi-Sichani, Hamed

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of field-of-view (FOV) size on the gray values derived from conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) compared with the Hounsfield unit values from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans as the gold standard. A radiographic phantom was designed with 4 acrylic cylinders. One cylinder was filled with distilled water, and the other 3 were filled with 3 types of bone substitute: namely, Nanobone, Cenobone, and Cerabone. The phantom was scanned with 2 CBCT systems using 2 different FOV sizes, and 1 MDCT system was used as the gold standard. The mean gray values (MGVs) of each cylinder were calculated in each imaging protocol. In both CBCT systems, significant differences were noted in the MGVs of all materials between the 2 FOV sizes ( P types of bone substitutes based on a comparison of their MGVs. The Cranex3D CBCT system used with a small FOV had a significant correlation with MDCT results.

  3. Clival Lesion incidentally discovered on cone-beam computed tomography: A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Aniket B.; Tadinada, Aditya; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Lurie, Alan G. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States); Douglas, Fellows [Division of Diagnostic Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2014-06-15

    An osteolytic lesion with a small central area of mineralization and sclerotic borders was discovered incidentally in the clivus on the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of a 27-year-old male patient. This benign appearance indicated a primary differential diagnosis of non-aggressive lesions such as fibro-osseous lesions and arrested pneumatization. Further, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the lesion showed a homogenously low T1 signal intensity with mild internal enhancement after post-gadolinium and a heterogeneous T2 signal intensity. These signal characteristics might be attributed to the fibrous tissues, chondroid matrix, calcific material, or cystic component of the lesion; thus, chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma were added to the differential diagnosis. Although this report was limited by the lack of final diagnosis and the patient lost to follow-up, the incidental skull base finding would be important for interpreting the entire volume of CBCT by a qualified oral and maxillofacial radiologist.

  4. Comparison of electron beam computed tomography and exercise electrocardiography in detecting coronary artery disease in the elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Shinji; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Masahiko [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Although exercise electrocardiography (ECG) is a useful noninvasive screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD), one prerequisite for ECG screening is that patient be able to exercise enough to evoke myocardial ischemia. Thus, exercise ECG may not be suitable for, some elderly people with CAD who cannot exercise enough. We compared electron beam Computed Tomography (EBCT) with exercise ECG for detecting CAD in 196 patients (mean age, 58.4{+-}12.5 (standard deviation)) who had undergone coronary angiography. Using the angiographic findings as the ``gold standard``, we found that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 88%, 77%, 89%, and 77%, respectively, for EBCT, and 66%, 72%, 83%, and 52%, respectively, for exercise ECG. Although the results were similar when the subjects were divided into different age groups, the negative predictive value for exercise ECG, among older patients was very low. These findings suggest that EBCT is superior to exercise ECG in detecting CAD in the elderly. (author)

  5. Cone Beam Computed Tomography(CBCT Features Of A Rare Fibro-Osseous Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography is a useful technique for imaging the craniofacial lesions. It produces more realistic images that facilitate interpretation. Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF is a rare and benign fibro-osseous neoplasm that arises within the craniofacial bones, especially in the maxilla. Mandibular lesions can be seen in 10% of the cases.In both jaws, it has a predilection for the premolar and molar regions (it is mostly seen in premolar and molar regions. Radiographically, it can be present as a radiolucent, mixed or radiopaque lesion. Radiodensity varies from purely radiolucent masses to mixed densities with prominent radiopacity as the lesion matures. This case report highlights a JOF with large foci of odontome-like radiopacities in a 6-year-old boy's mandibular anterior region. The location of the lesion in the anterior mandible and comparatively rapid formation of large odontome-like radiopaque foci at this early agehas made it a rare entity.

  6. Factors affecting the possibility to detect buccal bone condition around dental implants using cone beam computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedke, Gabriela S; Spin-Neto, Rubens; da Silveira, Heloisa E D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate factors with impact on the conspicuity (possibility to detect) of the buccal bone condition around dental implants in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Titanium (Ti) or zirconia (Zr) implants and abutments were inserted into 40 bone blocks...... in a way to obtain variable buccal bone thicknesses. Three combinations regarding the implant-abutment metal (TiTi, TiZr, or ZrZr) and the number of implants (one, two, or three) were assessed. Two CBCT units (Scanora 3D - Sc and Cranex 3D - Cr) and two voxel resolutions (0.2 and 0.13 mm) were used....... Reconstructed sagittal images (2.0 and 5.0 mm thickness) were evaluated by three examiners, using a dichotomous scale when assessing the condition of the buccal bone around the implants. A multivariate logistic regression was performed using examiners' detection of the buccal bone condition as the dependent...

  7. Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis and Treatment of an Unusual Canine Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Gopalakrishnan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and treatment planning are important for successful endodontic treatment. We report a 24-year old male who presented to the Government Dental College in Kozhikode, Kerala, India, in 2015 with pain in his right upper canine. A digital periapical radiograph indicated the presence of a supernumerary tooth superimposing the root of the canine. However, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT confirmed that the supernumerary tooth was an illusion and that the canine root had a sharp invagination involving the labial and pulpal dentin surfaces, with evidence of periapical bone destruction. A blunt resection was performed at the level of the invagination and the resected end was filled with a dentin substitute. At a one-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and the periapical region appeared to be healing well. This report highlights the importance of CBCT in visualising abnormal canine morphology, thus allowing appropriate endodontic treatment.

  8. Differences in Healing of a Horizontal Root Fracture as Seen on Conventional Periapical Radiography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnachat Rothom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different locations and healing patterns of horizontal root fractures bear different prognoses. Conventional periapical radiographs have been routinely used for the evaluation of the locations and healing of horizontal root fractures, with the limitation of presenting two-dimensional images. The three-dimensional imaging technology, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, has recently gained interest in dental traumatology, in particular for locating and diagnosing root fractures. However, the assessment of healing patterns of horizontal root fracture using CBCT compared to conventional radiographs has not been established. This case report describes the different healing patterns evaluated by two-dimensional radiographs and CBCT of a horizontally root-fractured maxillary right central incisor treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA with a two-year follow-up. The findings suggest that the healing patterns of horizontal root fractures seen on conventional radiographs and CBCT may be different.

  9. Comparison of conventional radiography with cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures. An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshosaz, M.; Tavakoli, M.A.; Mostafavi, M.; Baghban, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in comparison with conventional radiography for vertical root fractures, 50 of 100 teeth were subjected to vertical root fracture (VRF) and then placed in dry mandibles. 3D scans were obtained for all teeth, and conventional radiographs were used as control images. All the images were assessed by 6 observers, who determined the presence of root fractures by using a 5-point confidence rating scale. The mean area under the curve (Az) for CBCT was 0.91, and that for conventional radiography was 0.64. The difference between the modalities was statistically significant (P=0.003). On the basis of interclass coefficient, inter-observer agreement for CBCT was 0/750, and that for conventional radiography was 0/637. Thus CBCT was shown to be significantly better than conventional periapical radiography for diagnosis of vertical root fractures in vitro. (author)

  10. A comparative study between cone-beam computed tomography and periapical radiographs in the diagnosis of simulated endodontic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addazio, P S S; Campos, C N; Özcan, M; Teixeira, H G C; Passoni, R M; Carvalho, A C P

    2011-03-01

    To compare cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with periapical radiography for the identification of simulated endodontic complications. Sixteen human teeth, in three mandibles, were submitted to the following simulated endodontic complications: G1) fractured endodontic file; G2) root perforation; G3) cast post with deviation; G4) external root resorption. Periapical radiographs were taken of each tooth at three different angles, and CBCT scan was taken. One calibrated examiner who was specialized in dental radiology interpreted the images. The results were analysed using the following scoring system: 0 - unidentified alteration; 1 - alteration identified with inaccurate diagnosis; and 2 - alteration identified with accurate diagnosis. Data were analysed using McNemar and Wilcoxon tests (alfa=0.05). In the overall assessment, CBCT was superior when compared with periapical radiographs (Pperiapical radiographs especially in the detection and assessment of external root resorption. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  11. Diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography on detection of mechanically-created artificial secondary caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charuakkra, Arnon; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Pongsiriwet, Surawut; Verochana, Karune; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bitewing images in detection of secondary caries. One hundred and twenty proximal slots of Class II cavities were randomly prepared on human premolar and molar teeth, and restored with amalgam (n=60) and composite resin (n=60). Then, artificial secondary caries lesions were randomly created using round steel No. 4 bur. The teeth were radiographed with a conventional bitewing technique and two CBCT systems; Pax-500ECT and Promax 3D. All images were evaluated by five observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (A(z)) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Significant difference was tested using the Friedman test (p valuedetection of secondary caries.

  12. Endodontic management of a maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus and external root irregularity using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun Lim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is a useful diagnostic tool for identification of both internal and external root configurations. This case report describes the endodontic management of a lateral incisor with both dens invaginatus and external root irregularity by using CBCT. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment was performed on the lateral incisor with dens invaginatus. A perforation through the dens invaginatus and external concavity was repaired using mineral trioxide aggregate. After 18 mon of follow-up, there were no clinical symptoms. Recall radiographs appeared normal and showed healing of the periapical pathosis. The understanding of both internal root canal configuration and external root irregularity using CBCT can ensure predictable and successful results.

  13. Evaluation of the relationship between mandibular third molar and mandibular canal by different algorithms of cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh; Ahmadi, Navid; Jamshidi, Mahsa

    2014-11-01

    Exact location of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) bundle is very important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the mandibular third molar and the mandibular canal by cone-beam computed tomography. This was a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling. 94 mandibular CBCTs performed with CSANEX 3D machine (Soredex, Finland) and 3D system chosen. Vertical and horizontal relationship between the mandibular canal and the third molar depicted by 3D, panoramic reformat view of CBCT and cross-sectional view. Cross-sectional view was our gold standard and other view evaluated by it. There were significant differences between the vertical and horizontal relation of nerve and tooth in all views (p < 0.001). The results showed differences in the position of the inferior alveolar nerve with different views of CBCT, so CBCT images are not quite reliable and have possibility of error.

  14. Effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Shokri, Abbas, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Dental Research Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, Amin Mahdavi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalzadeh, Mohsen [Department of Endodontics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tayari, Maryam [Department of Pedodontics, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinipanah, Mohammad [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmal, Javad [Research Center for Health Sciences and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog’s teeth. Forty eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. (author)

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of the Nasopharyngeal Airway in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdawi, Mahmood Abd; Farid, Mary Medhat; El-Fotouh, Mona Abou; El-Kassaby, Marwa Abdelwahab

    2017-03-01

      To assess the nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth in previously repaired nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate versus bilateral cleft lip and palate patients compared with noncleft controls using cone-beam computed tomography with the ultimate goal of finding whether cleft lip and palate patients are more liable to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction.   A retrospective analysis comparing bilateral cleft lip and palate, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and control subjects. Significance at P ≤ .05.   Cleft Care Center and the outpatient clinic that are both affiliated with our faculty.   Cone-beam computed tomography data were selected of 58 individuals aged 9 to 12 years: 14 with bilateral cleft lip and palate and 20 with unilateral cleft lip and palate as well as 24 age- and gender-matched noncleft controls.   Volume, depth, and cross-sectional area of nasopharyngeal airway were measured.   Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger nasopharyngeal airway volume than controls and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger cross-sectional area than those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P .05). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger depth than controls and those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed insignificant nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth compared with controls (P > .05).   Unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients did not show significantly less volume, cross-sectional area, or depth of nasopharyngeal airway than controls. From the results of this study we conclude that unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the studied age and stage of repaired clefts are not more prone to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction than controls.

  16. Diagnostic Value of Panoramic Radiography, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and Clinical Measurement in Determining Bone Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirreza Babaloo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calculation of the bone dimensions is of great importance for implant treatment. Several radiographic modalities have been used for this purpose. This study compared the accuracy of mesiodistal measurements of bone using panoramic radiography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, and the clinical methods. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, panoramic and CBCT images were obtained from 100 implant patients. Mesiodistal bone dimensions (distance between tooth CEJ in the mesial of edentulous region and CEJ of the tooth in distal of edentulous region were calculated using a scaled ruler on the orthopantomograms and the system software in the CBCT images. During the implant insertions, a mucoperiosteal flap was raised and clinical dimensions of the bone were measured by a periodontal probe and bone gauge. The differences of bone height and thickness measurements between gold standard and CBCT or panoramic modalities were analyzed using Student’s t- test. Results: The mean bone height was 10.64±1.55, 11.44±1.51, and 10.68±1.6 mm in the clinical, panoramic and CBCT modalities, respectively. Statistically significant difference was noted between the clinical and panoramic techniques (P0.05. During the bone height calculations, 79%, 62% and 78% of the images were ranked in the normal range using CBCT, panoramic and gold standard measurements, respectively. The mean areas under the ROC curve were 0.92 and 0.83 in CBCT and panoramic techniques, respectively. Conclusion: Accuracy of the CBCT images was higher than panoramic technique in measuring the bone dimensions and this technique can be confidently used to calculate the bone dimensions for the implant surgeries.   Keywords: Partially edentulous jaw; panoramic radiography; cone-beam computed tomography; bone dimensions

  17. Evaluation of cortical bone thickness of mandible with cone beam computed tomography for orthodontic mini implant installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Moslemzade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving maximum anchorage without movement of the teeth in anchorage unit has been a great challenge in orthodontics and the success of the treatment plan highly depends on it. In this case, using orthodontic mini-implants can make a huge difference. The objective of this retrospective study was to measure thickness of cortical bone at prospective mini-implant placement sites in mandible in order to understand stability aspects of mini-implant placement by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT images. Materials and Methods: Initial 3-dimensional images of 40 adult patients were studied. The cortical bone thickness was obtained at the alveolar processes from canine to second molar at 5 different vertical levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ. To determine the cortical bone thickness, tangent lines were drawn buccolingually to the roots in axial section and a third line was drawn from the middle of these two lines, and the cortical bone thickness was measured where the third line crossed the buccal cortex.   Results: Mandibular and buccal cortical bone thicknesses were 0.79 to 2.49 mm, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase from the CEJ to the apex (P<0.001, while this increase was not statically significant at interdental area of teeth #3 and #4. Comparing the 4 mm section in all sites showed significant increase from anterior to posterior. Conclusion: Based on our results, the cortical bone thickness mostly follows a pattern and depends on the interradicular site rather than individual differences.     Key words: Cone-beam computed tomography; orthodontic anchorage procedures

  18. Accuracy and Reliability of a Novel Method for Fusion of Digital Dental Casts and Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Breuning, K. Hero; Schols, Jan G. J. H.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were scanned, impressions were taken from the plaster models and the impressions were also scanned. Linear measurements were performed on all three models, to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Besides that, matching of the scanned plaster models and scanned impressions was done, to assess the accuracy of the matching procedure. Results show that all measurement errors are smaller than 0.2 mm, and that 81% is smaller than 0.1 mm. Matching of the scanned plaster casts and scanned impressions show a mean error between the two surfaces of the upper arch of 0.14 mm and for the lower arch of 0.18 mm. The time needed for reconstructing the CBCT scans to a digital patient, where the impressions are integrated into the CBCT scan of the patient takes about 15 minutes, with little variance between patients. In conclusion, we can state that this new method is a reliable method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. As far as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and digital handling processes are concerned, it is a significant improvement compared to the previously published methods. PMID:23527111

  19. Orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion: redefining the amount of movement assessed by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellozza, José Antonio Zuega; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Nary, Hugo; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is essential for tridimensional planning of orthognathic surgery, as it allows visualization and evaluation of bone structures and mineralized tissues. Tomographic slices allow evaluation of tooth inclination and individualization of movement performed during preoperative decompensation. The aim of this paper was to assess maxillary and mandibular incisors inclination pre and post orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods: The study was conducted on six individuals with skeletal Class III malocclusion, surgically treated, who had Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic scans obtained before and after orthodontic decompensation. On multiplanar reconstruction view, tomographic slices (axial, coronal and sagittal) were obtained on the long axis of each incisor. The sagittal slice was used for measurement taking, whereas the references used to assess tooth inclination were the long axis of maxillary teeth in relation to the palatal plane and the long axis of mandibular teeth in relation to the mandibular plane. Results: There was significant variation in the inclination of incisors before and after orthodontic decompensation. This change was of greater magnitude in the mandibular arch, evidencing that natural compensation is more effective in this arch, thereby requiring more intensive decompensation. Conclusion: When routinely performed, the protocols of decompensation treatment in surgical individuals often result in intensive movements, which should be reevaluated, since the extent of movement predisposes to reduction in bone attachment levels and root length. PMID:26560818

  20. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  1. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility of linear measurements on digital models obtained from intraoral and cone-beam computed tomography scans of alginate impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiranto, Matthew G.; Engelbrecht, W. Petrie; Nolthenius, Heleen E. Tutein; van der Meer, W. Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Digital 3-dimensional models are widely used for orthodontic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of digital models obtained from the Lava Chairside Oral scanner (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and cone-beam computed tomography scans

  2. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models

  3. Assessment of the effective dose in supine, prone, and oblique positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel combined extremity and maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koivisto, J.; Wolff, J.; Järnstedt, J.; Dastidar, P.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to assess the organ and effective doses (International Commission on Radiological Protection [ICRP] 103 standard) resulting from supine, prone, and oblique phantom positions in the maxillofacial region using a novel cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)

  4. Volumetric changes in apical radiolucencies of endodontically treated teeth assessed by cone-beam computed tomography 1 year after orthograde retreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metska, M.E.; Parsa, A.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Wesselink, P.R.; Özok, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows us to assess in 3 dimensions the location and size of periapical radiolucencies. We aimed to assess by CBCT scans the volumetric changes of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth 1 year after orthograde retreatment. Methods

  5. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Part I. On subjective image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, X.; Jacobs, R.; Hassan, B.; Li, L.M.; Pauwels, R.; Corpas, L.; Souza, P.C.; Martens, W.; Alonso, A.; Lambrichts, I.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To compare image quality and visibility of anatomical structures in the mandible between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: One dry mandible was scanned with five CBCT scanners (Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, NewTom 3G,

  6. Evaluation of the visibility and the course of the mandibular incisive canal and the lingual foramen using cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makris, N.; Stamatakis, H.; Syriopoulos, K.; Tsiklakis, K.; van der Stelt, P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the visibility and the course of the incisive canal and the visibility and the location of the lingual foramen using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: In total, 100 CBCT examinations of patients for preoperative planning were used for this study. The examinations

  7. Position of the impacted third molar in relation to the mandibular canal. Diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography compared with panoramic radiography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaeminia, H.; Meijer, G.J.; Soehardi, A.; Borstlap, W.A.; Mulder, J.; Berge, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) compared to panoramic radiography in determining the anatomical position of the impacted third molar in relation with the mandibular canal. The study sample comprised 53 third molars from 40 patients with an

  8. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nada, R.M.; Maal, T.J.J.; Breuning, K.H.; Berge, S.J.; Mostafa, Y.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D) assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans.

  9. A comparison between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cephalometry on frontal radiographs and on cone beam computed tomography scans of human skulls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, O.J.C. van; Maal, T.J.J.; Berge, S.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Katsaros, C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether measurements performed on conventional frontal radiographs are comparable to measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) models of human skulls derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and if the latter can be used in longitudinal

  10. Accuracy of three-dimensional measurements obtained from cone beam computed tomography surface-rendered images for cephalometric analysis: influence of patient scanning position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P.; Sanderink, G.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the accuracy of linear measurements on three-dimensional (3D) surface-rendered images generated from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in comparison with two-dimensional (2D) slices and 2D lateral and postero-anterior (PA) cephalometric projections, and to

  11. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  12. A Novel Region-Growing Based Semi-Automatic Segmentation Protocol for Three-Dimensional Condylar Reconstruction Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xi, Tong; Schreurs, Ruud; Heerink, Wout J.; Berge, Stefaan J.; Maal, Thomas J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present and validate a semi-automatic segmentation protocol to enable an accurate 3D reconstruction of the mandibular condyles using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Approval from the regional medical ethics review board was obtained for this study.

  13. A Novel Region-Growing Based Semi-Automatic Segmentation Protocol for Three-Dimensional Condylar Reconstruction Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xi, T.; Schreurs, R.; Heerink, W.J.; Berge, S.J.; Maal, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and validate a semi-automatic segmentation protocol to enable an accurate 3D reconstruction of the mandibular condyles using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Approval from the regional medical ethics review board was obtained for this study.

  14. Locoregional control of non-small cell lung cancer in relation to automated early assessment of tumor regression on cone beam computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Carsten; Bernchou, Uffe; Bertelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Large interindividual variations in volume regression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are observable on standard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during fractionated radiation therapy. Here, a method for automated assessment of tumor volume regression is presented and its...... therapy provides biological information on the specific tumor. This could potentially form the basis for personalized response adaptive therapy....

  15. Interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion quantified using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Wieringen, Niek; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) and assess if a 4D-CT is sufficient for predicting the motion during the treatment. Twenty-four patients with 63 markers

  16. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...

  17. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...

  18. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 2. The use of cone-beam computed tomography in endodontic diagnosis and treatment planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özok, A R; Metska, M E

    2015-09-01

    Systems for cone-beam computed tomography make a high-quality 3D reconstruction of dentomaxillofacial structures possible, without exposing the patient to excessive doses of radiation. Due to its 3D nature cone-beam computed tomography is superior to conventional dental radiographic imaging methods for many aspects of endodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. There are multiple indications for the use of cone-beam computed tomography scans in endodontics, including detection of periapical lesions or root fractures and the exploration of the root canal anatomy and its deviations. Depending on conditions, a judicious decision will always have to be made with regard to the radiographic technique to be applied. Primary in that respect must be the means by which the most accurate diagnostic image can be achieved with the lowest possible dose of radiation. Making a cone-beam computed tomography scan is justified only when the required diagnostic information cannot be achieved adequately using lower dose conventional dental radiographic imaging techniques.

  19. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: a comprehensive review. Part 1: applications associated with endodontic treatment and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohenca, N.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new technology that produces three-dimensional (3D) digital imaging at reduced cost and less radiation for the patient than traditional CT scans. It also delivers faster and easier image acquisition. By providing a 3D representation of the maxillofacial

  20. Volumetric pulp changes after orthodontic treatment determined by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Shivanand; Ajmera, Shreya; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and evaluate 3-dimensional pulp cavity changes during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-seven patients formed the study sample and were divided into an experimental group (48 patients) and a control group (39 patients). Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) records were obtained before the start of the treatment (T0) and after space closure for the experimental group, whereas for the control group CBCT images were obtained approximately 17-18 months (T1) after obtaining the first image (T0). CBCT data were reconstructed with surface and volume rendering software (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium), and the volumetric images were modified to display the teeth from various orientations. Six anterior teeth were segmented and their pulps isolated. Paired t test was used to check for statistical significance. The difference in the pulp volume was statistically significant at P Orthodontic treatment in the experimental group produced a significant decrease in the size of the pulp, which was statistically significant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and features of distolingual roots in mandibular molars analyzed by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Ree; Moon, Young Mi; Seo, Min Seock [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, Wonkang University Daejeon Dental Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated the prevalence of distolingual roots in mandibular molars among Koreans, the root canal system associated with distolingual roots, and the concurrent appearance of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar. Cone-beam computed tomographic images of 264 patients were screened and examined. Axial sections of 1056 mandibular molars were evaluated to determine the number of roots. The interorifice distances from the distolingual canal to the distobuccal canal were also estimated. Using an image analysis program, the root canal curvature was calculated. Pearson's chi-square test, the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and post-hoc analysis were performed. Distolingual roots were observed in 26.1% of the subjects. In cases where a distolingual root was observed in the mandibular molar, a significant difference was observed in the root canal curvature between the buccolingual and mesiodistal orientations. The maximum root canal curvature was most commonly observed in the mesiodistal orientation in the coronal portion, but in the apical portion, maximum root canal curvature was most often observed in the buccolingual orientation. The canal curvature of distolingual roots was found to be very complex, with a different direction in each portion. No correlation was found between the presence of a distolingual root in the mandibular first molar and the presence of a C-shaped canal in the mandibular second molar.

  2. Binary Decision Trees for Preoperative Periapical Cyst Screening Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Brandon; Alaqla, Ali; Noujeim, Marcel; Wealleans, James A; Kotsakis, Georgios; Chrepa, Vanessa

    2017-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis allows for 3-dimensional assessment of periradicular lesions and may facilitate preoperative periapical cyst screening. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the predictive validity of a cyst screening method based on CBCT volumetric analysis alone or combined with designated radiologic criteria. Three independent examiners evaluated 118 presurgical CBCT scans from cases that underwent apicoectomies and had an accompanying gold standard histopathological diagnosis of either a cyst or granuloma. Lesion volume, density, and specific radiologic characteristics were assessed using specialized software. Logistic regression models with histopathological diagnosis as the dependent variable were constructed for cyst prediction, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive validity of the models. A conditional inference binary decision tree based on a recursive partitioning algorithm was constructed to facilitate preoperative screening. Interobserver agreement was excellent for volume and density, but it varied from poor to good for the radiologic criteria. Volume and root displacement were strong predictors for cyst screening in all analyses. The binary decision tree classifier determined that if the volume of the lesion was >247 mm 3 , there was 80% probability of a cyst. If volume was decision tree classifier renders it a useful preoperative cyst screening tool that can aid in clinical decision making but not a substitute for definitive histopathological diagnosis after biopsy. Confirmatory studies are required to validate the present findings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Influence of Cone-beam Computed Tomography in Clinical Decision Making among Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gustavo; Abella, Francesc; Durán-Sindreu, Fernando; Patel, Shanon; Roig, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Clinical information and diagnostic imaging are essential components of preoperative diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging on clinical decision-making choices among different specialists (prosthodontists, endodontists, oral surgeons, and periodontists) in endodontic treatment planning. A secondary objective was to assess the self-reported level of difficulty in making a treatment choice before and after viewing a preoperative CBCT scan. In accordance with the endodontic case difficulty guidelines of the American Association of Endodontists, 30 endodontic cases with varying degrees of complexity were selected. Each case included clinical photographs, digital periapical radiographs, and a small-volume CBCT scan. In the first evaluation, examiners were given all the information of each case, except the CBCT scan. Examiners were asked to select one of the proposed treatment alternatives and assess the difficulty of making a decision. One month later, the examiners reviewed randomly the same 30 cases with the additional information from the CBCT data. The CBCT scans only had a significant influence on the treatment plan when the endodontic case was classified as high difficulty (P making among specialists, particularly in high difficulty cases. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maxillary sinus pneumatization after maxillary molar extraction assessed with cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yu Hoa; Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inferior expansion of the maxillary sinus floor following maxillary molar extraction. Cone beam computed tomographic images of 59 subjects were used to evaluate the height difference of the maxillary sinus floor between extraction sites and contralateral dentate sites. The height of the maxillary sinus floor was defined as the vertical distance to the Frankfort plane from the level of the anterior nasal spine to the most inferior point of the sinus floor. We examined the difference in sinus pneumatization according to the number of missing teeth and the vertical relationship of the molar roots to the sinus floor. The inferior expansion of the maxillary sinus floor was 1.20 {+-} 1.86 mm on the maxillary first molar and 1.90 {+-} 2.42 mm on the maxillary second molar. Increased expansion was observed in cases where two proximate molars were extracted. There was no significant difference in sinus pneumatization following extraction according to the vertical relationship of the molar roots to the sinus floor. The results of this study confirm that sinus pneumatization occurs following maxillary molar extraction. In situations where pneumatization can affect treatment after molar extraction, three-dimensional radiography should be considered.

  5. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  6. A rare case of dilated invaginated odontome with talon cusp in a permanent maxillary central incisor diagnosed by cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaya, Ranganathan; Kumar, Rangarajan Sundaresan Mohan; Srinivasan, Ramasamy [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Priyadarshini Dental College and Hospital, Chennai (India)

    2013-09-15

    It has been a challenge to establish the accurate diagnosis of developmental tooth anomalies based on periapical radiographs. Recently, three-dimensional imaging by cone beam computed tomography has provided useful information to investigate the complex anatomy of and establish the proper management for tooth anomalies. The most severe variant of dens invaginatus, known as dilated odontome, is a rare occurrence, and the cone beam computed tomographic findings of this anomaly have never been reported for an erupted permanent maxillary central incisor. The occurrence of talon cusp occurring along with dens invaginatus is also unusual. The aim of this report was to show the importance of cone beam computed tomography in contributing to the accurate diagnosis and evaluation of the complex anatomy of this rare anomaly.

  7. A rare case of dilated invaginated odontome with talon cusp in a permanent maxillary central incisor diagnosed by cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaya, Ranganathan; Kumar, Rangarajan Sundaresan Mohan; Srinivasan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    It has been a challenge to establish the accurate diagnosis of developmental tooth anomalies based on periapical radiographs. Recently, three-dimensional imaging by cone beam computed tomography has provided useful information to investigate the complex anatomy of and establish the proper management for tooth anomalies. The most severe variant of dens invaginatus, known as dilated odontome, is a rare occurrence, and the cone beam computed tomographic findings of this anomaly have never been reported for an erupted permanent maxillary central incisor. The occurrence of talon cusp occurring along with dens invaginatus is also unusual. The aim of this report was to show the importance of cone beam computed tomography in contributing to the accurate diagnosis and evaluation of the complex anatomy of this rare anomaly.

  8. Comparative study of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral periapical radiographs in diagnosis of lingual-simulated external root resorptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Ricardo Affonso; de Paulo, Renata Silvéria; Pereira, Luciana Oliveira; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; de Azevedo, José Ribamar

    2012-08-01

    Owing to a lack of symptoms and difficult visualization in routine intraoral radiographs, diagnosis of external root resorptions can be challenging. The goal of this study was to compare two image acquisition methods, intraoral radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in the diagnosis of external resorption. Thirty-four maxillary and mandibular bicuspids were divided into three groups. Perforations measuring 0.3 and 0.6 mm in diameter and 0.15 and 0.3 mm in depth, respectively, were made on the lingual root surfaces in thirty teeth, and four were used as controls. Next, teeth were mounted on an apparatus and radiographed at mesial, distal, and orthoradial angulations. CBCT images were also taken. The analysis of the intraoral radiographic and tomographic images was carried out by two experts using standardized scores. Data were then compared statistically. A strong agreement between the examiners was observed in both diagnosis methods, the intraoral radiographic (r = 0.93) and the tomographic analysis (r = 1.0). Tomography had higher statistically significant detection values than intraoral radiography (P radiography was significantly higher than that of 0.3-mm perforations (P radiography, regardless of the tooth or the dimensions of the resorption evaluated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Comparison of the radiation dose from cone beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in examinations of the hand; Vergleich der Strahlendosis von Cone-Beam Computertomografie und Multidetektor Computertomografie in Untersuchungen der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J.; Neubauer, C.; Gerstmair, A.; Krauss, T.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Reising, K. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery; Zajonc, H. [University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Plastic and Hand Surgery; Fiebich, M.; Voigt, J. [University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection

    2016-05-15

    Comparison of radiation dose of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in examinations of the hand. Dose calculations were carried out by means of Monte Carlo simulations in MDCT and CBCT. A corpse hand was examined in a 320-row MDCT scanner and a dedicated extremities CBCT scanner with standard protocols and multiple low-dose protocols. The image quality of the examinations was evaluated by 5 investigators using a Likert scale from 1 (very good) to 5 (very poor) regarding depiction of cortical bone, cancellous bone, joint surfaces, soft tissues and artifacts. For a sum of ratings of all structures < 50 a good overall image quality was expected. The studies with at least good overall image quality were compared with respect to the dose. The dose of the standard examination was 13.21 (12.96 to 13.46 CI) mGy in MDCT and 7.15 (6.99 to 7.30 CI) mGy in CBCT. The lowest dose in a study with good overall image quality was 4.54 (4.43 to 4.64 CI) mGy in MDCT and 5.72 (5.59 to 5.85 CI) mGy in CBCT. Although the dose of the standard protocols in the CBCT is lower than in the MDCT, the MDCT can realize a good overall image quality at a lower dose than the CBCT. Dose optimization of CT examination protocols for the hand is useful in both modalities, the MDCT has an even greater potential for optimization.

  10. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  12. Evaluation of Interdental Spaces of the Mandibular Posterior Area for Orthodontic Mini-Implants with Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemzadeh, Seyed Hossein; Sohrabi, Aydin; Rafighi, Ali; Kananizadeh, Yusef; Nourizadeh, Amin

    2017-04-01

    The use of mini-implants has increased in recent years because of their role in absolute anchorage, but the placement sites may affect the success or failure of the procedure, so it is very important to determine the appropriate and safe location for orthodontic mini-implants. On the other hand, the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which offers clear 3-Dimentional (3D) images, has been widely used in orthodontics and implant dentistry for surgical guidance of mini-implant placement. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate inter-radicular spaces between mandibular canines to second molars using cone beam 3D images. In this retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study, maxillofacial CBCT scan data were obtained from 40 adults. The 3D images were evaluated in five axial sections at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 mm from the cementoenamel Junction (CEJ). To determine inter-radicular spaces, tangent lines were drawn buccolingually to the roots in axial section and the minimum distance between these two lines was measured. The data was analysed using Friedman test with SPSS(ver.13). Interradicular spaces of canine to second molar increased from cervical to apical direction. The maximum distance was recorded at 4 mm from the CEJ between first and second molars. According to our findings there is a distinct pattern of inter-radicular space changes in mandible. Attention to this pattern during placement of mini-implants can ensure the safety of the procedure.

  13. Cone-beam computed tomography: accuracy of three-dimensional cephalometry analysis and influence of patient scanning position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frongia, Gianluigi; Piancino, Maria Grazia; Bracco, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the influence of the position of the skull during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan and if the three-dimensional cephalometric measurements are influenced by skull orientation during CBCT scan.The study consisted of 5 CBCT scanning (KODAK 9500 Cone Beam 3D System unit) in 5 different positions of a dry skull. The data were imported in SIMPLANT OMS Software version 13.0. Fifteen three-dimensional cephalometric measurements were calculated; moreover, the mean, the SD, the maximum/minimum Δ, and the maximum/minimum Δ percentage were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed by an independent-samples t-test to evaluate differences between the 5 scans.No difference was found in all the three-dimensional analysis. Twelve of 15 measurements have a Δ greater than 1.5, and 7 of 15 measurements have a Δ greater than 2. Nine of 15 have a Δ percentage greater than 5%. The preliminary results suggest that the three-dimensional cephalometric analysis is influenced by patient scanning position.

  14. Comparison of intraoral radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the detection of periodontal defects: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Nilsun; Kolsuz, Mehmet Eray; Kursun, Sebnem; Orhan, Kaan

    2015-05-28

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit with digital intraoral radiography technique for detecting periodontal defects. The study material comprised 12 dry skulls with maxilla and mandible. Artificial defects (dehiscence, tunnel, and fenestration) were created on anterior, premolar and molar teeth separately using burs. In total 14 dehiscences, 13 fenestrations, eight tunnel and 16 without periodontal defect were used in the study. These were randomly created on dry skulls. Each teeth with and without defects were images at various vertical angles using each of the following modalities: a Planmeca Promax Cone Beam CT and a Digora photostimulable phosphor plates. Specificity and sensitivity for assessing periodontal defects by each radiographic technique were calculated. Chi-square statistics were used to evaluate differences between modalities. Kappa statistics assessed the agreement between observers. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05. The kappa values for inter-observer agreement between observers ranged between 0.78 and 0.96 for the CBCT, and 0.43 and 0.72 of intraoral images. The Kappa values for detecting defects on anterior teeth was the least, following premolar and molar teeth both CBCT and intraoral imaging. CBCT has the highest sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for detecting various periodontal defects among the radiographic modalities examined.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  16. Experience of direct percutaneous sac injection in type II endoleak using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoong-Seok; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2015-04-01

    Cone beam CT, usually used in dental area, could easily obtain 3-dimensional images using cone beam shaped ionized radiation. Cone beam CT is very useful for direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) which needs very precise measurement to avoid puncture of inferior vena cava or vessel around sac or stent graft. Here we describe two cases of DPSI using cone beam CT. In case 1, a 79-year-old male had widening of preexisted type II endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, transarterial embolization failed due to tortuous collateral branches of lumbar arteries. In case 2, a 72-year-old female had symptomatic sac enlargement by type II endoleak after EVAR. However, there was no route to approach the lumbar arteries. Therefore, we performed DPSI assisted by cone beam CT in cases 1, 2. Six-month CT follow-up revealed no sign of sac enlargement by type II endoleak.

  17. Clinical Experience of Dual-phase Cone Beam Computed Tomography during Hepatic Arteriography to Apply 3D-DSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Kakimi, Akihiko; Katayama, Yutaka; Sasaki, Shohei; Norimasa, Toshiyo; Izuta, Shinichiro; Himoto, Daisuke; Ichida, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We report on the methods and experiences of the dual-phase cone beam computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (CBCTHA) to apply the 3D-DSA. A total of 32 ml contrast medium (150 mgI/ml) was injected at the rate of 2.0 ml/s for 16 s. The early phase scan was initiated 10 s after the start of contrast media injection. The delayed phase scan was started 40 s after that (24 s after the end of CM injection). When using the dual phase CBCTHA, it was able to obtain the classical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) images same as computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (CTHA). In the early phase, the tumor can be highly enhanced against the liver parenchyma. In delayed phase, corona enhancement was clearly appeared at the liver parenchyma. Of 58 cases of acquisitions, we experienced six cases with miss breath holding and 14 cases with over the field of view (FOV) due to hepatomegaly. We evaluated the tumor contrast in 18 cases because the other 40 cases were not applied to our criteria. The pixel values of ROIs on the tumor, coronal enhancement, and liver parenchyma were measured, respectively. Then, we calculated tumor-parenchyma contrast (T-P contrast), corona-tumor contrast (C-T contrast), and corona-parenchyma contrast (C-P contrast). The T-P contrast was 358±112, the C-T contrast was 132±51, and the C-P contrast was 168±66. The contrast was clearly visualized among them. The dual-phase CBCTHA that applies the 3D-DSA is a simple and useful technique for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  18. Clinical Application of Cone Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 2—Dental Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, G. G.; Cissell, Derek D.; Arzi, Boaz; Hatcher, David C.; Kass, Philip H.; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic rabbits are increasing in popularity as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental disease. Current diagnostic approaches include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a new oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that has the capability to produce high-resolution images, has not yet been described for use in evaluating dental disease in rabbits. A total of 15 client-owned rabbits had CBCT, oral examination, dental charting, and dental treatment performed under general anesthesia. Images were evaluated using transverse and custom multiplanar (MPR), 3D, and panoramic reconstructed images. The CBCT findings were grouped into abnormalities that could be detected on conscious oral examination vs. abnormalities that could not be detected by conscious oral examination. Potential associations between the two categories were examined by pairwise Fisher’s exact test with statistical significance determined by P periapical lucency (11/15), moth-eaten pattern of osteolysis of the alveolar bone (9/15), ventral mandibular border contour changes (9/15), and missing teeth (8/15). Of the CBCT abnormalities likely to be observed on oral examination, coronal elongation (detectable on oral examination) was significantly associated with apical elongation (P = 0.029). There were no other significant associations between CBCT findings that are also clinically detectable and CBCT findings that are not be detectable on oral examination. This suggests that pathology often exists that is not apparent upon oral examination. This study establishes the common CBCT findings associated with dental disease in rabbits and demonstrates the feasibility of this technology to diagnose and plan treatment in dental disorders in this species. PMID:28194401

  19. Three-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography using cone beam collimation (CB-SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Manglos, S.H.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A simple and economically practical method of improving the sensitivity of camera-based SPECT was developed using converging (cone-beam) collimation. This geometry is particularly advantageous for SPECT devices using large field-of-view cameras in imaging smaller, centrally located activity distributions. Geometric sensitivities, spatial resolutions, and fields-of-view of a cone-beam collimator having a focal length of 48 cm and a similarly designed parallel hole collimator were compared analytically. At 15 cm from the collimator surface the point-source sensitivity of the cone-beam collimator was 2.4 times the sensitivity of the parallel-hole collimator. SPECT projection data (simulated using Monte Carlo methodology) were reconstructed using a 3-D filtered backprojection algorithm. Cone-beam emission CT (CB-SPECT) seems potentially useful for animal investigations, pediatric studies, and for brain imaging

  20. Observation of positional relation between mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal on limited cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Atsuko; Nakagawa, Yoichi; Ishii, Hisako; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    We describe the preoperative use of limited cone beam computed tomography (CT) with a dental CT scanner for the assessment of mandibular third molars before extraction. Cone beam CT provides 42.7-mm-high and 30-mm-wide rectangular solid images, with a resolution of less than 0.2 mm. The positional relationship between the mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal was examined by dental CT. Sixty-eight lower third molars of 62 patients whose teeth were superimposed on the mandibular canal on periapical or panoramic radiographs were studied. Dental CT scans clearly demonstrated the positional relationship between the mandibular canal and the teeth. The mandibular canal was located buccally to the roots of 16 teeth, lingually to the roots of 27 teeth, inferiorly to the roots of 23 teeth, and between the roots of 2 teeth. The presence of bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth was not noted in 7 of 16 buccal cases, 24 of 27 lingual cases, and 10 of 23 inferior cases on dental CT scans, suggesting that the canal was in contact with the teeth. Fifty-nine of the 68 mandibular third molars were surgically removed, and postoperative transient hypoesthesia occurred in 4 patients. Dental CT scans s