WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam arc delivery

  1. Dosimetric verification of RapidArc treatment delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Medin, Joakim; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, Varian Medical Systems have announced the introduction of a new treatment technique, in which dose is delivered over a single gantry rotation with variable MLC positions, dose rate and gantry speed. In February 2008, a preclinical installation of the RapidArc beam delivery appr...

  2. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Larson, D; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  3. Neutral beam dump with cathodic arc titanium gettering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A; Krivenko, A S; Murakhtin, S V; Savkin, V Ya; Korepanov, S A; Putvinski, S

    2011-03-01

    An incomplete neutral beam capture can degrade the plasma performance in neutral beam driven plasma machines. The beam dumps mitigating the shine-through beam recycling must entrap and retain large particle loads while maintaining the beam-exposed surfaces clean of the residual impurities. The cathodic arc gettering, which provides high evaporation rate coupled with a fast time response, is a powerful and versatile technique for depositing clean getter films in vacuum. A compact neutral beam dump utilizing the titanium arc gettering was developed for a field-reversed configuration plasma sustained by 1 MW, 20-40 keV neutral hydrogen beams. The titanium evaporator features a new improved design. The beam dump is capable of handling large pulsed gas loads, has a high sorption capacity, and is robust and reliable. With the beam particle flux density of 5 × 10(17) H∕(cm(2) s) sustained for 3-10 ms, the beam recycling coefficient, defined as twice the ratio of the hydrogen molecular flux leaving the beam dump to the incident flux of high-energy neutral atoms, is ∼0.7. The use of the beam dump allows us to significantly reduce the recycling of the shine-through neutral beam as well as to improve the vacuum conditions in the machine.

  4. Volumetric modulation arc radiotherapy with flattening filter-free beams compared with conventional beams for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzan Zhuang; Tuodan Zhang; Zhijian Chen; Zhixiong Lin; Derui Li; Xun Peng; Qingchun Qiu

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the clinical use of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams.In this study,we aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with FFF beams for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Ten NPC patients were randomly selected to undergo a RapidArc plan with either FFF beams (RA-FFF) or conventional beams (RA-C).The doses to the planning target volumes (PTVs),organs at risk (OARs),and normal tissues were compared.The technical delivery parameters for RapidArc plans were also assessed to compare the characteristics of FFF and conventional beams.Both techniques delivered adequate doses to PTVs.For PTVs,RA-C delivered lower maximum and mean doses and improved conformity and homogeneity compared with RA-FFF.Both techniques provided similar maximum doses to the optic nerves and lenses.For the brain stem,spinal cord,larynx,parotid glands,oral cavity,and skin,RA-FFF showed significant dose increases compared to RA-C.The dose to normal tissue was lower in RA-FFF.The monitor units (MUs) were (536 ± 46) MU for RA-FFF and (501 ± 25) MU for RA-C.The treatment duration did not significantly differ between plans.Although both treatment plans could meet clinical needs,RA-C is dosimetrically superior to RA-FFF for NPC radiotherapy.

  5. Status of the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Resta López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Schuler, P; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Brunetti, L; Geffroy, N; Jeremie, A; Seryi, A; Angal-Kalinin, D; Jackson, F

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Beam Delivery System (BDS) is experiencing the careful revision from a large number of world wide experts. This was particularly enhanced by the successful CLIC’08 workshop held at CERN. Numerous new ideas, improvements and critical points are arising, establishing the path towards the Conceptual Design Report by 2010.

  6. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  7. Beam loss detection system in the arcs of the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauzo, A.; Bovet, C.

    2000-11-01

    Over the whole circumference of the LHC, Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) will be needed for a continuous surveillance of fast and slow beam losses. In this paper, the location of the BLMs set outside the magnet cryostats in the arcs is proposed. In order to know the number of protons lost on the beam screen, the sensitivity of each BLM has been computed using the program GEANT 3.21, which generates the shower inside the cryostat. The material and the magnetic fields have been described thoroughly in 3-D and the simulation results show the best locations for 6 BLMs needed around each quadrupole. The number of minimum ionizing particles received for each lost proton serves to define local thresholds to dump the beam when the losses are menacing to quench a magnet.

  8. Beam Loss Detection System in the Arcs of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Arauzo-Garcia, A

    2000-01-01

    Over the whole circumference of the LHC, Beam Loss Monitors (BLM) will be needed for a continuous surveillance of fast and slow beam losses. In this paper, the location of the BLMs set outside the magnet cryostats in the arcs is proposed. In order to know the number of protons lost on the beam screen, the sensitivity of each BLM has been computed using the program GEANT 3.21, which generates the shower inside the cryostat. The material and the magnetic fields have been described thoroughly in 3-D and the simulation results show the best locations for 6 BLMs needed around each quadrupole. The number of minimum ionizing particles received for each lost proton serves to define local thresholds to dump the beam when the losses are menacing to quench a magnet

  9. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  10. Beam delivery for stable isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Andrew; Strydom, Hendrick J.; Botha, Lourens R.; Ronander, Einar

    2002-10-01

    In the multi-photon dissociation process of Carbon isotope enrichment, IR photons are used to selectively excite a molecule with the given isotopic base element. This enrichment process is very sensitive to the beam's intensity and wavelength. Because the intensity is determined by the propagation of the field, the enrichment factors are also very dependent on the field propagation. In this paper, the influence of the wavelength and intensity of the beam, on the isotope selective dissociation of a CFC compound is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Consideration is also given to some of the factors that influence the delivery of various beams to the reactor chamber, and their subsequent propagation through the reactor. The results show that suitable beam forming can lead to an improved isotope separation process.

  11. Planning study of flattening filter free beams for volumetric modulated arc therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqun Lai

    Full Text Available Flattening filter free (FFF beams show the potential for a higher dose rate and lower peripheral dose. We investigated the planning study of FFF beams with their role for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.One patient with squamous cell carcinoma which had involvement of entire scalp was subjected to VMAT using TrueBeam linear accelerator. As it was a rare skin malignancy, CT data of 7 patients with brain tumors were also included in this study, and their entire scalps were outlined as target volumes. Three VMAT plans were employed with RapidArc form: two half-field full-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFF-VMAT-FF, eight half-field quarter-arcs VMAT using 6 MV standard beams (HFQ-VMAT-FF, and HFQ-VMAT using FFF beams (HFQ-VMAT-FFF. Prescribed dose was 25 × 2 Gy (50 Gy. Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans.There were no statistically significant differences among the three VMAT plans in target volume coverage, conformity, and homogeneity. For HFQ-VMAT-FF plans, there was a significant decrease by 12.6% in the mean dose to the brain compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. By the use of FFF beams, the mean dose to brain in HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans was further decreased by 7.4% compared with HFQ-VMAT-FF. Beam delivery times were similar for each technique.The HFQ-VMAT-FF plans showed the superiority in dose distributions compared with HFF-VMAT-FF. HFQ-VMAT-FFF plans might provide further normal tissue sparing, particularly in the brain, showing their potential for radiation therapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp.

  12. The characteristics of arc beam shaping in hybrid plasma and laser deposition manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hai'ou; QIAN; Yingping; WANG; Guilan; ZHENG; Qiguang

    2006-01-01

    As a new direct metal prototyping technology,the hybrid plasma and laser deposition manufacturing (PLDM) is proposed in this paper. In order to figure out the characteristics of plasma arc beam and mould in the PLDM process of high temperature alloy, the high speed CCD camera is used to obtain the picture around the plasma arc. Afterwards the sketch of picture is clearly obtained. And the effect of laser parameter, such as average power, pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and the angle between laser beam and plasma arc beam on the plasma arc appearance, is studied experimentally. The results show that the modality of plasma arc beam is markedly influenced by laser beam. And the improvements of shape precision and surface state of the layer deposited by PLDM are confirmed.

  13. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philp; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois; Arumugam, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H&N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used.

  14. Beam Delivery Simulation - Recent Developments and Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00232566; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Garcia-Morales, H; Gibson, Stephen; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Nevay, Laurence James; Deacon, Lawrence Charles

    2015-01-01

    Beam Delivery Simulation (BDSIM) is a particle tracking code that simulates the passage of particles through both the magnetic accelerator lattice as well as their interaction with the material of the accelerator itself. The Geant4 toolkit is used to give a full range of physics processes needed to simulate both the interaction of primary particles and the production and subsequent propagation of secondaries. BDSIM has already been used to simulate linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), but it has recently been adapted to simulate circular accelerators as well, producing loss maps for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper the most recent developments, which extend BDSIM’s functionality as well as improve its efficiency are presented. Improvement and refactorisation of the tracking algorithms are presented alongside improved automatic geometry construction for increased particle tracking speed.

  15. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiya Noto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was evaluated in comparison to noninterrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to noninterrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater.

  16. Statistical quality control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery using machine log data

    CERN Document Server

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up statistical quality control for monitoring of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery error using machine log data. Eclipse and Clinac iX linac with the RapidArc system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) is used for delivery of the VMAT plan. During the delivery of the RapidArc fields, the machine determines the delivered motor units (MUs) and gantry angle position accuracy and the standard deviations of MU (sigma_MU; dosimetric error) and gantry angle (sigma_GA; geometric error) are displayed on the console monitor after completion of the RapidArc delivery. In the present study, first, the log data was analyzed to confirm its validity and usability; then, statistical process control (SPC) was applied to monitor the sigma_MU and sigma_GA in a timely manner for all RapidArc fields: a total of 195 arc fields for 99 patients. The sigma_MU and sigma_GA were determined twice for all fields, that is, first during the patient-specific plan QA and then again during th...

  17. Statistical quality control for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery by using the machine's log data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Park, Soah; Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Han, Tae Jin; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to set up statistical quality control for monitoring the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery error by using the machine's log data. Eclipse and a Clinac iX linac with the RapidArc system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) are used for delivery of the VMAT plan. During the delivery of the RapidArc fields, the machine determines the delivered monitor units (MUs) and the gantry angle's position accuracy and the standard deviations of the MU ( σMU: dosimetric error) and the gantry angle ( σGA: geometric error) are displayed on the console monitor after completion of the RapidArc delivery. In the present study, first, the log data were analyzed to confirm its validity and usability; then, statistical process control (SPC) was applied to monitor the σMU and the σGA in a timely manner for all RapidArc fields: a total of 195 arc fields for 99 patients. The MU and the GA were determined twice for all fields, that is, first during the patient-specific plan QA and then again during the first treatment. The sMU and the σGA time series were quite stable irrespective of the treatment site; however, the sGA strongly depended on the gantry's rotation speed. The σGA of the RapidArc delivery for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was smaller than that for the typical VMAT. Therefore, SPC was applied for SBRT cases and general cases respectively. Moreover, the accuracy of the potential meter of the gantry rotation is important because the σGA can change dramatically due to its condition. By applying SPC to the σMU and σGA, we could monitor the delivery error efficiently. However, the upper and the lower limits of SPC need to be determined carefully with full knowledge of the machine and log data.

  18. Comparison of arc-modulated cone beam therapy and helical tomotherapy for three different types of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Silke; Sterzing, Florian; Nill, Simeon; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Debus, Juergen; Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT) is a fast treatment technique deliverable in a single rotation with a conventional C-arm shaped linac. In this planning study, the authors assess the dosimetric properties of single-arc therapy in comparison to helical tomotherapy for three different tumor types. Methods: Treatment plans for three patients with prostate carcinoma, three patients with anal cancer, and three patients with head and neck cancer were optimized for helical tomotherapy and AMCBT. The dosimetric comparison of the two techniques is based on physical quantities derived from dose-volume histograms. Results: For prostate cancer, the quality of dose distributions calculated for AMCBT was of equal quality as that generated for tomotherapy with the additional benefits of a faster delivery and a lower integral dose. For highly complex geometries, the plan quality achievable with helical tomotherapy could not be achieved with arc-modulated cone beam therapy. Conclusions: Rotation therapy with a conventional linac in a single arc is capable to deliver a high and homogeneous dose to the target and spare organs at risk. Advantages of this technique are a fast treatment time and a lower integral dose in comparison to helical tomotherapy. For highly complex cases, e.g., with several target regions, the dose shaping capabilities of AMCBT are inferior to those of tomotherapy. However, treatment plans for AMCBT were also clinically acceptable.

  19. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, Dávid

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. In this model, a 360-degree arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. We demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. For that purpose, we first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated...

  20. Generation of intense plasma jets and microparticle beams by an arc in a supersonic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1990-04-01

    Temperatures up to 50000 have been reached in water vortex stabilized Gerdien arcs. In arcs confined within the cores of supersonic hydrogen vortices much higher temperatures should be possible. Furthermore if these arcs are thermally insulated by a strong magnetic field temperatures up to a 106 K may be attainable. At these temperatures and in passing through a Laval nozzle the arc plasma can reach jet velocities of 100km/sec. If small quantities of heavy elements are entrained by this high velocity plasma jet these heavy elements are carried along reaching the same speed and upon condensation can form beams of clusters and microparticles.

  1. Beam Emittance Measurement with Laser Wire Scanners in the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; /CERN; Blair, G.A.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of the beam phase-space is essential for the next generation of electron accelerators. A scheme for beam optics optimization and beam matrix reconstruction algorithms for the diagnostics section of the beam delivery system of the International Linear Collider based on laser-wire beam profile monitors are discussed. Possible modes of operation of the laser-wire system together with their corresponding performance are presented. Based on these results, prospects for reconstructing the ILC beam emittance from representative laser-wire beam size measurements are evaluated.

  2. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced...... on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans...... with a single 358° arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy × 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45° or 315°. To quantify the plan modulation, an average...

  3. The Superconducting Magnets of the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; /Brookhaven; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-09-28

    The ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.

  4. Conditions for coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced microbunching suppression in multibend beam transport or recirculation arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C.

    2017-02-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high-brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in beam phase space degradation. On one hand, CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beam line and possibly cause emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching instability. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Correspondingly, a few scenarios have been introduced to suppress CSR-induced microbunching instability, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching instability along transport or recirculation arcs. Examples are presented with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our developed semianalytical Vlasov solver [C.-Y. Tsai, D. Douglas, R. Li, and C. Tennant, Linear microbunching analysis for recirculation machines, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 19, 114401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.19.114401]. The example lattices include low-energy (˜100 MeV ) and high-energy (˜1 GeV ) recirculation arcs, and medium-energy compressor arcs. Our studies show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. Beam current dependences of maximal CSR microbunching gains are also demonstrated, which should help outline a beam line design for different scales of nominal currents. We expect this analysis can shed light on the lattice design approach that aims to control the CSR-induced microbunching.

  5. TECHNOLOGIES FOR DELIVERY OF PROTON AND ION BEAMS FOR RADIOTHERAPY

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, H; Alonso, J; Mackay, R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  6. Technologies for Delivery of Proton and Ion Beams for Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Hywel; Alonso, Jose; MacKay, Ranald

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments for the delivery of proton and ion beam therapy have been significant, and a number of technological solutions now exist for the creation and utilisation of these particles for the treatment of cancer. In this paper we review the historical development of particle accelerators used for external beam radiotherapy and discuss the more recent progress towards more capable and cost-effective sources of particles.

  7. Dielectric Collimators for Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, A; Baturin, S; Tomás, R

    2011-01-01

    The current status of ILC and CLIC concepts require additional research on wakefield reduction in the collimator sections. New materials and new geometries have been considered recently*. Dielectric collimators for the CLIC Beam Delivery System have been discussed with a view to minimize the BDS collimation wakefields**. Dielectric collimator concepts for the linear collider are presented in this paper; cylindrical and planar collimators for the CLIC parameters have been considered, and simulations to minimize the beam impedance have been performed. The prototype collimator system is planned to be fabricated and experimentally tested at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) at SLAC.

  8. Specialty flat-top beam delivery fibers with controlled beam parameter product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollivet, C.; Farley, K.; Conroy, M.; Abramczyk, J.; Belke, S.; Becker, F.; Tankala, K.

    2016-03-01

    Beam delivery fibers have been used widely for transporting the optical beams from the laser to the subject of irradiation in a variety of markets including industrial, medical and defense applications. Standard beam delivery fibers range from 50 to 1500 μm core diameter and are used to guide CW or pulsed laser light, generated by solid state, fiber or diode lasers. Here, we introduce a novel fiber technology capable of simultaneously controlling the beam profile and the angular divergence of single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) beams using a single-optical fiber. Results of beam transformation from a SM to a MM beam with flat-top intensity profile are presented in the case of a controlled BPP at 3.8 mm*mrad. The scaling capabilities of this flat-top fiber design to achieve a range of BPP values while ensuring a flat-top beam profile are discussed. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the homogenizer capabilities of this novel technology, able to transform random MM beams into uniform flat-top beam profiles with very limited impact on the beam brightness. This study is concluded with a discussion on the scalability of this fiber technology to fit from 50 up to 1500 μm core fibers and its potential for a broader range of applications.

  9. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, Stephen G.; Brennan, J. Michael; Tuozzolo, Joseph E.; Zaltsman, Alexander

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  10. TU-CD-304-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION and BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Development of Novel Arc Delivery Techniques Integrating Dynamic Table Motion for Extended Volume Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, E; Hoppe, R; Million, L; Loo, B; Koong, A; Xing, L; Hsu, A; Fahimian, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Otto, K [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Integration of coordinated robotic table motion with inversely-planned arc delivery has the potential to resolve table-top delivery limitations of large-field treatments such as Total Body Irradiation (TBI), Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI), and Cranial-Spinal Irradiation (CSI). We formulate the foundation for Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy (TMAT), and using Varian Developer Mode capabilities, experimentally investigate its practical implementation for such techniques. Methods: A MATLAB algorithm was developed for inverse planning optimization of the table motion, MLC positions, and gantry motion under extended-SSD geometry. To maximize the effective field size, delivery trajectories for TMAT TBI were formed with the table rotated at 270° IEC and dropped vertically to 152.5cm SSD. Preliminary testing of algorithm parameters was done through retrospective planning analysis. Robotic delivery was programmed using custom XML scripting on the TrueBeam Developer Mode platform. Final dose was calculated using the Eclipse AAA algorithm. Initial verification of delivery accuracy was measured using OSLDs on a solid water phantom of varying thickness. Results: A comparison of DVH curves demonstrated that dynamic couch motion irradiation was sufficiently approximated by static control points spaced in intervals of less than 2cm. Optimized MLC motion decreased the average lung dose to 68.5% of the prescription dose. The programmed irradiation integrating coordinated table motion was deliverable on a TrueBeam STx linac in 6.7 min. With the couch translating under an open 10cmx20cm field angled at 10°, OSLD measurements along the midline of a solid water phantom at depths of 3, 5, and 9cm were within 3% of the TPS AAA algorithm with an average deviation of 1.2%. Conclusion: A treatment planning and delivery system for Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy of extended volumes has been established and experimentally demonstrated for TBI. Extension to other treatment

  11. Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

  12. Delivery Parameter Variations and Early Clinical Outcomes of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for 31 Prostate Cancer Patients: An Intercomparison of Three Treatment Planning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Tsutsumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We created volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for 31 prostate cancer patients using one of three treatment planning systems (TPSs—ERGO++, Monaco, or Pinnacle—and then treated those patients. A dose of 74 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV. The rectum, bladder, and femur were chosen as organs at risk (OARs with specified dose-volume constraints. Dose volume histograms (DVHs, the mean dose rate, the beam-on time, and early treatment outcomes were evaluated and compared. The DVHs calculated for the three TPSs were comparable. The mean dose rates and beam-on times for Ergo++, Monaco, and SmartArc were, respectively, 174.3 ± 17.7, 149.7 ± 8.4, and 185.8 ± 15.6 MU/min and 132.7 ± 8.4, 217.6 ± 13.1, and 127.5 ± 27.1 sec. During a follow-up period of 486.2 ± 289.9 days, local recurrence was not observed, but distant metastasis was observed in a single patient. Adverse events of grade 3 to grade 4 were not observed. The mean dose rate for Monaco was significantly lower than that for ERGO++ and SmartArc (P<0.0001, and the beam-on time for Monaco was significantly longer than that for ERGO++ and SmartArc (P<0.0001. Each TPS was successfully used for prostate VMAT planning without significant differences in early clinical outcomes despite significant TPS-specific delivery parameter variations.

  13. The beam delivery modeling and error sources analysis of beam stabilization system for lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Lihua; Hou, Liying; He, Guojun; Ren, Bingqiang; Zeng, Aijun; Huang, Huijie

    2013-12-01

    Beam stabilization system is one of the most important units for lithography, which can accomplish displacement and pointing detection and control and includes beam measurement unit(BMU) and beam steering unit(BSU). Our group has set up a beam stabilization system and verified preliminarily beam stabilization algorithm of precise control beam position and angle. In the article, we establish beam delivery mathematic model and analyze the system inherent error. This shows that the reason why image rotation effect arises at the output plane of beam stabilization is the fast steering mirror (FSM) rotation of BSU in the process of beam stabilization. Two FSMs rotation around 45o axis of FSM make the most contribution to image rotation which rotates 1.414 mrad as two FSMs rotation angle difference changes 1 mrad. It is found that error sources include three key points: FSM accuracy; measurement noise and beam translation by passing through of beam splitters changing as the ambient temperature changing. FSM accuracy leads to the maximum 13.2μm displacement error and 24.49μrad angle error. Measurement inaccuracy as a result of 5μm measurement noise results in the maximum 0.126mm displacement error and 57.2μrad angle error. Beam translation errors can be negligible if temperature is unchanged. We have achieved beam stability of about 15.5μrad for angle and 28μm for displacement (both 1σ) after correcting 2mm initial displacement deviation and 5mrad initial angle deviation with regard to the system rebuilt due to practical requirements.

  14. Performance requirements of the MedAustron beam delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073034

    The Austrian hadron therapy center MedAustron is currently under construction with patient treatment planned to commence in 2015. Tumors will be irradiated using proton and carbon ions, for which the steeply rising Bragg curve and finite range offer a better conformity of the dose to the geometrical shape of the tumor compared to conventional photon irradiation. The current trend is to move from passive scattering toward active scanning using a narrow pencil beam in order to reach an even better dose conformation and limit the need of patient specific hardware. The quality of the deposited dose will ultimately depend on the performance of the beam delivery chain: beam profile and extraction stability of the extracted beam, accuracy and ramp rate of the scanning magnet power supplies, and precision of the beam monitors used for verifying the delivered dose. With a sharp lateral penumbra, the transverse dose fall-off can be minimized. This is of particular importance in situations where the lesion is adjace...

  15. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  16. Tuning of the Compact Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Latina, A; Tomas, R; Snuverink, J

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) BeamDelivery System (BDS), and in particular the Final Focus (FF), is a challenging task. In simulations without misalignments, the goal is to reach 120%o f the nominal luminosity target, in order to allow for 10% loss due to static imperfections, and another 10% loss from dynamic imperfections. Various approaches have been considered to correct the magnet misalignments, including 1-1 correction, Dispersion Free Steering (DFS), and several minimization methods utilizing multipole movers. In this paper we report on the recent advancements towards a feasible tuning approach that reaches the required luminosity target.

  17. Volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams for isolated abdominal/pelvic lymph nodes: report of dosimetric and early clinical results in oligometastatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongi Filippo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SBRT is a safe and efficient strategy to locally control multiple metastatic sites. While research in the physics domain for Flattening Filter Free Beams (FFF beams is increasing, there are few clinical data of FFF beams in clinical practice. Here we reported dosimentric and early clinical data of SBRT and FFF delivery in isolated lymph node oligometastatic patients. Methods Between October 2010 and March 2012, 34 patients were treated with SBRT for oligometastatic lymph node metastasis on a Varian TrueBeamTM treatment machine using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc. We retrospectively evaluated a total of 25 patients for isolated lymph node metastases in abdomen and/or pelvis treated with SBRT and FFF (28 treatments. Acute toxicity was recorded. Local control evaluation was scored by means of CT scan and/or PET scan. Results All dosimetric results are in line with what published for the same type of stereotactic abdominal lymph node metastases treatments and fractionation, using RapidArc. All 25 FFF SBRT patients completed the treatment. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was minimal: one patient showed Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity. Three other patients presented Grade 2 toxicity. No Grade 3 or higher was recorded. All toxicities were recovered within one week. The preliminary clinical results at the median follow up of 195 days are: complete response in 12 cases, partial response in 11, stable disease in 5, with an overall response rate of 82%; no local progression was recorded. Conclusions Data of dosimetrical findings and acute toxicity are excellent for patients treated with SBRT with VMAT using FFF beams. Preliminary clinical results showed a high rate of local control in irradiated lesion. Further data and longer follow up are needed to assess late toxicity and definitive clinical outcomes.

  18. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia); Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  19. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A [BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Island Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  20. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA (United States); Otto, K [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  1. Design of the extraction arc for the 2{sup nd} beam line of the free-electron laser FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, Matthias

    2014-01-15

    In this thesis, I deal with the design of the extraction arc for the second beam line of FLASH, an FEL (Free-Electron Laser) user facility at DESY Hamburg. Both beam lines will use the same linear accelerator and their separation will take place behind the last accelerating module. I present the constraints for the extraction arc given by the beam line layout of the existing machine, by the building environment of the new beam line and in particular, by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). The impact from CSR is presented, and I show how to mitigate these effects and what that means for the beam line design. The optimization of the extraction arc was done applying the downhill simplex algorithm which is presented, first in its basic form to explain the operation principle and then in a more advanced version as used in the applied program. I introduce in this thesis the final layout of the extraction arc including the following matching section. This layout fulfills all given constraints and can provide the required electron beam quality for FEL operation. In order to prove this, I present start-to-end simulations for different bunch charges and for two different wavelengths.

  2. C-arm based cone-beam CT using a two-concentric-arc source trajectory: system evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Joseph; Zhuang, Tingliang; Nett, Brian E.; Riddell, Cyril; Belanger, Barry; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2008-03-01

    The current x-ray source trajectory for C-arm based cone-beam CT is a single arc. Reconstruction from data acquired with this trajectory yields cone-beam artifacts for regions other than the central slice. In this work we present the preliminary evaluation of reconstruction from a source trajectory of two concentric arcs using a flat-panel detector equipped C-arm gantry (GE Healthcare Innova 4100 system, Waukesha, Wisconsin). The reconstruction method employed is a summation of FDK-type reconstructions from the two individual arcs. For the angle between arcs studied here, 30°, this method offers a significant reduction in the visibility of cone-beam artifacts, with the additional advantages of simplicity and ease of implementation due to the fact that it is a direct extension of the reconstruction method currently implemented on commercial systems. Reconstructed images from data acquired from the two arc trajectory are compared to those reconstructed from a single arc trajectory and evaluated in terms of spatial resolution, low contrast resolution, noise, and artifact level.

  3. The number of beams in IMRT - theoretical investigations and implications for single-arc IMRT

    CERN Document Server

    Bortfeld, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to shed some new light on the old question of selecting the number of beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The second purpose is to illuminate the related issue of discrete static beam angles vs. rotational techniques, which has recently re-surfaced due to the advancement of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). A specific objective is to find analytical expressions that allow one to address the points raised above. To make the problem mathematically tractable, it is assumed that the depth dose is flat and that the lateral dose profile can be approximated by polynomials, specifically Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind, of finite degree. The application of methods known from image reconstruction then allows one to answer the first question above as follows: The required number of beams is determined by the maximum degree of the polynomials used in the approximation of the beam profiles, which is a measure of the dose variability. There is nothing to be gained ...

  4. Development of an optimization concept for arc-modulated cone beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Silke; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-07-21

    In this paper, we propose an optimization concept for a rotation therapy technique which is referred to as arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT). The aim is a reduction of the treatment time while achieving a treatment plan quality equal to or better than that of IMRT. Therefore, the complete dose is delivered in one single gantry rotation and the beam is modulated by a multileaf collimator. The degrees of freedom are the field shapes and weights for a predefined number of beam directions. In the new optimization loop, the beam weights are determined by a gradient algorithm and the field shapes by a tabu search algorithm. We present treatment plans for AMCBT for two clinical cases. In comparison to step-and-shoot IMRT treatment plans, it was possible by AMCBT to achieve dose distributions with a better dose conformity to the target and a lower mean dose for the most relevant organ at risk. Furthermore, the number of applied monitor units was reduced for AMCBT in comparison to IMRT treatment plans.

  5. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Kumar Rout

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the continual diversity between flattening photon beam (FB and Flattening Filter Free (FFF photon beams for localized prostate cancer; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beam for this type of treatment.Methods: Eight prostate cases including seminal vesicles selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 78 Gy (56 Gy to PTVP and an additional 22 Gy to PTVB. For all cases, treatment plans using 6MV with FB and FFF beams with identical dose-volume constraints, arc angles and number of arcs were developed. The dose volume histograms for both techniques were compared for primary target volume and critical structures.Results: A low Sigma index (FFF: 1.65 + 0.361; FB: 1.725 + 0.39 indicating improved dose homogeneity in FFF beam. Conformity index (FFF: 0.994 + 0.01; FB: 0.993 + 0.01 is comparable for both techniques. Minimal difference of Organ at risk mean dose was observed. Normal tissue integral dose in FB plan resulted 1.5% lower than FFF plan. All the plans displayed significant increase (1.18 times for PTVP and 1.11 for PTBB in the average number of necessary MU with FFF beam.Conclusion: Diversity between FB and FFF beam plans were found. FFF beam accelerator has been utilized to develop clinically acceptable Rapid Arc treatment plans for prostate cancer with 6 MV.---------------------------------Cite this article as: Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6

  6. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  7. Fast intensity-modulated arc therapy based on 2-step beam segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark; Sauer, Otto A.; Richter, Anne; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 11, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Single or few arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is intended to be a time saving irradiation method, potentially replacing classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of different IMAT methods with the potential of fast delivery, which also has the possibility of adapting to the daily shape of the target volume. Methods: A planning study was performed. Novel double and triple IMAT techniques based on the geometrical analysis of the target organ at risk geometry (2-step IMAT) were evaluated. They were compared to step and shoot IMRT reference plans generated using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Volumetric arc (VMAT) plans from commercial preclinical software (SMARTARC) were used as an additional benchmark to classify the quality of the novel techniques. Four cases with concave planning target volumes (PTV) with one dominating organ at risk (OAR), viz., the PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom, breast/lung, spine metastasis/spinal cord, and prostate/rectum, were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV) and other parameters representing the plan quality were studied. Results: The novel 2-step IMAT techniques with geometry based segment definition were as good as or better than DMPO and were superior to the SMARTARC VMAT techniques. For the spine metastasis, the quality measured by the COV differed only by 3%, whereas the COV of the 2-step IMAT for the other three cases decreased by a factor of 1.4-2.4 with respect to the reference plans. Conclusions: Rotational techniques based on geometrical analysis of the optimization problem (2-step IMAT) provide similar or better plan quality than DMPO or the research version of SMARTARC VMAT variants. The results justify pursuing the goal of fast IMAT adaptation based on 2-step IMAT techniques.

  8. A treatment-planning comparison of three beam arrangement strategies for stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors using volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Kentaro; Okada, Wataru; Ogino, Ryo; Kubo, Kazuki; Kishimoto, Shun; Nakahara, Ryuta; Kawamorita, Ryu; Ishii, Yoshie; Tada, Takuhito; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine appropriate beam arrangement for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of patients with centrally located lung tumors. Fifteen consecutive patients with centrally located lung tumors treated at our institution were enrolled. For each patient, three VMAT plans were generated using two coplanar partial arcs (CP VMAT), two non-coplanar partial arcs (NCP VMAT), and one coplanar full arc ...

  9. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  10. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  11. mARC Treatment of Hypopharynx Carcinoma with Flat and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Energies – A Planning Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katharina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently implemented mARC-rotation-technique is capable to deliver high dose rate bursts. For the case of hypopharynx cancer plans we evaluate whether the mARC can achieve an advantage in treatment time in comparison to IMRT. These plans consider two arcs with flat and flattening filter free (FFF) beam energies. Materials and Methods For 8 hypopharynx-cancer patients step-and-shoot-IMRT and mARC plans were created retrospectively using flat and FFF beam energy. The comparison of the plan scenarios considered measures of quality for PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk. All plans were irradiated on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure scattered dose and treatment times. Results A visual comparison of the dose distribution did not show a marked preference for either technique or energy. The statistical evaluation yielded significant differences in favor of the mARC technique and the FFF energy. Scattered dose could be decreased markedly by the use of the mARC technique. Treatment times could be reduced up to 3 minutes with the use of mARC in comparison to IMRT. The high dose rate energy results in another time advantage of about 1 minute. Conclusions All four plan scenarios yielded equally good quality plans. A combination of the mARC technique with FFF 7 MV high dose rate resulted in a decrease of treatment times from about 9 minutes to 5–6 minutes in comparison to 6 MV IMRT. PMID:27741272

  12. Range optimization for mono- and bi-energetic proton modulated arc therapy with pencil beam scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, Daniel; Kirk, Maura; Fager, Marcus; Burgdorf, Brendan; Stowe, Malorie; Solberg, Tim; Carabe, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    The development of rotational proton therapy plans based on a pencil-beam-scanning (PBS) system has been limited, among several other factors, by the energy-switching time between layers, a system-dependent parameter that ranges between a fraction of a second and several seconds. We are investigating mono- and bi-energetic rotational proton modulated arc therapy (PMAT) solutions that would not be affected by long energy switching times. In this context, a systematic selection of the optimal proton energy for each arc is vital. We present a treatment planning comparison of four different range selection methods, analyzing the dosimetric outcomes of the resulting treatment plans created with the ranges obtained. Given the patient geometry and arc definition (gantry and couch trajectories, snout elevation) our in-house treatment planning system (TPS) FoCa was used to find the maximum, medial and minimum water-equivalent thicknesses (WETs) of the target viewed from all possible field orientations. Optimal ranges were subsequently determined using four methods: (1) by dividing the max/min WET interval into equal steps, (2) by taking the average target midpoints from each field, (3) by taking the average WET of all voxels from all field orientations, and (4) by minimizing the fraction of the target which cannot be reached from any of the available angles. After the range (for mono-energetic plans) or ranges (for bi-energetic plans) were selected, the commercial clinical TPS in use in our institution (Varian Eclipse™) was used to produce the PMAT plans using multifield optimization. Linear energy transfer (LET) distributions of all plans were also calculated using FoCa and compared among the different methods. Mono- and bi-energetic PMAT plans, composed of a single 180° arc, were created for two patient geometries: a C-shaped target located in the mediastinal area of a thoracic tissue-equivalent phantom and a small brain tumor located directly above the brainstem. All

  13. Impact of small MU/segment and dose rate on delivery accuracy of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Zhuang, Tingliang; Mastroianni, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik; Cui, Taoran; Xia, Ping

    2016-05-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans may require more control points (or segments) than some of fixed-beam IMRT plans that are created with a limited number of segments. Increasing number of control points in a VMAT plan for a given prescription dose could create a large portion of the total number of segments with small number monitor units (MUs) per segment. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the small number MU/segment on the delivery accuracy of VMAT delivered with various dose rates. Ten patient datasets were planned for hippocampus sparing for whole brain irradiation. For each dataset, two VMAT plans were created with maximum dose rates of 600 MU/min (the maximum field size of 21 × 40 cm2) and 1000 MU/min (the maximum field size of 15 × 15 cm2) for a daily dose of 3 Gy. Without reoptimization, the daily dose of these plans was purposely reduced to 1.5 Gy and 1.0 Gy while keeping the same total dose. Using the two dose rates and three different daily doses, six VMAT plans for each dataset were delivered to a physical phantom to investigate how the changes of dose rate and daily doses impact on delivery accuracy. Using the gamma index, we directly compared the delivered planar dose profiles with the reduced daily doses (1.5 Gy and 1.0 Gy) to the delivered planar dose at 3 Gy daily dose, delivered at dose rate of 600 MU/min and 1000 MU/min, respectively. The average numbers of segments with MU/segment ≤ 1 were 35 ± 8, 87 ± 6 for VMAT-600 1.5 Gy, VMAT-600 1 Gy plans, and 30 ± 7 and 42 ± 6 for VMAT-1000 1.5 Gy and VMAT-1000 1 Gy plans, respectively. When delivered at 600 MU/min dose rate, the average gamma index passing rates (1%/1 mm criteria) of comparing delivered 1.5 Gy VMAT planar dose profiles to 3.0 Gy VMAT delivered planar dose profiles was 98.28% ± 1.66%, and the average gamma index passing rate of comparing delivered 1.0 Gy VMAT planar dose to 3.0 Gy VMAT delivered planar dose was 83.75% ± 4.86%. If using 2%/2mm

  14. Total-body superficial electron-beam therapy using a multiple-field pendulum-arc technique. [Treatment of mycosis fungoides and other cutaneous lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewchand, W.; Khan, F.M.; Williamson, J.

    1979-02-01

    A technique using pendulum-arc rotation is presented for electron-beam treatment of generalized superficial malignancies. The technique consists of six arcing fields symmetrically dispersed around the body surface for circumferential coverage. The arc angle is selected to scan the height of the body fully. Beam uniformity within 10% over a height of 180 cm is achieved at a treatment distance of 385 cm. Randophantom dosimetry, using an 8 MeV electron beam degraded by 3/8 in. Plexiglas, indicates a surface dose uniformity within +- 7% over most of the body surface. Underdosages occur at regions obstructed by adjacent body parts.

  15. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

  16. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3...

  17. Ongoing characterization of the forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source for the selective production of exotic species facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzolaro, M., E-mail: mattia.manzolaro@lnl.infn.it; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Vasquez, J.; Corradetti, S.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Universita’ 2 - 35020 Legnaro, Padova,Italy (Italy); Meneghetti, G. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia 1 - 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    An intense research and development activity to finalize the design of the target ion source system for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility (operating according to the isotope separation on line technique) is at present ongoing at Legnaro National Laboratories. In particular, the characterization of ion sources in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is currently in progress, and a preliminary set of data is already available. In this work, the off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source in the case of a stable Ar beam are presented in detail.

  18. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Geoffrey G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI, which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD. Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p Conclusion Besides the advantage of faster delivery times, VMAT plans demonstrated better conformity to target, sharper dose fall-off in normal tissues and lower dose to

  19. Motion as a perturbation: Measurement-guided dose estimates to moving patient voxels during modulated arc deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey; Hunt, Dylan; Opp, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Wolf, Theresa K. [Live Oak Technologies LLC, Kirkwood, Missouri 63122 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To present a framework for measurement-guided VMAT dose reconstruction to moving patient voxels from a known motion kernel and the static phantom data, and to validate this perturbation-based approach with the proof-of-principle experiments. Methods: As described previously, the VMAT 3D dose to a static patient can be estimated by applying a phantom measurement-guided perturbation to the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose grid. The fraction dose to any voxel in the presence of motion, assuming the motion kernel is known, can be derived in a similar fashion by applying a measurement-guided motion perturbation. The dose to the diodes in a helical phantom is recorded at 50 ms intervals and is transformed into a series of time-resolved high-density volumetric dose grids. A moving voxel is propagated through this 4D dose space and the fraction dose to that voxel in the phantom is accumulated. The ratio of this motion-perturbed, reconstructed dose to the TPS dose in the phantom serves as a perturbation factor, applied to the TPS fraction dose to the similarly situated voxel in the patient. This approach was validated by the ion chamber and film measurements on four phantoms of different shape and structure: homogeneous and inhomogeneous cylinders, a homogeneous cube, and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. A 2D motion stage was used to simulate the motion. The stage position was synchronized with the beam start time with the respiratory gating simulator. The motion patterns were designed such that the motion speed was in the upper range of the expected tumor motion (1-1.4 cm/s) and the range exceeded the normally observed limits (up to 5.7 cm). The conformal arc plans for X or Y motion (in the IEC 61217 coordinate system) consisted of manually created narrow (3 cm) rectangular strips moving in-phase (tracking) or phase-shifted by 90 Degree-Sign (crossing) with respect to the phantom motion. The XY motion was tested with the computer-derived VMAT

  20. Industrial fiber beam delivery system for ultrafast lasers: applications and recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilzer, Sebastian; Funck, Max C.; Wedel, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Fiber based laser beam delivery is the method of choice for high power laser applications whenever great flexibility is required. For cw-lasers fiber beam delivery has long been established but has recently also become available for ultrafast lasers. Using micro-structured hollow core fibers that guide the laser beam mostly inside a hollow core, nonlinear effects and catastrophic damage that arise in conventional glass fibers can be avoided. Today, ultrafast pulses with several 100 μJ and hundreds of MW can be transmitted in quasi single mode fashion. In addition, the technology opens new possibilities for beam delivery systems as the pulse propagation inside the fiber can be altered on purpose. For example to shorten the pulse duration of picosecond lasers down into the femtosecond regime. We present a modular fiber beam delivery system for micromachining applications with industrial pico- and femtosecond lasers that is flexibly integrated into existing applications. Micro-structured hollow core fibers inside the sealed laser light cable efficiently guide high-power laser pulses over distances of several meters with excellent beam quality, while power, pulse duration and polarization are maintained. Robust and stable beam transport during dynamic operation as in robot or gantry systems will be discussed together with optional pulse compression.

  1. The precision of respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed beam proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Vedam, Sastry; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Umezawa, Masumi, E-mail: ytsunash@mdanderson.or [Accelerator System Group Medical System Project, Hitachi, Ltd, Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory, 2-1, Omika-cho 7-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan)

    2010-12-21

    A synchrotron-based proton therapy system operates in a low repetition rate pulsed beam delivery mode. Unlike cyclotron-based beam delivery, there is no guarantee that a synchrotron beam can be delivered effectively or precisely under the respiratory-gated mode. To evaluate the performance of gated synchrotron treatment, we simulated proton beam delivery in the synchrotron-based respiratory-gated mode using realistic patient breathing signals. Parameters used in the simulation were respiratory motion traces (70 traces from 24 patients), respiratory gate levels (10%, 20% and 30% duty cycles at the exhalation phase) and synchrotron magnet excitation cycles (T{sub cyc}) (fixed T{sub cyc} mode: 2.7, 3.0-6.0 s and each patient breathing cycle, and variable T{sub cyc} mode). The simulations were computed according to the breathing trace in which the proton beams were delivered. In the shorter fixed T{sub cyc} (<4 s), most of the proton beams were delivered uniformly to the target during the entire expiration phase of the respiratory cycle. In the longer fixed T{sub cyc} (>4 s) and the variable T{sub cyc} mode, the proton beams were not consistently delivered during the end-expiration phase of the respiratory cycle. However we found that the longer and variable T{sub cyc} operation modes delivered proton beams more precisely during irregular breathing.

  2. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A [University of Pennsylvenia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans.

  3. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolini, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.nicolini@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Banerjee, Sushovan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Munshi, Anusheel [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Mancosu, Pietro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano-Rozzano (Italy); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different

  4. Aperture Restriction Localisation in the LHC Arcs using an RF Mole and the LHC Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Albertone, J; Boccard, C; Bogey, T; Borowiec, P; Calvo, E; Caspers, Friedhelm; Gasior, M; González, J L; Jenninger, B; Jensen, L K; Jones, O R; Kroyer, T; Weisz, S

    2008-01-01

    Ensuring that the two 27km beam pipes of the LHC do not contain aperture restrictions is of utmost importance. Most of the ring is composed of continuous cryostats, so any intervention to remove aperture restrictions when the machine is at its operating temperature of 1.9K will require a substantial amount of time. On warming-up the first cooled sector, several of the sliding contacts which provide electrical continuity for the beam image current between successive sections of the vacuum chamber were found to have buckled into the beam pipe. This led to a search for a technique to verify the integrity of a complete LHC arc (~3km) before any subsequent cool-down. In this paper the successful results from using a polycarbonate ball fitted with a 40MHz RF transmitter are presented. Propulsion of the ball is achieved by sucking filtered air through the entire arc, while its progress is traced every 54m via the LHC beam position measurement system which is auto-triggered by the RF transmitter on passage of the bal...

  5. Automated analysis of images acquired with electronic portal imaging device during delivery of quality assurance plans for inversely optimized arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Korreman, Stine; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an automated method for comprehensively analyzing EPID images acquired for quality assurance of RapidArc treatment delivery. In-house-developed software has been used for the analysis and long-term results from measurements on three linacs are presented.......This work presents an automated method for comprehensively analyzing EPID images acquired for quality assurance of RapidArc treatment delivery. In-house-developed software has been used for the analysis and long-term results from measurements on three linacs are presented....

  6. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S W; Rosser, K E; Bedford, J L, E-mail: simon.stevens@nhs.net [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-07

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min{sup -1} were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min{sup -1} for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  7. Chest wall radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arcs and the potential role of flattening filter free photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramaniam, S.; Thirumalaiswamy, S.; Srinivas, C. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (IN)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The goal of the work was to assess the role of RapidArc treatments in chest wall irradiation after mastectomy and determine the potential benefit of flattening filter free beams. Planning CT scans of 10 women requiring post-mastectomy chest wall radiotherapy were included in the study. A dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was prescribed. Organs at risk (OARs) delineated were heart, lungs, contralateral breast, and spinal cord. Dose-volume metrics were defined to quantify the quality of concurrent treatment plans assessing target coverage and sparing of OARs. Plans were designed for conformal 3D therapy (3DCRT) or for RapidArc with double partial arcs (RA). RapidArc plans were optimized for both conventional beams as well as for unflattened beams (RAF). The goal for this planning effort was to cover 100% of the planning target volume (PTV) with {>=} 90% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume inside the PTV receiving > 105% of the dose. The mean ipsilateral lung dose was required to be lower than 15 Gy and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} < 22%. Contralateral organ irradiation was required to be kept as low as possible. All techniques met planning objectives for PTV and for lung (3DCRT marginally failed for V{sub 20} {sub Gy}). RA plans showed superiority compared to 3DCRT in the medium to high dose region for the ipsilateral lung. Heart irradiation was minimized by RAF plans with {proportional_to} 4.5 Gy and {proportional_to} 15 Gy reduction in maximum dose compared to RA and 3DCRT, respectively. RAF resulted in superior plans compared to RA with respect to contralateral breast and lung with a reduction of {proportional_to} 1.7 Gy and 1.0 Gy in the respective mean doses. RapidArc treatment resulted in acceptable plan quality with superior ipsilateral tissue sparing compared to traditional techniques. Flattening filter free beams, recently made available for clinical use, might provide further healthy tissue sparing, particularly in contralateral organs, suggesting their

  8. Three dimensional image reconstruction from cone-beam projections along arc-arc trajectory%双弧源轨迹锥束CT的三维图像重建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹宇; 潘晓川; EmilY.Sidky

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we review the general theory and algorithms that have proposed for image reconstruction from cone-beam data for general trajectories with kinks. The reconstruction algorithms include the backprojection filtration (BPF) algorithm and the minimum-data filteredbackprojection (MD-FBP) algorithm. One of the unique features of these new algorithms is that they can reconstruct exactly images within regions of interest (ROIs) from data containing truncations. In this work, we also apply these algorithms to reconstructing ROI images from truncated data acquired with a trajectory consisting of two pieces of arcs, which is referred to as the arc-arc trajectory. The numerical results in these studies show that exact ROI images can be reconstructed by use of the BPF and MD-FBP algorithms from truncated data acquired with an arc-arc trajectory.

  9. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  10. Modeling the Biophysical Effects in a Carbon Beam Delivery Line using Monte Carlo Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion beam therapy. In this study the biological effectiveness of a carbon ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. A carbon ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon beam transporting into media. An incident energy carbon ion beam in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetrating depth of the water phantom along the incident beam direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the water phantom depth.

  11. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  12. Failure Studies at the Compact Linear Collider: Main Linac and Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Maidana, C O; Jonker, M

    2012-01-01

    The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme. The energy of two high-intensity, low-energy drive beams is extracted and transferred to two low-intensity, high-energy main beams. The CERN Technology Department - Machine protection and electrical integrity group has the mission to develop and maintain the systems to protect machine components from damage caused by ill controlled conditions. Various failure scenarios were studied and the potential damage these failures could cause to the machine structures was estimated. In this paper, first results of the beam response to kick induced failures in the main LINAC and in the beam delivery system (BDS) sections are presented together with possible collimator damage scenarios.

  13. Behavior of the Siemens Virtual Wedge following an interruption to beam delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, N D; Walker, C P

    2003-01-01

    Investigations were made into the beam profile shape and dose delivered by the Siemens Virtual Wedge trade mark under standard operational conditions compared with those following delivery interruption on two Siemens Primus linear accelerators (Type 7445 and 8067) running different versions of control software (7.2 and 7.0, respectively). The shape of the Virtual Wedge trade mark profiles was found to be unaffected by beam delivery interruption. An increase in the dose delivered to the central axis was found when delivery was interrupted and subsequently resumed using information recorded in a recall data file on one of the accelerators. This dose increase was attributed to a difference in delivered monitor units recorded in the recall data file compared to those displayed on the linear accelerator control console.

  14. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125, Italy and Physics Department, University of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A. [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  15. Can volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free beams play a role in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver lesions? A volume-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reggiori, Giacomo; Mancosu, Pietro; Castiglioni, Simona; Alongi, Filippo; Pellegrini, Chiara; Lobefalo, Francesca; Catalano, Maddalena; Fogliata, Antonella; Arcangeli, Stefano; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy); Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano (Milano) (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric modulated arc therapy with flattening filter free (FFF) and flattening filter (FF) beams in patients with hepatic metastases subject to hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Methods: A planning study on 13 virtual lesions of increasing volume was performed. Two single arc plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using either FFF or FF beams. A second planning study was performed on ten patients treated for liver metastases to validate conclusions. In all cases, a dose of 75 Gy in 3 fractions was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) and plans were evaluated in terms of coverage, homogeneity, conformity, mean dose to healthy liver and to healthy tissue. For each parameter, results were expressed in relative terms as the percentage ratio between FFF and FF data. Results: In terms of PTV coverage, conformity index favored FFF for targets of intermediate size while FF resulted more suitable for small (<100 cm{sup 3}) and large (>300 cm{sup 3}) targets. Plans optimized with FFF beams resulted in increased sparing of healthy tissue in {approx_equal}85% of cases. Despite the qualitative results, no statistically significant differences were found between FFF and FF results. Plans optimized with un-flattened beams resulted in higher average MU/Gy than plans with FF beams. A remarkable and significant difference was observed in the beam-on time (BOT) needed to deliver plans. The BOT for FF plans was 8.2 {+-} 1.0 min; for FFF plans BOT was 2.2 {+-} 0.2 min. Conclusions: RapidArc plans optimized using FFF were dosimetrically equivalent to those optimized using FF beams, showing the feasibility of SBRT treatments with FFF beams. Some improvement in healthy tissue sparing was observed when using the FFF modality due to the different beam's profile. The main advantage was a considerable reduction of beam-on time, relevant for SBRT techniques.

  16. Investigation in the use of plasma arc welding and alternative feedstock delivery method in additive manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhuzaim, Abdullah F.

    The work conducted for this thesis was to investigate the use of plasma arc welding (PAW) and steel shot as a means of additive manufacturing. A robotic PAW system and automatic shot feeder were used to manufacture linear walls approximately 100 mm long by 7 mm wide and 20 mm tall. The walls were built, layer-by-layer, on plain carbon steel substrate by adding individual 2.5 mm diameter plain carbon steel shot. Each layer was built, shot-by-shot, using a pulse of arc current to form a molten pool on the deposit into which each shot was deposited and melted. The deposition rate, a measure of productivity, was approximately 50 g/hour. Three walls were built using the same conditions except for the deposit preheat temperature prior to adding each new layer. The deposit preheat temperature was controlled by allowing the deposit to cool after each layer for an amount of time called the inter-layer wait time. The walls were sectioned and grain size and hardness distribution were measured as a function of wall height. The results indicated that, for all specimens, deposit grain size increased and hardness decreased as wall height increased. Furthermore, average grain size decreased and hardness increased as interlayer wait time increased. An analytical heat flow model was developed to study the influence of interlayer wait time on deposit temperature and therefore grain size and hardness. The results of the model indicated that as wall height increased, the rate of deposit heat removal by conduction to the substrate decreased leading to a higher preheat temperature after a fixed interlayer wait time causing grain size to increase as wall height increased. However, the model results also show that as wall height increased, the deposit surface area from which heat energy is lost via convection and radiation increased. The model also demonstrated that the use of a means of forced convection to rapidly remove heat from the deposit could be an effective way to boost

  17. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  18. Silica hollow core microstructured fibers for beam delivery in industrial and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Jonathan; Urich, Artur; Carter, Richard; Jaworski, Piotr; Maier, Robert; Belardi, Walter; Yu, Fei; Wadsworth, William; Knight, Jonathan; Hand, Duncan

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this review is our recent work to develop microstructured hollow core fibers for two applications where the flexible delivery of a single mode beam is desired. Also, a review of other fiber based solutions is included. High power, short-pulsed lasers are widely used for micro-machining, providing high precision and high quality. However, the lack of truly flexible beam delivery systems limits their application to the processing of relatively small planar components. To address this, we developed hollow-core optical fibers for the 1 μm and green wavelength ranges. The hollow core overcomes the power delivery limitations of conventional silica fibers arising from nonlinear effects and material damage in the solid core. We have characterized such fibers in terms of power handling capability, damage threshold, bend loss and dispersion, and practically demonstrated delivery of high peak power pulses from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime. Such fibers are ideal candidates for industrial laser machining applications. In laser surgical applications, meanwhile, an Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm) is frequently the laser of choice because the water contained in tissue strongly absorbs this wavelength. If this laser beam is precisely delivered damage to surrounding tissue can be minimized. A common delivery method of surgical lasers, for use in the operating theatre, is articulated arms that are bulky, cumbersome and unsuitable for endoscopic procedures. To address this need for flexible mid-IR delivery we developed silica based hollow core fibers. By minimizing the overlap of the light with glass it is possible to overcome the material absorption limits of silica and achieve low attenuation. Additionally, it is possible to deliver pulse energies suitable for the ablation of both hard and soft tissue even with very small bend radii. The flexibility and small physical size of systems based on these fibers will enable new minimally invasive surgical procedures.

  19. Silica hollow core microstructured fibers for beam delivery in industrial and medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dale Shephard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is our recent work to develop microstructured hollow core fibers for two applications where the flexible delivery of a single mode beam is desired. Also, a review of other fiber based solutions is included.High power, short-pulsed lasers are widely used for micro-machining, providing high precision and high quality. However, the lack of truly flexible beam delivery systems limits their application to the processing of relatively small planar components. To address this, we developed hollow-core optical fibers for the 1 μm and green wavelength ranges. The hollow core overcomes the power delivery limitations of conventional silica fibers arising from nonlinear effects and material damage in the solid core. We have characterized such fibers in terms of power handling capability, damage threshold, bend loss and dispersion, and practically demonstrated delivery of high peak power pulses from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime. Such fibers are ideal candidates for industrial laser machining applications.In laser surgical applications, meanwhile, an Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm is frequently the laser of choice because the water contained in tissue strongly absorbs this wavelength. If this laser beam is precisely delivered damage to surrounding tissue can be minimized. A common delivery method of surgical lasers, for use in the operating theatre, is articulated arms that are bulky, cumbersome and unsuitable for endoscopic procedures. To address this need for flexible mid-IR delivery we developed silica based hollow core fibers. By minimizing the overlap of the light with glass it is possible to overcome the material absorption limits of silica and achieve low attenuation. Additionally, it is possible to deliver pulse energies suitable for the ablation of both hard and soft tissue even with very small bend radii. The flexibility and small physical size of systems based on these fibers will enable new minimally invasive surgical

  20. Verification of segmented beam delivery using a commercial electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin-Savard, A J; Podgorsak, E B

    1999-05-01

    In modern radiotherapy, three-dimensional conformal dose distributions are achieved through the delivery of beam ports having precalculated planar distributions of photon beam intensity. Although sophisticated means to calculate and deliver these spatially modulated beams have been developed, means to verify their actual delivery are relatively cumbersome, making equipment and treatment quality assurance difficult to enforce. An electronic portal imaging device of the scanning liquid ionization chamber type yields images which, once calibrated from a previously determined calibration curve, provide highly precise planar maps of the incident dose rate. For verification of an intensity-modulated beam delivered in the segmented approach with a multileaf collimator, a portal image is acquired for each subfield of the leaf sequence. Subsequent to their calibration, the images are multiplied by their respective associated monitor unit settings, and summed to produce a planar dose distribution at the measurement depth in phantom. The excellent agreement of our portal imager measurements with calculations of our treatment planning system and measurements with a one-dimensional beam profiler attests to the usefulness of this method for the planar verification of intensity-modulated fields produced in the segmented approach on a computerized linear accelerator equipped with a multileaf collimator.

  1. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Early Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: Is It Better Than the Conventional Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Wing Cheung Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the performance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT techniques: single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (SA-VMAT and double arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (DA-VMAT with the static beam conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy (C-IMRT for non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Twelve stage I and II NSCLC patients were recruited and their planning CT with contoured planning target volume (PTV and organs at risk (OARs was used for planning. Using the same dose constraints and planning objectives, the C-IMRT, SA-VMAT, and DA-VMAT plans were optimized. C-IMRT consisted of 7 static beams, while SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT plans consisted of one and two full gantry rotations, respectively. No significant difference was found among the three techniques in target homogeneity and conformity. Mean lung dose in C-IMRT plan was significantly lower than that in DA-VMAT plan P=0.04. The ability of OAR sparing was similar among the three techniques, with no significant difference in V20, V10, or V5 of normal lungs, spinal cord, and heart. Less MUs were required in SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT. Besides, SA-VMAT required the shortest beam on time among the three techniques. In treatment of early stage NSCLC, no significant dosimetric superiority was shown by the VMAT techniques over C-IMRT and DA-VMAT over SA-VMAT.

  2. Development of a novel ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} insert for routine quality assurance of VMAT delivery including dose calculation with inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakir, H.; Gaede, S.; Mulligan, M.; Chen, J. Z. [Department of Physics, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To design a versatile, nonhomogeneous insert for the dose verification phantom ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} (Sun Nuclear Corp., FL) and to demonstrate its usefulness for the verification of dose distributions in inhomogeneous media. As an example, we demonstrate it can be used clinically for routine quality assurance of two volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) systems for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT): SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} (Pinnacle{sup 3}, Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} (Eclipse{sup Trade-Mark-Sign }, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: The cylindrical detector array ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} has a retractable homogeneous acrylic insert. In this work, we designed and manufactured a customized heterogeneous insert with densities that simulate soft tissue, lung, bone, and air. The insert offers several possible heterogeneity configurations and multiple locations for point dose measurements. SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans for lung SBRT were generated and copied to ArcCHECK{sup Trade-Mark-Sign} for each inhomogeneity configuration. Dose delivery was done on a Varian 2100 ix linac. The evaluation of dose distributions was based on gamma analysis of the diode measurements and point doses measurements at different positions near the inhomogeneities. Results: The insert was successfully manufactured and tested with different measurements of VMAT plans. Dose distributions measured with the homogeneous insert showed gamma passing rates similar to our clinical results ({approx}99%) for both treatment-planning systems. Using nonhomogeneous inserts decreased the passing rates by up to 3.6% in the examples studied. Overall, SmartArc{sup Registered-Sign} plans showed better gamma passing rates for nonhomogeneous measurements. The discrepancy between calculated and measured point doses was increased up to 6.5% for the nonhomogeneous

  3. Source and Extraction for Simultaneous Four-hall Beam Delivery System at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimi, Reza; Wang, Haipeng; Spata, Mike F.; Hansknecht, John C.

    2013-06-01

    A new design for simultaneous delivery of the electron beam to all four 12 GeV CEBAF experimental halls* requires a new 750 MHz RF separator system in the 5th pass extraction region, a 250 MHz repetition rate for its beams, and addition of a fourth laser at the photo-cathode gun. The proposed system works in tandem with the existing 500 MHz RF separators and beam repetition rate on the lower passes. The new 5th pass RF separators will have the same basic design but modified to run at 750 MHz. The change to the beam repetition rate will be at the photo-cathode gun through an innovative upgrade of the seed laser driver system using electro-optic modulators. The new laser system also allows addition of the fourth laser. The new RF separators, the new laser system and other hardware changes required to implement the Four-Hall operation delivery system will be discussed in this paper.

  4. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins

  5. Inverse problem of elastica of a variable-arc-length beam subjected to a concentrated load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Zhang; Jialing Yang; Keren Wang

    2005-01-01

    An inverse problem of elastica of a variable-arclength beam subjected to a concentrated load is investigated.The beam is fixed at one end, and can slide freely over a hinge support at the other end. The inverse problem is to determine the value of the load when the deflection of the action point of the load is given. Based on the elasitca equations and the elliptic integrals, a set of nonlinear equations for the inverse problem are derived, and an analytical solution by means of iterations and Quasi-Newton method is presented. From the results, the relationship between the loads and deflections of the loading point is obtained.

  6. Critical appraisal of RapidArc radiosurgery with flattening filter free photon beams for benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife: a treatment planning study

    OpenAIRE

    Abacioglu, Ufuk; Ozen, Zeynep; YILMAZ, Meltem; Arifoglu, Alptekin; Gunhan, Basri; Kayalilar, Namik; Peker, Selcuk; Sengoz, Meric; Gurdalli, Salih; Cozzi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of RapidArc (RA) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife (GK) based technique. Methods Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS, n = 6) or cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM, n = 6) were planned for both SRS using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RA. 104 MV flattening filter free photon beams with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min were selected. Data were compared against plans optimised for GK. A si...

  7. Hollow-core photonic crystal fibre for high power laser beam delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying; Wang; Meshaal; Alharbi; Thomas; D.Bradley; Coralie; Fourcade-Dutin; Benot; Debord; Benot; Beaudou; Frdric; Ger??me; Fetah; Benabid

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of hollow-core photonic crystal fibre(HC-PCF)for high power laser beam delivery.A comparison of bandgap HC-PCF with Kagome-lattice HC-PCF on the geometry,guidance mechanism,and optical properties shows that the Kagome-type HC-PCF is an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation because of its large core size,low attenuation,broadband transmission,single-mode guidance,low dispersion and the ultra-low optical overlap between the core-guided modes and the silica core-surround.The power handling capability of Kagome-type HC-PCF is further experimentally demonstrated by millijoule nanosecond laser spark ignition and~100μJ sub-picosecond laser pulse transportation and compression.

  8. Beam Delivery System Dogleg Design and Integration for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, J

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed to investigate the option of moving the positron source to the end of the main linac as a part of the central integration in the International Linear Collider(ILC) project. The positron source incorporates an undulator at the end of the main linac and the photons generated in the undulator are transported to the target, located at a distance of around 400 m. The dogleg design has been optimised to provide the required transverse offset at the location of the target and to give minimum emittance growth at 500 GeV. The design of the dogleg, the layout changes and the tolerances on beam tuning as a result of locating this dogleg in the beginning of the beam delivery system (BDS) are presented.

  9. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external...... were described by medians and standard deviations (SDs) of position distributions of the markers. Gating windows (35% duty cycle) were retrospectively applied to the respiratory data for each session, mimicking the use of commercially available gating systems. Medians and SDs of gated data were......PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. MATERIALS/METHODS: The study is based on data...

  10. SU-E-T-273: Do Task Group External Beam QA Recommendations Guarantee Accurate Treatment Plan Dose Delivery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, A; Liao, Y; Redler, G; Zhen, H [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM task groups 40/142 have provided an invaluable set of goals for physicists designing QA programs, attempting to standardize what would otherwise likely be a highly variable phenomenon across institutions. However, with the complexity of modalities such as VMAT, we hypothesize that following these guidelines to the letter might still allow unacceptable dose discrepancies. To explore this hypothesis we simulated machines bordering on QA acceptability, and calculated the effect on patient plans. Methods: Two errant machines were simulated in Aria/Eclipse, each just within task group criteria for output, percent depth dose, beam profile, gantry and collimator rotations, and jaw and MLC positions. One machine minimized dose to the PTV (machine A) and the other maximized dose to the OARs (machine B). Clinical treatment plans (3-phase prostate, n=3; hypofractionated lung, n=1) were calculated on these machines and the dose distributions compared. A prostate case was examined for contribution of error sources and evaluated using delivery QA data. Results: The prostate plans showed mean decreases in target D95 of 9.9% of prescription dose on machine A. On machine B, The rectal and bladder V70Gy each increased by 7.1 percentage points, while their V45Gy increased by 16.2% and 15.0% respectively. In the lung plan, the target D95 decreased by 12.8% and the bronchial tree Dmax increased by 21% of prescription dose, on machines A and B. One prostate plan showed target dose errors of 3.8% from MLC changes, 2% from output, ∼3% from energy and ∼0.5% from other factors. This plan achieved an 88.4% gamma passing rate using 3%/3mm using ArcCHECK. Conclusion: In the unlikely event that a machine exhibits all maximum errors allowed by TG 40/142, unacceptably large changes in dose delivered are possible especially in highly modulated VMAT plans, despite the machine passing routine QA.

  11. Adaptive Optics Imaging of IRAS 18276-1431: a bipolar pre-planetary nebula with circumstellar "searchlight beams" and "arcs"

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, C S; Sahai, R; De Paz, A G; Morris, M

    2006-01-01

    We present high-angular resolution images of the post-AGB nebula IRAS18276-1431 (also known as OH17.7-2.0) obtained with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system in its Natural Guide Star (NGS) mode in the Kp, Lp, and Ms near-infrared bands. We also present supporting optical F606W and F814W HST images as well as interferometric observations of the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and 2.6mm continuum emission with OVRO. The envelope of IRAS18276-1431 displays a clear bipolar morphology in our optical and NIR images with two lobes separated by a dark waist and surrounded by a faint 4.5"x3.4" halo. Our Kp-band image reveals two pairs of radial ``searchlight beams'' emerging from the nebula center and several intersecting, arc-like features. From our CO data we derive a mass of M>0.38[D/3kpc]^2 Msun and an expansion velocity v_exp=17km/s for the molecular envelope. The density in the halo follows a radial power-law proportional to r^-3, which is consistent with a mass-loss rate increasing with time. Analysis of the NIR ...

  12. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    Physical properties of proton interactions in matter give them a theoretical advantage over photons in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, but they are seldom used relative to photons. The primary barriers to wider acceptance of proton therapy are the technical feasibility, size, and price of proton therapy systems. Several aspects of the proton therapy landscape are investigated, and new techniques for treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery are presented. The results of these investigations suggest a means by which proton therapy can be delivered more efficiently, effectively, and to a much larger proportion of eligible patients. An analysis of the existing proton therapy market was performed. Personal interviews with over 30 radiation oncology leaders were conducted with regard to the current and future use of proton therapy. In addition, global proton therapy market projections are presented. The results of these investigations serve as motivation and guidance for the subsequent development of treatment system designs and treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery methods. A major factor impacting the size and cost of proton treatment systems is the maximum energy of the accelerator. Historically, 250 MeV has been the accepted value, but there is minimal quantitative evidence in the literature that supports this standard. A retrospective study of 100 patients is presented that quantifies the maximum proton kinetic energy requirements for cancer treatment, and the impact of those results with regard to treatment system size, cost, and neutron production is discussed. This study is subsequently expanded to include 100 cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and the results are discussed in the context of a proposed dedicated proton SRS treatment system. Finally, novel proton therapy optimization and delivery techniques are presented. Algorithms are developed that optimize treatment plans over beam angle, spot size, spot spacing

  13. Total Body Irradiation using VMAT (RapidArc: A Planning Study of a novel treatment delivery method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santam Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT using RapidArc to deliver total body irradiation (TBI treatment. Methods: VMAT planning was performed a whole body computed tomography (CT data set using Rapid Arc. The planning target volumes included entire body trimmed to 3 mm below the skin. The organs at risk included the lungs and kidneys. A dose of 12 Gy in 10 fractions was prescribed to the target volume. The VMAT-TBI technique consisted of three isocentres and three overlapping arcs: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of 12 Gy was 95% and maximum dose of 109.8%. Mean dose to lung was restricted at 8.6Gy. Results: The total body volume in the study was 15469cm3 and the PTV volume was 11322cm3. The mean dose to PTV was 104%. The homogeneity index was 0.09. Sparing of normal tissues with adequate coverage of skeletal bones was shown to be feasible with Rapid Arc. The study demonstrates that VMAT is feasible for TBI treatment. Unlike conventional TBI chest wall boost with electrons was not required. Conclusion: The technique for total body irradiation using RapidArc VMAT was found feasible and is undergoing further studies prior to clinical use.

  14. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Olding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low′s gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery. When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low′s gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a from the same gel batch and (b from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration.

  15. X-ray flat-panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam volume CT (CBVCT) under a circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    2001-06-01

    The potential of cone beam volume CT (CBVCT) to improve the data acquisition efficiency for volume tomographic imaging is well recognized. A novel x-ray FPI based CBVCT prototype and its preliminary performance evaluation are presented in this paper. To meet the data sufficiency condition, the CBVCT prototype employs a circle-plus-two-arc orbit accomplished by a tiltable circular gantry. A cone beam filtered back-projection (CB-FBP) algorithm is derived for this data acquisition orbit, which employs a window function in the Radon domain to exclude the redundancy between the Radon information obtained from the circular cone beam (CB) data and that from the arc CB data. The number of projection images along the circular sub-orbit and each arc sub-orbit is 512 and 43, respectively. The reconstruction exactness of the prototype x-ray FPI based CBVCT system is evaluated using a disc phantom in which seven acrylic discs are stacked at fixed intervals. Images reconstructed with this algorithm show that both the contrast and geometric distortion existing in the disc phantom images reconstructed by the Feldkamp algorithm are substantially reduced. Meanwhile, the imaging performance of the prototype, such as modulation transfer function (MTF) and low contrast resolution, are quantitatively evaluated in detail through corresponding phantom studies. Furthermore, the capability of the prototype to reconstruct an ROI within a longitudinally unbounded object is verified. The results obtained from this preliminary performance evaluation encourage an expectation of medical applications of the x-ray FPI based CBVCT under the circle-plus-two-arc data acquisition, particularly the application in image-guided interventional procedures and radiotherapy where the movement of a patient table is to be avoided.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  17. The effect of the target-organ geometric complexity on the choice of delivery between RapidArc and sliding-window IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Monica W.K., E-mail: kanwkm@ha.org.hk [Department of Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Leung, Lucullus H.T. [Department of Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, Peter K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-10-01

    We attempted to assess the effect of target-organ geometric complexity on the plan quality of sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), double-arc (RA2), and triple-arc (RA3) RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Plans for 9-field sliding-window IMRT, RA2, and RA3 were optimized for 36 patients with NPC ranging from T1 to T4 tumors. Initially the patients were divided into 2 groups, with group A representing the most simple early stage (T1 and T2) cases, whereas group B represented the more complex advanced cases (T3 and T4). Evaluation was performed based on target conformity, target dose homogeneity, organ-sparing capability, and delivery efficiency. Based on the plan quality results, a subgroup of advanced cases, group B2, representing the most demanding task was distinguished and reported separately from the rest of the group B cases, B1. Detailed analysis was performed on the anatomic features for each group of cases, so that planners can easily identify the differences between B1 and B2. For the group A cases, RA3 plans were superior to the IMRT plans in terms of organ sparing, whereas target conformity and dose homogeneity were similar. For the group B1 cases, the RA3 plans produced almost equivalent plan quality as the IMRT plans. For the group B2 cases, for most of which large target volumes were adjacent to (5 mm or less) and wrapping around the brain stem, RA2 and RA3 were inferior to the IMRT regarding both target dose homogeneity and conformity. RA2 plans were slightly inferior to IMRT and RA3 plans for most cases. The plan comparison results depend on the target to brain stem distances and the target sizes. The plan quality results together with the anatomic information may allow the evaluation of the 3 treatment options before actual planning.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  19. Preparation of Fiber Optics for the Delivery of High-Energy High-Beam-Quality Nd:YAG Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; French, P; Hand, D P; Blewett, I J; Richmond, M; Jones, J D

    2000-11-20

    Recent improvements in design have made it possible to build Nd:YAG lasers with both high pulse energy and high beam quality. These lasers are particularly suited for percussion drilling of holes of as much as 1-mm diameter thick (a few millimeters) metal parts. An example application is the production of cooling holes in aeroengine components for which 1-ms duration, 30-J energy laser pulses produce holes of sufficient quality much more efficiently than with a laser trepanning process. Fiber optic delivery of the laser beam would be advantageous, particularly when one is processing complex three-dimensional structures. However, lasers for percussion drilling are available only with conventional bulk-optic beam delivery because of laser-induced damage problems with the small-diameter (approximately 200-400-mum) fibers that would be required for preserving necessary beam quality. We report measurements of beam degradation in step-index optical fibers with an input beam quality corresponding to an M(2) of 22. We then show that the laser-induced damage threshold of 400-mum core-diameter optical fibers can be increased significantly by a CO(2) laser treatment step following the mechanical polishing routine. This increase in laser-induced damage threshold is sufficient to propagate 25-J, 1-ms laser pulses with a 400-mum core-diameter optical fiber and an output M(2) of 31.

  20. Determining large deflections in rectangular combined loaded cantilever beams made of non-linear Ludwick type material by means of different arc length assumptions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ibrahim Eren

    2008-02-01

    In this study, large deflection of cantilever beams of Ludwick type material subjected to a combined loading consisting of a uniformly distributed load and one vertical concentrated load at the free end was investigated. In calculations, both material and geometrical non-linearity have been considered. Horizontal and vertical deflections magnitudes were calculated throughout Euler–Bernoulli curvature-moment relationship assuming different arc lengths. Vertical deflections were calculated by using Runge–Kutta method. More simple and easily understandable results have been obtained compared to the previous studies about the issue and compatible values have been obtained for most of the compared values.

  1. The geometric calibration of cone-beam imaging and delivery systems in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Matsinos, E; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Matsinos, Evangelos

    2006-01-01

    We propose a method to achieve the geometric calibration of cone-beam imaging and delivery systems in radiation therapy; our approach applies to devices where an X-ray source and a flat-panel detector, facing each other, move in circular orbits around the irradiated object. In order to extract the parameters of the geometry from the data, we use a light needle phantom which is easy to manufacture. A model with ten free parameters (spatial lengths and distortion angles) has been put forth to describe the geometry and the mechanical imperfections of the units being calibrated; a few additional parameters are introduced to account for residual effects (small effects which lie beyond our model). The values of the model parameters are determined from one complete scan of the needle phantom via a robust optimisation scheme. The application of this method to two sets of five counterclockwise (ccw) and five clockwise (cw) scans yielded consistent and reproducible results. A number of differences have been observed be...

  2. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Wala, Jeremiah; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. Methods and materials: A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Results: Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 seconds. Treatment times...

  3. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for cranial radiosurgery using multiple noncoplanar arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audet, Chantal; Poffenbarger, Brett A.; Chang, Pauling; Jackson, Paul S.; Lundahl, Robert E.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Ray, Gordon R. [Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Neurosurgery Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Neurosurgery Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), using multiple noncoplanar arcs, for linac-based cranial radiosurgery, as well as evaluate the combined accuracy of the VMAT dose calculations and delivery. Methods: Twelve patients with cranial lesions of variable size (0.1-29 cc) and two multiple metastases patients were planned (Eclipse RapidArc AAA algorithm, v8.6.15) using VMAT (1-6 noncoplanar arcs), dynamic conformal arc (DCA, {approx}4 arcs), and IMRT (nine static fields). All plans were evaluated according to a conformity index (CI), healthy brain tissue doses and volumes, and the dose to organs at risk. A 2D dose distribution was measured (Varian Novalis Tx, HD120 MLC, 1000 MU/min, 6 MV beam) for the {approx}4 arc VMAT treatment plans using calibrated film dosimetry. Results: The CI (0-1 best) average for all plans was best for {approx}4 noncoplanar arc VMAT at 0.86 compared with {approx}0.78 for IMRT and a single arc VMAT and 0.68 for DCA. The volumes of healthy brain receiving 50% of the prescribed target coverage dose or more (V{sub 50%}) were lowest for the four arc VMAT [RA(4)] and DCA plans. The average ratio of the V{sub 50%} for the other plans to the RA(4) V{sub 50%} were 1.9 for a single noncoplanar arc VMAT [RA(1nc)], 1.4 for single full coplanar arc VMAT [RA(1f)] and 1.3 for IMRT. The V{sub 50%} improved significantly for single isocenter multiple metastases plan when two noncoplanar VMAT arcs were added to a full single coplanar one. The maximum dose to 5 cc of the outer 1 cm rim of healthy brain which one may want to keep below nonconsequential doses of 300-400 cGy, was 2-3 times greater for IMRT, RA(1nc) and RA(1f) plans compared with the multiple noncoplanar arc DCA and RA(4) techniques. Organs at risk near (0-4 mm) to targets were best spared by (i) single noncoplanar arcs when the targets are lateral to the organ at risk and (ii) by skewed nonvertical planes of IMRT fields when the targets are not lateral to the

  4. A Study of volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy in case of multi-target liver cancer using flattening filter free beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Mi Sook; Yoon, In Ha; Hong, Dong Gi; Back, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has proved its efficacy in several patient populations with primary and metastatic limited tumors. Because SBRT prescription is high dose level than Conventional radiation therapy. SBRT plan is necessary for effective Organ at risk (OAR) protection and sufficient Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage. In particular, multi-target cases may result excessive doses to OAR and hot spot due to dose overlap. This study evaluate usefulness of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in dosimetric and technical considerations using Flattening filter free (FFF) beam. The treatment plans for five patients, being treated on TrueBeam STx(Varian™, USA) with VMAT using 10MV FFF beam and Standard conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using 15MV Flattening filter (FF) beam. PTV, liver, duodenum, bowel, spinal cord, esophagus, stomach dose were evaluated using the dose volume histogram(DVH). Conformity index(CI), homogeneity index(HI), Paddick's index(PCI) for the PTV was assessed. Total Monitor unit (MU) and beam on time was assessed. Average value of CI, HI and PCI for PTV was 1.381±0.028, 1.096±0.016, 0.944±0.473 in VMAT and 1.381± 0.042, 1.136±0.042, 1.534±0.465 in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT respectively. OAR dose in CRT plans evaluated 1.8 times higher than VMAT. Total MU in VMAT evaluated 1.3 times increase than CRT. Average beam on time was 6.8 minute in VMAT and 21.3 minute in CRT. VMAT for SBRT in multi-target liver cancer using FFF beam is effective treatment techniqe in dosimetric and technical considerations. VMAT decrease intra-fraction error due to treatment time shortening using high dose rate of FFF beam.

  5. SU-E-T-107: Development of a GPU-Based Dose Delivery System for Adaptive Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S; Russo, G; Marchetto, F; Attili, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino (Italy); Monaco, V; Varasteh, M [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Pella, A [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A description of a GPU-based dose delivery system (G-DDS) to integrate a fast forward planning implementing in real-time the prescribed sequence of pencil beams. The system, which is under development, is designed to evaluate the dose distribution deviations due to range variations and interplay effects affecting mobile tumors treatments. Methods: The Dose Delivery System (DDS) in use at the Italian Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), is the starting point for the presented system. A fast and partial forward planning (FP) tool has been developed to evaluate in few seconds the delivered dose distributions using the DDS data (on-line measurements of spot properties, i.e. number of particles and positions). The computation is performed during the intervals between synchrotron spills and, made available at the end of each spill. In the interval between two spills, the G-DDS will evaluate the delivered dose distributions taking into account the real-time target positions measured by a tracking system. The sequence of prescribed pencil beams for the following spill will be adapted taking into account the variations with respect to the original plan due to the target motion. In order to speed up the computation required to modify pencil beams distribution (up to 400 times has been reached), the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and advanced Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are used. Results: An existing offline forward planning is going to be optimized for the CUDA architecture: the gain in time will be presented. The preliminary performances of the developed GPU-based FP algorithms will be shown. Conclusion: A prototype of a GPU-based dose delivery system is under development and will be presented. The system workflow will be illustrated together with the approach adopted to integrate the three main systems, i.e. CNAO dose delivery system, fast forward planning, and tumor tracking system.

  6. Design and delivery of beam monitors for the energy-upgraded linac in J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akihiko; Ouchi, Nobuo; Oguri, Hidetomo; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Miyao, Tomoaki; Ikegami, Masanori

    2015-02-01

    In the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) linac, an energy-upgrade project has started to achieve a design beam power of 1 MW at the exit of the downstream synchrotron. To account for the significant beam parameter upgrades, we will use the newly-fabricated beam monitors for the beam commissioning. This paper discusses the design and assembly of the beam position monitor, phase monitor, current monitor, transverse profile monitor, and beam loss monitor for the energy-upgraded linac. We periodically installed the newly-fabricated monitors for the upgraded beam line, as well as for longitudinal matching, because of the frequency jump between the original RF cavity and the newly-developed cavity. We employed two debunchers to correct for momentum spread and jitter. To account for the new debunchers, we fabricated and installed additional pairs of phase monitors in order to tune the debunchers to the adequate RF set point. Finally, we propose commissioning plans to support the beam monitor check. We will begin to establish the 181-MeV operation to confirm the proper functioning of beam monitors. Herein, we will examine the response to changes of the knobs that control the quadrupole magnets after the energy upgrade. After proper functioning of the beam monitors is confirmed, we will use the new beam monitors to establish the 400-MeV acceleration operation.

  7. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  8. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  9. Effects of Surface Alloying and Laser Beam Treatment on the Microstructure and Wear Behaviour of Surfaces Modified Using Submerged Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regita BENDIKIENE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of surface alloying of cheap plain carbon steel using submerged metal arc technique and subsequent laser beam treatment on the microstructure and wear behaviour of surfaced layers were studied. This method is the cheapest one to obtain high alloyed coatings, because there is no need to apply complex technologies of powder making (metal powder is spread on the surface of base metal or inserted into the flux, it is enough to grind, granulate and blend additional materials. On the other hand, strengthening of superficial layers of alloys by thermal laser radiation is one of the applications of laser. Surface is strengthened by concentrated laser beam focused into teeny area (from section of mm till some mm. Teeny area of metal heat up rapidly and when heat is drain to the inner metal layers giving strengthening effect. Steel surface during this treatment exceeds critical temperatures, if there is a need to strengthen deeper portions of the base metal it is possible even to fuse superficial layer. The results presented in this paper are based on micro-structural and micro-chemical analyses of the surfaced and laser beam treated surfaces and are supported by analyses of the hardness, the wear resistance and resultant microstructures. Due to the usage of waste raw materials a significant improvement (~ 30 % in wear resistance was achieved. The maximum achieved hardness of surfaced layer was 62 HRC, it can be compared with high alloyed conventional steel grade. Wear properties of overlays with additional laser beam treatment showed that weight loss of these layers was ~10 % lower compared with overlays after welding; consequently it is possible to replace high alloyed conventional steel grades forming new surfaces or restoring worn machine elements and tools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7621

  10. Assessment of Corona/Arcing Hazard for Electron Beam Welding in Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for ISWE: Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Vaughn, J.; Stocks, C.; ODell, D.; Bhat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Test welds were made in argon over a range of pressures from 10-5 to 10-3 torr (the latter pressure an order of magnitude above pressures anticipated in the space shuttle bay during welding) with and without plasma on 304 stainless steel, 6Al-4V titanium, and 5456 aluminum in search of any possible unwanted electrical discharges. Only a faint steady glow of beam-excited atoms around the electron beam and sometimes extending out into the vacuum chamber was observed. No signs of current spiking or of any potentially dangerous electrical discharge were found.

  11. Rotational IMRT delivery using a digital linear accelerator in very high dose rate 'burst mode'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Bill J.; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Shukla, Himanshu; Szegedi, Martin; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema

    2011-04-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in arc-based IMRT, through the use of 'conventional' multileaf collimator (MLC) systems that can treat large tumor volumes in a single, or very few pass(es) of the gantry. Here we present a novel 'burst mode' modulated arc delivery approach, wherein 2000 monitor units per minute (MU min-1) high dose rate bursts of dose are facilitated by a flattening-filter-free treatment beam on a Siemens Artiste (Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Concord, CA, USA) digital linear accelerator in a non-clinical configuration. Burst mode delivery differs from continuous mode delivery, used by Elekta's VMAT (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK) and Varian's RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) implementations, in that dose is not delivered while MLC leaves are moving. Instead, dose is delivered in bursts over very short arc angles and only after an MLC segment shape has been completely formed and verified by the controller. The new system was confirmed to be capable of delivering a wide array of clinically relevant treatment plans, without machine fault or other delivery anomalies. Dosimetric accuracy of the modulated arc platform, as well as the Prowess (Prowess Inc., Concord, CA, USA) prototype treatment planning version utilized here, was quantified and confirmed, and delivery times were measured as significantly brief, even with large hypofractionated doses. The burst mode modulated arc approach evaluated here appears to represent a capable, accurate and efficient delivery approach.

  12. Validation of Planning Target Volume Margins by Analyzing Intrafractional Localization Errors for 14 Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Three-Dimensional Cross-Correlation between the Prostate Images of Planning CT and Intrafraction Cone-Beam CT during Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenshiro Shiraishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT. The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility.

  13. The ARCS radial collimator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone M.B.; Niedziela J.L.; Overbay M.A.; Abernathy D.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. W...

  14. Is high–dose rate RapidArc-based radiosurgery dosimetrically advantageous for the treatment of intracranial tumors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yangy2@upmc.edu; Li, Xiang; Li, Tianfang; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2015-04-01

    In linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT), circular cone(s) or conformal arc(s) are conventionally used to treat intracranial lesions. However, when the target is in close proximity to critical structures, it is frequently quite challenging to generate a quality plan using these techniques. In this study, we investigated the dosimetric characteristics of using high–dose rate RapidArc (RA) technique for radiosurgical treatment of intracranial lesions. A total of 10 intracranial SRS/SRT cases previously planned using dynamic conformal arc (DCA) or cone-based techniques have been included in this study. For each case, 3 treatment plans were generated: (1) a DCA plan with multiple noncoplanar arcs, (2) a high–dose rate RA plan with arcs oriented the same as DCA (multiple-arc RA), and 3) a high–dose rate RA plan with a single coplanar arc (single-arc RA). All treatment plans were generated under the same prescription and similar critical structure dose limits. Plan quality for different plans was evaluated by comparing various dosimetric parameters such as target coverage, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), critical structures, and normal brain tissue doses as well as beam delivery time. With similar critical structure sparing, high–dose rate RA plans can achieve much better target coverage, dose conformity, and dose homogeneity than the DCA plans can. Plan quality indices CI and HI, for the DCA, multiple-arc RA, and single-arc RA techniques, were measured as 1.67 ± 0.39, 1.32 ± 0.28, and 1.38 ± 0.30 and 1.24 ± 0.11, 1.10 ± 0.04, and 1.12 ± 0.07, respectively. Normal brain tissue dose (V{sub 12} {sub Gy}) was found to be similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but much larger for the single-arc RA plans. Beam delivery was similar for DCA and multiple-arc RA plans but shorter with single-arc RA plans. Multiple-arc RA SRS/SRT can provide better treatment plans than conventional DCA plans, especially for complex cases.

  15. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer : a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, Andrea; Van Gestel, Dirk; Arends, Mark P.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Schuring, Danny; Kunze-Busch, Martina C.; Louwe, Rob J. W.; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-

  16. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer: a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.; Gestel, D. Van; Arends, M.P.; Korevaar, E.W.; Schuring, D.; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Louwe, R.J.W.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment planner-

  17. A treatment planning and delivery comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy with or without flattening filter for gliomas, brain metastases, prostate, head/neck and early stage lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasic, Daniel; Ohlhues, Lars; Brodin, N. Patrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are an emerging technology that has not yet been widely implemented as standard practice in radiotherapy centers. To facilitate the clinical implementation of FFF, we attempted to elucidate the difference in plan quality and treatment delivery time c...

  18. Treatment planning and delivery of IMRT using 6 and 18 MV photon beams without flattening filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)], E-mail: stathakis@uthscsa.edu; Esquivel, Carlos; Gutierrez, Alonso; Buckey, Courtney R.; Papanikolaou, Niko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In light of the increasing use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in modern radiotherapy practice, the use of a flattening filter may no longer be necessary. Commissioning data have been measured for a Varian 23EX linear accelerator with 6 and 18 MV photon energies without a flattening filter. Measurements collected for the commissioning of the linac included percent depth dose curves and profiles for field sizes ranging from 2x2 to 40x40 cm{sup 2} as defined by the jaws and multileaf collimator. Machine total scatter factors were measured and calculated. Measurements were used to model the unflattened beams with the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. IMRT plans for prostate, lung, brain and head and neck cancer cases were generated using the flattening filter and flattening filter-free beams. From our results, no difference in the quality of the treatment plans between the flat and unflattened photon beams was noted. There was however a significant decrease in the number of monitor units required for unflattened beam treatment plans due to the increase in linac output-approximately two times and four times higher for the 6 and 18 MV, respectively.

  19. A Multiple-room, Continuous Beam Delivery, Hadron-therapy Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méot, F.

    A proton-therapy hospital installation, based on multiple beam extraction systems from a fixed-field synchrotron, is presented and commented. Potential interest as hospital operation efficiency, as well as estimates of the impact of continuous, multiple-port extraction, on the cost of a session, are discussed.

  20. Method of targeted delivery of laser beam to isolated retinal rods by fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Nigel; Bessarab, Dmitri; Jones, C Michael; Krivitsky, Leonid

    2011-11-01

    A method of controllable light delivery to retinal rod cells using an optical fiber is described. Photo-induced current of the living rod cells was measured with the suction electrode technique. The approach was tested with measurements relating the spatial distribution of the light intensity to photo-induced current. In addition, the ion current responses of rod cells to polarized light at two different orientation geometries of the cells were studied.

  1. Method of targeted delivery of laser beam to isolated retinal rods by fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Sim, Nigel; Jones, C Michael; Krivitsky, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    A method of controllable light delivery to retinal rod cells using an optical fiber is described. Photo-induced current of the living rod cells was measured with the suction electrode technique. The approach was tested with measurements relating the spatial distribution of the light intensity to photo-induced current. In addition, the ion current responses of rod cells to polarized light at two different orientation geometries of the cells were studied.

  2. Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: A Fully Dynamic Delivery With Synchronized Couch and Gantry Motion Significantly Improves Dosimetric Indices Correlated With Poor Cosmesis in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jieming; Atwood, Todd; Eyben, Rie von; Fahimian, Benjamin; Chin, Erika; Horst, Kathleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States); Otto, Karl [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada); Hristov, Dimitre, E-mail: dimitre.hristov@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To develop planning and delivery capabilities for linear accelerator–based nonisocentric trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) and to evaluate the benefit of TMAT for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with the patient in prone position. Methods and Materials: An optimization algorithm for volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was generalized to allow for user-defined nonisocentric TMAT trajectories combining couch rotations and translations. After optimization, XML scripts were automatically generated to program and subsequently deliver the TMAT plans. For 10 breast patients in the prone position, TMAT and 6-field noncoplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated under equivalent objectives and constraints. These plans were compared with regard to whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. Results: For TMAT APBI, nonisocentric collision-free horizontal arcs with large angular span (251.5 ± 7.9°) were optimized and delivered with delivery time of ∼4.5 minutes. Percentage changes of whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose for TMAT relative to IMRT were −10.81% ± 6.91%, −27.81% ± 7.39%, −14.82% ± 9.67%, and 39.40% ± 10.53% (P≤.01). Conclusions: This is a first demonstration of end-to-end planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT. Compared with IMRT, TMAT resulted in marked reduction of the breast tissue volume irradiated at high doses.

  3. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Materials and methods. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a...

  4. Nd:YAG laser bloodless tonsillectomy by fiber optic doppler coupled handpiece beam delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser ablation of palatine tonsils is a relatively new technique recently performed in head and neck surgery departments, in order to treat recurrent tonsillar infections or obstructions from enlarged tonsils. In our study, we have investigated a new procedure using the fiber optic laser beam Nd:YAG to remove up to the 89% of tonsillar tissue, and leaving in place the capsule avoiding any hemorrhagic complication and limiting the pain.

  5. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Mike; Arnold, Ray; Bailey, D; Barlow, Roger J; Beard, Carl D; Boogert, Stewart Takashi; Burrows, P N; Burton, D; Christian, Glenn B; Clarke, Christine; Cussans, D; Densham, C; Erickson, Roger; Frisch, Josef; Greenhalgh, J; Hartin, Anthony F; Hast, Carsten; Hildreth, Michael; Jackson, Frank; Kalinin, Alexander; Jobe, R Keith; Keller, Lewis; Kolomensky, Yury; Kourevlev, German Yu; Lyapin, A; Malton, Stephen; Markiewicz, Thomas W; Maruyama, Takashi; McCormick, Douglas; Mercer, Adam; Miller, David J; Molloy, Stephen; Nelson, Janice; Phinney, Nan; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Ross, Marc; Seryi, Andrei; Shales, N; Sinev, N; Slater, Mark; Smith, J; Smith, Stephen; Sopczak, A; Sugimoto, Y; Szalata, Zen M; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomson, Mark; Torrence, Eric; Tucker, R W; Walston, Sean; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Weiland, Thomas; White, Glen; Wing, Matthew; Woodley, Mark; Zagorodnov, Igor; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  6. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during delivery of clinical proton beams with a Compton camera: feasibility studies for range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C; Avery, Stephen; Mackin, Dennis S; Beddar, Sam

    2015-09-21

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a prototype Compton camera (CC) to measure prompt gamma rays (PG) emitted during delivery of clinical proton pencil beams for prompt gamma imaging (PGI) as a means of providing in vivo verification of the delivered proton radiotherapy beams. A water phantom was irradiated with clinical 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton pencil beams. Up to 500 cGy of dose was delivered per irradiation using clinical beam currents. The prototype CC was placed 15 cm from the beam central axis and PGs from 0.2 MeV up to 6.5 MeV were measured during irradiation. From the measured data (2D) images of the PG emission were reconstructed. (1D) profiles were extracted from the PG images and compared to measured depth dose curves of the delivered proton pencil beams. The CC was able to measure PG emission during delivery of both 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton beams at clinical beam currents. 2D images of the PG emission were reconstructed for single 150 MeV proton pencil beams as well as for a 5   ×   5 cm mono-energetic layer of 114 MeV pencil beams. Shifts in the Bragg peak (BP) range were detectable on the 2D images. 1D profiles extracted from the PG images show that the distal falloff of the PG emission profile lined up well with the distal BP falloff. Shifts as small as 3 mm in the beam range could be detected from the 1D PG profiles with an accuracy of 1.5 mm or better. However, with the current CC prototype, a dose of 400 cGy was required to acquire adequate PG signal for 2D PG image reconstruction. It was possible to measure PG interactions with our prototype CC during delivery of proton pencil beams at clinical dose rates. Images of the PG emission could be reconstructed and shifts in the BP range were detectable. Therefore PGI with a CC for in vivo range verification during proton treatment delivery is feasible. However, improvements in the prototype CC detection efficiency and reconstruction algorithms are necessary

  7. Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained Electron Beam Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Zhu, Zihua; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Hannon, Fay; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hess, Wayne P.

    2012-06-12

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Several photocathode degradation processes are suspected, including defect formation by ion back bombardment, photochemistry of surface adsorbed species and irradiation-induced surface defect formation. To better understand the mechanisms of photocathode degradation, we have conducted surface and bulk analysis studies of two GaAs photocathodes removed from the FEL photoinjector after delivering electron beam for a few years. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, strained super-lattice GaAs photocathode samples, removed from the CEBAF photoinjector were analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. This analysis of photocathode degradation during nominal photoinjector operating conditions represents first steps towards developing robust new photocathode designs necessary for generating sub-micron emittance electron beams required for both fourth generation light sources and intense polarized CW electron beams for nuclear and high energy physics facilities.

  8. Spin transport and polarimetry in the beam delivery system of the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, M.; Vauth, A.; Vormwald, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; List, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model - and possibly beyond - the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the interpretation of the e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data.

  9. Spin Transport and Polarimetry in the Beam Delivery System of the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Moritz; Vauth, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Polarised electron and positron beams are key ingredients to the physics programme of future linear colliders. Due to the chiral nature of weak interactions in the Standard Model - and possibly beyond - the knowledge of the luminosity-weighted average beam polarisation at the $e^+e^-$ interaction point is of similar importance as the knowledge of the luminosity and has to be controlled to permille-level precision in order to fully exploit the physics potential. The current concept to reach this challenging goal combines measurements from Laser-Compton polarimeters before and after the interaction point with measurements at the interaction point. A key element for this enterprise is the understanding of spin-transport effects between the polarimeters and the interaction point as well as collision effects. We show that without collisions, the polarimeters can be cross-calibrated to 0.1 %, and we discuss in detail the impact of collision effects and beam parameters on the polarisation value relevant for the inte...

  10. Cathodic arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  11. Cathodic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bia...

  12. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  13. Critical appraisal of RapidArc radiosurgery with flattening filter free photon beams for benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife: a treatment planning study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of RapidArc (RA) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of benign brain lesions in comparison to GammaKnife (GK) based technique. Methods Twelve patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS, n = 6) or cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM, n = 6) were planned for both SRS using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RA. 104 MV flattening filter free photon beams with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min were selected. Data were compared against plans optimised for GK. A single dose of 12.5 Gy was prescribed. The primary objective was to assess treatment plan quality. Secondary aim was to appraise treatment efficiency. Results For VS, comparing best GK vs. RA plans, homogeneity was 51.7 ± 3.5 vs. 6.4 ± 1.5%; Paddick conformity Index (PCI) resulted 0.81 ± 0.03 vs. 0.84 ± 0.04. Gradient index (PGI) was 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6. Mean target dose was 17.1 ± 0.9 vs. 12.9 ± 0.1 Gy. For the brain stem, D1cm3 was 5.1 ± 2.0 Gy vs 4.8 ± 1.6 Gy. For the ipsilateral cochlea, D0.1cm3 was 1.7 ± 1.0 Gy vs. 1.8 ± 0.5 Gy. For CSM, homogeneity was 52.3 ± 2.4 vs. 12.4 ± 0.6; PCI: 0.86 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.05; PGI: 2.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.8 ± 0.5; D1cm3 to brain stem was 5.4 ± 2.8 Gy vs. 5.2 ± 2.8 Gy; D0.1cm3 to ipsi-lateral optic nerve was 4.2 ± 2.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.5 Gy; D0.1cm3 to optic chiasm was 5.9 ± 3.1 vs. 4.5 ± 2.1 Gy. Treatment time was 53.7 ± 5.8 (64.9 ± 24.3) minutes for GK and 4.8 ± 1.3 (5.0 ± 0.7) minutes for RA for schwannomas (meningiomas). Conclusions SRS with RA and FFF beams revealed to be adequate and comparable to GK in terms of target coverage, homogeneity, organs at risk sparing with some gain in terms of treatment efficiency. PMID:24884967

  14. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Abram, T.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.

    2011-11-22

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and

  15. Ultra-large Mode Area Microstructured Core Chalcogenide Fiber Design for Mid-IR Beam Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Barh, Ajanta; Varshney, R K; Pal, Bishnu P

    2013-01-01

    An all solid large modearea (LMA) chalcogenide based microstructured core optical fiber (MCOF) is designed and proposed for high power handling in the mid IR spectral regime, covering the entire second transparency window of the atmosphere (3 to 5 microns). The core of the proposed specialty fiber is composed of a few rings of high index rods arranged in a pattern of hexagon. Dependence of effective mode area on the pitch and radius of high index rods are studied. Ultra high effective mode area up to 75000 micron square can be achieved over this specific wavelength range while retaining its single mode characteristic. A negligible confinement loss along with a low dispersion slope (near 0.03 ps/km-nm square) and a good beam quality factor (M2 1.17) should make this LMA fiber design attractive for fabrication as a potential candidate suitable for high power, passive applications at the mid IR wavelength regime.

  16. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X

    2009-11-07

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was delivered with a different dose rate, extra mode-up time (xMOT) was needed between the transitions of the successive sectors during delivery. On average, the delivery times of the CDR plans were approximately less than 1 min longer than the treatment times of the VDR plans, with an average of

  17. SU-E-T-539: Fixed Versus Variable Optimization Points in Combined-Mode Modulated Arc Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainz, K; Prah, D; Ahunbay, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel modulated arc therapy technique, mARC, enables superposition of step-and-shoot IMRT segments upon a subset of the optimization points (OPs) of a continuous-arc delivery. We compare two approaches to mARC planning: one with the number of OPs fixed throughout optimization, and another where the planning system determines the number of OPs in the final plan, subject to an upper limit defined at the outset. Methods: Fixed-OP mARC planning was performed for representative cases using Panther v. 5.01 (Prowess, Inc.), while variable-OP mARC planning used Monaco v. 5.00 (Elekta, Inc.). All Monaco planning used an upper limit of 91 OPs; those OPs with minimal MU were removed during optimization. Plans were delivered, and delivery times recorded, on a Siemens Artiste accelerator using a flat 6MV beam with 300 MU/min rate. Dose distributions measured using ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Inc.) were compared with the plan calculation; the two were deemed consistent if they agreed to within 3.5% in absolute dose and 3.5 mm in distance-to-agreement among > 95% of the diodes within the direct beam. Results: Example cases included a prostate and a head-and-neck planned with a single arc and fraction doses of 1.8 and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Aside from slightly more uniform target dose for the variable-OP plans, the DVHs for the two techniques were similar. For the fixed-OP technique, the number of OPs was 38 and 39, and the delivery time was 228 and 259 seconds, respectively, for the prostate and head-and-neck cases. For the final variable-OP plans, there were 91 and 85 OPs, and the delivery time was 296 and 440 seconds, correspondingly longer than for fixed-OP. Conclusion: For mARC, both the fixed-OP and variable-OP approaches produced comparable-quality plans whose delivery was successfully verified. To keep delivery time per fraction short, a fixed-OP planning approach is preferred.

  18. The ARCS radial collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  19. The ARCS radial collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  20. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  1. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  2. The GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and quality assurance of RapidArc, an intensity modulated rotational therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To expand and test the dosimetric procedure, known as GLAaS, for amorphous silicon detectors to the RapidArc intensity modulated arc delivery with Varian infrastructures and to test the RapidArc dosimetric reliability between calculation and delivery. Methods The GLAaS algorithm was applied and tested on a set of RapidArc fields at both low (6 MV and high (18 MV beam energies with a PV-aS1000 detector. Pilot tests for short arcs were performed on a 6 MV beam associated to a PV-aS500. RapidArc is a novel planning and delivery method in the category of intensity modulated arc therapies aiming to deliver highly modulated plans with variable MLC shapes, dose rate and gantry speed during rotation. Tests were repeated for entire (360 degrees gantry rotations on composite dose plans and for short partial arcs (of ~6 or 12 degrees to assess GLAaS and RapidArc mutual relationships on global and fine delivery scales. The gamma index concept of Low and the Modulation Index concept of Webb were applied to compare quantitatively TPS dose matrices and dose converted PV images. Results The Gamma Agreement Index computed for a Distance to Agreement of 3 mm and a Dose Difference (ΔD of 3% was, as mean ± 1 SD, 96.7 ± 1.2% at 6 MV and 94.9 ± 1.3% at 18 MV, over the field area. These findings deteriorated slightly is ΔD was reduced to 2% (93.4 ± 3.2% and 90.1 ± 3.1%, respectively and improved with ΔD = 4% (98.3 ± 0.8% and 97.3 ± 0.9%, respectively. For all tests a grid of 1 mm and the AAA photon dose calculation algorithm were applied. The spatial resolution of the PV-aS1000 is 0.392 mm/pxl. The Modulation Index for calculations resulted 17.0 ± 3.2 at 6 MV and 15.3 ± 2.7 at 18 MV while the corresponding data for measurements were: 18.5 ± 3.7 and 17.5 ± 3.7. Partial arcs findings were (for ΔD = 3%: GAI = 96.7 ± 0.9% for 6° rotations and 98.0 ± 1.1% for 12° rotations. Conclusion The GLAaS method can be considered as a valid

  3. Commissioning of an integrated platform for time-resolved treatment delivery in scanned ion beam therapy by means of optical motion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, G; Saito, N; Seregni, M; Kaderka, R; Pella, A; Constantinescu, A; Riboldi, M; Steidl, P; Cerveri, P; Bert, C; Durante, M; Baroni, G

    2014-12-01

    The integrated use of optical technologies for patient monitoring is addressed in the framework of time-resolved treatment delivery for scanned ion beam therapy. A software application has been designed to provide the therapy control system (TCS) with a continuous geometrical feedback by processing the external surrogates tridimensional data, detected in real-time via optical tracking. Conventional procedures for phase-based respiratory phase detection were implemented, as well as the interface to patient specific correlation models, in order to estimate internal tumor motion from surface markers. In this paper, particular attention is dedicated to the quantification of time delays resulting from system integration and its compensation by means of polynomial interpolation in the time domain. Dedicated tests to assess the separate delay contributions due to optical signal processing, digital data transfer to the TCS and passive beam energy modulation actuation have been performed. We report the system technological commissioning activities reporting dose distribution errors in a phantom study, where the treatment of a lung lesion was simulated, with both lateral and range beam position compensation. The zero-delay systems integration with a specific active scanning delivery machine was achieved by tuning the amount of time prediction applied to lateral (14.61 ± 0.98 ms) and depth (34.1 ± 6.29 ms) beam position correction signals, featuring sub-millimeter accuracy in forward estimation. Direct optical target observation and motion phase (MPh) based tumor motion discretization strategies were tested, resulting in 20.3(2.3)% and 21.2(9.3)% median (IQR) percentual relative dose difference with respect to static irradiation, respectively. Results confirm the technical feasibility of the implemented strategy towards 4D treatment delivery, with negligible percentual dose deviations with respect to static irradiation.

  4. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrle, A; Schnick, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E; Fuessel, U, E-mail: achim.mahrle@iws.fraunhofer.de [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, PO Box, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  5. TH-C-12A-07: Implementation of a Pulsed Low Dose Date Radiotherapy (PLRT) Protocol for Recurrent Cancers Using Advanced Beam Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Lin, M; Chen, L; Price, R [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, J; Kang, S; Wang, P; Lang, J [Sichuan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recent in vitro and in vivo experimental findings provided strong evidence that pulsed low-dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) produced equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy with significantly reduced normal tissue toxicities. This work aimed to implement a PLDR clinical protocol for the management of recurrent cancers utilizing IMRT and VMAT. Methods: Our PLDR protocol requires that the daily 2Gy dose be delivered in 0.2Gy×10 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. To take advantage of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity the mean dose to the target is set at 0.2Gy and the maximum dose is limited to 0.4Gy per pulse. Practical planning strategies were developed for IMRT and VMAT: (1) set 10 ports for IMRT and 10 arcs for VMAT with each angle/arc as a pulse; (2) set the mean dose (0.2Gy) and maximum dose (0.4Gy) to the target per pulse as hard constraints (no constraints to OARs); (3) select optimal port/arc angles to avoid OARs; and (4) use reference structures in or around target/OARs to reduce maximum dose to the target/OARs. IMRT, VMAT and 3DCRT plans were generated for 60 H and N, breast, lung, pancreas and prostate patients and compared. Results: All PLDR treatment plans using IMRT and VMAT met the dosimetry requirements of the PLDR protocol (mean target dose: 0.20Gy±0.01Gy; maximum target dose < 0.4Gy). In comparison with 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT exhibited improved target dose conformity and OAR dose sparing. A single arc can minimize the difference in the target dose due to multi-angle incidence although the delivery time is longer than 3DCRT and IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT and VMAT are better modalities for PLDR treatment of recurrent cancers with superior target dose conformity and critical structure sparing. The planning strategies/guidelines developed in this work are practical for IMRT/VMAT treatment planning to meet the dosimetry requirements of the PLDR protocol.

  6. Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for beam delivery and pulse compression of high-power ultrafast lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, C. J.; Emaury, F.; Diebold, A.; Schriber, C.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Südmeyer, T.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2015-02-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the last years in the field of ultrafast high-power sources. Among the different laser technologies driving this progress, thin-disk lasers (TDLs) have gained significant ground, both from amplifiers and modelocked oscillators. Modelocked TDLs are particularly attractive, as they allow for unprecedented high energy and average powers directly from an oscillator. The exponential progress in the performance of these sources drives growing needs for efficient means of beam delivery and pulse compression at high average power ( 10 MW). This remains a challenging regime for standard fiber solutions: microstructured large-mode-area silica photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are good candidates, but peak powers are limited to ≈4-6 MW by self-focusing. Hollow-core (HC) capillaries are adapted for higher peak powers, but exhibit high losses and are not suitable for compact beam delivery. In parallel to the progress achieved in the performance of ultrafast laser systems, recent progress in novel hollow-core PCF designs are currently emerging as an excellent solution for these challenges. In particular, Inhibited-coupling Kagome-type HC-PCFs are particularly promising: their intrinsic guiding properties allow for extremely high damage thresholds, low losses over wide transmission windows and ultra-low dispersion. In our most recent results, we achieve pulse compression in the hundred-watt average power regime using Kagome-type HC-PCFs. We launch 127-W, 18-μJ, 740-fs pulses from our modelocked TDL into an Ar-filled fiber (13 bar), reaching 93% transmission. The resulting spectral broadening allows us to compress the pulses to 88 fs at 112 W of average power, reaching 105 MW of peak power, at 88% compression efficiency. These results demonstrate the outstanding suitability of Kagome HC-PCFs for compression and beam delivery of state-of-the-art kilowatt-class ultrafast systems.

  7. Effectiveness of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with audio-visual biofeedback for synchrotron-based scanned heavy-ion beam delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pengbo; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Ting; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Ma, Yuanyuan

    2016-12-01

    A synchrotron-based heavy-ion accelerator operates in pulse mode at a low repetition rate that is comparable to a patient’s breathing rate. To overcome inefficiencies and interplay effects between the residual motion of the target and the scanned heavy-ion beam delivery process for conventional free breathing (FB)-based gating therapy, a novel respiratory guidance method was developed to help patients synchronize their breathing patterns with the synchrotron excitation patterns by performing short breath holds with the aid of personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment precision, efficiency and reproducibility of the respiratory guidance method in scanned heavy-ion beam delivery mode. Using 96 breathing traces from eight healthy volunteers who were asked to breathe freely and guided to perform short breath holds with the aid of BFB, a series of dedicated four-dimensional dose calculations (4DDC) were performed on a geometric model which was developed assuming a linear relationship between external surrogate and internal tumor motions. The outcome of the 4DDCs was quantified in terms of the treatment time, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose homogeneity index. Our results show that with the respiratory guidance method the treatment efficiency increased by a factor of 2.23-3.94 compared with FB gating, depending on the duty cycle settings. The magnitude of dose inhomogeneity for the respiratory guidance methods was 7.5 times less than that of the non-gated irradiation, and good reproducibility of breathing guidance among different fractions was achieved. Thus, our study indicates that the respiratory guidance method not only improved the overall treatment efficiency of respiratory-gated scanned heavy-ion beam delivery, but also had the advantages of lower dose uncertainty and better reproducibility among fractions.

  8. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency.

  9. Cleaning of endodontic root canal by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG laser beam with fiber optic delivery: scanning electron microscopy, endoscopic and microradiographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Norberto; Melis, Marco; Benvenuti, Alessandro; Tosto, Sebastiano; Pierdominici, Fabrizio

    1997-05-01

    12 teeth have been extracted and treated 'in vitro' by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG pulsed laser with fiber optic delivery to compare the cleaning efficiency of the root canal. The optic fiber was equipped with a water-air coaxial cooling system. The ultrasonic device was equipped with a 3 percent NaCl solution douche system. The samples have been prepared according to the technical specifications of the suppliers of laser and ultrasonics and observed by an endodontic endoscope. Cross sections of the samples have been utilized for microradiographic investigations and scanning electron microscopy observations. Local melting has been observed after laser irradiation.Also, vitrification preferentially occurred in the apical zones. The occurrence of vitrification was found strongly dependent on the translation velocity of the laser beam inside the root canal. The laser beam has shown a cleaning efficiency greater than that obtained by ultrasonic procedure.

  10. Delivery of 10-MW Nd:YAG laser pulses by large-core optical fibers: Dependence of the laser-intensity profile on beam propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, B.; Richou, J. [Laboratoire d` Optoelectronique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Toulon et du Var, BP 132, La Garde 83957 (France); Schertz, I.; Gobin, I. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique/Vaujours, Moronvilliers, BP 7, Courtry 77181 (France)

    1997-03-01

    A large-core multimode optical fiber of a few meters length is studied as a 10-MW beam delivery system for a 15-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A laser-to-fiber vacuum coupler is used to inhibit air breakdown and reduce the probability of dielectric breakdown on the fiber front surface. Laser-induced damage inside the fiber core is observed behind the fiber front surface. An explanation based on a high power density is illustrated by a ray trace. Damaged spots and measurements of fiber output energies are reported for two laser beam distributions: a flat-hat type and a near-Gaussian type. Experiments have been performed to deliver a 100-pulse mean energy between 100 and 230 mJ without catastrophic damage. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  11. Delivery of 10-MW Nd:YAG laser pulses by large-core optical fibers: dependence of the laser-intensity profile on beam propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richou, B; Schertz, I; Gobin, I; Richou, J

    1997-03-01

    A large-core multimode optical fiber of a few meters length is studied as a 10-MW beam delivery system for a 15-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A laser-to-fiber vacuum coupler is used to inhibit air breakdown and reduce the probability of dielectric breakdown on the fiber front surface. Laser-induced damage inside the fiber core is observed behind the fiber front surface. An explanation based on a high power density is illustrated by a ray trace. Damaged spots and measurements of fiber output energies are reported for two laser beam distributions: a flat-hat type and a near-Gaussian type. Experiments have been performed to deliver a 100-pulse mean energy between 100 and 230 mJ without catastrophic damage.

  12. SU-E-J-17: Intra-Fractional Prostate Movement Correction During Treatment Delivery Period for Prostate Cancer Using the Intra-Fractional Orthogonal KV-MV Image Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Azawi, S; Cho-Lim, J; Wei, R; Williams, R; Frank, E [VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the intra-fractional prostate movement range during the beam delivery and implement new IGRT method to correct the prostate movement during the hypofractionated prostate treatment delivery. Methods: To evaluate the prostate internal motion range during the beam delivery, 11 conventional treatments were utilized. Two-arc RapidArc plans were used for the treatment delivery. Orthogonal KV imaging is performed in the middle of the treatment to correct intra-fractional prostate movement. However, it takes gantry-mounted on-board imaging system relative long time to finish the orthogonal KV imaging because of gantry rotation. To avoid gantry movement and accelerate the IGRT processing time, orthogonal KV-MV image pair is tested using the OBI daily QA Cube phantom. Results: The average prostate movement between two orthogonal KV image pairs was 0.38cm (0.20cm ∼ 0.85cm). And the interval time between them was 6.71 min (4.64min ∼ 9.22 min). 2-arc beam delivery time is within 3 minutes for conventional RapidArc treatment delivery. Hypofractionated treatment or SBRT need 4 partial arc and possible non-coplanar technology, which need much longer beam delivery time. Therefore prostate movement might be larger. New orthogonal KV-MV image pair is a new method to correct the prostate movement in the middle of the beam delivery if real time tracking method is not available. Orthogonal KV-MV image pair doesn’t need gantry rotation. Images were acquired quickly which minimized possible new prostate movement. Therefore orthogonal KV-MV image pair is feasible for IGRT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated prostate treatment with less PTV margin always needs longer beam delivery time. Therefore prostate movement correction during the treatment delivery is critical. Orthogonal KV-MV imaging pair is efficient and accurate to correct the prostate movement during treatment beam delivery. Due to limited fraction number and high dose per fraction, the MV imaging dose is

  13. SU-E-T-508: End to End Testing of a Prototype Eclipse Module for Planning Modulated Arc Therapy On the Siemens Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Sarkar, V [University of Utah Hospitals, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Spiessens, S [Varian Medical Systems France, Buc Cedex (France); Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Salter, B [University Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhao, H [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Szegedi, M [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The latest clinical implementation of the Siemens Artiste linac allows for delivery of modulated arcs (mARC) using full-field flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. The maximum doserate of 2000 MU/min is well suited for high dose treatments such as SBRT. We tested and report on the performance of a prototype Eclipse TPS module supporting mARC capability on the Artiste platform. Method: our spine SBRT patients originally treated with 12/13 field static-gantry IMRT (SGIMRT) were chosen for this study. These plans were designed to satisfy RTOG0631 guidelines with a prescription of 16Gy in a single fraction. The cases were re-planned as mARC plans in the prototype Eclipse module using the 7MV FFF beam and required to satisfy RTOG0631 requirements. All plans were transferred from Eclipse, delivered on a Siemens Artiste linac and dose-validated using the Delta4 system. Results: All treatment plans were straightforwardly developed, in timely fashion, without challenge or inefficiency using the prototype module. Due to the limited number of segments in a single arc, mARC plans required 2-3 full arcs to yield plan quality comparable to SGIMRT plans containing over 250 total segments. The average (3%/3mm) gamma pass-rate for all arcs was 98.5±1.1%, thus demonstrating both excellent dose prediction by the AAA dose algorithm and excellent delivery fidelity. Mean delivery times for the mARC plans(10.5±1.7min) were 50-70% lower than the SGIMRT plans(26±2min), with both delivered at 2000 MU/min. Conclusion: A prototype Eclipse module capable of planning for Burst Mode modulated arc delivery on the Artiste platform has been tested and found to perform efficiently and accurately for treatment plan development and delivered-dose prediction. Further investigation of more treatment sites is being carried out and data will be presented.

  14. Beam delivery system for Ho:YLF and applications in endodontics; Sistema de entrega de feixe para laser de Ho:YLF e aplicacoes em endodontia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Luciano

    2000-07-01

    The beam delivery systems, whether using fibers or articulated arms, are very important for the expansion of laser applications into life sciences. This work aims to couple an optical fiber to a home-made Er:Tm:Ho:LiYF{sub 4} laser. For this purpose the beam profile was studied using the beam quality factor M{sup 2} to achieve an homogeneous beam. To determine the M{sup 2} factor, the knife-edge technique was used, relating the laser energy eclipsed by the knife with its transversal position. The resonant cavity was made suitable in order to obtain a stable and homogeneous transversal beam profile, for the optical fiber coupling. It was used a 365 {mu}m diameter core low OH{sup -} content fused silica optical fiber, with a proximal SMA-905 connection and a flat distal end. M{sup 2} factors for the Ho:YLF were between 3 and 8, with a non astigmatic beam, although it was observed a divergence asymmetry in the transversal sections. The coupling efficiency was 96%, and in a repeated operation without any adjustment, the new coupling were 82% and 81%. Lasers have being recently used as an adjunct to conventional endodontic preparation to reduce intracanal microbial, preventing reinfection. The knowledge of thermal profile in endodontic procedures is important to determine laser irradiation conditions avoiding periodontal damages. In this sense, the second scope of this work was to use the Ho:YLF system to register the thermal profile in vitro and to compare the results with those obtained with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG commercial lasers. The temperature was recorded in real time through a thermocouple probe at the root apex , resulting in maximum increase of 7 deg C. (author)

  15. A comprehensive EPID-based 3D validation technique for TrueBeam-delivered VMAT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbacher, W.; Gagne, I. M.; Swift, C.-L.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a pre-treatment EPI dosimetry method on Varian TrueBeam linacs using continuous imaging, with reconstruction in a 3D cylindrical phantom geometry. Methods: Delivery of VMAT plans with continuous imaging is currently possible only in Research Mode on TrueBeam linacs, with images acquired in a proprietary format. An earlier technique was adapted to take advantage of technical improvements in EPID delivery, and was tested under various acquisition conditions. The dosimetry of VMAT plans was evaluated at isocentre and within patient volumes that had been transferred to the virtual phantom. Results: Approximately 60 portal image projections per arc were found to be adequate for 3D reconstruction in phantom volumes of 28cm diameter. Twelve prostate, CNS and Head & Neck deliveries were evaluated in Research mode relative to the corresponding Eclipse (v.10) treatment plans, and to measurements on an ArcCheck device in Treatment mode. Mean dose differences at isocentre were within 2% for the three-way comparison, and in PTV volumes were within 1% (s.d. 1%). However, some discrepancies were observed in ArcCheck results that may be related to the small dimensions of certain VMAT apertures. Conclusions: EPI dosimetry with 3D dose reconstruction is an accurate, comprehensive and efficient pre-treatment validation technique for VMAT delivery. Although currently limited to a research mode on TrueBeam, it has the potential to be implemented for clinical use.

  16. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrle, A; SCHNICK, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) have been performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In case of aluminium weldin...

  17. Effect of negative substrate bias on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Si-N films deposited by a hybrid filtered cathodic arc and ion beam sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yujuan, E-mail: cnzhangyujuan@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Yang Yingze; Zhai Yuhao; Zhang Pingyu [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid cathodic arc and ion beam sputtering method was employed to synthesize Ti-Si-N films. The influence of negative substrate bias on the structure and mechanical properties was investigated by using XRD, XPS, HRTEM, nanoindentor and so on. With the increasing of negative bias there is a decrease in the TiN crystallite size from 36 nm to 10 nm. Negative substrate bias promoted the conformation of nc-TiN/a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposite structure with complete phase separation and uniform crystallite size. Superhard TiSiN films with a maximum hardness of 46 GPa were successfully synthesized under 100 V negative bias. Severe oxidation occurred in films deposited under 200 V and 300 V negative substrate bias due to the decreasing of deposition rate, which led to the hardness of films reduced to the value of 26 GPa and 22 GPa respectively.

  18. SU-E-T-187: Feasibility Study of Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Divided Partial Arcs in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y; Ozawa, S; Tsegmed, U; Nakashima, T; Shintaro, T; Ochi, Y; Kawahara, D; Kimura, T; Nagata, Y [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using flattening filter free (FFF) mode with jaw tracking (JT) feature for single breath hold as long as 15 s per arc in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) against intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) FFF-JT. Methods: Ten hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases were planned with 10 MV FFF using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system which delivered by TrueBeam to administer 48 Gy/ 4 fractions. Eight non-coplanar beams were assigned to IMRT using step-and-shoot technique. For VMAT, two or three non-coplanar partial arcs (up to 180 degrees) were further divided into subarcs with gantry rotation less than 80 degrees to limit delivery time within 15 s. Dose distributions were verified using OCTAVIUS II system and pass rates were evaluated using gamma analysis with criteria of 3%/3 mm at threshold of 5% to the maximum dose. The actual irradiation time was measured. Results: The VMAT-FFF-JT of partial-arcs with sub-divided arcs was able to produce a highly conformal plan as well as IMRT-FFF-JT. Isodose lines and DVH showed slight improvement in dosimetry when JT was employed for both IMRT and VMAT. Consequently, VMAT-FFF-JT was superior in reducing the dose to liver minus gross tumor volume. VMAT-FFF-JT has shorter total treatment time compared with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) FFF because the gantry was rotated simultaneously with the beam delivery in VMAT. Moreover, due to the small and regular shape of HCC, VMAT-FFF-JT offered less multileaf collimator motion, thus the interplay effect is expected to be reduced. The patient specific QA of IMRT and VMAT acquired the pass rates higher than 90%. Conclusion: VMAT-FFF-JT could be a promising technique for liver SBRT as the sub-divided arcs method was able to accommodate a single breath hold irradiation time of less than 15 s without deterioration of the dose distribution compared with IMRT-FFF-JT.

  19. Rotational IMRT delivery using a digital linear accelerator in very high dose rate 'burst mode'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, Bill J; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Szegedi, Martin; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shukla, Himanshu, E-mail: bill.salter@hci.utah.edu [Oncology Care Systems Group, Siemens Medical Solutions (USA), 4040 Nelson Avenue, Concord, CA (United States)

    2011-04-07

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in arc-based IMRT, through the use of 'conventional' multileaf collimator (MLC) systems that can treat large tumor volumes in a single, or very few pass(es) of the gantry. Here we present a novel 'burst mode' modulated arc delivery approach, wherein 2000 monitor units per minute (MU min{sup -1}) high dose rate bursts of dose are facilitated by a flattening-filter-free treatment beam on a Siemens Artiste (Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Concord, CA, USA) digital linear accelerator in a non-clinical configuration. Burst mode delivery differs from continuous mode delivery, used by Elekta's VMAT (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK) and Varian's RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) implementations, in that dose is not delivered while MLC leaves are moving. Instead, dose is delivered in bursts over very short arc angles and only after an MLC segment shape has been completely formed and verified by the controller. The new system was confirmed to be capable of delivering a wide array of clinically relevant treatment plans, without machine fault or other delivery anomalies. Dosimetric accuracy of the modulated arc platform, as well as the Prowess (Prowess Inc., Concord, CA, USA) prototype treatment planning version utilized here, was quantified and confirmed, and delivery times were measured as significantly brief, even with large hypofractionated doses. The burst mode modulated arc approach evaluated here appears to represent a capable, accurate and efficient delivery approach.

  20. A dosimetric evaluation of flattening filter-free volumetric modulated arc therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guishan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore the dosimetric effects of flattening filter-free (FFF beams in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via a retrospective planning study. Materials and Methods: A linear accelerator (LINAC was prepared to operate in FFF mode and the beam data were collected and used to build a model in TPS. For 10 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC cases, VMAT plans of FFF beams and normal flattened (FF beams were designed. Differences of plan quality and delivery efficiency between FFF-VMAT plans and filter filtered VMAT (FF-VMAT plans were analyzed using two-tailed paired t-tests. Results: Removal of the flattening filter increased the dose rate. Averaged beam on time (BOT of FFF-VMAT plans was decreased by 24.2%. Differences of target dose coverage between plans with flattened and unflattened beams were statistically insignificant. For dose to normal organs, up to 4.9% decrease in V35 of parotid grand and 4.5% decrease in averaged normal tissue (NT dose was observed. Conclusions: The TPS used in our study was able to handle FFF beams. The FFF beam prone to improve the normal tissue sparing while achieving similar target dose distribution. Decreasing of BOT in NPC cases was valuable in terms of patient′s comfort.

  1. SU-C-BRB-05: Investigation of Conformal Arc Therapy Utilizing Newly Designed Cobalt 60 Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Physics, AlAzhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Chibani, O; Jin, L; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A new modernized design for cobalt 60 (Co-60) machines is being developed with a ring type gantry. In this study we investigate the beneficial outcome of the new design for conformal arc therapy for various clinical sites. The new modality was evaluated based on isodose distributions and dose volume histograms as compared to 6MV photon beams from conventional linear accelerators. Methods: Computed tomographic images of seven different SBRT patients were selected from our patient database. All of these cases were previously planned on the Eclipse treatment planning system. New plans for these patients were generated with a modified conformal arc technique using both 6MV and Co-60 beams. The conformal arc was created by the delivery of treatment fields conformal to the target cross-section at every 5 or 10 degrees. The field shape was modified or turned off when it initially passed through a critical structure. Monte Carlo codes, MCBEAM and MCPLAN, were used for the machine head simulation and phantom/patient dose calculation, respectively. In the new Co-60 machine design, the source-to-isocenter distance was 60cm and the treatment head included the Co-60 source, primary collimator, jaws and MLC. Results: For all cases investigated, conformal arc plans utilizing Co-60 beams achieved similar conformity (mean conformity index=1.19) comparing to 6MV photon beams. Isodose distributions were tailored similarly around the PTV; both Co-60 and 6MV plans met our clinical acceptance criteria for the target coverage, and the maximum and minimum target doses. The DVH for the Co-60 plans showed slightly lower doses to the critical structures although the differences were small in most cases. Conclusion: There were no significant dosimetric differences between 6MV and Co-60 plans. Our results confirmed that this new Co-60 design could be a cost-effective machine for advanced radiotherapy due to its low cost, low maintenance and high up time.

  2. Pilot Study of the Delivery of Microcollimated Pars Plana External Beam Radiation in Porcine Eyes: 270-Day Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi P. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the dose response and toxicity threshold of micro-collimated X-rays delivered to porcine maculae by a stereotactic radiosurgical system after 270 days. Methods. Twelve eyes of six Yucatan mini-swine were randomized to receive up to 90 Gy to the retina, using an office-based trans-pars plana delivery system. To determine the safety profile of this radiation delivery, ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography (FA, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT were obtained at multiple time points up to 270 days post treatment. Results. No abnormalities were noted on external examination. Cataracts were noted in 4 of 12 eyes. Dose and time-dependent changes were noted on fundus examination, FA, ICG and SD-OCT. No significant abnormalities were seen in the control, 16 Gy or 24 Gy groups using any modality. Histopathology revealed a dose response effect with no discernable lesions in the 16 Gy group. Conclusion. The X-ray delivery system precisely targets the porcine retina in vivo with little effect on surrounding structures. No ophthalmic or intracranial adverse effects were noted at clinically relevant doses at 270 days following radiation delivery.

  3. Radiosurgery with high energy photon beams: a comparison among techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pike, G.B.; Olivier, A.; Pla, M.; Souhami, L.

    1989-03-01

    The presently known radiosurgical techniques with high energy photon beams are based either on the commercially available Gamma unit utilizing 201 stationary cobalt beams or on isocentric linear accelerators. The techniques using linear accelerators are divided into the single plane rotation, the multiple non-coplanar arcs, and the dynamic rotation. A brief description of these techniques is given, and their physical characteristics, such as precision of dose delivery, dose fall-off outside the target volume, and isodose distributions are discussed. It is shown that the multiple non-coplanar arcs technique and the dynamic rotation give dose distributions similar to those of the Gamma unit, which makes these two linear accelerator based techniques attractive alternatives to radiosurgery with the Gamma unit.22 references.

  4. 预应力混凝土梁反拱度试验和分析%PRESTRESSED CONCRETE ENGINEERING BEAM TEST AND ANALYSIS OF THE ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锋丹; 吴桐; 宋金良; 韩永强

    2012-01-01

    Prestressed concrete beam due to strength of prestressed eccentric existence, will produce a different from common of the reinforced concrete beam up deflection , that is elastic anti-camber. In addition, after prestressing the strand, concrete beam will continue to produce an upward deflection under the creep, that is creep of the anti-camber. This article to the Fu Xing Pao bridge registered for the engineering background, to research precast prestressed concrete box girder elastic anti-camber and creep anti-camber. And use MIDAS/Civil to establish finite element model, compare the statistics of elastic anti-camber data with simulated data, and the calculated value of this creep coefficient of actual engineering modified computing type.%预应力混凝土梁由于偏心预加力的存在,梁体将产生向上的挠度,即弹性反拱度.另外,张拉预应力束后在徐变作用下梁会继续产生上挠,即徐变反拱度[1].本文以复兴泡大桥为工程背景,对预制预应力混凝土箱梁的弹性反拱度和徐变反拱度进行研究.并建立梁体的MIDAS/Civil模型,将实测反拱值与模型模拟值进行对比分析,并对徐变系数的计算式进行修正.

  5. TH-C-12A-04: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Modulated Arc Technique for Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiamas, P; Czerminska, M; Makrigiorgos, G; Karen, M; Zygmanski, P [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/ Dana-Farber Institute/ Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A simplified Total Body Irradiation (TBI) was developed to work with minimal requirements in a compact linac room without custom motorized TBI couch. Results were compared to our existing fixed-gantry double 4 MV linac TBI system with prone patient and simultaneous AP/PA irradiation. Methods: Modulated arc irradiates patient positioned in prone/supine positions along the craniocaudal axis. A simplified inverse planning method developed to optimize dose rate as a function of gantry angle for various patient sizes without the need of graphical 3D treatment planning system. This method can be easily adapted and used with minimal resources. Fixed maximum field size (40×40 cm2) is used to decrease radiation delivery time. Dose rate as a function of gantry angle is optimized to result in uniform dose inside rectangular phantoms of various sizes and a custom VMAT DICOM plans were generated using a DICOM editor tool. Monte Carlo simulations, film and ionization chamber dosimetry for various setups were used to derive and test an extended SSD beam model based on PDD/OAR profiles for Varian 6EX/ TX. Measurements were obtained using solid water phantoms. Dose rate modulation function was determined for various size patients (100cm − 200cm). Depending on the size of the patient arc range varied from 100° to 120°. Results: A PDD/OAR based beam model for modulated arc TBI therapy was developed. Lateral dose profiles produced were similar to profiles of our existing TBI facility. Calculated delivery time and full arc depended on the size of the patient (∼8min/ 100° − 10min/ 120°, 100 cGy). Dose heterogeneity varied by about ±5% − ±10% depending on the patient size and distance to the surface (buildup region). Conclusion: TBI using simplified modulated arc along craniocaudal axis of different size patients positioned on the floor can be achieved without graphical / inverse 3D planning.

  6. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  7. Simple methods to reduce patient dose in a Varian cone beam CT system for delivery verification in pelvic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxby, P; Kron, T; Foroudi, F; Haworth, A; Fox, C; Mullen, A; Cramb, J

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a three-dimensional imaging modality that has recently become available on linear accelerators for radiotherapy patient position verification. It was the aim of the present study to implement simple strategies for reduction of the dose delivered in a commercial CBCT system. The dose delivered in a CBCT procedure (Varian, half-fan acquisition, 650 projections, 125 kVp) was assessed using a cylindrical Perspex phantom (diameter, 32 cm) with a calibrated Farmer type ionisation chamber. A copper filter (thickness, 0.15 mm) was introduced increasing the half value layer of the beam from 5.5 mm Al to 8 mm Al. Image quality and noise were assessed using an image quality phantom (CatPhan) while the exposure settings per projection were varied from 25 ms/80 mA to 2 ms/2 mA per projection. Using the copper filter reduced the dose to the phantom from approximately 45 mGy to 30 mGy at standard settings (centre/periphery weighting 1/3 to 2/3). Multiple CBCT images were acquired for six patients with pelvic malignancies to compare CBCTs with and without a copper filter. Although the reconstructed image is somewhat noisier with the filter, it features similar contrast in the centre of the patient and was often preferred by the radiation oncologist because of greater image uniformity. The X-ray shutters were adjusted to the minimum size required to obtain the desired image volume for a given patient diameter. The simple methods described here reduce the effective dose to patients undergoing daily CBCT and are easy to implement, and initial evidence suggests that they do not affect the ability to identify soft tissue for the purpose of treatment verification.

  8. IMRT planning and delivery incorporating daily dose from mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Fuhrer, Russell; Leicher, Brian; Parda, David S

    2007-10-01

    The technology of online mega-voltage cone-beam (CB) computed tomography (MV-CBCT) imaging is currently used in many institutions to generate a 3D anatomical dataset of a patient in treatment position. It utilizes an accelerator therapy beam, delivered with 200 degrees gantry rotation, and captured by an electronic portal imager to account for organ motion and setup variations. Although the patient dose exposure from a single volumetric MV-CBCT imaging procedure is comparable to that from standard double-exposure orthogonal portal images, daily image localization procedures can result in a significant dose increase to healthy tissue. A technique to incorporate the daily dose, from a MV-CBCT imaging procedure, in the IMRT treatment planning optimization process was developed. A composite IMRT plan incorporating the total dose from the CB was optimized with the objective of ensuring uniform target coverage while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. One head and neck cancer patient and four prostate cancer patients were planned and treated using this technique. Dosimetric results from the prostate IMRT plans optimized with or without CB showed similar target coverage and comparable sparing of bladder and rectum volumes. Average mean doses were higher by 1.6 +/- 1.0 Gy for the bladder and comparable for the rectum (-0.3 +/- 1.4 Gy). In addition, an average mean dose increase of 1.9 +/- 0.8 Gy in the femoral heads and 1.7 +/- 0.6 Gy in irradiated tissue was observed. However, the V65 and V70 values for bladder and rectum were lower by 2.3 +/- 1.5% and 2.4 +/- 2.1% indicating better volume sparing at high doses with the optimized plans incorporating CB. For the head and neck case, identical target coverage was achieved, while a comparable sparing of the brain stem, optic chiasm, and optic nerves was observed. The technique of optimized planning incorporating doses from daily online MV-CBCT procedures provides an alternative method for imaging IMRT patients. It allows

  9. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata-cozzi@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  10. TU-CD-304-03: Dosimetric Verification and Preliminary Comparison of Dynamic Wave Arc for SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghelea, M [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Poels, K; Gevaert, T; Tournel, K; Dhont, J; De Ridder, M; Verellen, D [UZ BRUSSEL, Brussels (Belgium); Hung, C [BRAINLAB AG, Munich (Germany); Eriksson, K [RAYSEARCH LABORATORIES AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Simon, V [Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits and verify the delivery accuracy of Dynamic Wave Arc, a novel treatment delivery approach for the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) combines simultaneous movement of gantry/ring with inverse planning optimization, resulting in an uninterrupted non-coplanar arc delivery technique. Thirteen SBRT complex cases previously treated with 8–10 conformal static beams (CRT) were evaluated in this study. Eight primary centrally-located NSCLC (prescription dose 4×12Gy or 8×7.5Gy) and five oligometastatic cases (2×2 lesions, 10×5Gy) were selected. DWA and coplanar VMAT plans, partially with dual arcs, were generated for each patient using identical objective functions for target volumes and OARs on the same TPS (RayStation, RaySearch Laboratories). Dosimetric differences and delivery time among these three planning schemes were evaluated. The DWA delivery accuracy was assessed using the Delta4 diode array phantom (ScandiDos AB). The gamma analysis was performed with the 3%/3mm dose and distance-to-agreement criteria. Results: The target conformity for CRT, VMAT and DWA were 0.95±0.07, 0.96±0.04 and 0.97±0.04, while the low dose spillage gradient were 5.52±1.36, 5.44±1.11, and 5.09±0.98 respectively. Overall, the bronchus, esophagus and spinal cord maximum doses were similar between VMAT and DWA, but highly reduced compared with CRT. For the lung cases, the mean dose and V20Gy were lower for the arc techniques compares with CRT, while for the liver cases, the mean dose and the V30Gy presented slightly higher values. The average delivery time of VMAT and DWA were 2.46±1.10 min and 4.25±1.67 min, VMAT presenting shorter treatment time in all cases. The DWA dosimetric verification presented an average gamma index passing rate of 95.73±1.54% (range 94.2%–99.8%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicated that the DWA is deliverable with clinically acceptable accuracy and has the potential to

  11. [New methods in the treatment of localized prostate cancer: use of dynamic arc therapy and kV cone-beam CT positioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Lőcsei, Zoltán; László, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Csapó, László; Sebestyén, Klára; Halász, Judit; Musch, Zoltán; Beöthe, Tamás; Farkas, László; Mangel, László

    2014-08-10

    Bevezetés: A prosztatarák az idősebb életkor és a fejlett világ daganatos megbetegedése. Lokalizált prosztatarák esetében a műtéti ellátás mellett komoly szerepe van a definitív sugárkezelésnek. Célkitűzés: A szerzők intézetében telepített Novalis TX gyorsító segítségével úgynevezett intenzitásmodulált sugárterápia, annak dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett formája, illetve verifikáció során háromdimenziós lágy szöveti képellenőrzést biztosító, integrált kilovoltos cone-beam komputertomográfiával végzett képvezérelt sugárterápia került bevezetésre, amely módszerekkel szerzett első tapasztalataikat ismertetik a szerzők. Módszer: 2011 decembere és 2013 februárja között, dóziseszkalációt követően, 102 dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett kezelést végeztek, majd 10-10 szelektált, alacsony és magas kockázatú betegnél (átlagéletkor 72,5 év) elkészítették a háromdimenziós konformális besugárzási terveket is. Azonos célterület-lefedettség mellett összevetették a rizikószervek dózisterhelését. Eredmények: A dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett kezelések mellett a rizikószervek szignifikánsan alacsonyabb dózisterhelését érték el, amelyet a kedvező korai mellékhatásprofil is alátámaszt. Következtetések: Az intenzitásmodulált sugárterápia dinamikus ívbesugárzással elvégzett formája biztonsággal alkalmazott standard kezelési módozattá vált a szerzők intézetében. Késői mellékhatások és lokális kontroll további vizsgálata szükséges. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(32), 1265–1272.

  12. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  13. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  14. Comparative dosimetry of volumetric modulated arc therapy and limited-angle static intensity-modulated radiation therapy for early-stage larynx cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegel, Adam C.; Antone, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore–LIJ Health System, New Hyde, Park, NY (United States); Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore–LIJ Health System, New Hyde, Park, NY (United States); Hofstra–NSLIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY (United States)

    2013-04-01

    To compare relative carotid and normal tissue sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage larynx cancer. Seven treatment plans were retrospectively created on 2 commercial treatment planning systems for 11 consecutive patients with T1-2N0 larynx cancer. Conventional plans consisted of opposed-wedged fields. IMRT planning used an anterior 3-field beam arrangement. Two VMAT plans were created, a full 360° arc and an anterior 180° arc. Given planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% total volume at 95% of 6300 cGy and maximum spinal cord dose below 2500 cGy, mean carotid artery dose was pushed as low as possible for each plan. Deliverability was assessed by comparing measured and planned planar dose with the gamma (γ) index. Full-arc planning provided the most effective carotid sparing but yielded the highest mean normal tissue dose (where normal tissue was defined as all soft tissue minus PTV). Static IMRT produced next-best carotid sparing with lower normal tissue dose. The anterior half-arc produced the highest carotid artery dose, in some cases comparable with conventional opposed fields. On the whole, carotid sparing was inversely related to normal tissue dose sparing. Mean γ indexes were much less than 1, consistent with accurate delivery of planned treatment. Full-arc VMAT yields greater carotid sparing than half-arc VMAT. Limited-angle IMRT remains a reasonable alternative to full-arc VMAT, given its ability to mediate the competing demands of carotid and normal tissue dose constraints. The respective clinical significance of carotid and normal tissue sparing will require prospective evaluation.

  15. SU-E-T-442: Sensitivity of Quality Assurance Tools to Delivery Errors On a Magnetic Resonance-Imaging Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, V; Li, H; Yang, D; Kashani, R; Wooten, H; Mutic, S; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Dempsey, J [ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To test the sensitivity of the quality assurance (QA) tools actively used on a clinical MR-IGRT system for potential delivery errors. Methods: Patient-specific QA procedures have been implemented for a commercially available Cobalt-60 MR-IGRT system. The QA tools utilized were a MR-compatible cylindrical diode-array detector (ArcCHECK) with a custom insert which positions an ionization chamber (Exradin A18) in the middle of the device, as well as an in-house treatment delivery verification program. These tools were tested to investigate their sensitivity to delivery errors. For the ArcCHECK and ion chamber, a baseline was established with a static field irradiation to a known dose. Variations of the baseline were investigated which included rotated gantry, altered field size, directional shifts, and different delivery time. In addition, similar variations were tested with the automated delivery verification program that compared the treatment parameters in the machine delivery logs to the ones in the plan. To test the software, a 3-field conformal plan was generated as the baseline. Results: ArcCHECK noted at least a 13% decrease in passing rate from baseline in the following scenarios: gantry rotation of 1 degree from plan, 5mm change in field size, 2mm lateral shift, and delivery time decrease. Ion chamber measurements remained consistent for these variations except for the 5 second decrease in delivery time scenario which resulted in an 8% difference from baseline. The delivery verification software was able to detect and report the simulated errors such as when the gantry was rotated by 0.6 degrees, the beam weighting was changed by a percent, a single multileaf collimator was moved by 1cm, and the dose was changed from 2 to 1.8Gy. Conclusion: The results show that the current tools used for patient specific QA are capable of detecting small errors in RT delivery with presence of magnetic field.

  16. SU-E-T-64: A Programmable Moving Insert for the ArcCHECK Phantom for Dose Verification of Respiratory-Gated VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaede, S; Jordan, K [London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Western University, London, ON (United Kingdom); Young, H [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Mulligan, M [London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a customized programmable moving insert for the ArcCHECK™ phantom that can, in a single delivery, check both entrance dosimetry, while simultaneously verifying the delivery of respiratory-gated VMAT. Methods: The cylindrical motion phantom uses a computer-controlled stepping motor to move an insert inside a stationery sleeve. Insert motion is programmable and can include rotational motion in addition to linear motion along the axis of the cylinder. The sleeve fits securely in the bore of the ArcCHECK™. Interchangeable inserts, including an A1SL chamber, optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeters, radiochromic film, or 3D gels, allow this combination to be used for commissioning, routine quality assurance, and patient-specific dosimetric verification of respiratory-gated VMAT. Before clinical implementation, the effect of a moving insert on the ArcCHECK™ measurements was considered. First, the measured dose to the ArcCHECK™ containing multiple inserts in the static position was compared to the calculated dose during multiple VMAT treatment deliveries. Then, dose was measured under both sinusoidal and real-patient motion conditions to determine any effect of the moving inserts on the ArcCHECK™ measurements. Finally, dose was measured during gated VMAT delivery to the same inserts under the same motion conditions to examine any effect of various beam “on-and-off” and dose rate ramp “up-and-down”. Multiple comparisons between measured and calculated dose to different inserts were also considered. Results: The pass rate for the static delivery exceeded 98% for all measurements (3%/3mm), suggesting a valid setup for entrance dosimetry. The pass rate was not altered for any measurement delivered under motion conditions. A similar Result was observed under gated VMAT conditions, including agreement of measured and calculated dose to the various inserts. Conclusion: Incorporating a programmable moving insert within the Arc

  17. Modeling treatment couches in the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Especially important for arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggar, William Neil; Nguyen, Alex; Stanford, Jason; Morris, Bart; Yang, Claus C

    2016-01-01

    This study is to demonstrate the importance and a method of properly modeling the treatment couch for dose calculation in patient treatment using arc therapy. The 2 treatment couch tops-Aktina AK550 and Elekta iBEAM evo-of Elekta LINACs were scanned using Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT Simulator. Various parts of the couch tops were contoured, and their densities were measured and recorded on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) using the established computed tomography density table. These contours were saved as organ models to be placed beneath the patient during planning. Relative attenuation measurements were performed following procedures outlined by TG-176 as well as absolute dose comparison of static fields of 10 × 10 cm(2) that were delivered through the couch tops with that calculated in the TPS with the couch models. A total of 10 random arc therapy treatment plans (5 volumetric-modulated arc therapy [VMAT] and 5 stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT]), using 24 beams, were selected for this study. All selected plans were calculated with and without couch modeling. Each beam was evaluated using the Delta(4) dosimetry system (Delta(4)). The Student t-test was used to determine statistical significance. Independent reviews were exploited as per the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core head and neck credentialing phantom. The selected plans were calculated on the actual patient anatomies with and without couch modeling to determine potential clinical effects. Large relative beam attenuations were noted dependent on which part of the couch top beams were passing through. Substantial improvements were also noted for static fields both calculated with the TPS and delivered physically when the couch models were included in the calculation. A statistically significant increase in agreement was noted for dose difference, distance to agreement, and γ-analysis with the Delta(4) on VMAT and SBRT plans. A credentialing review showed improvement in

  18. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  19. SU-E-T-579: On the Relative Sensitivity of Monte Carlo and Pencil Beam Dose Calculation Algorithms to CT Metal Artifacts in Volumetric-Modulated Arc Spine Radiosurgery (RS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, M; Lee, V; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S; Chan, M [Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong (S.A.R) (Hong Kong); Blanck, O [University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigating the relative sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) dose calculation algorithms to low-Z (titanium) metallic artifacts is important for accurate and consistent dose reporting in post¬operative spinal RS. Methods: Sensitivity analysis of MC and PB dose calculation algorithms on the Monaco v.3.3 treatment planning system (Elekta CMS, Maryland Heights, MO, USA) was performed using CT images reconstructed without (plain) and with Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR; Philips Healthcare system, Cleveland, OH, USA). 6MV and 10MV volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) RS plans were obtained for MC and PB on the plain and OMAR images (MC-plain/OMAR and PB-plain/OMAR). Results: Maximum differences in dose to 0.2cc (D0.2cc) of spinal cord and cord +2mm for 6MV and 10MV VMAT plans were 0.1Gy between MC-OMAR and MC-plain, and between PB-OMAR and PB-plain. Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage changed by 0.1±0.7% and 0.2±0.3% for 6MV and 10MV from MC-OMAR to MC-plain, and by 0.1±0.1% for both 6MV and 10 MV from PB-OMAR to PB-plain, respectively. In no case for both MC and PB the D0.2cc to spinal cord was found to exceed the planned tolerance changing from OMAR to plain CT in dose calculations. Conclusion: Dosimetric impacts of metallic artifacts caused by low-Z metallic spinal hardware (mainly titanium alloy) are not clinically important in VMAT-based spine RS, without significant dependence on dose calculation methods (MC and PB) and photon energy ≥ 6MV. There is no need to use one algorithm instead of the other to reduce uncertainty for dose reporting. The dose calculation method that should be used in spine RS shall be consistent with the usual clinical practice.

  20. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  1. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction. Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation. This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annual energy production. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation when arc scans are used for wind resource assessment.

  2. SU-E-T-262: Development of An In-House Forward Planning System for Conformal Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Physics, AlAzhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Chibani, O; Jin, L; Li, J; Chen, L; Lin, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, M [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Conformal radiotherapy with forward planning has many practical advantages (e.g., more uniform target dose) and has been used routinely for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and other conventional treatment. This study investigates a forward-planning approach for conformal arc therapy and a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) for a newly designed cobalt 60 machine with a ring type gantry and a multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: Conformal arcs were modeled with continuous delivery of treatment fields conformal to the target cross-section. Treatment plans were further optimized by weighting or offsetting beams based on the target-critical structure relationship. CT and structure data of seven previous SBRT patients treated at our center were used for plan evaluation. An in-house forward planning tool was developed to aid the forward planning process. A graphical user interface (GUI) was designed with interactive and automatic adjustment between beam gantry angle and the beam weight. Dose distributions were calculated using our in-house Monte Carlo based TPS. Dose contributions from individual beam angles were summed together with different weight factors, which were continuously optimized until the pre-set dose conformity goal was met. Results: We were able to achieve target coverage and critical structure sparing to meet the required clinical criteria in all studied cases. It should be mentioned that those cases were selected having critical structures not proximal to the target. However, this was usually the case in the majority of SBRT cases especially those involving lung targets. The developed GUI tool was very useful in the forward treatment planning process. Conclusion: Conformal arcs can be used successfully on the new Cobalt 60 modality for the treatment of a sizeable fraction of cancer patients, which can be efficiently planned with our simple forward planning approach.

  3. WSTF electrical arc projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  4. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of Forward Tangent Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (FT-IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for early stage whole breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri Sedeh, Nader

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a well-known type of external beam radiation therapy. The advancement in technology has had an inevitable influence in radiation oncology as well that has led to a newer and faster dose delivery technique called Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Since the presence of the VMAT modality in clinics in the late 2000, there have been many studies in order to compare the results of the VMAT modality with the current popular modality IMRT for various tumor sites in the body such as brain, prostate, head and neck, cervix and anal carcinoma. This is the first study to compare VMAT with IMRT for breast cancer. The results show that the RapidArc technique in Eclipse version 11 does not improve all aspects of the treatment plans for the breast cases automatically and easily, but it needs to be manipulated by extra techniques to create acceptable plans thus further research is needed.

  5. The time-dependent prize-collecting arc routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Dan; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2013-01-01

    A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change with the t......A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change...

  6. Circular-Arc Cartograms

    CERN Document Server

    Kämper, Jan-Hinrich; Nöllenburg, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a new circular-arc cartogram model in which countries are drawn with circular arcs instead of straight-line segments. Given a geographic map and values associated with each country in the map, the cartogram is a new map in which the areas of the countries represent the corresponding values. In the circular-arc cartogram model straight-line segments can be replaced with circular arcs in order to achieve the desired areas, while the corners of the polygons defining each country remain fixed. The countries in circular-arc cartograms have the aesthetically pleasing appearance of clouds or snowflakes, depending on whether their edges are bent outwards or inwards. This makes is easy to determine whether a country has grown or shrunk, just by its overall shape. We show that determining whether a given map and area-values can be realized with a circular-arc cartogram is an NP-hard problem. Next we describe a heuristic method for constructing circular-arc cartograms, which uses a max-flow computation on the...

  7. SU-E-T-140: Dynamic Wave Arc Trajectory Verification Using KV X-Ray Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghelea, M; Poels, K; Depuydt, T; Tournel, K; Verellen, D; De Ridder, M [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Jette, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose: This study investigates the geometric accuracy of simultaneous Gantry/Ring rotation during Dynamic Wave Arc (DWA) delivery. Methods: The Vero SBRT system consists of a 6MV LINAC mounted on an O-ring gantry that can rotate around the vertical axis (±60°), similar to couch rotation on C-arm gantries. To provide CBCT and fluoroscopy imaging functionalities, two orthogonal kV imaging units are attached to the O-ring at −45°/+45° from the beam axis.Dynamic Wave Arc maximizes Vero's motion capabilities by employing synchronized gantry and ring motion on a complex non-coplanar trajectory in combination with aperture based optimized MLC segments.Four wave arc trajectories (T1-4) were delivered using a cubic phantom with a configuration of five lead beads. O-ring gantry position information was retrieved through continuous dual-source kV X-ray image acquisition during DWA. An in-house algorithm read in the image set, extracted the projected marker positions and determined the angulation through reconstruction of the beam source position. The geometric error was quantified as the distance between the independently detected positions from kV-images and reference trajectory derived from the treatment plan in the Ring-Gantry space. Results: The average displacement between the 3D gantry/ring positions reconstructed from the fluoroscopy images and the reference trajectory was 0.346 mm (SD 0,171) for T1. A mean offset of 0.348 mm (SD 0,182) and 0.357 mm (SD 0.194) was observed for trajectory T2(2segmens) and T3(4segments), respectively. The saw shape T4 presented a mean geometric error of 0.363 (SD 0.156). The overall systematic error of 0.350 was caused by the difference between planned reference trajectory created by linear interpolation between CP, and the machine delivery following a spline curve. Conclusion: An independent geometric QA approach has been developed for DWA delivery verification, successfully applied on diverse trajectories and

  8. Phenomenology of surface arcs on spacecraft dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmain, K. G.; Gossland, M.; Reeves, R. D.; Kuller, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    For electron beam incidence on large specimens of Kapton thermal blanket material, surface arc discharges are shown to cause damage consisting of punchthrough holes which act as focal points for other types of damage, including subsurface tunnels, blowout holes and surface breakup. Under electron bombardment, dielectric sheet specimens separated by a gap are shown to discharge simultaneously. Teflon specimens which have been brushed or rubbed are shown to exhibit directional guidance of discharge arcs, and this phenomenon has been used to generate straight arcs whose velocities have been measured optically.

  9. Filtered cathodic arc source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  10. Pulsed plasma arc cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙; 白钢; 李振民; 张赋升; 杨思乾

    2004-01-01

    A prototype of Pulsed Plasma Arc Cladding system was developed, in which single power source supplies both transferred plasma arc (TPA) and non-transferred plasma arc (N-TPA). Both plasmas work in turn in a high frequency controlled by an IGBT connecting nozzle and workpiece. The working frequency of IGBT ranges from 50 ~ 7000Hz, in which the plasmas can work in turn smoothly. Higher than 500 Hz of working frequency is suggested for promotion of cladding quality and protection of IGBT. Drag phenomenon of TPA intensifies as the frequency goes up, which tends to increase the current proportion of TPA and suppress N-TPA. The occupation ratio of IGBT can be regulated from 5% ~ 95%, which balances the power supplies of both plasmas. An occupation ratio higher than 50% gives adequate proportion of arc current for N-TPA to preheat powder.

  11. Early clinical experience of radiotherapy of prostate cancer with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valli Mariacarla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial clinical experience in radiation treatment of carcinoma of prostate with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc (RA technology. Methods Forty-five patients with a median age of 72 ± 3, affected by prostate carcinoma (T1c: 22 patients, T2a-b: 17 patients, T3a-b: 6 patients. N0: 43 patients, N1-Nx: 2 patients, all M0, with initial PSA of 10.0 ± 3.0 ng/mL, were treated with RapidArc in a feasibility study. All patients were treated with single arc using 6MV photons. Dose prescription ranged between 76 (7 patients and 78 Gy (38 patients in 2Gy/fraction. Plan quality was assessed by means of Dose Volume Histogram (DVH analysis. Technical parameters of arcs and pre-treatment quality assurance results (Gamma Agreement Index, GAI are reported to describe delivery features. Early toxicity was scored (according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Effects scale, CTCAE, scale at the end of treatment together with biochemical outcome (PSA. Results From DVH data, target coverage was fulfilling planning objectives: V95% was in average higher than 98% and V107%~0.0% (D2%~104.0% in average. Homogeneity D5%-D95% ranged between 6.2 ± 1.0% to 6.7 ± 1.3%. For rectum, all planning objectives were largely met (e.g. V70Gy = 10.7 ± 5.5% against an objective of 2% = 79.4 ± 1.2Gy against an objective of 80.0Gy. Maximum dose to femurs was D2% = 36.7 ± 5.4Gy against an objective of 47Gy. Monitor Units resulted: MU/Gy = 239 ± 37. Average beam on time was 1.24 ± 0.0 minutes. Pre-treatment GAI resulted in 98.1 ± 1.1%. Clinical data were recorded as PSA at 6 weeks after RT, with median values of 0.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL. Concerning acute toxicity, no patient showed grade 2-3 rectal toxicity; 5/42 (12% patients experienced grade 2 dysuria; 18/41 (44% patients preserved complete or partial erectile function. Conclusion RapidArc proved to be a safe, qualitative and advantageous treatment modality for prostate cancer.

  12. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV{sub P}), right pelvic (PTV{sub RtLN}) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV{sub LtLN}), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV{sub RtLN}, and PTV{sub LtLN} received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV{sub B} of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D{sub MEAN}) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D{sub MEAN} of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D{sub MEAN} in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  13. 软调制双散射质子治疗束流配送系统%A Soft-Modulating and Double-Scattering Beam Delivery System for Proton Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郁庆长; 徐韬光

    2001-01-01

    The proton therapy is a new developing method in the radiation oncology. The superior dose localization capabilities of proton beams suggest the possibility of depositing a higher dose into the cancer while reducing the unwanted radiation damage in surrounding normal tissues. The merit can be realized with the aid of the beam delivery system, whose functions are energy adjustment, energy modulation, beam spreading and collimation. In this paper a new soft-modulating and double-scattering beam delivery system is proposed. It uses a program-controlled modulator to change proton energy and thereby the proton range in the body so that the Bragg peak is spread out. Moreover, a larger treatment field can be obtained with two scatterers. The delivery system has high reliability and flexibility, and is especially good for conformal therapy.%质子治疗是一种新兴的放射治疗方法,它的主要优点是剂量分布特性优良,可以使高辐射剂量集中于肿瘤部位,减少对周围正常组织的损伤. 这一优点的实现主要依靠束流配送系统,它包含质子能量调节与调制、束流扩展和准直等功能. 现提出一种新的软调制双散射质子治疗束流配送系统. 其特点是利用程序控制质子能量变化以改变质子在体内的射程从而展宽Bragg峰,同时利用两次散射获得较大面积的均匀照射野. 它的优点是运行可靠、调节灵活,并特别有利于实现适形治疗.

  14. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shen, Jiajian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  15. Commissioning and first clinical application of mARC treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G.; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert P.; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg, Saarland (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    The modulated arc (mARC) technique has recently been introduced for Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerators. We present the first experiences with the commissioning of the system and first patient treatments. Treatment planning and delivery are presented for the Prowess Panther treatment planning system or, alternatively, an in-house code. Dosimetric verification is performed both by point dose measurements and in 3D dose distribution. Depending on the target volume, one or two arcs can be used to create highly conformal plans. Dosimetric verification of the converted mARC plans with step-and-shoot plans shows deviations below 1 % in absolute point dose; in the 3D dose distribution, over 95 % of the points pass the 3D gamma criteria (3 % deviation in local dose and 3 mm distance to agreement for doses > 20 % of the maximum). Patient specific verification of the mARC dose distribution with the calculations has a similar pass rate. Treatment times range between 2 and 5 min for a single arc. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical application of the mARC technique. The mARC offers the possibility to save significant amounts of time, with single-arc treatments of only a few minutes achieving comparable dose distribution to IMRT plans taking up to twice as long. (orig.) [German] Die mARC (modulated arc) Technik wurde vor kurzen fuer Siemens ARTISTE Linearbeschleuniger eingefuehrt. Wir zeigen die ersten Erfahrungen mit der Kommissionierung des Systems sowie die ersten Patientenbestrahlungen. Bestrahlungsplanung und Behandlung werden fuer das Prowess Panther Bestrahlungsplanungssystem oder alternativ in einer in-house-Loesung praesentiert. Die dosimetrische Verifikation wurde sowohl mit Punktmessungen als auch fuer die 3D-Dosisverteilung durchgefuehrt. Je nach Zielvolumen koennen mit einem oder zwei Boegen hochkonformale Plaene erzeugt werden. Die dosimetrische Verifikation konvertierter mARC-Plaene gegen step-and-shoot-Plaene weicht in absoluter Dosis um

  16. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrehaug, Sten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chan, Gordon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weinberg, Vivian [Biostatistics Core, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheng, Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  17. SU-E-T-106: An Institutional Review of Using Commercially Available Software to Evaluate Treatment Plan Quality for Various Treatment Sites and Beam Deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Walker, S; Lawson, S [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, New Braunfels, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Use Sun Nuclear Quality Reports™ with PlanIQ™ to evaluate different treatment delivery techniques for various treatment sites. Methods: Fifteen random patients with different treatment sites were evaluated. These include the Head/Neck, prostate, pelvis, lung, esophagus, axilla, bladder and abdomen. Initially, these sites were planned on the Pinnacle {sup 3} V9.6 treatment planning system and utilized nine 6MV step-n-shoot IMRT fields. The RT plan, dose and structure sets were sent to Quality Reports™ where a DVH was recreated and the plans were compared to a unique Plan Algorithm for each treatment site. Each algorithm has its own plan quality metrics and objectives, which include the PTV coverage, PTV maximum dose, the prescription dose outside the target, doses to the critical structures, and the global maximum dose and its location. Each plan was scored base on meeting each objective. Plans may have been reoptimized and reevaluated with Quality Reports™ based on the initial score. PlanIQ™ was used to evaluate if any objective not met was achievable or difficult to obtain. A second plan using VMAT delivery was created for each patient and scored with Quality Reports™. Results: There were a wide range of scores for the different treatment sites with some scoring better for IMRT plans and some better for the VMAT deliveries. The variation in the scores could be attributed to the treatment site, location, and shape of the target. Most deliveries were chosen for the VMAT due to the short treatment times and quick patient throughput with acceptable plan scores. Conclusion: The tools are provided for both physician and dosimetrist to objectively evaluate the use of VMAT delivery versus the step-n-shoot IMRT delivery for various sites. PlanIQ validates if objectives can be met. For the physicist, a concise pass/fail report is created for plan evaluation.

  18. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  19. First NIF ARC target shot results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; di Nicola, P.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.; Tommasini, R.; NIF ARC Team

    2015-11-01

    The commissioning of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently in progress. ARC laser is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 50 ps, and energies up to 1.7 kJ per beamlet. ARC will add critical capability for the NIF facility for creating precision x-ray backlighters needed for many current NIF ICF and HED experiments. ARC can also produce MeV electrons and protons for new science experiment on NIF. In the initial set of experiments, 4 of the 8 beamlets are being commissioned up to 1 kJ per beam at 30 ps pulse length using foil and wire targets. X-ray energy distribution, spot size and pulse duration are measured using various diagnostics. This talk will describe the shot setup and results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  1. Effect of high power CO2 and Yb:YAG laser radiation on the characteristics of TIG arc in atmospherical pressure argon and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shikai; Xiao, Rongshi

    2015-04-01

    The effects of laser radiation on the characteristics of the DC tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc were investigated by applying a high power slab CO2 laser and a Yb:YAG disc laser. Experiment results reveal that the arc voltage-current curve shifts downwards, the arc column expands, and the arc temperature rises while the high power CO2 laser beam vertically interacts with the TIG arc in argon. With the increase of the laser power, the voltage-current curve of the arc shifts downwards more significantly, and the closer the laser beam impingement on the arc to the cathode, the more the decrease in arc voltage. Moreover, the arc column expansion and the arc temperature rise occur mainly in the region between the laser beam incident position and the anode. However, the arc characteristics hardly change in the cases of the CO2 laser-helium arc and YAG laser-arc interactions. The reason is that the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption coefficients are greatly different due to the different electron densities of the argon and helium arcs and the different wave lengths of CO2 and YAG lasers.

  2. Treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, James L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a specific type of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in which the gantry speed, multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, and dose rate vary continuously during delivery. A treatment planning system for VMAT is presented. Methods: Arc control points are created uniformly throughout one or more arcs. An iterative least-squares algorithm is used to generate a fluence profile at every control point. The control points are then grouped and all of the control points in a given group are used to approximate the fluence profiles. A direct-aperture optimization is then used to improve the solution, taking into account the allowed range of leaf motion of the MLC. Dose is calculated using a fast convolution algorithm and the motion between control points is approximated by 100 interpolated dose calculation points. The method has been applied to five cases, consisting of lung, rectum, prostate and seminal vesicles, prostate and pelvic lymph nodes, and head and neck. The resulting plans have been compared with segmental (step-and-shoot) IMRT and delivered and verified on an Elekta Synergy to ensure practicality. Results: For the lung, prostate and seminal vesicles, and rectum cases, VMAT provides a plan of similar quality to segmental IMRT but with faster delivery by up to a factor of 4. For the prostate and pelvic nodes and head-and-neck cases, the critical structure doses are reduced with VMAT, both of these cases having a longer delivery time than IMRT. The plans in general verify successfully, although the agreement between planned and measured doses is not very close for the more complex cases, particularly the head-and-neck case. Conclusions: Depending upon the emphasis in the treatment planning, VMAT provides treatment plans which are higher in quality and/or faster to deliver than IMRT. The scheme described has been successfully introduced into clinical use.

  3. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  4. Influence of Welding Current and Focal Position on the Resonant Absorption of Laser Radiation in a TIG Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, B.; Huse, M.; Hermsdorf, J.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.

    The work presents the influence of welding current and focal position on the resonant absorption of diode laser radiation in a TIG welding arc. The laser beam is guided perpendicular to the electrical arc to avoid an interaction with the electrodes. Laser power measurements have shown a reduction of the measured laser power up to 18% after passing the electrical arc. This reduction results from the interaction of argon shielding gas atoms and laser radiation at 810.4 nm and 811.5 nm. The interaction is strongly affected by the adjusted welding current and the adjustment of the laser beam and the electrical arc. Lowering the welding current or shifting the laser beam out of the centerline of the electrical arc reduces the ionization probability. An increased ionization is necessary to decrease the resistance of the electrical arc.

  5. Practical approach for pretreatment verification of IMRT with flattening filter free(FFF) beams using Varian Portal Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Soonki; Choi, Young Eun; Kwak, Jungwon; Cho, Byungchul

    2014-01-08

    Patient-specific pretreatment verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is strongly recommended for all patients in order to detect any potential errors in treatment planning process and machine deliverability, and is thus performed routinely in many clinics. Portal dosimetry is an effective method for this purpose because of its prompt setup, easy data acquisition, and high spatial resolution. However, portal dosimetry cannot be applied to IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter-free (FFF) beams because of the high dose-rate saturation effect of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). In our current report, we suggest a practical QA method of expanding the conventional portal dosimetry to FFF beams with a QA plan generated by the following three steps: 1) replace the FFF beams with flattening filtered (FF) beams of the same nominal energy; 2) reduce the dose rate to avoid the saturation effect of the EPID detector; and 3) adjust the total MU to match the gantry and MLC leaf motions. Two RapidArc plans with 6 and 10 MV FFF beams were selected, and QA plans were created by the aforementioned steps and delivered. The trajectory log files of TrueBeam obtained during the treatment and during the delivery of QA plan were analyzed and compared. The maximum discrepancies in the expected trajectories between the treatment and QA plans were within 0.002 MU for the MU, 0.06° for the motion of gantry rotation, and 0.006 mm for the positions of the MLC leaves, indicating much higher levels of accuracy compared to the mechanical specifications of the machine. For further validation of the method, direct comparisons of the delivered QA FF beam to the treatment FFF beam were performed using film dosimetry and show that gamma passing rates under 2%/2 mm criteria are 99.0%-100% for the all four arc beams. This method can be used on RapidArc plans with FFF beams without any additional procedure or modifications on the

  6. Dual arc penning ion source gas flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Mallory, M.L.; Antaya, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Support gas, when added directly to an arc or admitted to an auxiliary chamber of a two-arc chamber ion source, increases the beam intensity for multicharged ions such as /sup 16/O/sup 5 +/. To clarify the mechanism of this intensity increase, gas flow rates from the auxiliary chamber to the main chamber have been measured by using the ORIC cyclotron as a mass spectrometer. The results show that only about three percent of the gas admitted to the auxiliary chamber reaches the main chamber. One can then infer that the improved operation probably results from the stabilizing effect of heating the common cathodes with the auxiliary arc and/or the more favorable distribution of the support gas to the part of the main arc close to the cathodes.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of the shorter treatment delivery time. Future studies are necessary to assess the clinical outcome and the toxicity.

  8. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  9. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  10. Single Pass Collider Memo: Gradient Perturbations of the SLC arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, W T

    2016-12-16

    As the beam passes through the arcs, the gradient it encounters at each magnet differs from the design value. This deviation may be in part random and in part systematic. In this note we make estimates of the effects to be expected from both kinds of errors.

  11. ALICE-ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva;

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  12. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  13. Variable polarity arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  14. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  15. SU-E-T-78: A Study of Dose Falloff Gradient in RapidArc Planning of Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, D; Srinivasan, S; Elasmar, H [Memorial Health Care System, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Johnson, E [Univ Kentucky Medical Ctr, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Rapid dose falloff beyond PTV is an important criterion for normal tissue sparing in SBRT. RTOG protocols use D2cm and R50% for plan quality evaluation. This study is aimed at analyzing the dose falloff gradient beyond the PTV extending into normal tissue structures and to ascertain the impact of PTV geometry and location on the dose falloff gradient in RapidArc planning of lung SBRT Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed 39 clinical RapidArc lung SBRT treatment plans that met RTOG-0915 criteria. Planning was done on Eclipse 8.9 for delivery on either Novalis NTx or TrueBeam STx equipped with HD MLCs. PTV volumes ranged between 5.3 and 113 cc (2.2 to 6 cm sphere equivalent diameter respectively) and their geographic locations were distributed in both lungs. 6X, 6X-FFF, 10X, and 10X-FFF energies were used for planning. All of these SBRT plans were planned using either 2 or 3 full or hemi arcs, with moderate couch kicks. Dose falloff gradients were obtained by generating 7 concentric 5 mm rings beyond PTV surface. Mean dose in each ring is used to evaluate percentage dose falloff gradient as a function of distance from the PTV surface. Results: The mean percentage dose falloff beyond PTV surface in all plans followed an exponential decay and the data was modeled with double exponential decay fit. Photon energy selection in the plan had a minimal impact on the mean percentage dose fall off beyond PTV surface. Conclusion: Dose falloff beyond PTV surface as a function of distance can be ascertained by the use of the double exponential decay fit coefficients in RapidArc planning of lung SBRT. This will help also in plan quality evaluation in addition to D2cm and R50% defined by RTOG.

  16. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and the conformity index (CI of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases.

  17. Motion of polar cap arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, K.; Moen, J. I.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A statistics of motion of polar cap arcs is conducted by using 5 years of optical data from an all-sky imager at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.73°N, 265.07°E). We identified 743 arcs by using an automated arc detection algorithm and statistically examined their moving velocities as estimated by the method of Hosokawa et al. (2006). The number of the arcs studied is about 5 times larger than that in the previous statistics of polar cap arcs by Valladares et al. (1994); thus, we could expect to obtain more statistically significant results. Polar cap arcs are found to fall into two distinct categories: the By-dependent and By-independent arcs. The motion of the former arcs follows the rule reported by Valladares et al. (1994), who showed that stable polar cap arcs move in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By. About two thirds of the arcs during northward IMF conditions belong to this category. The latter arcs always move poleward irrespective of the sign of the IMF By, which possibly correspond to the poleward moving arcs in the morning side reported by Shiokawa et al. (1997). At least one third of the arcs belong to this category. The By-dependent arcs tend to move faster when the magnitude of the IMF By is larger, suggesting that the transport of open flux by lobe reconnection from one polar cap compartment to the other controls their motion. In contrast, the speed of the By-independent arcs does not correlate with the magnitude of the By. The motions of both the By-dependent and By-independent arcs are most probably caused by the magnetospheric convection. Convection in the region of By-dependent arcs is affected by the IMF By, which indicates that their sources may be on open field lines or in the closed magnetosphere adjacent to the open-closed boundary, whereas By-independent arcs seem to be well on closed field lines. Hence, the magnetospheric source of the two types of arc may be different. This implies that the mechanisms causing the

  18. Commissioning and early experience with a new-generation low-energy linear accelerator with advanced delivery and imaging functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new-generation low-energy linear accelerator (UNIQUE was introduced in the clinical arena during 2009 by Varian Medical Systems. The world's first UNIQUE was installed at Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and put into clinical operation in June 2010. The aim of the present contribution was to report experience about its commissioning and first year results from clinical operation. Methods Commissioning data, beam characteristics and the modeling into the treatment planning system were summarized. Imaging system of UNIQUE included a 2D-2D matching capability and tests were performed to identify system repositioning capability. Finally, since the system is capable of delivering volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc, a summary of the tests performed for such modality to assess its performance in preclinical settings and during clinical usage was included. Results Isocenter virtual diameter was measured as less than 0.2 mm. Observed accuracy of isocenter determination and repositioning for 2D-2D matching procedures in image guidance was Conclusions The results of the commissioning tests and of the first period of clinical operation, resulted meeting specifications and having good margins respect to tolerances. UNIQUE was put into operation for all delivery techniques; in particular, as shown by the pre-treatment quality assurance results, it enabled accurate and safe delivery of RapidArc plans.

  19. Radiotherapy for large cutaneous angiosarcoma of face with RapidArc (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Athar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy of vascular origin. It can affect any part of the body, head and neck region being probably the most common site of diagnosis. We present here a case of Angiosarcoma of face in a 67-year-old elderly gentleman who was treated with RapidArc – volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT for recurrence after surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. As an alternative to Electron Beam Therapy, RapidArc with skin bolus can be considered for large complex shaped targets with irregular surface and tissue inhomogeneity. RapidArc plan can achieve adequate target coverage with acceptable dose homogeneity and conformity.

  20. Image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Orth, Charles; Roberts, Randy; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short-pulse kilo-Joule laser pulses with controllable delays that generate X-rays to provide backlighting for high-density internal confinement fusion (ICF) capsule targets. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. ARC is designed to employ up to eight backlighters with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution, to record the dynamics and produce an X-ray "motion picture" of the compression and ignition of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets. ARC will generate tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of ICF shots. Additionally, ARC supports a variety of other high energy density experiments including fast ignition studies on NIF. The automated alignment image analysis algorithms use digital camera sensor images to direct ARC beams onto the tens-of-microns scale metal wires. This paper describes the ARC automatic alignment sequence throughout the laser chain from pulse initiation to target with an emphasis on the image processing algorithms that generate the crucial alignment positions for ARC. The image processing descriptions and flow diagrams detail the alignment control loops throughout the ARC laser chain beginning in the ARC high-contrast front end (HCAFE), on into the ARC main laser area, and ending in the ARC target area.

  1. SU-E-T-584: Optical Tracking Guided Patient-Specific VMAT QA with ArcCHECK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Q; Park, C; Lu, B; Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the novel use of an in-house optical tracking system (OTS) to improve the efficacy of VMAT QA with a cylindrical dosimeter (ArcCHECK™). Methods: The translational and rotational setup errors of ArcCHECK are convoluted which makes it challenging to position the device efficiently and accurately. We first aligned the ArcCHECK to the machine cross-hair at three cardinal angles (0°, 90°, and 270°) to establish a reference position. Four infrared reflective markers were attached to the back of the device. An OTS with 0.2mm/0.2° accuracy was used to control its setup uncertainty. Translational uncertainties of 1 mm and 2 mm in three directions (in, right, and up) were applied on the device. Four open beams of various field sizes and six clinical VMAT arcs were delivered and measured for all simulated setup errors. The measurements were compared with Pinnacle™ calculations using Gamma analysis to evaluate the impact of setup uncertainty. This study also evaluated the improvement in setup reproducibility and efficiency with the aid of the OTS. Results: For open beams, with 3%/3mm, the mean passing rates dropped by less than 5% for all shifts; with 2%/2mm, two significant drops(>5%) were observed: 15.38±6.75% for 2 mm lateral shift and 9.35±4.88% for 2 mm longitudinal shift. For VMAT arcs, the mean passing rates using 2%/2mm dropped by 10.47±7.46% and 22.02±11.39% for 1 and 2 mm shift, respectively. With 3%/3mm, significant drop only occurred with 2 mm longitudinal shift (13.73±8.30%). Setup time could be reduced by >15 min with the aid of the OTS. Conclusion: OTS is an effective tool for separating translational and rotational uncertainties. The current VMAT QA solution was not strongly sensitive to translation errors of 2mm with widely accepted criterion (3%/3mm). This finding raises concerns regarding the efficacy of such QA system in detecting errors in the dynamic VMAT delivery.

  2. ALICE - ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva;

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Gridware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic...... Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...... management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. dCache provides support for several data management tools (among them for xrootd the tools used by AliEn) using the so called "doors". Therefore, we will concentrate on the second...

  3. Modeling rf breakdown arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Huang, Dazhang; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, Seth

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakdown in 805 MHz rf accelerator cavities in terms of a number of mechanisms. We devide the breakdown process into three stages: (1) we model surface failure using molecular dynamics of fracture caused by electrostatic tensile stress, (2) we model the ionization of neutrals responsible for plasma initiation and plasma growth using a particle in cell code, and (3) we model surface damage by assuming a process similar to unipolar arcing. Although unipolar arcs are strictly defined with equipotential boundaries, we find that the cold, dense plasma in contact with the surface produces very small Debye lengths and very high electric fields over a large area. These high fields produce strong erosion mechanisms, primarily self sputtering, compatible with the crater formation that we see. Results from the plasma simulation are included as a guide to experimental verification of this model.

  4. Radiosurgery of small skull-base lesions. No advantage for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery versus conformal arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U.; Mueller, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O.; Fahlbusch, R. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) has shown the ability to conform the dose to concavities and to better avoid critical organs for large tumors. Given the availability of an electronically driven micro-multileaf collimator, both intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS) and dynamic conformal arc (DCA) technique (DCA) can be performed at the Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, since 12/2002. This study evaluates both techniques in small skull-base tumors treated with radiosurgery. Material and methods: between 12/2002 and 04/2004, a total of 109 radiosurgical procedures were performed in 77 patients, equally distributed between patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), pituitary adenoma (PA) and meningeoma (M). Six index patients (n = 2 AN, n = 1 PA, n = 3 M) routinely planned for dynamic arc stereotactic radiosurgery were replanned using the IMSRS approach (BrainScan, BrainLAB, Heimstetten, Germany). The RTOG radiosurgery quality assurance guidelines, isodose volumes, doses to organs at risk (OAR), and dose delivery criteria were compared. Results: DCA was superior to IMSRS for homogeneity and coverage. IMSRS could keep the high-dose-irradiated volumes (90% isodose volume) lower than DCA in the PA and AN with very small volumes, but all other lower dose volumes were larger for IMSRS. Dose maxima to OAR were higher for IMSRS. Treatment delivery time for IMSRS would clearly exceed treatment time for DCA by a factor of 2-3. The integral absorbed dose to the brain was much higher in the IMSRS than in the DCA approach (factor 2-3). Conclusion: RTOG radiosurgery guidelines were best met by the DCA rather than IMSRS approach for the treatment of small skull-base lesions. The IMSRS approach will increase the time for planning, dose delivery and integral dose to the brain. Thus, IMSRT techniques are recommended for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to larger volumes rather

  5. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  6. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  7. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  8. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonin, A. A., E-mail: a.adonin@gsi.de; Hollinger, R. [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  9. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  10. Arc Behavior and Droplet Transfer of CWW CO2 Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong YANG; Chen-fu FANG; Yong CHEN; Guo-xiang XU; Qing-xian HU; Xiao-yan GU

    2016-01-01

    Cable-type welding wire (CWW)CO2 welding is an innovative process arc welding with high quality,high efficiency and energy saving,in which CWW is used as consumable electrode.The CWW is composed of seven wires with a diameter of 1.2 mm.One is in the center,while others uniformly distribute around it.The diameter of twisted wire is up to 3.6 mm,which can increase the deposition rate significantly.With continual wire-feeding and melting of CWW,the formed rotating arc improved welding quality obviously.The arc behavior and droplet transfer were ob-served by the electrical signal waveforms and corresponding synchronous images,based on the high speed digital camera and electrical signal system.The results showed that the shape of welding arc changed from bell arc to beam arc with the increase of welding parameter.The droplet transfer mode changed from repelled transfer,globular transfer to projected transfer in turn.Droplet transfer frequency increased from 18.17 Hz to 119.05 Hz,while the droplet diameter decreased from 1.5 times to 0.3 times of the CWW diameter.

  11. Forceps Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivery. If your health care provider does an episiotomy — an incision in the tissue between the vagina ... the tissue between your vagina and your anus (episiotomy) to help ease the delivery of your baby. ...

  12. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  13. 应用锥形束CT研究鼻咽癌容积弧形调强放射治疗的摆位误差%Analysis of Inter-fraction and Intra-fraction Setup Error of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with Cone Beam CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹文晶; 孙颖; 迟峰; 方键蓝; 郭蕊; 林爱华; 祁振宇; 马骏

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To evaluate the inter-fraction and intra-fraction setup error during the treatment with cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) and provide theoretical basis for clinical target volume-planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with volumetric-modulated arc: therapy (VMAT). [Methods] Seventeen consecutive NPC patients treated with VMAT were prospectively enrolled for the study between October 2010 and January 2012. For each patient, three CBCT scans were obtained after conventional positioning, online correction with 2 mm tolerance daily and VMAT delivery weekly, and the scans were registered to the planning CT to determine inter-fraction and intra-fraction errors. The MPTV were calculated with the recipe, Vmurin = 2.5Σ + 0.7σ (Σ, systematic error; σ, random error). [Results] The average absolute errors of the pre-correction, post-correction, and intra-fraction error were 1.1-1.2 mm, 0.6-0.7 mm and 0.4-0.6 mm in the three dimensions. The corresponding X were 0.9—1.3 mm, 0.4—0.5 mm and 0.2-0.4 mm, σ were 0.7-0.9 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5-0.7 mm. Gradual increases in both inter-fraction and intra-fraction three-dimensional (3D) displacement were observed with time and treatment (P = 0.004, P = 0.009). The total MPTV accounting for pre-correction and intra-fraction error were 3.4-4.0 mm and margins accounting for post-correction and intra-fraction error were 1.7—2.3 mm. [Conclusions] VMAT irradiation technology personalized MPTV should be adopted for the design of VMAT plan. Displacement increased as a function of time.%[目的]应用锥形束CT(CBCT)研究鼻咽癌容积弧形调强放射治疗(VMAT)分次间和分次内的摆位误差,为制订临床靶区(CTV)外的计划靶区(PTV)边界提供依据.[方法]于2010年10月至2012年1月共17例接受VMAT治疗的鼻咽癌患者前瞻性的纳入研究.所有患者分别于每日常规摆位后、摆位纠正后(校位阈值2 mm)、每周放射治疗后

  14. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  15. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul [Institut Matematik Kejuruteraan, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kampus Pauh Putra, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Luis, Martino [Othman Yeop Abdullah Graduate School of Business, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time.

  16. Capacitated arc routing problem and its extensions in waste collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadzli, Mohammad; Najwa, Nurul; Luis, Martino

    2015-05-01

    Capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) is the youngest generation of graph theory that focuses on solving the edge/arc routing for optimality. Since many years, operational research devoted to CARP counterpart, known as vehicle routing problem (VRP), which does not fit to several real cases such like waste collection problem and road maintenance. In this paper, we highlighted several extensions of capacitated arc routing problem (CARP) that represents the real-life problem of vehicle operation in waste collection. By purpose, CARP is designed to find a set of routes for vehicles that satisfies all pre-setting constraints in such that all vehicles must start and end at a depot, service a set of demands on edges (or arcs) exactly once without exceeding the capacity, thus the total fleet cost is minimized. We also addressed the differentiation between CARP and VRP in waste collection. Several issues have been discussed including stochastic demands and time window problems in order to show the complexity and importance of CARP in the related industry. A mathematical model of CARP and its new version is presented by considering several factors such like delivery cost, lateness penalty and delivery time.

  17. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  18. Self accelerating electron Airy beams

    CERN Document Server

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental generation and observation of Airy beams of free electrons. The electron Airy beams are generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, that imprints a cubic phase modulation on the beams' transverse plane. We observed the spatial evolution dynamics of an arc-shaped, self accelerating and shape preserving electron Airy beams. We directly observed the ability of electrons to self-heal, restoring their original shape after passing an obstacle. This electromagnetic method opens up new avenues for steering electrons, like their photonic counterparts, since their wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories. Furthermore, these beams can be easily manipulated using magnetic or electric potentials. It is also possible to efficiently self mix narrow beams having opposite signs of acceleration, hence obtaining a new type of electron interferometer.

  19. Arc Testing of a Mockup Cable in a Simulated Space Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    A mockup cable was irradiated with electrons of 25-100 keV energy in a vacuum chamber. The m'ockup cable consisted of insulated wires on a kapton substrate, overlaid with a metallized teonex shield. Voltages induced on the wires and shield by the electron beam during irradiation were monitored, and voltage changes were used, along with video, to detect arcs due to the charge built-up in the cable. The cable was also cooled with liquid nitrogen to very low temperatures, to simulate cables kept in the dark for long periods of time. Arcing was common at fluences typical of long space missions. Occasionally an arc would occur some time after the electron beam was turned off. The conductivity of the wires and shield was monitored as a function of temperature, and behaved as expected, with lower conductivities at lower temperatures. Arcs from the wires and shield to ground and from the wires to the shield were measured. Sympathetic arcs were also seen, wherein an arc from the shield to ground or from the wires to ground was followed in a short period of time by another arc of a different type. Implications of these results for real cables on long space missions will be discussed, and recommendations given for arc mitigation.

  20. Searching standard parameters for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treutwein Marius

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since December 2009 a new VMAT planning system tool is available in Oncentra® MasterPlan v3.3 (Nucletron B.V.. The purpose of this study was to work out standard parameters for the optimization of prostate cancer. Methods For ten patients with localized prostate cancer plans for simultaneous integrated boost were optimized, varying systematically the number of arcs, collimator angle, the maximum delivery time, and the gantry spacing. Homogeneity in clinical target volume, minimum dose in planning target volume, median dose in the organs at risk, maximum dose in the posterior part of the rectum, and number of monitor units were evaluated using student’s test for statistical analysis. Measurements were performed with a 2D-array, taking the delivery time, and compared to the calculation by the gamma method. Results Plans with collimator 45° were superior to plans with collimator 0°. Single arc resulted in higher minimum dose in the planning target volume, but also higher dose values to the organs at risk, requiring less monitor units per fraction dose than dual arc. Single arc needs a higher value (per arc for the maximum delivery time parameter than dual arc, but as only one arc is needed, the measured delivery time was shorter and stayed below 2.5 min versus 3 to 5 min. Balancing plan quality, dosimetric results and calculation time, a gantry spacing of 4° led to optimal results. Conclusion A set of parameters has been found which can be used as standard for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning of prostate cancer.

  1. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Bender, Edward [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Tomé, Wolfgang A., E-mail: wtome@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  2. Comparison of hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique and double arc VMAT technique in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaloo Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has quickly become accepted as standard of care for the treatment of prostate cancer based on studies showing it is able to provide faster delivery with adequate target coverage and reduced monitor units while maintaining organ at risk (OAR sparing. This study aims to demonstrate the potential to increase dose conformality with increased planner control and OAR sparing using a hybrid treatment technique compared to VMAT.

  3. SU-E-J-81: Interplay Effect in Non-Gated Dynamic Treatment Delivery of a Lung Phantom with Simulated Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, V; Fagerstrom, J; Bayliss, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interplay effect in non-gated VMAT external beam delivery using realistic, clinically relevant 3D motion in an anthropomorphic lung phantom, and to determine if adding margins is sufficient to account for motion or if gating is required in all cases. Methods: A 4D motion stage was used to move a Virtual Water (VW) lung target containing a piece of radiochromic EBT3 film in an anthropomorphic chest phantom. A five-arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment was planned using a CT scan of the phantom in its stationary position, using planning parameters chosen to push the optimizer to achieve a highly-modulated plan. Two scenarios were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam: the first was delivered with the phantom and target both stationary and the second was delivered with the phantom stationary but the target moving in a realistic, irregular 3D elliptical pattern. A single piece of 4×4 cm{sup 2} film was used per fraction, located in the central coronal plane of the target. Film was calibrated on a 6 MV beam with dose values from 0.20 to 20 Gy. Results: Preliminary test films were analyzed in ImageJ and MatLab software. Dose maps were calculated on a central region of interest (ROI) delineated on both the motion-induced and stationary films. Both static and dynamic film dose maps agreed with planning values within acceptable uncertainty. Conclusion: Including a large number of arcs in a clinically realistic SBRT treatment could reduce the effect of motion interplay due to averaging. Because all clinics do not employ multiple arcs for SBRT lung treatments, it is still important to consider the effects of motion on treatment delivery. Further analysis on the treatment films, as well as a broader investigation other planning parameters, will be conducted.

  4. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  5. Application of a new dosimetry formalism to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Karen E; Bedford, James L

    2009-12-07

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) offers a challenge to classical dosimetry protocols as the beams are dynamic in orientation and aperture shape and may include small apertures. The aim of this paper is to apply a formalism to VMAT beams that has recently been published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) working party to improve the dosimetry for small and non-standard fields. We investigated three possible fields and assessed their suitability as plan class specific reference (pcsr) fields. The factors in the new dosimetry formalism were investigated: the conversion of dose to water from the conventional reference field to the pcsr and then from the pcsr to a treatment plan, using a PTW semiflex chamber, two Farmer chambers and an electron diode. Finally, the dose was compared for Alanine, the new formalism and calculated using Pinnacle(3) (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) for two typical clinical VMAT beams. Correction factors between the reference field and the pcsr determined with Alanine range from 0.1% to 2.3% for the three pcsr fields. Dose to water measured using the calibrated ionization chambers is less than 2% different to the dose calculated by Pinnacle(3). VMAT planning and delivery procedures have been successfully implemented and a new dosimetry protocol has been investigated for this new technique. Calibration factors for pcsr fields are found to be up to 2.3% different when using the new formalism, compared to using a standard dosimetry protocol. Using the calibration factors determined in the pcsr fields, the ionization chambers and electron diode agree to within 1% with Alanine dosimetry for two clinical VMAT plans. Good agreements between calculations and measurements are found for these two plans when the new formalism is used.

  6. Characteristics of Arcs Between Porous Carbon Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Carvou, Erwann; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Mitchell, Brian

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Arcs between carbon electrodes present some specific differences compared with metallic arcs. The arc voltage is higher, but does not attain a stable value displaying large fluctuations. Indeed, the arcs are produced by the direct sublimation of the electrodes, without passing through a molten phase. The arc production is also facilitated by both circuit breaking and electric field breakdown. In this paper, arcing has been examined under various conditions (voltage, cu...

  7. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1–100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans.

  8. Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose

  9. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  10. CO2 laser-micro plasma arc hybrid welding for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. H. KIM; Y. N. AHN; J. H. KIM

    2011-01-01

    A laser lap welding process for zinc-coated steel has a well-known unsolved problem-porosity formation. The boiling temperature of coated zinc is lower than the melting temperature of the base metal. which is steel. In the autogenous laser welding,the zinc vapor generates from the lapped surfaces expels the molten pool and the expulsion causes numerous weld defects, such as spatters and blow holes on the weld surface and porosity inside the welds. The laser-arc hybrid welding was suggested as an alternative method for the laser lap welding because the arc can preheat or post-heat the weldment according to the arrangement of the laser beam and the arc. CO2 laser-micro plasma hybrid welding was applied to the lap welding of zinc-coated steel with zero-gap.The relationships among the weld quality and process parameters of the laser-arc arrangement, and the laser-arc interspacing distance and arc current were investigated using a full-factorial experimental design. The effect of laser-arc arrangement is dominant because the leading plasma arc partially melts the upper steel sheets and vaporizes or oxidizes the coated zinc on the lapped surfaces.Compared with the result from the laser-TIG hybrid welding, the heat input from arc can be reduced by 40%.

  11. Vacuum ARC ion sources - activities & developments at LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The author describes work at LBL on the development and application of vacuum arc ion sources. Work has been done on vacuum spark sources - to produce very high charge states, studies of high charge states in magnetic field, hybrid ion source operation on metal/gas plasma, multipole operation, work on MEVVA V for implantation applications, development of broad beam sources, and removal of particles from the output of the source.

  12. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  13. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  14. Controllability of arc jet from arc horns with slits. Slit tsuki arc horn no arc jet seigyo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunabe, K.; Inaba, T.; Fukagawa, H. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Kito, Y. (Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-09-20

    To improve the corona discharge characteristics, test preparation was made of hollow rod form horns with slits for the overhead power transmission line use. Two types of horn electrode were prepared. The first horn electrode is of a hollow hemisphere fitted with and divided by slits on its tip. The second horn electrode is the first one which is further fitted with rod form electrode at the center of its tip. In experiment, relation was obtained between the deflection angle of arc jet and arc current, electrode diameter, etc., through an observation of arc jet by high speed camera. Melting loss of electrode was also made clear. The following knowledge was obtained: For the first horn electrode, the deflection angle can be limited to a narrow range by a division with slits, e.g., within 30 degrees under the condition of 5kA in arc current, 4 in number of sectors and 200mm in diameter. For the second horn electrode, the deflection angle can be limited to within 20 degrees under the condition of 5kA in arc current and 4 in number of sectors. The arc current is also limited to below 5kA by an addition of 50mm diameter central electrode. As a conclusion for the first electrode, the arc jet control characteristics excels in the stronger arc current range than 5kA, while for the second electrode, they are effective in the weaker arc current range than 5kA. 6 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppala Jan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs, IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated

  16. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Shin, E-mail: kajita.shin@nagoya-u.jp [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tsventoukh, Mikhail M. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, Sergey A. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  17. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p VMAT is dosimetrically advantageous in treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR compared to fixed-beam, while providing significantly shorter treatment times.

  18. Convergent evolution of the arginine deiminase pathway: the ArcD and ArcE arginine/ornithine exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noens, Elke E E; Lolkema, Juke S

    2017-02-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and yields 1 mol of ATP per mol of L-arginine consumed. The L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger in the pathway takes up L-arginine and excretes L-ornithine from the cytoplasm. Analysis of the genomes of 1281 bacterial species revealed the presence of 124 arc gene clusters encoding the pathway. About half of the clusters contained the gene encoding the well-studied L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger ArcD, while the other half contained a gene, termed here arcE, encoding a membrane protein that is not a homolog of ArcD. The arcE gene product of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown to take up L-arginine and L-ornithine with affinities of 0.6 and 1 μmol/L, respectively, and to catalyze metabolic energy-independent, electroneutral exchange. ArcE of S. pneumoniae could replace ArcD in the ADI pathway of Lactococcus lactis and provided the cells with a growth advantage. In contrast to ArcD, ArcE catalyzed translocation of the pathway intermediate L-citrulline with high efficiency. A short version of the ADI pathway is proposed for L-citrulline catabolism and the presence of the evolutionary unrelated arcD and arcE genes in different organisms is discussed in the context of the evolution of the ADI pathway.

  19. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang [THz Research Center, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  20. SU-E-T-248: Near Real-Time Analysis of Radiation Delivery and Imaging, Accuracy to Ensure Patient Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesooriya, K; Seitter, K; Desai, V; Read, P; Larner, J [University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and optimize an effective software method for comparing planned to delivered control point machine parameters for all VARIAN TrueBeam treatments so as to permit (1) assessment of a large patient pool throughout their treatment course to quantify treatment technique specific systematic and random uncertainty of observables, (2) quantify the site specific daily imaging shifts required for target alignment, and (3) define tolerance levels for mechanical parameters and imaging parameters based on statistical analysis data gathered, and the dosimetric impact of variations. Methods: Treatment and imaging log files were directly compared to plan parameters for Eclipse and Pinnacle planned treatments via 3D, IMRT, control point, RapidArc, and electrons. Each control point from all beams/arcs (7984) for all fractions (1940) of all patients treated over six months were analyzed. At each control point gantry angle, collimator angle, couch angle, jaw positions, MLC positions, MU were compared. Additionally per-treatment isocenter shifts were calculated. Results were analyzed as a whole in treatment type subsets: IMRT, 3D, RapidArc; and in treatment site subsets: brain, chest/mediastinum, esophagus, H and N, lung, pelvis, prostate. Results: Daily imaging isocenter shifts from initial external tattoo alignment were dependent on the treatment site with < 0.5 cm translational shifts for H and N, Brain, and lung SBRT, while pelvis, esophagus shifts were ∼1 cm. Mechanical delivery parameters were within tolerance levels for all sub-beams. The largest variations were for RapidArc plans: gantry angle 0.11±0.12,collimator angle 0.00±0.00, jaw positions 0.48±0.26, MLC leaf positions 0.66±0.08, MU 0.14±0.34. Conclusion: Per-control point validation reveals deviations between planned and delivered parameters. If used in a near real-time error checking system, patient safety can be improved by equipping the treatment delivery system with additional forcing

  1. Signatures of moving polar cap arcs in the F-region PolarDARN echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joint observations of the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada and the Polar Dual Auroral Radar Network (PolarDARN HF radars at Rankin Inlet and Inuvik (Canada are considered to establish radar signatures of poleward moving polar cap arcs "detaching" from the auroral oval. Common features of the events considered are enhanced power or echo occurrence in the wake of the arcs and enhanced spectral width of these echoes. When the arcs were oriented along some of the radar beams, velocity reversals at the arc location were observed with the directions of the arc-associated flows corresponding to a converging electric field. For the event of 9 December 2007, two arcs were poleward progressing almost along the central beams of the Inuvik radar at the speed close to the E × B drift of the bulk of the F-region plasma as inferred from HF Doppler velocities and from independent measurements by the Resolute Bay ionosonde. In global-scale convection maps inferred from all Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN radar measurements, the polar cap arcs were often seen close to the reversal line of additional mesoscale convection cells located poleward of the normal cells related to the auroral oval.

  2. On arc efficiency in gas tungsten arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Stenbacka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the literature on published arc efficiency values for GTAW and, if possible, propose a narrower band. Articles between the years 1955 - 2011 have been found. Published arc efficiency values for GTAW DCEN show to lie on a wide range, between 0.36 to 0.90. Only a few studies covered DCEP - direct current electrode positive and AC current. Specific information about the reproducibility in calorimetric studies as well as in modeling and simulation studies (considering that both random and systematic errors are small was scarce. An estimate of the average arc efficiency value for GTAW DCEN indicates that it should be about 0.77. It indicates anyway that the GTAW process with DCEN is an efficient welding method. The arc efficiency is reduced when the arc length is increased. On the other hand, there are conflicting results in the literature as to the influence of arc current and travel speed.

  3. Feasibility study of a periodic arc compressor in the presence of coherent synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mitri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of short electron bunches in high brightness linear accelerators has raised the awareness of the accelerator community to the degradation of the beam transverse emittance by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted in magnetic bunch length compressors, transfer lines and turnaround arcs. Beam optics control has been proposed to mitigate that CSR effect. In this article, we enlarge on the existing literature by reviewing the validity of the linear optics approach in a periodic, achromatic arc compressor. We then study the dependence of the CSR-perturbed emittance to beam optics, mean energy, and bunch charge. The analytical findings are compared with particle tracking results. Practical considerations on CSR-induced energy loss and nonlinear particle dynamics are included. As a result, we identify the range of parameters that allows feasibility of an arc compressor for driving, for example, a free electron laser or a linear collider.

  4. Feasibility study of a periodic arc compressor in the presence of coherent synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Mitri, S.

    2016-01-11

    The advent of short electron bunches in high brightness linear accelerators has raised the awareness of the accelerator community to the degradation of the beam transverse emittance by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted in magnetic bunch length compressors, transfer lines and turnaround arcs. Beam optics control has been proposed to mitigate that CSR effect. In this article, we enlarge on the existing literature by reviewing the validity of the linear optics approach in a periodic, achromatic arc compressor. We then study the dependence of the CSR-perturbed emittance to beam optics, mean energy, and bunch charge. The analytical findings are compared with particle tracking results. Practical considerations on CSR-induced energy loss and nonlinear particle dynamics are included. As a result, we identify the range of parameters that allows feasibility of an arc compressor for driving, for example, a free electron laser or a linear collider.

  5. SU-E-T-789: Validation of 3DVH Accuracy On Quantifying Delivery Errors Based On Clinical Relevant DVH Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T; Kumaraswamy, L [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Detection of treatment delivery errors is important in radiation therapy. However, accurate quantification of delivery errors is also of great importance. This study aims to evaluate the 3DVH software’s ability to accurately quantify delivery errors. Methods: Three VMAT plans (prostate, H&N and brain) were randomly chosen for this study. First, we evaluated whether delivery errors could be detected by gamma evaluation. Conventional per-beam IMRT QA was performed with the ArcCHECK diode detector for the original plans and for the following modified plans: (1) induced dose difference error up to ±4.0% and (2) control point (CP) deletion (3 to 10 CPs were deleted) (3) gantry angle shift error (3 degree uniformly shift). 2D and 3D gamma evaluation were performed for all plans through SNC Patient and 3DVH, respectively. Subsequently, we investigated the accuracy of 3DVH analysis for all cases. This part evaluated, using the Eclipse TPS plans as standard, whether 3DVH accurately can model the changes in clinically relevant metrics caused by the delivery errors. Results: 2D evaluation seemed to be more sensitive to delivery errors. The average differences between ECLIPSE predicted and 3DVH results for each pair of specific DVH constraints were within 2% for all three types of error-induced treatment plans, illustrating the fact that 3DVH is fairly accurate in quantifying the delivery errors. Another interesting observation was that even though the gamma pass rates for the error plans are high, the DVHs showed significant differences between original plan and error-induced plans in both Eclipse and 3DVH analysis. Conclusion: The 3DVH software is shown to accurately quantify the error in delivered dose based on clinically relevant DVH metrics, where a conventional gamma based pre-treatment QA might not necessarily detect.

  6. Arc of opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia.

  7. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  8. Determination of action thresholds for electromagnetic tracking system-guided hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Happersett, Laura; Cox, Brett; Hunt, Margie; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York 10467 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy may benefit from both volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to shortened treatment time and intrafraction real-time monitoring provided by implanted radiofrequency(RF) transponders. The authors investigate dosimetrically driven action thresholds (whether treatment needs to be interrupted and patient repositioned) in VMAT treatment with electromagnetic (EM) tracking. Methods: VMAT plans for five patients are generated for prescription doses of 32.5 and 42.5 Gy in five fractions. Planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with a 3 mm margin at the prostate-rectal interface and 5 mm elsewhere. The VMAT delivery is modeled using 180 equi-spaced static beams. Intrafraction prostate motion is simulated in the plan by displacing the beam isocenter at each beam assuming rigid organ motion according to a previously recorded trajectory of the transponder centroid. The cumulative dose delivered in each fraction is summed over all beams. Two sets of 57 prostate motion trajectories were randomly selected to form a learning and a testing dataset. Dosimetric end points including CTV D95%, rectum wall D1cc, bladder wall D1cc, and urethra Dmax, are analyzed against motion characteristics including the maximum amplitude of the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right components. Action thresholds are triggered when intrafraction motion causes any violations of dose constraints to target and organs at risk (OAR), so that treatment is interrupted and patient is repositioned. Results: Intrafraction motion has a little effect on CTV D95%, indicating PTV margins are adequate. Tight posterior and inferior action thresholds around 1 mm need to be set in a patient specific manner to spare organs at risk, especially when the prescription dose is 42.5 Gy. Advantages of setting patient specific action thresholds are to reduce false positive alarms by 25% when prescription dose is low, and

  9. MO-H-19A-02: Investigation of Modulated Electron Arc (MeArc) Therapy for the Treatment of Scalp Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Electron arc therapy has long been proposed as the most suitable technique for the treatment of superficial tumors that follow circularly curved surfaces. However it was challenged by unsuitability of the conventional applicators and the lack of adequate 3-D dose calculation tools for arc electron beams in the treatment planning systems (TPS). Now with the availability of an electron specific multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) and an in-house Monte Carlo (MC) based TPS, we were motivated to investigate more advanced modulated electron arc (MeARC) therapy and its beneficial outcome. Methods: We initiated the study by a film measurement conducted in a head and neck phantom, where we delivered electron arcs in a step and shoot manner using the light field as a guide to avoid fields abutments. This step was done to insure enough clearance for the arcs with eMLC. MCBEAM and MCPLAN MC codes were used for the treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation, respectively. Treatment plans were generated for targets drawn in real patient CTs and head and neck phantom. We utilized beams eye view available from a commercial planning system to create beamlets having same isocenter and adjoined at the scalp surface. Then dose-deposition coefficients from those beamlets were calculated for all electron energies using MCPLAN. An in-house optimization code was then used to find the optimum weights needed from individual beamlets. Results: MeARC showed a nicely tailored dose distribution around the circular curved target on the scalp. Some hot spots were noticed and could be attributed to fields abutment problem owing to the bulging nature of electron profiles. Brain dose was shown to be at lower levels compared to photon treatment. Conclusion: MeARC was shown to be a promising modality for treating scalp cases and could be beneficial to all superficial tumors with a circular curvature.

  10. Single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy is sufficient for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a dosimetric comparison with dual arc VMAT and dynamic MLC and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    NING, ZHONG-HUA; Mu, Jin-Ming; Jin, Jian-Xue; Li, Xiao-Dong; LI, QI-LIN; GU, WEN-DONG; Huang, Jin; Han, Yang; PEI, HONG-LEI

    2013-01-01

    Background The performance of single arc VMAT (VMAT1) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) on the Axesse linac has not been well described in previous studies. The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of VMAT1 for NPC by comparing the dosimetry, delivery efficiency, and accuracy with dual arc VMAT (VMAT2), dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiotherapy (dIMRT), and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ssIMRT). Methods Twenty consecutive patients with non-metastatic NPC w...

  11. The Time-Dependent Multiple-Vehicle Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Daniel; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a multi vehicle version of the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-MPARP). It is inspired by a situation where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries to be performed by a fleet of vehicles. Real...

  12. Geometric calibration of the circle-plus-arc trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Stefan; Noo, Frédéric; Dennerlein, Frank; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2007-12-07

    In this paper, a novel geometric calibration method for C-arm cone-beam scanners is presented which allows the calibration of the circle-plus-arc trajectory. The main idea is the separation of the trajectory into two circular segments (circle segment and arc segment) which are calibrated independently. This separation makes it possible to reuse a calibration phantom which has been successfully applied in clinical environments to calibrate numerous routinely used C-arm systems. For each trajectory segment, the phantom is placed in an optimal position. The two calibration results are then combined by computing the transformation the phantom underwent between the independent calibration runs. This combination can be done in a post-processing step by using standard linear algebra. The method is not limited to circle-plus-arc trajectories and works for any calibration procedure in which the phantom has a preferred orientation with respect to a trajectory segment. Results are presented for both simulated as well as real data acquired with a C-arm system. We also present the first image reconstruction results for the circle-plus-arc trajectory using real C-arm data.

  13. High pressure neon arc lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  14. SU-E-T-625: Potential for Reduced Radiation Induced Toxicity for the Treatment of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using RapidArc Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using RapidArc (RA) treatment planning to reduce irradiation volume of normal lung and other organs at risk (OARs) in the treatment of inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: A retrospective treatment planning and delivery study was performed to compare target coverage and the volumes of the normal lung, spinal cord, heart and esophagus on 4D-CT scan above their dose tolerances delivered by RA vs. IMRT for ten inoperable NSCLC patients (Stage I-IIIB). RA plans consisted of either one-full or two-partial co-planar arcs used to treat 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 6MV beam to a prescription of 66Gy in 33 fractions. IMRT plans were generated using 5–7 co-planar fields with 6MV beam. PTV coverage, dose-volume histograms, homogeneity/conformity indices (CI), total number of monitor units(MUs), beam-on time and delivery accuracy were compared between the two treatment plans. Results: Similar target coverage was obtained between the two techniques. RA (CI=1.02) provided more conformal plans without loss of homogeneity compared to IMRT plans (CI=1.12). Compared to IMRT, RA achieved a significant median dose reduction in V10 (3%), V20 (8%), and mean lung dose (3%) on average, respectively. On average, V5 was comparable between the two treatment plans. RA reduced mean esophagus (6%), mean heart (18%), and maximum spinal cord dose (7%), on average, respectively. Total number of MUs and beam-on time were each reduced almost by a factor of 2 when compared to IMRT-patient comfort, reduced intra-fraction-motion and leakage dose. The average IMRT and RA QA pass rate was about 98% for both types of plans for 3%/3mm criterion. Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, RA provided not only comparable target coverage, but also improved conformity, treatment time, and significant reduction in irradiation of OARs. This may potentially allow for target dose escalation without increase in normal tissue toxicity.

  15. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  16. Quality assurance methodology for Varian RapidArc treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Xiong, Li; Mower, Herbert W

    2010-09-01

    With the commercial introduction of the Varian RapidArc, a new modality for treatment planning and delivery, the need has arisen for consistent and efficient techniques for performing patient-specific quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper we present our methodology for a RapidArc treatment plan QA procedure. For our measurements we used a 2D diode array (MapCHECK) embedded at 5 cm water equivalent depth in MapPHAN 5 phantom and an Exradin A16 ion chamber placed in six different positions in a cylindrical homogeneous phantom (QUASAR). We also checked the MUs for the RapidArc plans by using independent software (RadCalc). The agreement between Eclipse calculations and MapCHECK/MapPHAN5 measurements was evaluated using both absolute distance-to-agreement (DTA) and gamma index with 10% dose threshold (TH), 3% dose difference (DD), and 3 mm DTA. The average agreement was 94.4% for the DTA approach and 96.3% for the gamma index approach. In high-dose areas, the discrepancy between calculations and ion chamber measurements using the QUASAR phantom was within 4.5% for prostate cases. For the RadCalc calculations, we used the average SSD along the arc; however, for some patients the agreement for the MUs obtained with RadCalc versus Eclipse was inadequate (discrepancy > 5%). In these cases, the plan was divided into partial arc plans so that RadCalc could perform a better estimation of the MUs. The discrepancy was further reduced to within ~4% using this approach. Regardless of the variation in prescribed dose and location of the treated areas, we obtained very good results for all patients studied in this paper.

  17. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  18. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C DK-8000 (Denmark); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Bokrantz, Rasmus [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm SE-111 34 (Sweden); Chen, Danny [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Men, Chunhua [Department of Research, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Papp, Dávid [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Romeijn, Edwin [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Salari, Ehsan [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67260 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  19. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Osei, E [Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use.

  20. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Adamson, Justus; Rodrigues, Anna; Zhou, Fugen; Yin, Fang-fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2013-10-07

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta(4) system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods.

  1. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Adamson, Justus; Rodrigues, Anna; Zhou, Fugen; Yin, Fang-fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2013-10-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta4 system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods.

  2. Formation of Multicharged Metal Ions in Vacuum Arc Plasma Heated by Gyrotron Radiation%Formation of Multicharged Metal Ions in Vacuum Arc Plasma Heated by Gyrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Yu. YUSHKOV; K. P. SAVKIN; A. G. NIKOLAEV; E. M. OKS; A.V. VODOPYANOV; I. V. IZOTOV; D. A. MANSFELD

    2011-01-01

    A new method for the generation of high charged state metal ion beams is developed. This method is based on microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions. Two gyrotrons for plasma heating were used, which were with the following parameters. The first is with a wave frequency of 37.5 GHz, a pulse duration of 1 ms and power of 100 kW, another is with 75 GHz, 0.15 ms and 400 kW. Two different magnetic traps were considered for vacuum arc plasma confinement. The first one is a simple mirror trap. Such system was already investigated and could provide high charge state ions. The second trap was with a cusp magnetic field configuration with native "minimum-B" field structure. Two different ways of metal plasma injection into the magnetic trap were used. The first one is an axial injection from an arc source located out of the trap, and the second is a radial injection from four arc sources mounted at the center of the trap. Both traps provide up to 200 eMA of ion beam current for platinum ions with highest charge state 10+. Ion beams were successfully extracted from the plasma and accelerated by a voltage of up to 20 kV.

  3. Validation of Pinnacle treatment planning system for use with Novalis delivery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faygelman, Vladimir; Hunt, Dylan; Walker, Luke; Mueller, Richard; Demarco, Mary Lou; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2010-06-15

    For an institution that already owns the licenses, it is economically advantageous and technically feasible to use Pinnacle TPS (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with the BrainLab Novalis delivery system (BrainLAB A.G., Heimstetten, Germany). This takes advantage of the improved accuracy of the convolution algorithm in the presence of heterogeneities compared with the pencil beam calculation, which is particularly significant for lung SBRT treatments. The reference patient positioning DRRs still have to be generated by the BrainLab software from the CT images and isocenter coordinates transferred from Pinnacle. We validated this process with the end-to-end hidden target test, which showed an isocenter positioning error within one standard deviation from the previously established mean value. The Novalis treatment table attenuation is substantial (up to 6.2% for a beam directed straight up and up to 8.4% for oblique incidence) and has to be accounted for in calculations. A simple single-contour treatment table model was developed, resulting in mean differences between the measured and calculated attenuation factors of 0.0%-0.2%, depending on the field size. The maximum difference for a single incidence angle is 1.1%. The BrainLab micro-MLC (mMLC) leaf tip, although not geometrically round, can be represented in Pinnacle by an arch with satisfactory dosimetric accuracy. Subsequently, step-and-shoot (direct machine parameter optimization) IMRT dosimetric agreement is excellent. VMAT (called "SmartArc" in Pinnacle) treatments with constant gantry speed and dose rate are feasible without any modifications to the accelerator. Due to the 3 mm-wide mMLC leaves, the use of a 2 mm calculation grid is recommended. When dual arcs are used for the more complex cases, the overall dosimetric agreement for the SmartArc plans compares favorably with the previously reported results for other implementations of VMAT: gamma(3%,3mm) for absolute dose obtained with the

  4. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  5. Hooded arc ion-source

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The positioning system for the hooded arc ion-source, shown prior to mounting, consists of four excentric shafts to locate the ion-source and central electrodes. It will be placed on the axis of the SC and introduced into the vacuum tank via the air locks visible in the foreground.

  6. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  7. Rotating Drive for Electrical-Arc Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rotating drive improves quality of holes made by electrical-arc machining. Mechanism (Uni-tek, rotary head, or equivalent) attached to electrical-arc system. Drive rotates electrode as though it were mechanical drill, while an arc disintegrates metal in workpiece, thereby creating hole. Rotating electrode method often used in electric-discharge machining. NASA innovation is application of technique to electrical-arc machining.

  8. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  9. Magnification Bias in Gravitational Arc Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminha, G. B. [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Estrada, J. [Fermilab; Makler, M. [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2013-08-29

    The statistics of gravitational arcs in galaxy clusters is a powerful probe of cluster structure and may provide complementary cosmological constraints. Despite recent progresses, discrepancies still remain among modelling and observations of arc abundance, specially regarding the redshift distribution of strong lensing clusters. Besides, fast "semi-analytic" methods still have to incorporate the success obtained with simulations. In this paper we discuss the contribution of the magnification in gravitational arc statistics. Although lensing conserves surface brightness, the magnification increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the arcs, enhancing their detectability. We present an approach to include this and other observational effects in semi-analytic calculations for arc statistics. The cross section for arc formation ({\\sigma}) is computed through a semi-analytic method based on the ratio of the eigenvalues of the magnification tensor. Using this approach we obtained the scaling of {\\sigma} with respect to the magnification, and other parameters, allowing for a fast computation of the cross section. We apply this method to evaluate the expected number of arcs per cluster using an elliptical Navarro--Frenk--White matter distribution. Our results show that the magnification has a strong effect on the arc abundance, enhancing the fraction of arcs, moving the peak of the arc fraction to higher redshifts, and softening its decrease at high redshifts. We argue that the effect of magnification should be included in arc statistics modelling and that it could help to reconcile arcs statistics predictions with the observational data.

  10. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  11. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  12. Thermal analysis of an arc heater electrode with a rotating arc foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Shepard, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A smoothly rotating arc foot and an arc foot that jumps between multiple sticking points were analyzed using analytic formulations and numerical solution procedures. For each case the temperature distribution for a copper electrode was obtained for the plausible range of operating conditions. It is shown that the smoothly rotating arc foot is an extremely safe mode of operation, whereas the jumping arc foot produces excessively high electrode surface temperatures which are not greatly alleviated by increasing the average rotational frequency of the arc foot. It is suggested to eliminate arc-foot rotation and rely on the distribution of fixed electrodes with stationary arc attachment to avoid electrode failure at high current.

  13. Dosimetry Comparison between Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with RapidArc and Fixed Field Dynamic IMRT for Local-Regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-min Zheng; Xiao-xia Dong; Hao Wu; You-jia Duan; Shu-kui Han; Yan Sun

    2011-01-01

    Objective:A dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy with RapidArc on locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).Methods:The CT scan data sets of 20 patients of locally advanced NPC were selected randomly.The plans were managed using volumetric modulated arc with RapidArc and fixed nine-field coplanar dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for these patients.The dosimetry of the planning target volumes (PTV),the organs at risk (OARs) and the healthy tissue were evaluated.The dose prescription was set to 70 Gy to the primary tumor and 60 Gy to the clinical target volumes (CTV) in 33 fractions.Each fraction applied daily,five fractions per week.The monitor unit (MU) values and the delivery time were scored to evaluate the expected treatment efficiency.Results:Both techniques had reached clinical treatment's requirement.The mean dose (Dmean),maximum dose (Dmax) and minimum dose (Dmin) in RapidArc and fixed field IMRT for PTV were 68.4±0.6 Gy,74.8±0.9 Gy and 56.8±1.1 Gy; and 67.6±0.6 Gy,73.8±0.4 Gy and 57.5±0.6 Gy (P<0.05),respectively.Homogeneity index was 78.85±1.29 in RapidArc and 80.34±0.54 (P<0.05) in IMRT.The conformity index (CI:95%) was 0.78±0.01 for both techniques (P>0.05).Compared to IMRT,RapidArc allowed a reduction of Dmean to the brain stem,mandible and optic nerves of 14.1% (P<0.05),5.6% (P<0.05) and 12.2% (P<0.05),respectively.For the healthy tissue and the whole absorbed dose,Dmean of RapidArc was reduced by 3.6% (P<0.05),and 3.7% (P<0.05),respectively.The Dmean to the parotids,the spinal cord and the lens had no statistical difference among them.The mean MU values of RapidArc and IMRT were 550 and 1,379.The mean treatment time of RapidArc and IMRT was 165 s and 447 s.Compared to IMRT,the delivery time and the MU values of RapidArc were reduced by 63% and 60%,respectively.Conclusion:For locally advanced NPC,both RapidArc and IMRT reached

  14. Tectonomagmatism in continental arcs: evidence from the Sark arc complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Wes; Moreno, Teresa

    2002-07-01

    The island of Sark (Channel Islands, UK) exposes syntectonic plutons and country rock gneisses within a Precambrian (Cadomian) continental arc. This Sark arc complex records sequential pulses of magmatism over a period of 7 Ma (ca. 616-609 Ma). The earliest intrusion (ca. 616 Ma) was a composite sill that shows an ultramafic base overlain by a magma-mingled net vein complex subsequently deformed at near-solidus temperatures into the amphibolitic and tonalitic Tintageu banded gneisses. The deformation was synchronous with D 2 deformation of the paragneissic envelope, with both intrusion and country rock showing flat, top-to-the-south LS fabrics. Later plutonism injected three homogeneous quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets: the Creux-Moulin pluton (150-250 m; ca. 614 Ma), the Little Sark pluton (>700 m; 611 Ma), and the Northern pluton (>500 m; 609 Ma). Similar but thinner sheets in the south (Derrible-Hogsback-Dixcart) and west (Port es Saies-Brecqhou) are interpreted as offshoots from the Creux-Moulin pluton and Little Sark pluton, respectively. All these plutons show the same LS fabric seen in the older gneisses, with rare magmatic fabrics and common solid state fabrics recording syntectonic crystallisation and cooling. The cooling rate increased rapidly with decreasing crystallisation age: >9 Ma for the oldest intrusion to cool to lower amphibolite conditions, 7-8 Ma for the Creux Moulin pluton, 5-6 Ma for the Little Sark pluton, and 10 -14 s -1) that focussed extensional deformation into the Sark area. The increased rates of extension allowed ingress of the subsequent quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets, although strain rate slowly declined as the whole complex cooled during exhumation. The regional architecture of syntectonic Cadomian arc complexes includes flat-lying "Sark-type" and steep "Guernsey-type" domains produced synchronously in shear zone networks induced by oblique subduction: a pattern seen in other continental arcs such as that running from Alaska

  15. Accelerating total body irradiation with large field modulated arc therapy in standard treatment rooms without additional equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polednik, Martin; Lohr, Frank; Ehmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a generic and ultra-efficient modulated arc technique for treatment with total body irradiation (TBI) without additional equipment in standard treatment rooms. A continuous gantry arc between 300 and 70 composed of 26 subarcs (5 per subarc) using a field size of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} was used to perform the initial beam data measurements. The profile was measured parallel to the direction of gantry rotation at a constant depth of 9 cm (phantom thickness 18 cm). Beam data were measured for single 5 subarcs, dissecting the individual contribution of each subarc to a certain measurement point. The phantom was moved to 20 measurement positions along the profile. Then profile optimization was performed manually by varying the weighting factors of all segments until calculated doses at all points were within ± 1 %. Finally, the dose distribution of the modulated arc was verified in phantom thicknesses of 18 and 28 cm. The measured profile showed a relative mean dose of 99.7 % [standard deviation (SD) 0.7 %] over the length of 200 cm at a depth of 9 cm. The measured mean effective surface dose (at a depth of 2 cm) was 102.7 % (SD 2.1 %). The measurements in the 28 cm slab phantom revealed a mean dose of 95.9 % (SD 2.9 %) at a depth of 14 cm. The mean dose at a depth of 2 cm was 111.9 % (SD 4.1 %). Net beam-on-time for a 2 Gy fraction is approximately 8 min. This highly efficient modulated arc technique for TBI can replace conventional treatment techniques, providing a homogeneous dose distribution, dosimetric robustness, extremely fast delivery, and applicability in small treatment rooms, with no need for additional equipment. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieses Projekts war die Entwicklung einer generischen, hocheffizienten und modulierten Rotationsbestrahlungstechnik fuer Ganzkoerperbestrahlung (TBI, ''total body irradiation''), die ohne zusaetzliches Equipment in Standartbehandlungsraeumen angewendet werden kann. Ein

  16. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  17. A Contribution to Arc Length Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Egerland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation was raising the question: "What does 'arc length' mean?" Actually, it is considered expressing a kind of natural relationship between arc voltage and arc column shape. Statements such as "The higher the voltage the longer the arc" or "The arc voltage proves approximately proportional to the arc length", are frequently noticed in this conjunction. However, the author suggests that there is no general possibility of describing 'arc length' over the whole welding process range. Instances are represented in this paper, showing both theoretical attempts of definition and practical observations. This paper intends to contribute to a serious discussion of something trivial, indeed very well-known or used among welding experts, but actually yet hardly understood, at least as when it comes to closer examination

  18. Laser-driven beam lines for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy with particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, K. M.; Schell, S.; Wilkens, J. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München (Germany)

    2013-07-26

    Laser-accelerated particles can provide a promising opportunity for radiation therapy of cancer. Potential advantages arise from combining a compact, cost-efficient treatment unit with the physical advantages in dose delivery of charged particle beams. We consider different dose delivery schemes and the required devices to design a possible treatment unit. The secondary radiation produced in several beam line elements remains a challenge to be addressed.

  19. Planning for mARC treatments with the Eclipse treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Vikren; Huang, Long; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Jessica; Szegedi, Martin; Salter, Bill J

    2015-03-08

    While modulated arc (mARC) capabilities have been available on Siemens linear accelerators for almost two years now, there was, until recently, only one treatment planning system capable of planning these treatments. The Eclipse treatment planning system now offers a module that can plan for mARC treatments. The purpose of this work was to test the module to determine whether it is capable of creating clinically acceptable plans. A total of 23 plans were created for various clinical sites and all plans delivered without anomaly. The average 3%/3 mm gamma pass rate for the plans was 98.0%, with a standard deviation of 1.7%. For a total of 14 plans, an equivalent static gantry IMRT plan was also created to compare delivery time. In all but two cases, the mARC plans delivered significantly faster than the static gantry plan. We have confirmed the successful creation of mARC plans that are deliverable with high fidelity on an ARTISTE linear accelerator, thus demonstrating the successful implementation of the Eclipse mARC module.

  20. Comparison of Dosimetric Performance among Commercial Quality Assurance Systems for Verifying Pretreatment Plans of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Flattening-Filter-Free Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of different commercial quality assurance (QA) systems for the pretreatment verification plan of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique using a flattening-filter-free beam. The verification for 20 pretreatment cancer patients (seven lung, six spine, and seven prostate cancers) were tested using three QA systems (EBT3 film, I’mRT MatriXX array, and MapCHECK). All the SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized in the Eclipse (version 11.0.34) treatment planning system (TPS) using the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm and were delivered to the Varian TrueBeam® accelerator equipped with a high-definition multileaf collimator. Gamma agreement evaluation was analyzed with the criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement (2%/2 mm) or 3%/3 mm. The highest passing rate (99.1% for 3%/3 mm) was observed on the MapCHECK system while the lowest passing rate was obtained on the film. The pretreatment verification results depend on the QA systems, treatment sites, and delivery beam energies. However, the delivery QA results for all QA systems based on the TPS calculation showed a good agreement of more than 90% for both the criteria. It is concluded that the three 2D QA systems have sufficient potential for pretreatment verification of the SBRT-VMAT plan. PMID:27709851

  1. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically Tzrnsat [3]. A corollary is that slightly older zircon antecrysts that are common in the inner units of the TIS could be considered inherited if they are derived from remelting of slightly older intrusions. Remelting at such low temperatures in the arc would require a source of external water. Refs: [1] Sawyer, J.Pet 32:701-738; [2] Fraser et al, Geology 25:607-610; [3] Harrison et al, Geology 35:635- 638

  2. SU-E-T-426: Feasibility of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Jackson, J; Davies, G; Herman, J; Forbang, R Teboh [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT shows excellent tumor control and toxicity rates for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PCA). Herein, we evaluate the feasibility of using VMAT with ABC for PCA SBRT. Methods: Nine PCA patients previously treated via SBRT utilizing 11-beam step-and-shoot IMRT technique in our center were retrospectively identified, among whom eight patients received 3300cGy in 5 fractions while one received 3000cGy in 5 fractions. A VMAT plan was generated on each patient’s planning CT in Pinnacle v9.8 on Elekta Synergy following the same PCA SBRT clinical protocol. Three partial arcs (182°–300°, 300°-60°, and 60°-180°) with 2°/4° control-point spacing were used. The dosimetric difference between the VMAT and the original IMRT plans was analyzed. IMRT QA was performed for the VMAT plans using MapCheck2 in MapPHAN and the total delivery time was recorded. To mimic the treatment situation with ABC, where patients hold their breath for 20–30 seconds, the delivery was intentionally interrupted every 20–30 seconds. For each plan, the QA was performed with and without beam interruption. Gamma analysis (2%/2mm) was used to compare the planned and measured doses. Results: All VMAT plans with 2mm dose grid passed the clinic protocol with similar PTV coverage and OARs sparing, where PTV V-RxDose was 92.7±2.1% (VMAT) vs. 92.1±2.6% (IMRT), and proximal stomach V15Gy was 3.60±2.69 cc (VMAT) vs. 4.80±3.13 cc (IMRT). The mean total MU and delivery time of the VMAT plans were 2453.8±531.1 MU and 282.1±56.0 seconds. The gamma passing rates of absolute dose were 94.9±3.4% and 94.5±4.0% for delivery without and with interruption respectively, suggesting the dosimetry of VMAT delivery with ABC for SBRT won’t be compromised. Conclusion: This study suggests that PCA SBRT using VMAT with ABC is a feasible technique without compromising plan dosimetry. The combination of VMAT with ABC will potentially reduce the SBRT treatment time.

  3. Premature delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardita Donoso Bernales

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Preterm delivery is the single most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. In Chile, preterm births have increased in the past decade, although neonatal morbidity and mortality attributable to it shows a downward trend, thanks to improvements in neonatal care of premature babies, rather than the success of obstetric preventive and therapeutic strategies. This article describes clinical entities, disease processes and conditions that constitute predisposing factors of preterm birth, as well as an outline for the prevention and clinical management of women at risk of preterm birth.

  4. Theoretical investigation of coherent synchrotron radiation induced microbunching instability in transport and recirculation arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as recirculation or transport arcs, may lead to the microbunching instability. We extend and develop a semi-analytical approach of the CSR-induced microbunching instability for a general lattice, based on the previous formulation with 1-D CSR model [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 064401 (2002)] and apply it to investigate the physical processes of microbunching amplification for two example transport arc lattices. We find that the microbunching instability in transport arcs has a distinguishing feature of multistage amplification (e.g, up to 6th stage for our example arcs in contrast to two stage amplification for a 3-dipole chicane). By further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 074401 (2002)], we developed a method to quantitatively characterize the microbunching amplification in terms of iterative or staged orders that allows the compar...

  5. On the use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy for single-fraction thoracic vertebral metastases stereotactic body radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; McClinton, Christopher; Shen, Xinglei; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; Mallory, Matthew; Mitchell, Mellissa; Wang, Fen; Lominska, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate quality, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for single-fraction treatment of thoracic vertebral metastases using image-guided stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRS) after RTOG 0631 dosimetric compliance criteria. After obtaining credentialing for MD Anderson spine phantom irradiation validation, 10 previously treated patients with thoracic vertebral metastases with noncoplanar hybrid arcs using 1 to 2 3D-conformal partial arcs plus 7 to 9 intensity-modulated radiation therapy beams were retrospectively re-optimized with VMAT using 3 full coplanar arcs. Tumors were located between T2 and T12. Contrast-enhanced T1/T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were coregistered with planning computed tomography and planning target volumes (PTV) were between 14.4 and 230.1cc (median = 38.0cc). Prescription dose was 16Gy in 1 fraction with 6MV beams at Novalis-TX linear accelerator consisting of micro multileaf collimators. Each plan was assessed for target coverage using conformality index, the conformation number, the ratio of the volume receiving 50% of the prescription dose over PTV, R50%, homogeneity index (HI), and PTV_1600 coverage per RTOG 0631 requirements. Organs-at-risk doses were evaluated for maximum doses to spinal cord (D0.03cc, D0.35cc), partial spinal cord (D10%), esophagus (D0.03cc and D5cc), heart (D0.03cc and D15cc), and lung (V5, V10, and maximum dose to 1000cc of lung). Dose delivery efficiency and accuracy of each VMAT-SBRS plan were assessed using quality assurance (QA) plan on MapCHECK device. Total beam-on time was recorded during QA procedure, and a clinical gamma index (2%/2mm and 3%/3mm) was used to compare agreement between planned and measured doses. All 10 VMAT-SBRS plans met RTOG 0631 dosimetric requirements for PTV coverage. The plans demonstrated highly conformal and homogenous coverage of the vertebral PTV with mean HI, conformality index, conformation number, and R50

  6. A fast radiotherapy paradigm for anal cancer with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Friedlieb

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Purpose Radiotherapy (RT volumes for anal cancer are large and of moderate complexity when organs at risk (OAR such as testis, small bowel and bladder are at least partially to be shielded. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT might provide OAR-shielding comparable to step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for this tumor entity with better treatment efficiency. Materials and methods Based on treatment planning CTs of 8 patients, we compared dose distributions, comformality index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, number of monitor units (MU and treatment time (TTT for plans generated for VMAT, 3D-CRT and step-and-shoot-IMRT (optimized based on Pencil Beam (PB or Monte Carlo (MC dose calculation for typical anal cancer planning target volumes (PTV including inguinal lymph nodes as usually treated during the first phase (0-36 Gy of a shrinking field regimen. Results With values of 1.33 ± 0.21/1.26 ± 0.05/1.3 ± 0.02 and 1.39 ± 0.09, the CI's for IMRT (PB-Corvus/PB-Hyperion/MC-Hyperion and VMAT are better than for 3D-CRT with 2.00 ± 0.16. The HI's for the prescribed dose (HI36 for 3D-CRT were 1.06 ± 0.01 and 1.11 ± 0.02 for VMAT, respectively and 1.15 ± 0.02/1.10 ± 0.02/1.11 ± 0.08 for IMRT (PB-Corvus/PB-Hyperion/MC-Hyperion. Mean TTT and MU's for 3D-CRT is 220s/225 ± 11MU and for IMRT (PB-Corvus/PB-Hyperion/MC-Hyperion is 575s/1260 ± 172MU, 570s/477 ± 84MU and 610s748 ± 193MU while TTT and MU for two-arc-VMAT is 290s/268 ± 19MU. Conclusion VMAT provides treatment plans with high conformity and homogeneity equivalent to step-and-shoot-IMRT for this mono-concave treatment volume. Short treatment delivery time and low primary MU are the most important advantages.

  7. H_2O and CO_2 in magmas from the Mariana arc and back arc systems

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Sally; Stolper, Edward; STERN, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We examined the H2O and CO2 contents of glasses from lavas and xenoliths from the Mariana arc system, an intraoceanic convergent margin in the western Pacific, which contains an active volcanic arc, an actively spreading back arc basin, and active behind-the-arc cross-chain volcanoes. Samples include (1) glass rims from Mariana arc, Mariana trough, and cross-chain submarine lavas; (2) glass inclusions in arc and trough phenocrysts; and (3) glass inclusions from a gabbro + anorthosite xenolith...

  8. Arc Root Attachment on the Anode Surface of Arc Plasma Torch Observed with a Novel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wen-Xia; LI Teng; MENG Xian; CHEN Xi; WU Cheng-Kang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The arc-root attachment on the anode surface of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch has been successfullyobserved using a novel approach. A specially designed copper mirror with a boron nitride film coated on itssurface central-region is employed to avoid the effect of intensive light emitted from the arc column upon theobservation of weakly luminous arc root. It is found that the arc-root attachment is diffusive on the anode surfaceof the argon plasma torch, while constricted arc roots often occur when hydrogen or nitrogen is added into argonas the plasma-forming gas.

  9. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  10. Comparison of VMAT-SABR treatment plans with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, In-Ah; Kang, Sang-Won; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam with an endorectal balloon for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) of clinically localized prostate cancer. We assessed plans of SABR with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) that used a flattening filter (FF) beam and an FFF beam and compared the verification results of dosimetric quality assurance for all pretreatment plans. A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. SABR plans using VMAT with two full arcs were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. All plans prescribed 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions of 6.1 Gy each. Four SABR plans were computed for each patient: two with FF beams and two with FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. For all plans, the cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were recorded and compared. Pretreatment quality assurance (QA) was performed using the I'mRT MatriXX system and radiochromic EBT3 film to verify treatment delivery, and gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. In addition, total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were investigated as technical parameters of delivery. All four plans achieved adequate dose conformity to the target volumes and had comparable dosimetric data. The DVHs of all four plans for each patient were very similar. All plans were highly conformal with CI 0.90, and the doses were homogeneous (HI = 0.08-0.15). Sparing for the bladder and rectum was slightly better with the 10 MV FF and FFF plans than with the 6 MV FF and FFF plans, but the difference was negligible. However, there was no significant difference in sparing for the other OARs. The mean agreement with the 3%/3 mm criterion was higher than 97% for verifying all plans. For the 2%/2 mm criterion, the corresponding agreement values were more than 90%, which showed that the plans were acceptable. The mean MUs and

  11. Reappraisal of the Arc-Arc Collision in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuzo Seno and Yoshiaki Kawanishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Al though it is evident that Taiwan has been formed by the collision of the west-facing Luzon arc with the Eurasian continental mar gin, _ main a lot of enigmas in this collision. The major ones are: (1 a trans form fault presently connecting the Manila and Ryukyu Trenches in the Philippine Sea _ Eurasia relative motion direction is missing, and in stead, the Ryukyu Trench ex tends near off shore E. Tai wan, (2 the western edge of the intermediate-depth seismicity associated with We pro pose a new model of the collision in Tai wan to re solve these enigmas, assuming that the southern Ryukyu forearc was mi grating to the south west with respect to Eurasia for the past several m.y. and the Luzon arc has been colliding with this actively migrating Ryukyu forearc. The northern most Luzon arc is divided into two parts by the NNW line directing along the Philippine Sea - Ryukyu forearc motion from its initial intersection point with the Ryukyu Trench; the part west of this line has been obducted on the Ryukyu forearc-Eurasian mar gin, producing the collision orogen in Taiwan, and the part east of it has been subducted beneath the Ryukyu forearc. This evolutionary scenario resolves enigmas (1 and (2 kinematically. This model also predicts that the South China Sea slab has to be torn by the west ward component of the motion of the subducting Philippine Sea slab to Eurasia. This would have brought large lateral compression in the shallow portion of the Philippine Sea slab at its western border, which might lead to buck ling of the slab causing the ob served undulated gravity anomaly.

  12. Temperature rise induced in Si by continuous xenon arc lamp radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietoila, A.; Gold, R. B.; Gibbons, J. F.

    1982-02-01

    It is shown that practical beam annealing of silicon can be accomplished with a high intensity arc lamp. The use of a one-dimensional, steady-state solution for temperature is justified. The Kirchhoff transform is utilized to include the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. Surface temperatures produced by a xenon arc lamp are calculated for 300- and 375-μm thick silicon samples, using substrate temperatures of 350 and 500 °C. It is shown that substantial reduction of the radiation intensity required for a given surface temperature can be obtained by placing a quartz wafer between the silicon sample and the heat sink.

  13. Adhesion improvement of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester composites by gliding arc discharge treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Sørensen, Bent F.; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    A gliding arc is a plasma that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and applied for plasma surface treatment for adhesion improvement. In the present work, glass-fibre-reinforced polyester plates were treated using an atmospheric pressure gliding arc discharge with an air flow to improve...... adhesion with a vinylester adhesive. The treatment improved wettability and increased the polar component of the surface energy and the density of oxygen-containing polar functional groups at the surfaces. Double cantilever beam specimens were prepared for fracture mechanics characterisation (fracture...

  14. Efficiency of biological versus physical optimization for single-arc VMAT for prostate and head and neck cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyshniak, Vadzim; Fotina, Irina; Zverava, Alena; Siamkouski, Stanislau; Zayats, Elena; Kopanitsa, Georgy; Okuntsau, Dzmitry

    2014-07-08

    The aim of this work was to compare different approaches to VMAT optimization (biological vs. physical DVH-based) in two commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for head and neck and prostate cases, using Pareto fronts. VMAT vs. IMRT Pareto front comparison was additionally performed in order to benchmark the optimizer efficiency and VMAT plan quality for each TPS. Three prostate and three head and neck cancer patients were selected for nine-beam IMRT and single-arc VMAT planning in Monaco 3.00 and Oncentra MasterPlan (OMP) 3.3 planning systems. Pareto fronts for prostate cases were constructed based on PTV coverage by 95% isodose and volume of rectum receiving 60 Gy or more. For head and neck cases, PTV coverage by the same isodose and mean dose to parotid gland were used for the construction of Pareto fronts. DVH analysis was performed together with evaluation of planning and delivery efficiency for all the plans. In the intersystem comparison for prostate plans, Monaco generated very similar IMRT and VMAT solutions. Quality of Monaco VMAT plans was superior compared to Oncentra in terms of conformity, homogeneity, and lower median dose to bladder due to biological formalism of optimization cost functions. For the head and neck cases, IMRT and VMAT plans were similar in both systems, except the case where a very strong modulation was required. In this situation single-arc VMAT plan generated with OMP was inferior compared to IMRT. VMAT OMP solutions were similar to Monaco or slightly better for two less-modulated head and neck cases. However, this advantage was achieved on the cost of lower conformity and homogeneity of the Oncentra VMAT plans. IMRT and VMAT solutions generated by Monaco were very similar for both prostate and head and neck cases. Oncentra system shows a bigger difference, and use of the dual-arc VMAT would be recommended to achieve the same plan quality as nine-field IMRT. Biological optimization seems beneficial in terms of plan conformity

  15. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  16. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  17. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  18. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-09-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is defined as the electron dose at a given point in phantom divided by the number of monitor units given for any one stationary electron beam. For a given depth of isocenter di the electron dose rates at dmax are linearly dependent on the nominal field width w, while for a given w the dose rates are inversely proportional to di. The dose rates for rotational electron beams with different di are related through the inverse square law provided that the two beams have (di,w) combinations which give the same characteristic angle beta. The photon dose at the isocenter depends on the arc angle alpha, field width w, and isocenter depth di. For constant w and di the photon dose at isocenter is proportional to alpha, for constant alpha and w it is proportional to di, and for constant alpha and di it is inversely proportional to w. The w and di dependence implies that for the same alpha the photon dose at the isocenter is inversely proportional to the electron dose rate at dmax.

  19. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  20. High power fiber delivery for laser ignition applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalin, Azer P

    2013-11-01

    The present contribution provides a concise review of high power fiber delivery research for laser ignition applications. The fiber delivery requirements are discussed in terms of exit energy, intensity, and beam quality. Past research using hollow core fibers, solid step-index fibers, and photonic crystal and bandgap fibers is summarized. Recent demonstrations of spark delivery using large clad step-index fibers and Kagome photonic bandgap fibers are highlighted.

  1. Dosimetric differences in flattened and flattening filter-free beam treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the dosimetric differences in treatment plans from flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF beams from the TrueBeam System. A total of 104 treatment plans with static (sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy beams and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT beams were generated for 15 patients involving three cancer sites. In general, the FFF beam provides similar target coverage as the flattened beam with improved dose sparing to organ-at-risk (OAR. Among all three cancer sites, the head and neck showed more important differences between the flattened beam and FFF beam. The maximum reduction of the FFF beam in the mean dose reached up to 2.82 Gy for larynx in head and neck case. Compared to the 6 MV flattened beam, the 10 MV FFF beam provided improved dose sparing to certain OARs, especially for VMAT cases. Thus, 10 MV FFF beam could be used to improve the treatment plan.

  2. Boxicity of Circular Arc Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Diptendu; Chandran, L. Sunil

    2008-01-01

    A $k$-dimensional box is the cartesian product $R_1 \\times R_2 \\times ... \\times R_k$ where each $R_i$ is a closed interval on the real line. The {\\it boxicity} of a graph $G$, denoted as $box(G)$, is the minimum integer $k$ such that $G$ can be represented as the intersection graph of a collection of $k$-dimensional boxes: that is two vertices are adjacent if and only if their corresponding boxes intersect. A circular arc graph is a graph that can be represented as the intersection graph of ...

  3. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwen; CHEN Degui; LI Rui; WU Yi; NIU Chunping

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  4. The Team Orienteering Arc Routing Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Archetti, Claudia; Speranza, M. Grazia; Corberan, Angel; Sanchís Llopis, José María; Plana, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The team orienteering arc routing problem (TOARP) is the extension to the arc routing setting of the team orienteering problem. In the TOARP, in addition to a possible set of regular customers that have to be serviced, another set of potential customers is available. Each customer is associated with an arc of a directed graph. Each potential customer has a profit that is collected when it is serviced, that is, when the associated arc is traversed. A fleet of vehicles with a given maximum trav...

  5. Class `E` protective headwear: electric arc exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.

    1997-04-01

    A series of tests were conducted using electric arcs under laboratory conditions to determine what, if any, damages can be inflicted upon class `E` hard hats. Ten hard hats were subjected to different levels of arc exposure to see if the hat would ignite, melt, drip, stick to the head, etc. It was noted that there is no standard on hard hat exposure to an electric arc. It was recommended that the CSA committee revise the protective headwear standard to include a requirement for flame/arc resistance, including specification of pass/fail criteria. 1 tab., 3 figs.

  6. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  7. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian;

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers......We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers...

  9. Feedback Linearization Based Arc Length Control for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feedback linearization based arc length controller for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is described. A nonlinear model describing the dynamic arc length is transformed into a system where nonlinearities can be cancelled by a nonlinear state feedback control part, and thus, leaving only...

  10. Simulating Proton Synchrotron Radiation in the Arcs of the LHC, HL-LHC, and FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Guillermo Cantón, Gerardo; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    At high proton-beam energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, of beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and of primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distributions in the arcs of the LHC, HL-LHC, and FCC-hh. Specifically, for the LHC we study the effect of the “sawtooth” chamber, for the HL-LHC the consequences of the ATS optics with large beta beating in the arcs, and for the FCC-hh the effect of a novel beam-screen design, with a long slit surrounded by a “folded” antechamber.

  11. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias;

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...... outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from otherGrids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data...

  12. l580aa.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-5-80-AA in Aleutian Arc, Alaska from 06/23/1980 to 07/05/1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-5-80-AA in Aleutian Arc, Alaska from...

  13. l981aa.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-9-81-AA in Aleutian Arc, Alaska from 07/19/1981 to 08/13/1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, magnetics, and gravity data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-9-81-AA in Aleutian Arc,...

  14. 4D dose simulation in volumetric arc therapy: Accuracy and affecting parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions has changed from normofractioned 3D-CRT to stereotactic treatment in a single or few fractions, often employing volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-based techniques. Potential unintended interference of respiratory target motion and dynamically changing beam parameters during VMAT dose delivery motivates establishing 4D quality assurance (4D QA) procedures to assess appropriateness of generated VMAT treatment plans when taking into account patient-specific motion characteristics. Current approaches are motion phantom-based 4D QA and image-based 4D VMAT dose simulation. Whereas phantom-based 4D QA is usually restricted to a small number of measurements, the computational approaches allow simulating many motion scenarios. However, 4D VMAT dose simulation depends on various input parameters, influencing estimated doses along with mitigating simulation reliability. Thus, aiming at routine use of simulation-based 4D VMAT QA, the impact of such parameters as well as the overall accuracy of the 4D VMAT dose simulation has to be studied in detail–which is the topic of the present work. In detail, we introduce the principles of 4D VMAT dose simulation, identify influencing parameters and assess their impact on 4D dose simulation accuracy by comparison of simulated motion-affected dose distributions to corresponding dosimetric motion phantom measurements. Exploiting an ITV-based treatment planning approach, VMAT treatment plans were generated for a motion phantom and different motion scenarios (sinusoidal motion of different period/direction; regular/irregular motion). 4D VMAT dose simulation results and dose measurements were compared by local 3% / 3 mm γ-evaluation, with the measured dose distributions serving as ground truth. Overall γ-passing rates of simulations and dynamic measurements ranged from 97% to 100% (mean across all motion scenarios: 98% ± 1%); corresponding values for comparison of different day repeat measurements were

  15. Potential for Fabric Damage by Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Welding electron beam effects on Nextel AF-62 ceramic fabric enable a preliminary, tentative interpretation of electron beam fabric damage. Static surface charging does not protect fabric from beam penetration, but penetration occurs only after a delay time. The delay time is thought to be that required for the buildup of outgassing products at the fabric surface to a point where arcing occurs. Extra long delays are noted when the gun is close enough to the surface to be shut off by outgassing emissions. Penetration at long distances is limited by beam attenuation from electronic collisions with the chamber atmosphere.

  16. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-02: Optimizing Orientations of Hundreds of Intensity-Modulated Beams to Treat Multiple Brain Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Dong, P; Larson, D [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Keeling, V; Hossain, S; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new modulated beam orientation optimization (MBOO) approach maximizing treatment planning quality for the state-of-the-art flattening filter free (FFF) beam that has enabled rapid treatments of multiple brain targets. Methods: MBOO selects and optimizes a large number of intensity-modulated beams (400 or more) from all accessible beam angles surrounding a patient’s skull. The optimization algorithm was implemented on a standalone system that interfaced with the 3D Dicom images and structure sets. A standard published data set that consisted of 1 to 12 metastatic brain tumor combinations was selected for MBOO planning. The planning results from various coplanar and non-coplanar configurations via MBOO were then compared with the results obtained from a clinical volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery system (Truebeam RapidArc, Varian Oncology). Results: When planning a few number of targets (n<4), MBOO produced results equivalent to non-coplanar multi-arc VMAT planning in terms of target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. For example, the 12-Gy and 4-Gy normal brain volumes for the 3-target plans differed by less than 1 mL ( 3.0 mLvs 3.8 mL; and 35.2 mL vs 36.3 mL, respectively) for MBOO versus VMAT. However, when planning a larger number of targets (n≥4), MBOO significantly reduced the dose to the normal brain as compared to VMAT, though the target volume coverage was equivalent. For example, the 12-Gy and 4-Gy normal brain volumes for the 12-target plans were 10.8 mL vs. 18.0 mL and 217.9 mL vs. 390.0 mL, respectively for the non-coplanar MBOO versus the non-coplanar VMAT treatment plans, yielding a reduction in volume of more than 60% for the case. Conclusion: MBOO is a unique approach for maximizing normal tissue sparing when treating a large number (n≥4) of brain tumors with FFF linear accelerators. Dr Ma and Dr Sahgal are currently on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery. Dr Sahgal has

  17. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Z.W.; Zhu, J.J.; Li, Z.S.;

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera...

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical m

  19. Measurement of an Electric Arc Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, D.

    2015-01-01

    Article is focused on electric arc spectroscopy diagnostics related to electric low voltage apparatuses. The first attempts of spectroscopy measurements are dealt with. An example of radiation spectra of the electric arc burning between copper electrodes is presented. The problems connected with the measurements are discussed.

  20. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F;

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto...

  1. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  2. Characterization of Micro-arc Oxidized Titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the sparkling discharges during the micro-arc oxidation process in KOH aqueous electrolyte was achieved. The change of surface morphology was progressively observed and a plausible pore formation mechanism is proposed. Cell proliferation and ALP activity of micro-arc oxidized titanium was evaluated by human body derived osteoblasts and slightly better than those of blasted surface.

  3. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of use...

  4. Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the VMAT case

    CERN Document Server

    Balvert, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to generate the trade-off between delivery time and fluence map matching quality for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the heart of our method lies a mathematical programming model that, for a given duration of delivery, optimizes leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the desired fluence map is reproduced as well as possible. This model was presented for the single map case in a companion paper (Fast approximate delivery of fluence maps: the single map case). The resulting large-scale, non-convex optimization problem was solved using a heuristic approach. The single-map approach cannot directly be applied to the full arc case due to the large increase in model size, the issue of allocating delivery times to each of the arc segments, and the fact that the ending leaf positions for one map will be the starting leaf positions for the next map. In this article the method proposed in \\cite{dm1} is extended to solve the full map treatment planning problem. We test ...

  5. Do technological advances in linear accelerators improve dosimetric outcomes in stereotaxy? A head-on comparison of seven linear accelerators using volumetric modulated arc therapy-based stereotactic planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Linear accelerator (Linac based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT has been used for treating small intracranial lesions. Recent development in the Linacs such as inbuilt micro multileaf collimator (MLC and flattening filter free (FFF beam are intended to provide a better dose conformity and faster delivery when using VMAT technique. This study was aimed to compare the dosimetric outcomes and monitor units (MUs of the stereotactic treatment plans for different commercially available MLC models and beam profiles. Materials and Methods: Ten patients having 12 planning target volume (PTV/gross target volume's (GTVs who received the SRS/SRT treatment in our clinic using Axesse Linac (considered reference arm gold standard were considered for this study. The test arms comprised of plans using Elekta Agility with FFF, Elekta Agility with the plane beam, Elekta APEX, Varian Millennium 120, Varian Millennium 120HD, and Elekta Synergy in Monaco treatment planning system. Planning constraints and calculation grid spacing were not altered in the test plans. To objectively evaluate the efficacy of MLC-beam model, the resultant dosimetric outcomes were subtracted from the reference arm parameters. Results: V95%, V100%, V105%, D1%, maximum dose, and mean dose of PTV/GTV showed a maximum inter MLC - beam model variation of 1.5% and 2% for PTV and GTV, respectively. Average PTV conformity index and heterogeneity index shows a variation in the range 0.56–0.63 and 1.08–1.11, respectively. Mean dose difference (excluding Axesse for all organs varied between 1.1 cGy and 74.8 cGy (mean dose = 6.1 cGy standard deviation [SD] = 26.9 cGy and 1.7 cGy–194.5 cGy (mean dose 16.1 cGy SD = 57.2 cGy for single and multiple fraction, respectively. Conclusion: The dosimetry of VMAT-based SRS/SRT treatment plan had minimal dependence on MLC and beam model variations. All tested MLC

  6. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  7. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumours using flattening filter free beam: dosimetric and technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancosu Pietro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To report the initial institute experience in terms of dosimetric and technical aspects in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT delivered using flattening filter free (FFF beam in patients with liver lesions. Methods and Materials From October 2010 to September 2011, 55 consecutive patients with 73 primary or metastatic hepatic lesions were treated with SBRT on TrueBeam using FFF beam and RapidArc technique. Clinical target volume (CTV was defined on multi-phase CT scans, PET/CT, MRI, and 4D-CT. Dose prescription was 75 Gy in 3 fractions to planning target volume (PTV. Constraints for organs at risk were: 700 cc of liver free from the 15 Gy isodose, Dmax max 0.1 cc 15 Gy Results Forty-three patients with a single lesion, nine with two lesions and three with three lesions were treated with this protocol. Target and organs at risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean delivery time was 2.8 ± 1.0 min. Pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index of 98.6 ± 0.8%. Mean on-line co-registration shift of the daily CBCT to the simulation CT were: -0.08, 0.05 and -0.02 cm with standard deviations of 0.33, 0.39 and 0.55 cm in, vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions respectively. Conclusions SBRT for liver targets delivered by means of FFF resulted to be feasible with short beam on time.

  8. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  9. Numerical Study on Arc Plasma Behavior During Arc Commutation Process in Direct Current Circuit Breaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨飞; 马瑞光; 吴翊; 孙昊; 纽春萍; 荣命哲

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc plasma behavior during arc commutation process in a medium-voltage direct current circuit breaker (DCCB) contact system. A three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model of air arc plasma in the contact system of a DCCB is developed, based on commercial software FLUENT. Coupled electromagnetic and gas dynamic interactions are considered as usual, and a thin layer of nonlinear electrical resistance elements is used to represent the voltage drop of plasma sheath and the formation of new arc root. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in arc region are calculated. The simulation results indicate that the pressure distribution related to the contact system has a strong effect on the arc commutation process, arising from the change of electrical conductivity in the arc root region. In DCCB contact system, the pressure of arc root region will be concentrated and higher if the space above the moving contact is enclosed, which is not good for arc root commutation. However, when the region is opened, the pressure distribution would be lower and more evenly, which is favorable for the arc root commutation.

  10. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  11. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  12. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  13. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  14. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  15. Lifetime of hydrogenated composite cathodes in a vacuum arc ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savkin, K. P., E-mail: savkin@opee.hcei.tsc.ru; Frolova, V. P.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, S. A. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The paper reports on a study of the mass-charge state of the plasma produced in a vacuum arc discharge with composite cathodes which were copper-disk coated with a hydrogenated Zr film of thicknesses 9, 22, and 35 μm. The cathodes allow the generation of multicomponent gas and metal ion beams with a hydrogen ion content from several to several tens of percent. Also investigated is the dependence of the H ion fraction in a beam on the Zr film thickness during erosion to the point of disappearance of Zr peaks in mass-charge spectra. The ability of the vacuum arc system to produce H ions is analyzed by analyzing the cathode lifetime as a function of the film thickness and pulse repetition frequency.

  16. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  17. Computer simulation to arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志芳; 李午申; 王迎娜

    2004-01-01

    The arc spraying process is divided into two stages: the first stage is atomization-spraying stream (ASS) and the second one is spraying deposition (SD). Then study status is described of both stages' physical model and corresponding controlling-equation. Based on the analysis of study status, the conclusion as follows is got. The heat and mass transfer models with two or three dimensions in ASS stage should be established to far deeply analyses the dynamical and thermal behavior of the overheat droplet. The statistics law of overheated droplets should be further studied by connecting simulation with experiments. More proper validation experiments should be designed for flattening simulation to modify the models in SD stage.

  18. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias;

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Scandinavia and other countries. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed...... by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...... environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF....

  19. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful.

  20. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  1. Electron Model Of A Dogbone RLA With Multi-Pass Arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, Kevin B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and MUONS Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bogacz, Slawomir Alex [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The design of a dogbone Recirculated Linear Accelerator, RLA, with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed [1] for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to the frequency readily available at CEBAF: 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement

  2. Beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    A four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with SPS secondary beams, the collimator operates under vacuum conditions. See Annual Report 1976 p. 121 and photo 7701014.

  3. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  4. Contribution For Arc Temperature Affected By Current Increment Ratio At Peak Current In Pulsed Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryota; Mitubori, Hironori; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding is one of the high quality welding. However, parameters of the pulsed arc welding are many and complicated. if the welding parameters are not appropriate, the welding pool shape becomes wide and shallow.the convection of driving force contributes to the welding pool shape. However, in the case of changing current waveform as the pulse high frequency TIG welding, the arc temperature does not follow the change of the current. Other result of the calculation, in particular, the arc temperature at the reaching time of peak current is based on these considerations. Thus, the accurate measurement of the temperature at the time is required. Therefore, the objective of this research is the elucidation of contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc. It should obtain a detail knowledge of the welding model in pulsed arc. The temperature in the case of increment of the peak current from the base current is measured by using spectroscopy. As a result, when the arc current increases from 100 A to 150 A at 120 ms, the transient response of the temperature didn't occur during increasing current. Thus, during the current rise, it has been verified by measuring. Therefore, the contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc was elucidated in order to obtain more knowledge of welding model of pulsed arc.

  5. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A.G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oztarhan, A. [Izmir University, Izmir 35140 (Turkey); Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  6. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  7. ATLAS One of the first Heavy ions collisions with stable beams- Event Display - November 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    One of the first heavy ions collisions with stable beams recorded by ATLAS in November 2015. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as orange arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the Liquid Argon and Scintillating Tile calorimeters respectively. The beam pipe and the inner detectors are also shown.

  8. SU-E-T-200: Comparison Between HybridARC and Sliding Windows IMRT for Spine SBRT Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Vacca, N; Garrigo, E; Caussa, L [Instituto de Radioterapia - Funadacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine SBRT treatments require high dose to PTV, located close to OAR. Treatment time should be short due to patient condition. The objective of this work is to compare HybridARC (HA) with sliding windows IMRT treatment modality Methods: A 6MV photon beam with 1000MU/min (SRS beam) produced by a NovalisTX (Varian/BrainLAB) equipped with HDMLC was used. The TPS was iPlan v4.5.3 (BrainLAB). Treatment plans comparison was done for 5 patients. Dose prescription was 27Gy in 3 fractions. HA used 1 arc plus 3 (HA), 5 (HA5) and 8 (HA8) IMRT fields. HA plans used OAR high. Between 60–40% of the prescribed dose was given by the arc. IMRT plans used 15 beams. Treatment times, MU, CI, V50% and V20% was used for plans comparisons. Results: Assuming IMRT plan as reference, the treatment time was reduced by −14.6% with HA8, −8.6% with HA5 and −23% with HA3. Increasing arc dose proportion in HA (arc MU > 2000) requires 2 or more arcs which increments treatment time. HA3 and HA5 exhibits beam hold off for fixed IMRT fields which in some cases need to be split in 2 segments. MU varied +4% with HA8, +3.7% with HA5 and −5% with HA3. CI increased +5% with HA8, +23% with HA5 and +37% with H3. V50% increased +5% with HA8, +43% with HA5 and +62% with HA3. V20% increased +13.2% with HA8, +7.6% with HA5 and +1% with HA3. OARs doses were keep within tolerances in all plans. Conclusion: HybridARC for spine SBRT with 8 fix IMRT gantry angle shows a treatment time reduction, comparable MU and similar dose conformation to dMLC IMRT. HybridARC with 5 or 3 fix IMRT fields produce undesirable beam hold off, worse dose conformation and increments the total volume with 50% of the prescribed dose.

  9. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding question concerns the nature of the melts forming in the subarc mantle and giving rise to arc magmatism. The global array of primitive arc melts (1180 volcanic rocks in 25 arcs extracted from the georoc database, calculated to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine) yields five principal melt types: calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg andesites, tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg andesites, and shoshonitic or alkaline arc melts; many arcs have more than one type. Primitive calc-alkaline basalts occur in 11 arcs but most strikingly, 8 continental arcs (incl. Aleutians, Cascades, Japan, Mexico, Kamtschatka) have a continuous range of calc-alkaline basalts to high-Mg andesites with mostly 48-58 wt% SiO2. In each arc, these are spatially congruent, trace element patterns overlap, and major elements form a continuum. Their Ca-Mg-Si systematics suggests saturation in olivine+opx+cpx. We hence interpret the large majority of high-Mg andesites as derived from primitive calc-alkaline basalts through fractionation and reaction in the shallower mantle. Removal of anhydrous mantle phases at lower pressures increases SiO2 and H2O-contents while Mg# and Ni remain buffered to mantle values. Primitive tholeiitic basalts (Cascades, Kermadec, Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan, Palau, Sunda) have a much lesser subduction signal (e.g. in LILE) than the calc-alkaline suite. These tholeiites have been interpreted to form through decompression melting, but also characterize young intraoceanic arcs. In the two continental arcs with both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline primitive basalts (clearly distinct in trace patterns), there is no clear spatial segregation (Casacades, Japan). Three intraoceanic arcs (Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Tonga) have primitive tholeiitic, highly depleted high-Mg andesites (boninites) with HFSE and HREE slightly above primitive mantle values. These deviate in majors from the array formed by the basalts and calc-alkaline andesites suggesting that only these formed from a

  10. Formation of the G-ring arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves increasing the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario in which the excitation of Mimas's eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance. This is a possible explanation for the origin of the arcs.

  11. Formation of the G-ring arc

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, N C S; Foryta, D W

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  12. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    OpenAIRE

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ion source. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials in the Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-like behavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arc triggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsec and 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially 8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150 micros...

  13. A hybrid simulation model for a stable auroral arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We present a new type of hybrid simulation model, intended to simulate a single stable auroral arc in the latitude/altitude plane. The ionospheric ions are treated as particles, the electrons are assumed to follow a Boltzmann response and the magnetospheric ions are assumed to be so hot that they form a background population unaffected by the electric fields that arise. The system is driven by assumed parallel electron energisation causing a primary negative charge cloud and an associated potential structure to build up. The results show how a closed potential structure and density depletion of an auroral arc build up and how they decay after the driver is turned off. The model also produces upgoing energetic ion beams and predicts strong static perpendicular electric fields to be found in a relatively narrow altitude range (~ 5000–11 000 km.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; auroral phenomena – Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  14. Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, Static Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and 3D Conformal Planning for the Treatment of a Right-Sided Reconstructed Chest Wall and Regional Nodal Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared 3D conformal planning, static field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to investigate the suitable treatment plan and delivery method for a right-sided reconstructed chest wall and nodal case. The dose prescribed for the reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes was 50.4 Gy. Plans were compared for target coverage and doses of the lungs, heart, contralateral breast, and healthy tissue. All plans achieved acceptable coverage of the target and IMNs. The best right lung sparing achieved with 3D was a V20 Gy of 31.09%. Compared to it, VMAT reduced the same by 10.85% and improved the CI and HI over 3D by 18.75% and 2%, respectively. The ipsilateral lung V5 Gy to V20 Gy decreased with VMAT over IMRT by as high as 17.1%. The contralateral lung V5 Gy was also lowered with VMAT compared to IMRT by 16.22%. The MU and treatment beams were lowered with VMAT over IMRT by 30% and 10, respectively, decreasing the treatment time by >50%. VMAT was the treatment plan and delivery method of choice for this case due to a combination of improved lung sparing and reduced treatment time without compromising target coverage.

  15. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  16. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  17. Comparison and evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for postoperative radiation therapy of prostate cancer patient using a rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae Youn; Seok, Jin Yong; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Choi, Byeong Don; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sangnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The dose distribution of organ at risk (OAR) and normal tissue is affected by treatment technique in postoperative radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to compare dose distribution characteristic and to evaluate treatment efficiency by devising VMAT plans according to applying differed number of arc and IMRT plan for postoperative patient of prostate cancer radiation therapy using a rectal balloon. Ten patients who received postoperative prostate radiation therapy in our hospital were compared. CT images of patients who inserted rectal balloon were acquired with 3 mm thickness and 10 MV energy of HD120MLC equipped Truebeam STx (Varian, Palo Alto, USA) was applied by using Eclipse (Version 11.0, Varian, Palo Alto, USA). 1 Arc, 2 Arc VMAT plans and 7-field IMRT plan were devised for each patient and same values were applied for dose volume constraint and plan normalization. To evaluate these plans, PTV coverage, conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) were compared and R{sub 50%} was calculated to assess low dose spillage as per treatment plan. D{sub 50%} of rectum and bladder Dmean were compared on OAR. And to evaluate the treatment efficiency, total monitor units(MU) and delivery time were considered. Each assessed result was analyzed by average value of 10 patients. Additionally, portal dosimetry was carried out for accuracy verification of beam delivery. There was no significant difference on PTV coverage and HI among 3 plans. Especially CI and R{sub 50%} on 7F-IMRT were the highest as 1.230, 3.991 respectively(p=0.00). Rectum D{sub 50%} was similar between 1A-VMAT and 2A-VMAT. But approximately 7% higher value was observed on 7F-IMRT compare to the others(p=0.02) and bladder Dmean were similar among the all plan(P>0.05). Total MU were 494.7, 479.7, 757.9 respectively(P=0.00) for 1A-VMAT, 2A-VMAT, 7F-IMRT and at the most on 7F-IMRT. The delivery time were 65.2sec, 133.1sec, 145.5sec respectively(p=0.00). The obvious shortest

  18. Prostate treatments, 1MRT o RapidArc; Tratamiento de prostata, IMART o RapidArc?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro novais, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Pardo Perez, E.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Cerro Penalver, E.

    2015-07-01

    Techniques that modulate the dose (as IMRT or RapidArcTM) improve dose homogeneity within the target volume decreasing the dose in healthy organs. The aim of this work is to study the dosimetric differences in prostate radiotherapy treatments with IMRT and RapidArcTM. The results of the 109 patients studied show that plans to RapidArcTM have better coverage, compliance and dose gradient outside the target volume. (Author)

  19. Delivery Ring Lattice Modifications for Transitionless Deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, J. A. [Fermilab; Syphers, M. J. [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-10-09

    A portion of the remnant Tevatron program infrastruc- ture at Fermilab is being reconfigured to be used for the generation and delivery of proton and muon beams for new high-precision particle physics experiments. With the 8 GeV Booster as its primary source, the Mu2e exper- iment will receive 8.9 GeV/c bunched beam on target, after being stored and slow spilled from the Delivery Ring (DR) -- a refurbished debuncher ring from Tevatron anti- proton production. For the Muon g-2 experiment, the DR will be tuned for 3.1 GeV/c to capture muons off of a target before sending them to this experiment's Storage Ring. The apertures in the beam transport systems are optimized for the large muon beams of this lower-energy experiment. In order to provide further flexibility in the operation of the DR for future possible low-energy, high- intensity particle physics experiments (REDTOP[1], for example) and detector development, investigations are underway into the feasibility of decelerating beams from its maximum kinetic energy of 8 GeV level to lower en- ergies, down to 1-2 GeV. In this paper we look at possi- ble lattice modifications to the DR to avoid a transition crossing during the deceleration process. Hardware re- quirements and other operational implications of this scheme will also be discussed.

  20. Seward, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  1. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed......An alternating current (AC) gliding arc can be conveniently operated at atmospheric pressure and efficiently elongated into the ambient air by an air flow and thus is useful for surface modification. A high speed camera was used to capture dynamics of the AC gliding arc in the presence of polymer...... surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface...

  2. Laboratory arc furnace features interchangeable hearths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. L.; Kruger, O. L.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory arc furnace using rapidly interchangeable hearths gains considerable versatility in casting so that buttons or special shaped castings can be produced. It features a sight glass for observation.

  3. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, D.; Bulgadaryan, D.; Hwangbo, D.; Kajita, S.; Kolodko, D.; Kurnaev, V.; Ohno, N.

    2016-09-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope.

  4. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  5. Effect of arc on radiation thermometry in welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮玉; 王燕; 武宝林

    2002-01-01

    The effect of arc on radiation thermometry is analyzed in a field close to the arc during the welding process, and the ratio of signal to noise and other factors are obtained for a small current arc .The method of the temperature measurement is feasible when the arc current is decreased to a smaller value in the welding process.

  6. Resistance Characteristics of Arc in Long Air Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhanqing; YU Junjie; ZENG Rong; CHEN He; PENG Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Arc resistance is an important parameter for characterizing long arcs in air,and its laboratory testing is of importance for accurate arc modeling of electromagnetic transient caused by short circuit fault.Therefore,we constructed an experimental system to study the characteristics of long AC arc in air.Driven by currents of 10 kA or 40 kA (root mean square value),the system produces arcs with different initial lengths of 1 m,2 m and 4 m,and the movement of the arcs are captured by a high-speed camera.After performing experiments using the system,we carried out analysis and comparisons of the arc resistance of arcs with different lengths and different currents,as well as a study of the relationship between the macro-morphology and the resistance of the arcs.Conclusions were drawn from the experimental results:the arc voltage had obvious saturation characteristics; the arc resistance increased with the increase of arc length and the decrease of current; the arcs bended or extended significantly in time and the peak arc voltage within a single cycle increased correspondingly; the arcs had voltage and current in the same phase.In the end,a formula of arc resistance based on the experiment results is derived.

  7. Palaeomagnetic constraints on the geodynamic evolution of the Gibraltar Arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, W.; Garces, M.

    2004-01-01

    Subduction zone roll-back was recently put forward as a convincing model to explain the geometry and evolution of the Gibraltar Arc. For other subduction-related arc systems of the Mediterranean, such as the Calabrian Arc and the Hellenic Arc, palaeomagnetic rotation data from Neogene extensional ba

  8. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  9. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  10. Influence of metal vapour on arc temperatures in gas-metal arc welding: convection versus radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-06-01

    The presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding has been shown to have two strong effects on the arc plasma: a decrease in temperature throughout the arc, and the formation of a local temperature minimum near the arc axis. These effects have been attributed, on the basis of different computational models, to either the increased radiative emission associated with the presence of metal vapour in the arc plasma, or the influence of the metal vapour influx on convective flow in the arc. This question is investigated using a three-dimensional computational model in which the production and the transport of metal vapour are taken into account self-consistently. Parameters relevant to welding of thin sheets of aluminum are examined. For these conditions, it is found that the first effect (the decrease in temperature throughout the arc) is due to both the increased radiative emission and the influence of the metal vapour influx on flow. The second effect (the local temperature minimum, which in this case occurs just below the wire electrode) is a consequence of the influence of aluminum vapour produced from the wire electrode on flow in the arc. By examining published results and the energy balance in the plasma, it is shown that for welding of steel with higher arc currents, the increased radiative emission can lead to a local temperature minimum at a greater distance from the wire electrode.

  11. Arcing flow phenomena; Visualisation des ecoulements en presence d'un arc de coupure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachard, H.; Mottet, C. [Schneider Electric, Centre de Recherches A2, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-06-01

    Optical diagnostic techniques have been used for studying electric arcing phenomena at Schneider Electric for many years now, and are integrated in new-product development practice. Studies have so far focused on electric arc behaviour, but today we are especially interested in studying the interaction of an electric arc with its immediate environment, i.e. gaseous medium and neighbouring materials. This article starts by discussing the specificities of electric arcs in low-voltage circuit-breakers, then goes on to examine diagnostic methods for viewing the physical phenomena of interest. After setting out and analysing the results obtained, we conclude with details on planned upgrades targeting enhanced diagnostic performance. (author)

  12. Rapid magmatic processes accompany arc-continent collision: the Western Bismarck arc, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Heather; Gill, Jim; Turner, Simon; Caulfield, John; Edwards, Louise; Day, Simon

    2012-11-01

    New U-Th-Ra, major and trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data are presented for young lavas from the New Britain and Western Bismarck arcs in Papua New Guinea. New Britain is an oceanic arc, whereas the latter is the site of an arc-continent collision. Building on a recent study of the Manus Basin, contrasts between the two arcs are used to evaluate the processes and timescales of magma generation accompanying arc-continent collision and possible slab detachment. All three suites share many attributes characteristic of arc lavas that can be ascribed to the addition of a regionally uniform subduction component derived from the subducting altered oceanic crust and sediment followed by dynamic melting of the modified mantle. However, the Western Bismarck arc lavas diverge from the Pb isotope mixing array formed by the New Britain and the Manus Basin lavas toward elevated 208Pb/204Pb. We interpret this to reflect a second and subsequent addition of sediment melt at crustal depth during collision. 238U and 226Ra excesses are preserved in all of the lavas and are greatest in the Western Bismarck arc. High-Mg andesites with high Sr/Y ratios in the westernmost arc are attributed to recent shallow mantle flux melting at the slab edge. Data for two historical rhyolites are also presented. Although these rhyolites formed in quite different tectonic settings and display different geochemical and isotopic compositions, both formed from mafic parents within millennia.

  13. Study on Ceramic Cutting by Plasma Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are typical difficult-to-machine materials because of high hardness and brittleness. PAC (Plasma Arc Cutting) is a very important thermal cutting process and has been successfully used in cutting stainless steel and other difficult-to-machine alloys. PAC's application in cutting ceramics, however, is still limited because the most ceramics are not good electronic conducts, and transferred plasma arc cannot be produced between cathode and work-piece. So we presented a method of plasma ...

  14. Data delivery system for MAPPER using image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeehong; Savari, Serap A.

    2013-03-01

    The data delivery throughput of electron beam lithography systems can be improved by applying lossless image compression to the layout image and using an electron beam writer that can decode the compressed image on-the-fly. In earlier research we introduced the lossless layout image compression algorithm Corner2, which assumes a somewhat idealized writing strategy, namely row-by-row with a raster order. The MAPPER system has electron beam writers positioned in a lattice formation and each electron beam writer writes a designated block in a zig-zag order. We introduce Corner2-MEB, which redesigns Corner2 for MAPPER systems.

  15. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Qiwen, E-mail: fanqiwen0926@163.com [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(62), Beijing 102413 (China); Du, Yinghui; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guoji [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(62), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ∼5μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ∼4μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine–saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ∼1μg/cm{sup 2} in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4 for the {sup 197}Au{sup −} (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) and {sup 63}Cu{sup −} (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp{sup 3} bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is 0.78.

  16. Electric arc furnace models for flicker study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina González Castaño

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to evaluate voltage fluctuations or flicker of two electric arc furnace models through comparison with real data.Method: The first proposed model is founded on the energy conservation principle, which generates a non-linear differential equation modelling the electric arc voltage – current characteristics. Voltage fluctuations are generated using a chaotic circuit that modulates the amplitude of arc voltage. The second model is based on the empirical relationship between the arc diameter or length as well as voltage and electrical current on the arc. Voltage fluctuations are considered adding a random signal in the arc length. Both models are implemented in PSCADTM.Results: The results of both models are compared with real data taken at the most critical stage of the operation of the furnace, and they show that the model based on energy conservation has a lower average mean square error in the voltages and currents 5.6 V and 1.7 kA against 27,2 V y 3.38 kA obtained with the second model.Conclusions: Both models consider the nonlinearity and random behavior present in this type of load, validating their inclusion in computer models of electric power systems.

  17. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  18. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  19. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J [NDGF, Kastruplundsgade 22, DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B [Lund University, Experimental High Energy Physics, Institute of Physics, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kocan, M [Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Faculty of Science, Jesenna 5, SK-04000 Kosice (Slovakia); Marton, I; Nagy, Zs [NIIF/HUNGARNET, Victor Hugo 18-22, H-1132 Budapest (Hungary); Moeller, S [University of Luebeck, Inst. Of Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany); Mohn, B, E-mail: oxana.smirnova@hep.lu.s [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Box 535, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  20. New method for capturing arc of moving on switching apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiao-min; WANG Jing-hong

    2007-01-01

    The switching arc that occurs in contact gap when contact of low voltage apparatus closes or breaks in electric circuit is harmful to the contacts, insulation, and reliability of electrical gear because of its very high temperature. As arcing time is very short in switching gear, it is very difficult to observe arc phenomena directly for researchers. Therefore, visualization of switching arc is important for understanding arc phenomena, to analyze the arc features, and to improve the design and reliability of switching gear. Based on analyzing the visualization methods proposed by researchers, a new switching arc capturing approach is introduced in this paper. Arc image acquisition, and image processing techniques were studied. A switching arc image acquisition and visual simulation software based on high speed CCD camera hard ware system was designed and implemented to yield enhanced arc image with good visual effect.

  1. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Tatsuya

    2013-03-04

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties.

  2. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy in lung cancer: Current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT is a novel radiation technique that delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target by allowing the simultaneous variation of gantry rotation speed, dose rate and multiple-leaf collimators leaf positions. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on two VMAT systems, RapidArc and SmartArc with main focus on planning studies of lung cancer. A systematic review of available data was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed with the keywords ′′lung′′ and "VMAT". The published data show that VMAT techniques have clear superiority over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with regard to improving dose conformity and sparing of organs at risks (OARs. The data indicates that for lung tumor VMAT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT provide equivalent dose homogeneity, dose conformity and target volume coverage; however, contradictory results were obtained in terms of OARs sparing. The major advantages of VMAT over IMRT are the reduction in the number of monitor units and faster treatment delivery times without compromising the quality of the treatment plans. Moreover, faster delivery time is more patient-friendly and it minimizes intra-fractional patient motion allowing treatment volumes stay within their respective treatment margins. Current literature data shows that VMAT can be a good option to treat lung cancer; however, data on clinical trials are still lacking. The clinical trials are essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of VMAT techniques.

  3. Making and breaking an Island arc: a new perspective from the Oligocene Kyushu-Palau arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Yuasa, M.; Ohara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) is a 2000km long remnant island arc that is separated from the active Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc system by a series of spreading and rift basins. In this study we present 40Ar/39Ar ages and geochemical data for new samples taken from the entire length of the Kyushu-Palau arc. As such, this data provides the first comprehensive evaluation of temporal and spatial changes that are present in an Eocene-Oligocene island arc. Kyushu-Palau arc geochemistry is evaluated alongside new data from the conjugate arc which is stranded within the IBM fore-arc. Boninitic magmatism gave way to transitional arc suites including high-Mg andesites at c. 45 Ma (Ishizuka et al., 2006). After the transitional 45-41 Ma period, a mature arc system developed through the Eocene-Oligocene time: This volcanism is now preserved as the KPR. Dating results from 33 sites indicate that the KPR was active between 25 and 43 Ma, but the majority of the exposed volcanism occurred in the final phase of this arc, between 25 and 27 Ma. Unlike the IBM, the KPR has only limited systematic along-arc trends and does not include any of the strongly HIMU lavas found to the south of Izu-Bonin. Two components found along the KPR are found to have geochemistry that suggests an origin in the supra-subduction mantle rather than from the descending ocean crust. Firstly, in the south of the arc, EM-2-like lavas are present where the West Philippine Basin was in the final stages of spreading. Secondly, EM-1-like lavas are present in a restricted section of the arc, suggesting a localised heterogeneity. Subduction flux beneath the KPR generally imparted a Pb isotope vector towards low Δ8/4 (19). This is a similar trend to the Eocene/Oligocene lavas found on the eastern side of the basins which split the arc at 25Ma. Another geochemical heterogeneity is found at the KPR-Daito Ridge intersection where arc magmatism occurred on pre-existing Daito Ridge crust: a Cretaceous remnant arc

  4. eDelivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — eDelivery provides the electronic packaging and delivery of closed and complete OPM investigation files to government agencies, including USAID, in a secure manner....

  5. Direct probing of anode arc root dynamics and voltage instability in a dc non-transferred arc plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorui, S.; Tiwari, N.; Meher, K. C.; Jan, A.; Bhat, A.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transient dynamics of the anode arc root in a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is captured through fast photography and directly correlated with the associated voltage instability for the first time. The coexistence of multiple arc roots, the transition to a single arc root, root formation and extinction are investigated for the steady, takeover and re-strike modes of the arc. Contrary to the usual concept, the emerging plasma jet of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is found to carry current. An unusually long self-propelled arc plasma jet, a consequence of the phenomenon, is demonstrated.

  6. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans and conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer involving seminal vesicles and pelvis lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Rout

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to (1 identify the continual diversity between conventional fixed field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT and RapidArc (RA for high-risk prostate cancer; and (2 determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using for this type of treatment.Methods: A cohort of 20 prostate cases including prostate, seminal vesicles and pelvic lymph nodes was selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 75.6 Gy (45 Gy to PTVP and an additional 21.6 Gy to PTVB. Two plans were generated for each PTV: multiple 7-fields for IMRT and two arcs for RA.Results: A Sigma index (IMRT: 2.75 ± 0.581; RA: 2.8 ± 0.738 for PTVP and (IMRT: 2.0 ± 0.484; RA: 2.1 ± 0.464 for PTVB indicated similar dose homogeneity inside the PTV. Conformity index (IMRT: 0.96 ± 0.047; RA: 0.95 ± 0.059 for PTVP and (IMRT: 0.97 ± 0.015; RA: 0.96 ± 0.014 for PTVB was comparable for both the techniques. IMRT offered lower mean dose to organ at risks (OARs compared to RA plans. Normal tissue integral dose in IMRT plan resulted 0.87% lower than RA plans. All the plans displayed significant increase (2.50 times for PTVP and 1.72 for PTBB in the average number of necessary monitor units (MUs with IMRT beam. Treatment delivery time of RA was 2 ‒ 6 minutes shorter than IMRT treatment.Conclusion: For PTV including pelvic lymph nodes, seminal vesicles and prostate, IMRT offered a greater degree of OARs sparing. For PTV including seminal vesicles and prostate, RA with two arcs provided comparable plan with IMRT. RA also improved the treatment efficiency due to smaller number of MUs required.

  7. Phase space modulation method for EPID-based Monte Carlo dosimetry of IMRT and RapidArc plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Avery; Townson, Reid; Bush, Karl; Zavgorodni, Sergei, E-mail: szavgorodni@bccancer.bc.c

    2010-11-01

    Quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT require 3D evaluation of the dose distributions from the treatment planning system as compared to the distributions reconstructed from signals acquired during the plan delivery. This study presents the results of the dose reconstruction based on a novel method of Monte Carlo (MC) phase space modulation. Typically, in MC dose calculations the linear accelerator (linac) is modelled for each field in the plan and a phase space file (PSF) containing all relevant particle information is written for each field. Particles from the PSFs are then used in the dose calculation. This study investigates a method of omitting the modelling of the linac in cases where the treatment has been measured by an electronic portal imaging device. In this method each portal image is deconvolved using an empirically fit scatter kernel to obtain the primary photon fluence. The Phase Space Modulation (PSM) method consists of simulating the linac just once to create a large PSF for an open field and then modulating it using the delivered primary particle fluence. Reconstructed dose distributions in phantoms were produced using MC and the modulated PSFs. The kernel derived for this method accurately reproduced the dose distributions for 3x3, 10x10, and 15x15 cm{sup 2} field sizes (mean relative dose-difference along the beam central axis is under 1%). The method has been applied to IMRT pre-treatment verification of 10 patients (including one RapidArc{sup TM} case), mean dose in the structures of interest agreed with that calculated by MC directly within 1%, and 95% of the voxels passed 2%/2mm criteria.

  8. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT with Oncentra MasterPlan® for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koelbl Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several comparison studies have shown the capability of VMAT to achieve similar or better plan quality as IMRT, while reducing the treatment time. The experience of VMAT in a multi vendor environment is limited. We compared the plan quality and performance of VMAT to IMRT and we investigate the effects of varying various user-selectable parameters. Methods IMRT, single arc VMAT and dual arc VMAT were compared for four different head-and-neck tumors. For VMAT, the effect of varying gantry angle spacing and treatment time on the plan quality was investigated. A comparison of monitor units and treatment time was performed. Results IMRT and dual arc VMAT achieved a similar plan quality, while single arc could not provide an acceptable plan quality. Increasing the number of control points does not improve the plan quality. Dual arc VMAT delivery time is about 30% of IMRT delivery time. Conclusions Dual arc VMAT is a fast and accurate technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. It applies similar number of MUs as IMRT, but the treatment time is strongly reduced, maintaining similar or better dose conformity to the PTV and OAR sparing.

  9. Analysis of direct clinical consequences of MLC positional errors in volumetric-modulated arc therapy using 3D dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Mani, Ganesh K; Subramani, Vikraman; Mueller, Lutz; Palaniappan, Karrthick K; Kataria, Tejinder

    2015-09-08

    In advanced, intensity-modulated external radiotherapy facility, the multileaf collimator has a decisive role in the beam modulation by creating multiple segments or dynamically varying field shapes to deliver a uniform dose distribution to the target with maximum sparing of normal tissues. The position of each MLC leaf has become more critical for intensity-modulated delivery (step-and-shoot IMRT, dynamic IMRT, and VMAT) compared to 3D CRT, where it defines only field boundaries. We analyzed the impact of the MLC positional errors on the dose distribution for volumetric-modulated arc therapy, using a 3D dosimetry system. A total of 15 VMAT cases, five each for brain, head and neck, and prostate cases, were retrospectively selected for the study. All the plans were generated in Monaco 3.0.0v TPS (Elekta Corporation, Atlanta, GA) and delivered using Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Systematic errors of +1, +0.5, +0.3, 0, -1, -0.5, -0.3 mm were introduced in the MLC bank of the linear accelerator and the impact on the dose distribution of VMAT delivery was measured using the COMPASS 3D dosim-etry system. All the plans were created using single modulated arcs and the dose calculation was performed using a Monte Carlo algorithm in a grid size of 3 mm. The clinical endpoints D95%, D50%, D2%, and Dmax,D20%, D50% were taken for the evaluation of the target and critical organs doses, respectively. A significant dosimetric effect was found for many cases even with 0.5 mm of MLC positional errors. The average change of dose D 95% to PTV for ± 1 mm, ± 0.5 mm, and ±0.3mm was 5.15%, 2.58%, and 0.96% for brain cases; 7.19%, 3.67%, and 1.56% for head and neck cases; and 8.39%, 4.5%, and 1.86% for prostate cases, respectively. The average deviation of dose Dmax was 5.4%, 2.8%, and 0.83% for brainstem in brain cases; 8.2%, 4.4%, and 1.9% for spinal cord in H&N; and 10.8%, 6.2%, and 2.1% for rectum in prostate cases, respectively. The average changes in dose followed a linear

  10. Characterization of a novel 2D array dosimeter for patient-specific quality assurance with volumetric arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios; Myers, Pamela; Esquivel, Carlos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors are evaluating a new, commercially available 2D array that offers 3D dose reconstruction for patient specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA).Methods: The OCTAVIUS 4D system and its accompanying software (VERISOFT) by PTW were evaluated for the accuracy of the dose reconstruction for patient specific pretreatment IMRT QA. OCTAVIUS 4D measures the dose plane at the linac isocenter as the phantom rotates synchronously with the gantry, maintaining perpendicularity with the beam, by means of an inclinometer and a motor. The measurements collected during a volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery (VMAT) are reconstructed into a 3D dose volume. The VERISOFT application is used to perform the analysis, by comparing the reconstructed dose against the 3D dose matrix from the treatment planning system (TPS) that is computed for the same geometry and beam arrangement as that of the measurement. In this study, the authors evaluated the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm of this new system using a series of tests. Using the Octavius 4D phantom as the patient, dose distributions for various field sizes, beam orientations, shapes, and combination of fields were calculated using the Pinnacle3, TPS, and the respective DICOMRT dose was exported to the VERISOFT analysis software. Measurements were obtained by delivering the test treatment plans and comparisons were made based on gamma index, dose profiles, and isodose distribution analysis. In addition, output factors were measured and the dose linearity of the array was assessed. Those measurements were compared against measurements in water using a single, calibrated ionization chamber as well as calculations from Pinnacle for the same delivery geometries.Results: The number of voxels that met the 3%/3 mm criteria for the volumetric 3D gamma index analysis ranged from 92.3% to 98.9% for all the patient plans that the authors evaluated. 2D gamma analysis in the

  11. SU-E-T-133: Assessing IMRT Treatment Delivery Accuracy and Consistency On a Varian TrueBeam Using the SunNuclear PerFraction EPID Dosimetry Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trestrail, E; Holt, R [Pacific Crest Medical Physics, Chico, CA (United States); Saini, S [Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL (Australia); Pfeiffer, I [VMTH, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kent, M; Hansen, K [Surgical and Radiological Sciences, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess if the TrueBeam HD120 collimator is delivering small IMRT fields accurately and consistently throughout the course of treatment using the SunNuclear PerFraction software. Methods: 7-field IMRT plans for 8 canine patients who passed IMRT QA using SunNuclear Mapcheck DQA were selected for this study. The animals were setup using CBCT image guidance. The EPID fluence maps were captured for each treatment field and each treatment fraction, with the first fraction EPID data serving as the baseline for comparison. The Sun Nuclear PerFraction Software was used to compare the EPID data for subsequent fractions using a Gamma (3%/3mm) pass rate of 90%. To simulate requirements for SRS, the data was reanalyzed using a Gamma (3%/1mm) pass rate of 90%. Low-dose, low- and high gradient thresholds were used to focus the analysis on clinically relevant parts of the dose distribution. Results: Not all fractions could be analyzed, because during some of the treatment courses the DICOM tags in the EPID images intermittently change from CU to US (unspecified), which would indicate a temporary loss of EPID calibration. This technical issue is still being investigated. For the remaining fractions, the vast majority (7/8 of patients, 95% of fractions, and 96.6% of fields) are passing the less stringent Gamma criteria. The more stringent Gamma criteria caused a drop in pass rate (90 % of fractions, 84% of fields). For the patient with the lowest pass rate, wet towel bolus was used. Another patient with low pass rates experienced masseter muscle wasting. Conclusion: EPID dosimetry using the PerFraction software demonstrated that the majority of fields passed a Gamma (3%/3mm) for IMRT treatments delivered with a TrueBeam HD120 MLC. Pass rates dropped for a DTA of 1mm to model SRS tolerances. PerFraction pass rates can flag missing bolus or internal shields. Sanjeev Saini is an employee of Sun Nuclear Corporation. For this study, a pre-release version of PerFRACTION 1

  12. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  13. Effects of process parameters on arc shape and penetration in twin-wire indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-shan ZHANG; Mei-qing CAO; Dong-ting WU; Zeng-da ZOU

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effects of variable parameters on arc shape and depth of penetration in twin-wire indirect arc gas shielded welding were investigated. The variation of arc shape caused by changes of the parameters was recorded by a high-speed camera,and the depths of penetration of specimen were measured after bead welding by an optical microscope. Experiments indicated that proper parameters give birth to a concentrated and compressed welcimg arc, which Would increase the depth of penetration as the incensement of the arc foice Several pnncipal parameters including toe distance ot twin wires intersecting point to base metal,the included angle,and the content of shielding gas were determined. The arc turned more concentrated and the depth of penetration increased obviously as the welding current increased,the arc turned brighter while unobvlous change of penetration occurred as the arc voltage increased,and the deepest penetration was obtained when the welding speed was 10.5 mm/s..

  14. Application of micro-arc oxidation methods in making the structure elements of spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Shatalov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing any spacecraft, the opening elements of the structure are applied in which deployment and locking units are used.There is a transporting step i.e. an insertion of the deployment unit in the folded state into orbit. During this step the deployment unit is under considerable vibratory loads, which are accepted by thrusts. Since the thrusts at this step work under increased wear conditions it is offered, considering a protuberant surface hardness of the micro-arc oxide (MAO coating, to replace a constructional material of the thrusts with a larger density for the MAO-coated aluminium alloy.The step of deploying, at which required angle of deployment is provided by the rolling unit, is realized after the spacecraft has been placed into calculated orbit. This unit contains the target sleeve with the bearing, which provides reliable locking by means of the penetration in the inner cone of beam sector. To increase the product reliability and avoid a possibility for occurring the wear slot and burrs it is necessary to increase the hardness of the sector surface on which the target sleeve bearing rolls. The most rational solution is to form the local micro-arc oxide coating on the beam sector surface.Application of the micro-arc oxidation of aluminium alloys and research of the micro-arc oxidation specificities enable us:1 to decrease the typical deployment unit mass (by 0.221 kg or 0.85 %;2 to increase the rolling unit operation reliability;3 to design the schemes and select the conditions to form the micro-arc oxide coating on the parts of the typical deployment unit.The micro-arc oxide coating formed on the aluminium alloy is of significance for the aerospace industry that uses a diversity of aluminium alloys and prefers the structure mass decrease as much as possible. It should be appreciated that the process to form the micro-arc oxide coating is production friendly because it does not need the complex expensive equipment and is

  15. GUI for studying the parameters influence of the electric arc model for a three-phase electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiormez, L.; Prostean, O.; Panoiu, M.; Panoiu, C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis regarding the modeling of the behavior for a three-phase electric arc furnace installation. Therefore, a block diagram is implemented in Simulink that represents the modeling of the entire electric arc furnace installation. This block diagram contains also the modeling of the electric arc which is the element that makes the electric arc furnace behaving as a nonlinear load. The values for the model parameters of the electric arc furnace installation are like the ones from the real installation taken into consideration. Other model parameters are the electric arc model ones. In order to study the influence of the parameters of the electric arc models, it is developed a Matlab program that contains the graphical user interfaces. These interfaces make connection with the models of the electric arc implemented in Simulink. The interfaces allow the user to modify parameters for each of the electric arc model. Current and voltage of the electric arc are the variables taken into account to study the influence of the parameters on the electric arc models. Waveforms for voltage and current of the electric arc are illustrated when a parameter of the model is modified in order to analyze the importance of this parameter on the electric arc model. Also, for each of the models is presented the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc because this characteristic gives information about the behavior of the electric arc furnace installation.

  16. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon EPID used in continuous acquisition mode for application to dynamic and arc IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, B M C; Greer, P B

    2009-07-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in a real-time acquisition mode were investigated. This mode will be essential for time-resolved dose verification of dynamic (sliding window) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated arc radiation therapy (arc-IMRT). The EPID was used in continuous acquisition mode (i.e., "cine" mode) where individual sequential image frames are acquired in real time. The properties studied include dose linearity, reproducibility of response, and image stability. Results of using the continuous acquisition mode with several example treatments including dynamic IMRT, arc treatment, and single-arc-IMRT are compared to results using the well-studied integrated acquisition mode (i.e., "frame averaging" or "IMRT" mode). Real-time EPID response was also compared to real-time ion-chamber data for selected points in the deliveries. The example treatment deliveries in both continuous and integrated acquisition modes were converted to arbitrary EPID dose units via a calibration field. The summation of all acquired continuous mode images was compared using percentage dose difference to the single image acquired in the integrated mode using in-field pixels only (defined as those pixels > 10% of maximum, in-field signal). Using the continuous acquisition mode, the EPID response was not linear with dose. It was found that the continuous mode dose response corresponded approximately to dropping one image per acquisition session. Reproducibility of EPID response to low monitor units (MUs) was found to be poor but greatly improved with increasing MU. Open field profiles were found to be stable in the cross-plane direction but required several frames to become stable in the in-plane direction. However, both of these issues are clinically insignificant due to arc-IMRT deliveries requiring relatively large monitor units (> 100 MU). Analysis of the five IMRT, arc, and arc

  17. Method to reduce arc blow during DC arc welding of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H.; Rueda-Morales, G.L.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perz-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Tabasco, (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Steel pipelines are huge ferromagnetic structures and can be easily subjected to arc blow during the DC arc welding process. The development of methods to avoid arc blow during pipeline DC arc welding is a major objective in the pipeline industry. This study developed a simple procedure to compensate the residual magnetic field in the groove during DC arc welding. A Gaussmeter was used to perform magnetic flux density measurements in pipelines in southern Mexico. These data were used to perform magnetic finite element simulations using FEMM. Different variables were studied such as the residual magnetic field in the groove or the position of the coil with respect to the groove. An empirical predictive equation was developed from these trials to compensate for the residual magnetic field. A new method of compensating for the residual magnetic field in the groove by selecting the number of coil turns and the position of the coil with respect to the groove was established.

  18. Overview of ArcGIS Engine Controls%ArcGIS Engine控件综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊

    2010-01-01

    ArcGIS Engine是ESRI公司发布的嵌入式地理信息系统软件开发包.基于ArcGIS Engine开发的应用程序一般有3类:独立非可视化应用程序、独立可视化应用程序和嵌入式应用程序,由于ArcGIS Engine提供了一套可复用、跨平台、设计良好的ArcGIS控件,因此利用控件开发可视化的GIS应用程序是一种常用的开发方式.重点探讨了ArcGIS Engine自带控件的功能、使用方法以及与伙伴控件之间的联系机制.

  19. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  20. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  1. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Haoxi; Li, Qingmin; Xing, Jinyuan; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51277061 and 51420105011)

  2. Established and Adapted Diagnostic Tools for Investigation of a Special Twin-Wire Arc Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Johannes; Lahres, Michael; Zimmermann, Stephan; Schein, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    In the LDS® ( Lichtbogendrahtspritzen) process, a twin-wire arc spraying (TWAS) process developed by Daimler AG, the gas injection and feed to the arc play a crucial role in separating the molten particles from the wire ends. This paper describes an investigation of the gas and particle behavior according to individual LDS® process parameters. Coating problems are not considered. The measurements are separated into two different parts: "cold" (without arc and particles) and "hot" (with arc and particles). The results provide the first detailed understanding of the effect of different LDS® process parameters. A correlation between the gas parameter settings and the particle beam properties was found. Using established and adapted diagnostic tools, as also applied for conventional TWAS processes, this special LDS® process was investigated and the results (gas and particle behavior) validated, thereby allowing explanation and comparison of the diagnostic methods, which is the main focus of this paper. Based on error analysis, individual instabilities, limits, and deviations during the gas determinations and particle measurements are explained in more detail. The paper concludes with presentation of the first particle-shadow diagnostic results and main statements regarding these investigations.

  3. Gas Arcs in Comet Hyakutake: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, M. R.; Harris, W. M.; Kabin, K.

    2000-10-01

    The recent break-up of the nucleus of Comet LINEAR S4 demonstrates that fragmentation is an important cometary process and that it is not a rare phenomenon. Comet Hyakutake (1996 B2) underwent an outburst of gas production on March 21, 1996. Subsequent to the outburst, fragments, or condensations as they have been called, were observed moving tailward from the position of the nucleus. Arc-shaped structures were seen in images of gas species (OH, CN and C2) providing clear evidence of production of gas from cometary nucleus debris also tailward of the nucleus. We have already (Harris et al. 1997, Science 277, 676) described observations taken with the WIYN telescope consisting of a 6-hour time sequence of images on March 26, 1996 of CN and dust continuum and a single OH image showing that the arc, and by inference it's source, was generally moving tailward with the visible condensations. The entire OH arc was reproduced using a kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculation for water and all its photodissociation products. DSMC is suited to this physical environment that is in transition from fluid conditions in the inner coma to free-expansion in the outer coma. Our model asuming a string of fragments within the apex of the arc (i.e., the intersection of the arc and the tailward sun-comet line) reproduced the arc. Here we present a more extensive parameter study of the arc using DSMC and a solution of the standard perfect-fluid Euler equations. We find that a secondary source just behind the apex of the arc can reproduce the OH arc, but the location of the source must be much closer to the apex than indicated by solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) (Rodionov et al. 1998, Icarus 136, 232). We find that we must use unrealistically large collision cross sections to reproduce the NSE results, and that the NSE results are not substantially different from a simpler Euler equation approach. This work has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres

  4. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. BASIC THEORY AND METHOD OF WELDING ARC SPECTRAL INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junyue; Li Zhiyong; Li Huan; Xue Haitao

    2004-01-01

    Arc spectral information is a rising information source which can solve many problems that can not be done with arc electric information and other arc information.It is of important significance to develop automatic control technique of welding process.The basic theory and methods on it play an important role in expounding and applying arc spectral information.Using concerned equation in plasma physics and spectrum theory,a system of equations including 12 equations which serve as basic theory of arc spectral information is set up.Through analyzing of the 12 equations,a basic view that arc spectral information is the reflection of arc state and state variation,and is the most abundant information resource reflecting welding arc process is drawn.Furthermore,based on the basic theory,the basic methods of test and control of arc spectral information and points out some applications of it are discussesed.

  6. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  7. Arc Conductance and Flow Velocity Affected by Transient Recovery Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Reo; Ishikawa, Yuya; Ono, Seisui; Sato, Ken; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the stable supply of electric power is indispensable. The GCB (Gas Circuit Breaker) can prevent the spread of the fault current. However, it should have the reliability more. Therefore the GCB has been researched for performance improvement of the arc interruption of abnormal fault current without the fail. Therefore, it is important to prevent the breakdown such as the re-ignition and thermal re-ignition of arc after the arc interruption. It is necessary to reduce the arc conductance in order to prevent the re-ignition of arc. The arc conductance is derived from the temperature distribution and the volume of the arc. The temperature distribution of the arc is formed by convection. In this research, the arc conductance and flow velocity affected by transient recovery voltage are elucidated. The flow rate and temperature distribution of the arc is calculated with changing transient recovery voltage. In addition, the arc conductance is calculated in order to know the extinguish arc ability. As a result, when the transient recovery voltage increases, the probability of re-ignition increases. Therefore, the arc temperature and the arc conductance were increased.

  8. Single-Plane Magnetically Focused Elongated Small Field Proton Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Grant A; Slater, James M; Wroe, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    We previously performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically focused proton beams shaped by a single quadrapole magnet and thereby created narrow elongated beams with superior dose delivery characteristics (compared to collimated beams) suitable for targets of similar geometry. The present study seeks to experimentally validate these simulations using a focusing magnet consisting of 24 segments of samarium cobalt permanent magnetic material adhered into a hollow cylinder. Proton beams with properties relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications were delivered through the magnet to a water tank containing a diode detector or radiochromic film. Dose profiles were analyzed and compared with analogous Monte Carlo simulations. The focused beams produced elongated beam spots with high elliptical symmetry, indicative of magnet quality. Experimental data showed good agreement with simulations, affirming the utility of Monte Carlo simulations as a tool to model the inherent complexity of a magnetic focusing system. Compared to target-matched unfocused simulations, focused beams showed larger peak to entrance ratios (26% to 38%) and focused simulations showed a two-fold increase in beam delivery efficiency. These advantages can be attributed to the magnetic acceleration of protons in the transverse plane that tends to counteract the particle outscatter that leads to degradation of peak to entrance performance in small field proton beams. Our results have important clinical implications and suggest rare earth focusing magnet assemblies are feasible and could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering enhanced dose to narrow elongated targets (eg, in and around the spinal cord) in less time compared to collimated beams.

  9. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2015-01-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, provid

  10. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  11. Application of AAPM TG 119 to volumetric arc therapy (VMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynampati, Dinesh Kumar; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Hong, Linda; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mah, Dennis

    2012-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to create AAPM TG 119 benchmark plans for volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) and to compare VMAT plans with IMRT plan data. AAPM TG 119 proposes a set of test clinical cases for testing the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery system. For these test cases, we generated two treatment plans, the first plan using 7-9 static dMLC IMRT fields and a second plan utilizing one- or two-arc VMAT technique. Dose optimization and calculations performed using 6 MV photons and Eclipse treatment planning system. Dose prescription and planning objectives were set according to the TG 119 goals. Plans were scored based on TG 119 planning objectives. Treatment plans were compared using conformity index (CI) for reference dose and homogeneity index (HI) (for D(5)-D(95)). For test cases prostate, head-and-neck, C-shape and multitarget prescription dose are 75.6 Gy, 50.4 Gy, 50 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. VMAT dose distributions were comparable to dMLC IMRT plans. Our planning results matched TG 119 planning results. For treatment plans studied, conformity indices ranged from 1.05-1.23 (IMRT) and 1.04-1.23 (VMAT). Homogeneity indices ranged from 4.6%-11.0% (IMRT) and 4.6%-10.5% (VMAT). The ratio of total monitor units necessary for dMLC IMRT to that of VMAT was in the range of 1.1-2.0. AAPM TG 119 test cases are useful to generate VMAT benchmark plans. At preclinical implementation stage, plan comparison of VMAT and IMRT plans of AAPM TG 119 test case allowed us to understand basic capabilities of VMAT technique.

  12. Arc-welding robot. 2; Yosetsu robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    This is an introductory lecture on the selection and handling of arc-welding robot and was explained easily in Q and A style. This is the second of its series and extraction examples of Q and A are Q: type of stations for setting works, A: fixed, slide, inversion, rotary types and their combination, Q: station type for constructing a highly universal system for a wide variety of works, A: a highly universal robot was realized owing to external shaft control function. Recently, one robot can control a maximum of 21 shafts to cope with a variety of works, Q: off-line teaching for arc-welding robot, A: yes. It is available but does not spread as much as for spot since arc welding requires a high tracing accuracy. 12 figs.

  13. Circular arc snakes and kinematic surface generation

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the theory, discretization, and numerics of curves which are evolving such that part of their shape, or at least their curvature as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The discretization of a curve as a smooth sequence of circular arcs is well suited for such purposes, and allows us to reduce evolution of curves to the evolution of a control point collection in a certain finite-dimensional shape space. We approach this evolution by a 2-step process: linearized evolution via optimized velocity fields, followed by optimization in order to exactly fulfill all geometric side conditions. We give applications to freeform architecture, including "rationalization" of a surface by congruent arcs, form finding and, most interestingly, non-static architecture. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. ArcForm - A multimodal notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allsopp, Benjamin Brink

    ArcForm (AF) is a visual notation based on a new graph-like network structure. It supports a unique approach to labeling arcs and nodes to allow diverse and grammatically normal English (or other natural language) sentences to be embedded in the network (Allsopp, 2013). In doing this AF combines ...... as a notational foundation for e-learning platforms (Allsopp 2015). We will explore a prototype supporting basic interaction with the landscape and consider how it can benefit from virtual reality, online social curating and the block chain....... of individual nodes and arcs will allow us to create new perspectives on the underlying information. This presentation will use multiple visual examples to show how AF achieves its many affordances. We will discuss how it has been used in education research (Misfeldt 2016) and how it could be used...

  15. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B [Omega Hospitals, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Anuradha, C [Vit University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  16. SU-F-BRE-10: Methods to Simulate and Measure the Attenuation for Modeling a Couch Top with Rails for FFF Treatment Delivery On the Varian Edge Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulam, M; Gardner, S; Zhao, B; Snyder, K; Song, K; Li, H; Gordon, J; Wen, N; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Kearns, W [Varian Medical Systems, Clemmons, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To measure attenuation for modelling of the KVue Couchtop for 6X and 10X FFF SRS/SBRT treatment Methods: Treatment planning simulation studies were done using 6X FFF beams to estimate the dosimetric impact of KVue couchtops (including the Q-Fix IGRT [carbon fiber] and Calypso [nonconductive Kevlar material]) with a structure model obtained from a research workstation (Eclipse, advanced planning interface (API) v13). Prior to installation on the Varian Edge linac, the couchtop along with (Kevlar) rails were CT scanned with the rails at various positions. An additional scan with the couchtop 15cm above the CT table top was obtained with 20cm solid water to facilitate precised/indexed data acquisition. Measurements for attenuation were obtained for field sizes of 2, 4 and 10 cm{sup 2} at 42 gantry angles including 6 pairs of opposing fields and other angles for oblique delivery where the beams traversed the couchtop and or rails. The delivery was fully automated with xml scripts running in developer mode. The results were then used to determine an accurate structure model for AAA (Eclipse v11) planning of IMRT and RapidArc delivery. Results: The planning simulation relative dose attenuation for oblique entry was not significantly different than the Exact IGRT or BrainLab iBeam couch except that the rails added 6% additional attenuation. The relative attenuation measurements for PA, PA (rails: inner position), oblique, oblique (rails: outer position), oblique (rails: inner position) were: −2.0%, −2.5%, −15.6%, −2.5%, −5.0% for 6X FFF and −1.4%, −1.5%, −12.2%, − 2.5%, −5.0% for 10X FFF with slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. A Couch structure model (with HU values) was developed. Calculation compared to measurement showed good agreement except for oblique (rails: outer position) where differences approached a magnitude of 6%. Conclusion: A model of the couch structures has been developed accounting for attenuation for FFF

  17. The influence of arc plasma electric and laser treatment on the structure and properties of the high speed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bochnowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The examination of the structure, hardness and abrasion resistance of surface layer of high speed steel: HS 2-10-1-8, HS 6-5-2 and HS 10-2-5-8 after arc plasma and laser welding are presented in the paper. They are compared with the properties obtained after conventional hardening. Diode laser of continuous operation and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding method were used. As a result of concentrated energy beam treatment applied to a steels surface layer, the structures characteristic of rapid solidification / crystallization process were obtained. The treatment of the steel by arc plasma electric with a single remelted track about 7 mm width does not lead to growth of the mechanical and tribological properties of high speed steels. The growth of microhardness as well as low the coefficient Archard of the high speed steel after remelting on the surface single track about 6 mm width by diode laser using can be obtained.

  18. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  19. On the Trail of Joan of Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joyce Forristal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marked the 600th anniversary of the birthday of Joan of Arc (Fr., Jeanne d’Arc (1412–1431. Tributes to this national heroine can be found all over France. There are literally countless statues, streets and restaurants named after her and many sites dedicated to her life. However, despite widespread social and mechanical reproduction and cultural naming in relation to the Maid of Orléans, there is no official network or integrated signage in France to promote cultural heritage tourism to the numerous Joan of Arc sites and festivals, even though her life and death, by any measure, were seminal events in the country’s history. Unfortunately, the pilgrim who wants to follow or intersect with Joan of Arc’s trail through France, for cultural, historical or religious reasons, must do so without much help. Using Actor Network Theory and Site Sacralization Theory as framing devices, this paper explores human actors and tangible and intangible non-human factors that may have contributed to the lack of a unified tourism product despite the existence of an adequate Joan of Arc tourismscape. Insights gleaned from this research include Joan’s conflicted status as both/either saint and/or patriot, the existence of no cooperation or linkage between Joan of Arc sites, and cautious French tourism development policies. Several possible scenarios are suggested as suitable means to help implement or foster the creation of an on-the-ground or virtual Joan of Arc trail or tour.

  20. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  1. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David M.; Falabella, Steven

    1994-01-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  2. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  3. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. IMRT for the Treatment of Distal Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Benthuysen, Liam, E-mail: liam.vanbenthuysen@roswellpark.org; Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V{sub 5} was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V{sub 5} for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  4. Volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. IMRT for the treatment of distal esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benthuysen, Liam; Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V(5) was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V(5) for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  5. Change of electrical conductivity of Ar welding arc under resonant absorption of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, R.; Emde, B.; Pipa, A. V.; Huse, M.; Uhrlandt, D.; Hermsdorf, J.; Wesling, V.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental investigations of the impact of resonant laser absorption by a tungsten inert gas welding arc in argon are presented. The intensity increase of the arc’s radiation between the laser entrance height and the anode are observed, as well as the variation of arc voltage due to the presence of the laser beam. High-speed camera recordings from different directions combined with absolutely calibrated spectroscopic measurements allow the reconstruction of the three-dimensional emission coefficient profiles without the assumption of axial symmetry. The obtained data are evaluated within the framework of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The local increase in the temperature and conductivity due to the influence of the laser is determined. Changes in the electrical conductivity obtained from the optical measurements coincide well with the measured voltage drop, and show significant redistribution of the current density profile near the anode in particular.

  6. SU-E-T-631: Commissioning and Comprehensive Evaluation of the ArcCHECK Cylindrical Diode Array for VMAT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaswal, V; Weldon, M; Gupta, N; Rong, Y [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Commissioning and comprehensive evaluation of ArcCHECK phantom for dosimetry of VMAT QA, using 6MV photon beam with and without the flattening filter. Methods: ArcCHECK was evaluated for response dependency on linac dose rate, instantaneous dose rate, radiation field size, beam angle and couch insertion. Scatter dose characterization, consistency and symmetry of response, dosimetric accuracy of fixed aperture arcs and clinical VMAT plans were investigated. Measurements were done using TrueBeam™ STx accelerator (Console version 1.6) with a 6 MV beam with and without flattening filter. Reference dose-grids were calculated using Eclipse TPS Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA version 10.0.39). Planned doses were calculated using symmetric 2mm 3D dose grids with 4 degree angular resolution defaulted to each control point. Gamma evaluations were performed in absolute dose mode, with default normalization to maximum dose in the curved plane and a low dose threshold of 10% to restrict the analysis to clinically relevant areas. Global and local gamma indices at 3mm/3% and 2mm/2% level were computed using SNC software (version 6.0). Results: Results of gamma analysis demonstrated an overall agreement between ArcCHECK measured and TPS calculated reference doses. Field size dependency was within 0.5% of the reference. Dose-rate based dependency was well within 1% of the TPS reference and the angular dependency was ±3% of the reference, as tested for BEV angles. At the level of 3%/3mm, narrow and wide open arcs as well as clinical VMAT cases demonstrated high level of dosimetry accuracy in global gamma passing rates for both 6X and 6F beams. At the level of 2%/2mm two VMAT cases involving the narrow heavily modulated arcs demonstrated lower passing rates. Conclusion: ArcCHECK phantom with latest software and hardware upgrades is suitable for VMAT QA. For higher sensitivity of 2%/2mm gamma analysis, we intend to use it as one of the VMAT QA evaluation metrics.

  7. Arcing Model of a Disconnector and its Effect on VFTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Na; Xu, Jianyuan

    2013-07-01

    In the computational process of very fast transient over-voltage (VFTO), it is essential to find an accurate model for a gas insulated substation. The arcing model of the disconnector is particularly important. The general arcing model is not able to give a good description of the arc development process. In this paper, based on the physical process of arcing and existing arc models (the exponential time-varying resistance model and the segmental arcing models), a dynamic arcing model is proposed, which is divided into two stages before and after the zero crossing. The dynamic arcing model combines hyperbola time-varying resistance and the Mayr model to describe the dynamic process of arcing. The present paper creates an arc model blockset upon the Matlab/Simulink software platform. Moreover for a specific 1100 kV station, VFTO is simulated in detail based on different arcing models. It is demonstrated that the dynamic arcing model can describe the physical arc process precisely and is useful for improving the accuracy of VFTO simulations.

  8. A retarding potential analyzer design for keV-level ion thruster beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Haibin; Zhang, Zun; Wang, Joseph; Cao, Shuai

    2016-12-01

    We present a new Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) design that is capable of measuring keV-level energy, high-density plasma beams. This instrument overcomes the limitations of existing RPAs and can operate in plasmas with densities in excess of 1 × 1015 m-3 and ion energies up to 1200 eV. The RPA design parameters were determined by analyzing the electron density and temperature, the sheath thickness, and the ion density in the beam based on the Faraday probe and Langmuir probe measurements. A previously unobserved grid spacing arcing phenomenon was observed in experiments. This arcing phenomenon was also investigated and a grid spacing criterion was proposed to eliminate the arcing. We present measurement results on the plasma beam emitted from the 20 cm Xenon ion thruster used on the Chinese SJ-9A satellite.

  9. Recent DIII-D neutral beam calibration results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, J.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.

    1991-10-01

    Injected DIII-D neutral beam power is estimated based on three principle quantities: the fraction of ion beam that is neutralized in the neutralizer gas cell, the beamline transmission efficiency, and the fraction of beam reionized in the drift duct. System changes in the past few years have included a new gradient grid voltage operating point, ion source arc regulation, routine deuterium operations and new neutralizer gas flow controllers. Additionally, beam diagnostics have been improved and better calibrated. To properly characterize the beams the principle quantities have been re-measured. Two diagnostics are primarily used to measure the quantities. The beamline waterflow calorimetry system measures the neutralization efficiency and the beamline transmission efficiency, and the target tile thermocouples measure the reionization loss. An additional diagnostic, the target tile pyrometer, confirmed the reionization loss measurement. Descriptions and results of these measurements will be presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  11. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  12. Project delivery system (PDS)

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    As business environments become increasingly competitive, companies seek more comprehensive solutions to the delivery of their projects. "Project Delivery System: Fourth Edition" describes the process-driven project delivery systems which incorporates the best practices from Total Quality and is aligned with the Project Management Institute and ISO Quality Standards is the means by which projects are consistently and efficiently planned, executed and completed to the satisfaction of clients and customers.

  13. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm in prostate cancer treatment using RapidArc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the dosimetric impact of Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm (AXB, in comparisons with Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA calculations in prostate cancer treatment using RapidArc. Materials and Methods: A computed tomography (CT dataset of low-risk prostate cancer patients treated at Arizona Center for Cancer Care was selected and contoured for prostate, seminal vesicles, and organs at risk (OARs(rectum, bladder, and femur heads. Plans were created for 6 MV photon beam using RapidArc technique in Eclipse treatment planning system. Dose calculations were performed with AAA and AXB for same number of monitor units and identical beam setup. Mean and maximum doses to planning target volume (PTV and OARs were analyzed. Additionally, minimum dose to PTV and V100 was analyzed. Finally, point-dose difference between planar dose distributions of AAA and AXB plans was investigated. Results: The highest dose difference was up to 0.43% (range: 0.05−0.43%, P> 0.05 for PTV and 1.98% (range: 0.22−1.98%, P> 0.05 for OARs with AAA predicting higher dose than AXB. The V100 values of AAA plans (95 % and AXB plans (range: 93.1−97.9 % had an average difference of 0.89±1.47% with no statistical significance (P = 0.25411. The point-dose difference analysis showed that AAA predicted higher dose than AXB at significantly higher percentage (in average 94.15 of total evaluated points. Conclusion: The dosimetric results of this study suggest that the AXB can perform the dose computation comparable to AAA in RapidArc prostate cancer treatment plans that are generated by a partial single-arc technique.

  14. DMLC motion tracking of moving targets for intensity modulated arc therapy treatment - a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Jens; Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Cattell, Herb; Svatos, Michelle (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Sawant, Amit; Venkat, Raghu; Carlson, David; Keall, Paul (Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States))

    2009-02-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy offers great advantages with the capability of delivering a fast and highly conformal treatment. However, moving targets represent a major challenge. By monitoring a moving target it is possible to make the beam follow the motion, shaped by a Dynamic MLC (DMLC). The aim of this work was to evaluate the dose delivered to moving targets using the RapidArcTM (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) technology with and without a DMLC tracking algorithm. Material and methods. A Varian Clinac iX was equipped with a preclinical RapidArcTM and a 3D DMLC tracking application. A motion platform was placed on the couch, with the detectors on top: a PTW seven29 and a Scandidos Delta4. One lung plan and one prostate plan were delivered. Motion was monitored using a Real-time Position Management (RPM) system. Reference measurements were performed for both plans with both detectors at state (0) 'static, no tracking'. Comparing measurements were made at state (1) 'motion, no tracking' and state (2) 'motion, tracking'. Results. Gamma analysis showed a significant improvement from measurements of state (1) to measurements of state (2) compared to the state (0) measurements: Lung plan; from 87 to 97% pass. Prostate plan; from 81 to 88% pass. Sub-beam information gave a much reduced pattern of periodically spatial deviating dose points for state (2) than for state (1). Iso-dose curve comparisons showed a slightly better agreement between state (0) and state (2) than between state (0) and state (1). Conclusions. DMLC tracking together with RapidArcTM make a feasible combination and is capable of improving the dose distribution delivered to a moving target. It seems to be of importance to minimize noise influencing the tracking, to gain the full benefit from the application.

  15. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring : first test with proton beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solevi, Paola; Munoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosa, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector

  16. PNW River Reach Files -- 1:100k Watercourses (arcs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This feature class includes the ARC features from the 2001 version of the PNW River Reach files Arc/INFO coverage. Separate, companion feature classes are also...

  17. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  18. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  19. Recirculating linacs for a neutrino factory--Arc optics design and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bogacz, S A

    2001-01-01

    A conceptual lattice design for a muon accelerator based on recirculating linacs (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 472 (2001) 499, these proceedings) is presented here. The challenge of accelerating and transporting a large phase space of short-lived muons is answered here by presenting a proof-of-principle lattice design for a recirculating linac accelerator. It is the centerpiece of a chain of accelerators consisting of a 3 GeV linac and two consecutive recirculating linear accelerators, which facilitates acceleration starting after ionization cooling at 190 MeV/c and proceeding to 50 GeV. Beam transport issues for large-momentum-spread beams are accommodated by appropriate lattice design choices. The resulting arc optics is further optimized with a sextupole correction to suppress chromatic effects contributing to the emittance dilution. The presented proof-of-principle design of the arc optics with horizontal separation of multi-pass beams can be extended to all passes in both recirculating linacs.

  20. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal-gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the "inverse" concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  1. Localization of deformable tumors from short-arc projections using Bayesian estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegele, W.; Zygmanski, P.; Dobler, B.; Kroiss, M.; Koelbl, O.; Loeschel, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany) and Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Applied Sciences, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the Sisters of Mercy, 4010 Linz (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg University Medical Center, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Applied Sciences, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The authors present a stochastic framework for radiotherapy patient positioning directly utilizing radiographic projections. This framework is developed to be robust against anatomical nonrigid deformations and to cope with challenging imaging scenarios, involving only a few cone beam CT projections from short arcs. Methods: Specifically, a Bayesian estimator (BE) is explicitly derived for the given scanning geometry. This estimator is compared to reference methods such as chamfer matching (CM) and the minimization of the median absolute error adapted as tools of robust image processing and statistics. In order to show the performance of the stochastic short-arc patient positioning method, a CIRS IMRT thorax phantom study is presented with movable markers and the utilization of an Elekta Synergy{sup Registered-Sign} XVI system. Furthermore, a clinical prostate CBCT scan of a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} On-Board Imager{sup Registered-Sign} system is utilized to investigate the robustness of the method for large variations of image quality (anterior-posterior vs lateral views). Results: The results show that the BE shifts reduce the initial setup error of up to 3 cm down to 3 mm at maximum for an imaging arc as short as 10 Degree-Sign while CM achieves residual errors of 7 mm at maximum only for arcs longer than 40 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, the BE can compensate robustly for low image qualities using several low quality projections simultaneously. Conclusions: In conclusion, an estimation method for marker-based patient positioning for short imaging arcs is presented and shown to be robust and accurate for deformable anatomies.

  2. SCALED ELECTRON MODEL OF A DOGBONE MUON RLA WITH MULTI-PASS ARCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Beard, Rolland Johnson, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Andrew Hutton, Geoffrey Krafft, Slawomir Bogacz

    2012-07-01

    The design of a dogbone RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available at CEBAF 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement. In this report, we have shown first of all that measuring the energy spectrum of the fast neutrons in the liquid scintillators allows one to distinguish the two chemical forms of plutonium. In addition, combining this information with the Feynman 2-neutron and 3-neutron correlations allows one to extract the {alpha}-ratio without explicitly knowing the multiplication. Given the {alpha}-ratio one can then extract the multiplication as well as the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu masses directly from the moment equations.

  3. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  4. Soundness of Timed-Arc Workflow Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Jose Antonio; Srba, Jiri; Sørensen, Mathias Grund

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of workflow processes with quantitative aspects like timing is of interest in numerous time-critical applications. We suggest a workflow model based on timed-arc Petri nets and study the foundational problems of soundness and strong (time-bounded) soundness. We explore the decidability o...

  5. ArcAid Interactive Archery Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Vervaeke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design process of a bow aiming system, called ArcAid, which is an interactive archery assistant. The main goal of ArcAid is to introduce a way for beginner Robin Hoods to learn the art of archery to its fullest. In order to achieve this goal, our smartphone-based design focuses on a fun and interactive learning process that gives constant feedback to the user on how to hit a certain goal. A SPIKE high- end laser sensor is used for the distance measurement and the smartphone’s accelerometer is used to define the angle of inclination. To measure the force on the arrow and the displacement of the string, a flex sensor is attached upon one of the arcs of the bow. All sensor data is processed in an Arduino Nano microprocessor and feedback to the user is given by a dedicated smartphone app. In this paper, we mainly focus on the construction, mechanics and electronics of the ArcAid bow and on the design of the mobile app, which is the game controller. Furthermore, we briefly discuss some future development ideas.

  6. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Elise; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, due to the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  7. Hypergravity effects on glide arc plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šperka, J.; Souček, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Dowson, A.; Schwarz, C.; Krause, J.; Kroesen, G.; Kudrle, V.

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of a special type of electric discharge - the gliding arc plasma - has been investigated in hypergravity (1g-18g) using the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC) at ESA/ESTEC. The discharge voltage and current together with the videosignal from a fast camera have been recorded during the exp

  8. Arc discharge sliding over a conducting surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, van F.A.; Mitko, S.V.; Ochkin, V.N.; Paramonov, A.P.; Witteman, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the arc discharge which slides over the surface of a conductor are reported. Experiments were performed in air and argon ambients at various pressures. It is found that the velocity of the discharge plasma front depends linearly on the strength of t

  9. Stability of alternating current gliding arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    that the critical length can be increased by increasing the AC frequency, decreasing the serial resistance and lowering the gas flow rate. The predicted dependence of gas flow rate on the arc length is experimentally demonstrated. The gap width is varied to study an optimal electrode design, since the extended non...

  10. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  11. Roadmap for the ARC Grid Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleist, Josva; Eerola, Paula; Ekelöf, Tord

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) or the NorduGrid middleware is an open source software solution enabling production quality computational and data Grids, with special emphasis on scalability, stability, reliability and performance. Since its first release in May 2002, the middleware is depl...

  12. Nonlinear Study of Industrial Arc Spring Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar; Hartmann, Henning

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a numerical approach for analyzing parameter excited vibrations on a gas compressor, induced by the nonlinear characteristic of the arc spring feature of certain designs of squeeze film dampers, SFDs. The behavior of the journal is studied in preparation ...

  13. Supersonic Vortex Gerdien Arc with Magnetic Thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1988-02-01

    Temperatures up to ~ 5 x 104 oK have been obtained with water vortex Gerdien arcs, and temperatures of ~ 105oK have been reached in hydrogen plasma arcs with magnetic thermal insulation through an externally applied strong magnetic field. It is suggested that a further increase in arc temperatures up to 106oK can conceivably be attained by a combination of both techniques, using a Gerdien arc with a supersonic hydrogen gas vortex.

  14. H2O and CO2 in magmas from the Mariana arc and back arc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sally; Stolper, Edward; Stern, Robert

    2000-05-01

    We examined the H2O and CO2 contents of glasses from lavas and xenoliths from the Mariana arc system, an intraoceanic convergent margin in the western Pacific, which contains an active volcanic arc, an actively spreading back arc basin, and active behind-the-arc cross-chain volcanoes. Samples include (1) glass rims from Mariana arc, Mariana trough, and cross-chain submarine lavas; (2) glass inclusions in arc and trough phenocrysts; and (3) glass inclusions from a gabbro + anorthosite xenolith from Agrigan (Mariana arc). Glass rims of submarine arc lavas contain 0.3-1.9 wt % H2O, and CO2 is below detection limits. Where they could be compared, glass inclusions in arc phenocrysts contain more H2O than their host glasses; most arc glasses and phenocryst inclusions contain no detectable CO2, with the exception of those from a North Hiyoshi shoshonite, which contains 400-600 ppm. The glass inclusions from the Agrigan xenolith contain 4-6% H2O, and CO2 is below the detection limit. Glasses from the cross-chain lavas are similar to those from the arc: H2O contents are 1.4-1.7 wt %, and CO2 is below detection limits. Volatile contents in Mariana trough lava glass rims are variable: 0.2-2.8 wt % H2O and 0-300 ppm CO2. Glass inclusions from trough phenocrysts have water contents similar to the host glass, but they can contain up to 875 ppm CO2. Volatile contents of melt inclusions from trough and arc lavas and from the xenolith imply minimum depths of crystallization of ~1-8 km. H2O and CO2 contents of Mariana trough glasses are negatively correlated, indicating saturation of the erupting magma with a CO2-H2O vapor at the pressure of eruption (~400 bars for these samples), with the vapor ranging from nearly pure CO2 at the CO2-rich end of the glass array to nearly pure H2O at the H2O-rich end. Degassing of these magmas on ascent and eruption leads to significant loss of CO2 (thereby masking preeruptive CO2 contents) but minimal disturbance of preeruptive H2O contents. For

  15. Anatomy of Intra-Oceanic Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Intra-oceanic arc systems (IOAS) are ultimately embedded in orogenic belts and added to the continental crust. Reconstructing fossil IOASs in collision zones requires understanding the salient features of a typical IOAS. IOASs have the relative dimensions of tagliatelle (flat) pasta: much wider (~250 km) than thick (10-30 km), much longer (1000's of km) than wide. IOASs begin to form when subduction begins, either spontaneously (SNSZ) or by forced convergence (INSZ). For SNSZ, IOASs start as broad zones of seafloor spreading associated with subsidence of the adjacent lithosphere, whereas INSZ IOASs are built on trapped crust. IOAS magmatism manifests the evolution of its subduction zone and indirectly the breadth of the subducted ocean. Two stages in SNSZ IOAS magmato-tectonic evolution exist: infancy and maturity. Infancy lasts 5-10 Ma and results in broad zones of seafloor spreading of tholeiite/boninite; this becomes forearc for the mature IOAS and is emplaced as ophiolite during collision (subduction zone failure). Arc maturity begins with true subduction, as the subducted slab reaches depths ~130 km, focusing magmatism to begin building the magmatic arc ~200km away from the trench and allowing the forearc to cool and hydrate. Mature magmatic arcs mostly yield low-K tholeiitic and medium-K calc-alkaline magmas. Magmatic focusing begins crustal thickening beneath the magmatic arc, at ~500m/Ma for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana IOAS. No systematic compositional evolution to more LIL-enriched primitive magmas occurs once IOAS maturity is reached, except when upper plate stress regime (BAB formation, strike- slip faulting) or the nature of subducted material (more/different sediments, young oceanic crust) changes. Thickening is accompanied by processing of crust beneath the magmatic arc, with progressive differentiation into upper volcanic, middle tonalitic, and lower mafic layers, producing an increasingly effective density filter for magma ascent. Crustal layer formation

  16. The arc arises: The links between volcanic output, arc evolution and melt composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Hamada, Morihisa; Arculus, Richard J.; Johnson, Kyle; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Savov, Ivan P.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Li, He

    2017-03-01

    Subduction initiation is a key process for global plate tectonics. Individual lithologies developed during subduction initiation and arc inception have been identified in the trench wall of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) island arc but a continuous record of this process has not previously been described. Here, we present results from International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 351 that drilled a single site west of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), a chain of extinct stratovolcanoes that represents the proto-IBM island arc, active for ∼25 Ma following subduction initiation. Site U1438 recovered 150 m of oceanic igneous basement and ∼1450 m of overlying sediments. The lower 1300 m of these sediments comprise volcaniclastic gravity-flow deposits shed from the evolving KPR arc front. We separated fresh magmatic minerals from Site U1438 sediments, and analyzed 304 glass (formerly melt) inclusions, hosted by clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Compositions of glass inclusions preserve a temporal magmatic record of the juvenile island arc, complementary to the predominant mid-Miocene to recent activity determined from tephra layers recovered by drilling in the IBM forearc. The glass inclusions record the progressive transition of melt compositions dominated by an early 'calc-alkalic', high-Mg andesitic stage to a younger tholeiitic stage over a time period of 11 Ma. High-precision trace element analytical data record a simultaneously increasing influence of a deep subduction component (e.g., increase in Th vs. Nb, light rare earth element enrichment) and a more fertile mantle source (reflected in increased high field strength element abundances). This compositional change is accompanied by increased deposition rates of volcaniclastic sediments reflecting magmatic output and maturity of the arc. We conclude the 'calc-alkalic' stage of arc evolution may endure as long as mantle wedge sources are not mostly advected away from the zones of arc magma generation, or the rate of

  17. Electric-arc synthesis of soot with high content of higher fullerenes in parallel arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutlov, A. E.; Nekrasov, V. M.; Sergeev, A. G.; Bubnov, V. P.; Kareev, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soot with a relatively high content of higher fullerenes (C76, C78, C80, C82, C84, C86, etc.) is synthesized in a parallel arc upon evaporation of pure carbon electrodes. The content of higher fullerenes in soot extract amounts to 13.8 wt % when two electrodes are simultaneously burnt in electric-arc reactor. Such a content is comparable with the content obtained upon evaporation of composite graphite electrodes with potassium carbonate impurity.

  18. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.

  19. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated Arc treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young Kyu; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young; Kang, Young-Nam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were performed in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre study was conducted to find the most competent plan condition of mARC treatment and the usefulness of mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with the other Arc treatment plans such as Tomotherapy and RapidArc. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans with the use of various parameters. The various parameters includes the photon energies (6 MV, 10 MV), optimization point angle (6{\\deg}-10{\\deg} intervals), and total segment number (36-59 segment). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at 10 MV photon energy and the point angle 6 degree, and 59 segments. The each treatment plans of three different techniques were compared with the followin...

  20. Unstable Behavior of Anodic Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    Fast imaging and electrical current measurements reveal unstable behavior of the carbon arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials. The arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode move in a somewhat sporadic way with a characteristic time in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. A physical mechanism is proposed based on the thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode which leads to the shift of the arc to a new anode region. According to the transient heat transfer analysis, the time needed to heat a new anode region is also in a 10-3 sec range. For a 0.6 cm diameter anode used in our experiments, this time yields a frequency of about 200-300 Hz, comparable to the measured frequency of the arc motion. The voltage and current measurements show oscillations with a similar characteristic frequency. The thermal model is indirectly supported by the measured negative differential resistance of the arc discharge during arc oscillations. The observed unstable behavior of the arc may be responsible for the mixing of the flow of nanoparticles during the synthesis of nanoparticles leading to poor selectivity typical for the arc synthesis. The work was supported by US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.