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Sample records for bdnf val66met polymorphism

  1. BDNF val66met Polymorphism Affects Aging of Multiple Types of Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Kristen M.; Reese, Elizabeth D.; Horn, Marci M.; Sizemore, April N.; Unni, Asha K.; Meerbrey, Michael E.; Kalich, Allan G.; Rodrigue, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The BDNF val66met polymorphism (rs6265) influences activity-dependent secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the synapse, which is crucial for learning and memory. Individuals homozygous or heterozygous for the met allele have lower BDNF secretion than val homozygotes and may be at risk for reduced declarative memory performance, but it remains unclear which types of declarative memory may be affected and how aging of memory across the lifespan is impacted by the BDNF val66met poly...

  2. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on White Matter Microstructure in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tost, Heike; Alam, Tajvar; Geramita, Matthew; Rebsch, Christine; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Dickinson, Dwight; Verchinski, Beth A.; Lemaitre, Herve; Barnett, Alan S.; Trampush, Joey W.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Marenco, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, a possible risk variant for mental disorders, is a potent modulator of neural plasticity in humans and has been linked to deficits in gray matter structure, function, and cognition. The impact of the variant on brain white matter structure, however, is controversial and remains poorly understood. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the effects of BDNF Val66Met genotype on white matter microstructure in a sample of 85 healthy Caucasian adults. We d...

  3. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and protein levels in Amniotic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calabrese Francesca

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin which plays survival- and growth-promoting activity in neuronal cells and it is involved in cellular plasticity mechanisms as it controls activity dependent synaptic transmission. A functional polymorphism (Val66Met in the pro-region of BDNF, which affects the intracellular trafficking of proBDNF has been associated with memory and cognitive deficits as well as to an increased susceptibility for several psychiatric disorders especially those with a neurodevelopmental origin. To date, no study has evaluated the influence of the Val66Met polymorphism on BDNF levels in a peripheral system that may reflect fetal neurodevelopment. Therefore we investigated in amniotic fluids (AF obtained from 139 healthy women during 15-17 week of pregnancy, BDNF protein levels in correlation with the Val66Met polymorphism. Results Interestingly we found a significant BDNF protein levels reduction in 55 Met carriers (Val/Met and Met/Met (p = 0.002 as compared to 84 non carriers (Val/Val, and no effect of fetus gender, maternal age or gestation week on BDNF levels has been observed. Conclusion These results, although explorative, indicate that during fetal life the Val66Met genotype might influences BDNF protein levels in AF supporting the involvement of this polymorphism in behavioral and functional brain individual differences in the adulthood.

  4. BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Is Associated with Self-Reported Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschereau-Dumouchel, Vincent; Hétu, Sébastien; Bagramian, Anaït; Labrecque, Alexandre; Racine, Marion; Chagnon, Yvon C; Jackson, Philip L

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is an important driver of human social behaviors and presents genetic roots that have been studied in neuroimaging using the intermediate phenotype approach. Notably, the Val66Met polymorphism of the Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene has been identified as a potential target in neuroimaging studies based on its influence on emotion perception and social cognition, but its impact on self-reported empathy has never been documented. Using a neurogenetic approach, we investigated the association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and self-reported empathy (Davis' Interpersonal Reactivity Index; IRI) in a sample of 110 young adults. Our results indicate that the BDNF genotype is significantly associated with the linear combination of the four facets of the IRI, one of the most widely used self-reported empathy questionnaire. Crucially, the effect of BDNF Val66Met goes beyond the variance explained by two polymorphisms of the oxytocin transporter gene previously associated with empathy and its neural underpinnings (OXTR rs53576 and rs2254298). These results represent the first evidence suggesting a link between the BDNF gene and self-reported empathy and warrant further studies of this polymorphism due to its potential clinical significance. PMID:26901829

  5. Peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to aerobic training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, José R; Alves, Cleber R; de Souza, Sílvia B C; Marsiglia, Julia D C; Silva, Michelle S M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Vieira, Erica L M; Krieger, José E; Negrão, Carlos E; Alves, Guilherme B; de Oliveira, Edilamar M; Bolani, Wladimir; Dias, Rodrigo G; Trombetta, Ivani C

    2016-02-01

    Besides neuronal plasticity, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also important in vascular function. The BDNF has been associated with angiogenesis through its specific receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB). Additionally, Val66Met polymorphism decreases activity-induced BDNF. Since BDNF and TrkB are expressed in vascular endothelial cells and aerobic exercise training can increase serum BDNF, this study aimed to test the hypotheses: 1) Serum BDNF levels modulate peripheral blood flow; 2) The Val66Met BDNF polymorphism impairs exercise training-induced vasodilation. We genotyped 304 healthy male volunteers (Val66Val, n = 221; Val66Met, n = 83) who underwent intense aerobic exercise training on a running track three times/wk for 4 mo. We evaluated pre- and post-exercise training serum BDNF and proBDNF concentration, heart rate (HR), mean blood pressure (MBP), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). In the pre-exercise training, BDNF, proBDNF, BDNF/proBDNF ratio, FBF, and FVR were similar between genotypes. After exercise training, functional capacity (V̇o2 peak) increased and HR decreased similarly in both groups. Val66Val, but not Val66Met, increased BDNF (interaction, P = 0.04) and BDNF/proBDNF ratio (interaction, P < 0.001). Interestingly, FBF (interaction, P = 0.04) and the FVR (interaction, P = 0.01) responses during handgrip exercise (HG) improved in Val66Val compared with Val66Met, even with similar responses of HR and MBP. There were association between BDNF/proBDNF ratio and FBF (r = 0.64, P < 0.001) and FVR (r = -0.58, P < 0.001) during HG exercise. These results show that peripheral vascular reactivity and serum BDNF responses to exercise training are impaired by the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and such responsiveness is associated with serum BDNF concentrations in healthy subjects. PMID:26603150

  6. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Influences Reading Ability and Patterns of Neural Activation in Children.

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    Jasińska, Kaja K; Molfese, Peter J; Kornilov, Sergey A; Mencl, W Einar; Frost, Stephen J; Lee, Maria; Pugh, Kenneth R; Grigorenko, Elena L; Landi, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how genes impact the brain's functional activation for learning and cognition during development remains limited. We asked whether a common genetic variant in the BDNF gene (the Val66Met polymorphism) modulates neural activation in the young brain during a critical period for the emergence and maturation of the neural circuitry for reading. In animal models, the bdnf variation has been shown to be associated with the structure and function of the developing brain and in humans it has been associated with multiple aspects of cognition, particularly memory, which are relevant for the development of skilled reading. Yet, little is known about the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on functional brain activation in development, either in animal models or in humans. Here, we examined whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (dbSNP rs6265) is associated with children's (age 6-10) neural activation patterns during a reading task (n = 81) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), genotyping, and standardized behavioral assessments of cognitive and reading development. Children homozygous for the Val allele at the SNP rs6265 of the BDNF gene outperformed Met allele carriers on reading comprehension and phonological memory, tasks that have a strong memory component. Consistent with these behavioral findings, Met allele carriers showed greater activation in reading-related brain regions including the fusiform gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus as well as greater activation in the hippocampus during a word and pseudoword reading task. Increased engagement of memory and spoken language regions for Met allele carriers relative to Val/Val homozygotes during reading suggests that Met carriers have to exert greater effort required to retrieve phonological codes. PMID:27551971

  7. The BDNF gene Val66Met polymorphism as a modifier of psychiatric disorder susceptibility: progress and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaras, M; Hill, R; van den Buuse, M

    2015-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a primary role in neuronal development, differentiation and plasticity in both the developing and adult brain. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the proregion of BDNF, termed the Val66Met polymorphism, results in deficient subcellular translocation and activity-dependent secretion of BDNF, and has been associated with impaired neurocognitive function in healthy adults and in the incidence and clinical features of several psychiatric disorders. Research investigating the Val66Met polymorphism has increased markedly in the past decade, and a gap in integration exists between and within academic subfields interested in the effects of this variant. Here we comprehensively review the role and relevance of the Val66Met polymorphism in psychiatric disorders, with emphasis on suicidal behavior and anxiety, eating, mood and psychotic disorders. The cognitive and molecular neuroscience of the Val66Met polymorphism is also concisely reviewed to illustrate the effects of this genetic variant in healthy controls, and is complemented by a commentary on the behavioral neuroscience of BDNF and the Val66Met polymorphism where relevant to specific disorders. Lastly, a number of controversies and unresolved issues, including small effect sizes, sampling of allele inheritance but not genotype and putative ethnicity-specific effects of the Val66Met polymorphism, are also discussed to direct future research. PMID:25824305

  8. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David;

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2...

  9. Depression, 5HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms, and plasma BDNF levels in hemodialysis patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang LJ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang-Jen Wang,1,* Chih-Ken Chen,2,3,* Heng-Jung Hsu,3,4 I-Wen Wu,3,4 Chiao-Yin Sun,3,4 Chin-Chan Lee3,41Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan; 3Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan *LJW and CKC are joint first authors and contributed equally to this manuscriptObjective: Depression is the most prevalent comorbid psychiatric disease among hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease. This cross-sectional study investigated whether depression in hemodialysis patients is associated with the polymorphism of the 5' flanking transcriptional region (5-HTTLPR of the serotonin transporter gene, the valine (Val-to-methionine (Met substitution at codon 66 (Val66Met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, or plasma BDNF levels.Methods: A total of 188 participants (mean age: 58.5±14.0 years; 89 men and 99 women receiving hemodialysis at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were recruited. The diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD was confirmed using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The genotypes of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met were conducted using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The plasma BDNF levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.Results: Forty-five (23.9% patients fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV-TR criteria for a MDD. There were no significant effects of the 5-HTTLPR or BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism on MDD among the hemodialysis patients. The plasma BDNF levels correlated significantly with age (P=0.003 and sex (P=0.047 but not with depression, the genotypes of 5

  10. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism predicts rumination and depression differently in young adolescent girls and their mothers.

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    Hilt, Lori M; Sander, Lisa C; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Simen, Arthur A

    2007-12-11

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene Val66Met has been associated with depression. However, the relationship between this SNP and depression has been mixed, especially when comparing studies of child and adult depression. We examined whether Val66Met would predict depression differentially in mothers versus their daughters. We also examined whether rumination, the tendency to brood and repetitively think about negative information, might serve as a mediator in the path between genotype and depressive symptoms. Participants included 200 individuals (100 mother-daughter pairs) from a high-risk population. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism was examined in DNA samples from the mothers and daughters, and measures of depressive symptoms and rumination were also obtained. Among the young adolescent girls (ages 10-14), the Val/Val genotype was associated with more depressive symptoms and higher rumination scores compared to the Val/Met genotype. Furthermore, rumination mediated the relationship between genotype and depressive symptoms. However, in the mothers with adult-onset depression the Val/Met genotype was associated with more depressive symptoms, and rumination again mediated the relationship between genotype and depression. Rumination may be an endophenotype in the pathway from the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism to depression. Future work should further explore this mechanism and pursue explanations for its effects at different times in development. PMID:17959306

  11. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with the functional connectivity dynamics of pain modulatory systems in primary dysmenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shyh-Yuh; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Tu, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Ming-Wei; Li, Wei-Chi; Low, Intan; Shen, Horng-Der; Chen, Li-Fen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea (PDM), menstrual pain without an organic cause, is a prevailing problem in women of reproductive age. We previously reported alterations of structure and functional connectivity (FC) in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of PDM subjects. Given that the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts as a pain modulator within the PAG and the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism contributes towards susceptibility to PDM, the present study of imaging genetics set out to investigate the influence of, firstly, the BDNF Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphism and, secondly, the genotype-pain interplays on the descending pain modulatory systems in the context of PAG-seeded FC patterning. Fifty-six subjects with PDM and 60 controls participated in the current study of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the menstruation and peri-ovulatory phases; in parallel, blood samples were taken for genotyping. Our findings indicate that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with the diverse functional expressions of the descending pain modulatory systems. Furthermore, PAG FC patterns in pain-free controls are altered in women with PDM in a genotype-specific manner. Such resilient brain dynamics may underpin the individual differences and shed light on the vulnerability for chronic pain disorders of PDM subjects. PMID:27010666

  12. Interaction between stress and the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hosang, Georgina M; Shiles, Celia; Tansey, Katherine E; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depression is a disabling psychiatric illness with complex origins. Life stress (childhood adversity and recent stressful events) is a robust risk factor for depression. The relationship between life stress and Val66Met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene has received much attention. The aim of the present work was to review and conduct a meta-analysis on the results from published studies examining this interaction. Methods A literatur...

  13. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism: relation to familiar risk of affective disorder, BDNF levels and salivary cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Bennike, Bente;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of affective disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with a...... polymorphism may present with an enhanced stress response. The presence of a specific genotype alone may not enhance the risk of developing an affective episode. Rather, the altered stress response may be expressed only in combination with other risk variants through interactions with the environment....... familiar risk of affective disorder and whether these genotypes affect whole blood BDNF level and salivary cortisol. METHOD: In a high-risk study, healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with and without a co-twin (high- and low-risk twins, respectively) history of affective disorder were identified...

  14. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Gray Matter Volume in Typically Developing Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Fukui, Kento; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Yokota, Susumu; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with psychiatric disorders and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in adults. However, the relationship between BDNF and rGMV in children has not been clarified. In this 3-year cross-sectional/longitudinal (2 time points) study, we investigated the effects of BDNF genotypes on rGMV in 185 healthy Japanese children aged 5.7–18.4 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. W...

  15. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David; Haugbol, Steven; Madsen, Jacob; Baaré, William; Aznar, Susana; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding.......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...

  16. BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms predict a human in vivo marker for brain serotonin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Holst, Klaus K; Adamsen, Dea; Klein, Anders Bue; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Jensen, Peter S; Svarer, Claus; Gillings, Nic; Baare, William F C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2015-01-01

    BDNF val66met significantly predicted a LV reflecting [(11) C]SB207145 binding across regions (P = 0.005). BDNF val66met met-carriers showed 2-9% higher binding relative to val/val homozygotes. In contrast, 5-HTTLPR did not predict the LV but S-carriers showed 7% lower neocortical binding relative to...... LL homozygotes (P = 7.3 × 10(-6) ). We observed no evidence for genetic interaction. Our findings indicate that BDNF val66met significantly predicts a common regulator of brain [(11) C]SB207145 binding, which we hypothesize reflects brain serotonin levels. In contrast, our data indicate that 5-HTTLPR...

  17. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, energy intake and BMI: a follow-up study in schoolchildren at risk of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda Nuria; Ferrer-Barcala Marta; Arija Victoria; Canals Josepa

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Eating disorders (ED) have a multifactorial aetiology in which genetics play an important role. Several studies have found an association between the Val66Met (G196A) polymorphism of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Eating disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the association of the Val66Met (G196A) polymorphism of the BDNF gene and its effect on eating disorders (ED), energy intake and BMI in schoolchildren. Methods Two-year cohort study (pread...

  18. Higher reward value of starvation imagery in anorexia nervosa and association with the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J; Ramoz, N; Fladung, A-K; Gorwood, P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies support the idea that abnormalities of the reward system contribute to onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). Next to cues coding for overweight, other research suggest cues triggering the proposed starvation dependence to be pivotally involved in the AN pathogenesis. We assessed the characteristics of the cognitive, emotional and physiologic response toward disease-specific pictures of female body shapes, in adult AN patients compared with healthy control (HC) women. Frequency and amplitude of skin conductance response (SCR) in 71 patients with AN and 20 HC were registered during processing of stimuli of three weight categories (over-, under- and normal weight). We then assessed the role of the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism as a potential intermediate factor. AN patients reported more positive feelings during processing of underweight stimuli and more negative feelings for normal- and overweight stimuli. The SCR showed a group effect (P=0.007), AN patients showing overall higher frequency of the response. SCR within patients was more frequent during processing of underweight stimuli compared with normal- and overweight stimuli. The Met allele of the BDNF gene was not more frequent in patients compared with controls, but was associated to an increased frequency of SCR (P=0.008) in response to cues for starvation. A higher positive value of starvation, rather than more negative one of overweight, might more accurately define females with AN. The Met allele of the BDNF gene could partly mediate the higher reward value of starvation observed in AN. PMID:27271855

  19. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism on Gray Matter Volume in Typically Developing Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Fukui, Kento; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Yokota, Susumu; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-04-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with psychiatric disorders and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) in adults. However, the relationship between BDNF and rGMV in children has not been clarified. In this 3-year cross-sectional/longitudinal (2 time points) study, we investigated the effects of BDNF genotypes on rGMV in 185 healthy Japanese children aged 5.7-18.4 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses. We found that the volume of the right cuneus in Met homozygotes (Met/Met) was greater than in Val homozygotes (Val/Val) in both exams, and the left insula and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex volumes were greater in Val homozygotes versus Met homozygotes in Exam l. In addition, Met homozygous subjects exhibited higher processing speed in intelligence indices than Val homozygotes and Val/Met heterozygotes at both time points. Longitudinal analysis showed that the left temporoparietal junction volume of Val/Met heterozygotes increased more substantially over the 3-year study period than in Val homozygotes, and age-related changes were observed for the Val/Met genotype. Our findings suggest that the presence of 2 Met alleles may have a positive effect on rGMV at the developmental stages analyzed in this study. PMID:26830347

  20. Higher reward value of starvation imagery in anorexia nervosa and association with the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J; Ramoz, N; Fladung, A-K; Gorwood, P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies support the idea that abnormalities of the reward system contribute to onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). Next to cues coding for overweight, other research suggest cues triggering the proposed starvation dependence to be pivotally involved in the AN pathogenesis. We assessed the characteristics of the cognitive, emotional and physiologic response toward disease-specific pictures of female body shapes, in adult AN patients compared with healthy control (HC) women. Frequency and amplitude of skin conductance response (SCR) in 71 patients with AN and 20 HC were registered during processing of stimuli of three weight categories (over-, under- and normal weight). We then assessed the role of the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism as a potential intermediate factor. AN patients reported more positive feelings during processing of underweight stimuli and more negative feelings for normal- and overweight stimuli. The SCR showed a group effect (P=0.007), AN patients showing overall higher frequency of the response. SCR within patients was more frequent during processing of underweight stimuli compared with normal- and overweight stimuli. The Met allele of the BDNF gene was not more frequent in patients compared with controls, but was associated to an increased frequency of SCR (P=0.008) in response to cues for starvation. A higher positive value of starvation, rather than more negative one of overweight, might more accurately define females with AN. The Met allele of the BDNF gene could partly mediate the higher reward value of starvation observed in AN. PMID:27271855

  1. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and bipolar disorder in European populations: A risk association in case-control, family-based and GWAS studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Chang, Hong; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a nerve growth factor that has antidepressant-like effects in animal models and may be implicated in the etiology of mood-related phenotypes. A functional polymorphism (Val66Met) in the BDNF gene was demonstrated to influence BDNF's secretion and function, as well as mood and cognitive related phenotypes. However, previous genetic association studies of Val66Met polymorphism in the clinical risk of mood disorders have been complicated, possibly due to phenotypic diversity, underpowered statistical association or ancestry-specific effects. Here, we collected mood phenotypic and genetic data in over 90,000 individuals from diverse ethnic groups and conducted a systematic meta-analysis. The results showed that the Val66Met polymorphism was significantly associated with BPD in Europeans (Pmeta=0.0029, OR=1.136), but not in Asians (Pmeta=0.443). Also, it appears that the risk for MDD conferred by BDNF is waning, as the Val66Met variant was not associated with MDD in either European or Asian samples (Pmeta>0.5). PMID:27236043

  2. Depression, the Val66Met polymorphism, age, and gender influence the serum BDNF level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elfving, Betina; Buttenschøn, Henriette N; Foldager, Leslie;

    2012-01-01

    participated in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. The major contribution of the present study is the integration of clinical assessment of cases and control individuals, simultaneous analyses of several genetic variants, serum BDNF measurements, and information on socio-demographic variables, lifestyle...

  3. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, energy intake and BMI: a follow-up study in schoolchildren at risk of eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranda Nuria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating disorders (ED have a multifactorial aetiology in which genetics play an important role. Several studies have found an association between the Val66Met (G196A polymorphism of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and Eating disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the association of the Val66Met (G196A polymorphism of the BDNF gene and its effect on eating disorders (ED, energy intake and BMI in schoolchildren. Methods Two-year cohort study (preadolescence to adolescence. From an initial sample of 1336 Caucasian children (mean age = 11.37 years, a group at risk of ED (n = 141 and a control group (n = 117 were selected using the Children's Eating Attitudes Test. Two years later, they were re-classified into an at-risk group (n = 41 and a control group (n = 159 using the Eating Attitudes Test. The diagnosis of the individuals at risk of ED was confirmed by means of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents. BMI, energy intake and the Val66Met (G196A polymorphism of the BDNF gene were analysed in the at-risk and control groups. Results The frequency of genotypes of the Val66Met (G196A polymorphism of the BDNF gene is 28.6% (95% CI: 22.4-34.9 in the heterozygous form (Val/Met and 5% (95% CI: 2.4-9 in the homozygous form (Met/Met. We detected no association between Val66Met genotypes and the severity of ED. Over time, the carriers of the Met66 allele with a persistent risk of ED significantly restricted energy intake (507 Kcal/day; p = 0.033. Conclusion We have not found an association between Val66Met (G196A polymorphism of the BDNF and ED in schoolchildren from general population. The relationship found between this polymorphism and energy intake restriction in adolescents with a persistent risk of ED should be replicated in a larger sample.

  4. Are variations in whole blood BDNF level associated with the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in patients with first episode depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann; Bennike, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    stressful life events (SLE) in a cohort of patients with a first depressive episode. 262 patients with first episode depression (females 174, males 88, age range 18-70, mean age 41) participated and control sample of 84 participants was included (females 52, males 32, age range 22-70, mean age 42......Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to play an important role in the pathophysiology of affective disorders. The current study investigated whether blood level BDNF is correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms and recent (six months prior to onset of depression) experience of......). Symptomatology was rated using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and Becks Depression Inventory (BDI 21). No differences in whole blood BDNF was seen in relation to the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and no significant correlations between whole blood BDNF and HAMD-17 or BDI 21 scores were found. No...

  5. [Anxiety and polymorphism Val66Met of BDNF gene--predictors of depression severity in ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimbet, V E; Volel', B A; Kopylov, F Iu; Dolzhikov, A V; Korovaitseva, G I; Kasparov, S V; Isaeva, M I

    2015-01-01

    In a framework of search for early predictors of depression in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) we studied effect of molecular-genetic factors (polymorphism of brain-derived neirotrophic factor--BDNF), personality traits (anxiety, neuroticism), IHD severity, and psychosocial stressors on manifestations of depression in men with verified diagnosis of IHD. Severity of depression was assessed by Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 21-item (HAMD 21), anxiety and neuroticism were evaluated by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and "Big Five" questionnaire, respectively. It wa shown that personal anxiety and ValVal genotype of BDNF gene appeared to be predictors of moderate and severe depression. PMID:26050483

  6. Plasma BDNF Concentration, Val66Met Genetic Variant, and Depression-Related Personality Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Antonio; Martin, Bronwen; Ansari, David; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ferrucci, Luigi; Maudsley, Stuart; Mattson, Mark P; Costa, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, and BDNF plasma and serum levels have been associated with depression, Alzheimer's disease, and other psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. In a relatively large community sample, drawn from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), we examine whether BDNF plasma concentration is associated with the Val66Met functional polymorphism of the BDNF gene (n = 335) and with depression-related pers...

  7. The Interacting Effect of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism and Stressful Life Events on Adolescent Depression Is Not an Artifact of Gene-Environment Correlation: Evidence from a Longitudinal Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Li, Xinying; McGue, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding introduced by gene-environment correlation (rGE) may prevent one from observing a true gene-environment interaction (G × E) effect on psychopathology. The present study investigated the interacting effect of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs) on adolescent depression while controlling for the…

  8. BDNF Val66Met is Associated with Introversion and Interacts with 5-HTTLPR to Influence Neuroticism

    OpenAIRE

    Terracciano, Antonio; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sutin, Angelina R.; Deiana, Barbara; Balaci, Lenuta; Sanna, Serena; Olla, Nazario; Maschio, Andrea; Uda, Manuela; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schlessinger, David; Costa, Paul T.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission, and has been linked to neuroticism, a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders. A recent genome-wide association (GWA) scan, however, found the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) associated with extraversion but not with neuroticism. In this study, we examine the links between BDNF and personality traits, assessed using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), in a sample from SardiNIA (...

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and alcohol-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedic, Gordana; Perkovic, Matea Nikolac; Sviglin, Korona Nenadic; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2013-01-10

    Alcoholism is a chronic psychiatric disorder affecting neural pathways that regulate motivation, stress, reward and arousal. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates mood, response to stress and interacts with neurotransmitters and stress systems involved in reward pathways and addiction. Aim of the study was to evaluate the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (BDNF Val66Met or rs6265) and alcohol related phenotypes in Caucasian patients. In ethnically homogenous Caucasian subjects of the Croatian origin, the BDNF Val66Met genotype distribution was determined in 549 male and 126 female patients with alcohol dependence and in 655 male and 259 female healthy non-alcoholic control subjects. Based on the structured clinical interview, additional detailed clinical interview, the Brown-Goodwin Scale, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Clinical Global Impression scores, alcoholic patients were subdivided into those with or without comorbid depression, aggression, delirium tremens, withdrawal syndrome, early/late onset of alcohol abuse, prior suicidal attempt during lifetime, current suicidal behavior, and severity of alcohol dependence. The results showed no significant association between BDNF Val66Met variants and alcohol dependence and/or any of the alcohol related phenotypes in either Caucasian women, or men, with alcohol dependence. There are few limitations of the study. The overall study sample size was large (N=1589) but not well-powered to detect differences in BDNF Val66Met genotype distribution between studied groups. Healthy control women were older than female alcoholic patients. Only one BDNF polymorphism (rs6265) was studied. In conclusion, these data do not support the view that BDNF Val66Met polymorphism correlates with the specific alcohol related phenotypes in ethnically homogenous medication-free Caucasian subjects with alcohol dependence. PMID:23023098

  10. Genetic susceptibility to family environment: BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR influence depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Elizabeth D; Hammen, Constance L; Najman, Jake M; Brennan, Patricia A

    2014-12-01

    Functional genetic polymorphisms associated with Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and serotonin (5-HTTLPR) have demonstrated associations with depression in interaction with environmental stressors. In light of evidence for biological connections between BDNF and serotonin, it is prudent to consider genetic epistasis between variants in these genes in the development of depressive symptoms. The current study examined the effects of val66met, 5-HTTLPR, and family environment quality on youth depressive symptoms in adolescence and young adulthood in a longitudinal sample oversampled for maternal depression history. A differential susceptibility model was tested, comparing the effects of family environment on depression scores across different levels of a cumulative plasticity genotype, defined as presence of both, either, or neither plasticity alleles (defined here as val66met Met and 5-HTTLPR 'S'). Cumulative plasticity genotype interacted with family environment quality to predict depression among males and females at age 15. After age 15, however, the interaction of cumulative plasticity genotype and early family environment quality was only predictive of depression among females. Results supported a differential susceptibility model at age 15, such that plasticity allele presence was associated with more or less depressive symptoms depending on valence of the family environment, and a diathesis-stress model of gene-environment interaction after age 15. These findings, although preliminary because of the small sample size, support prior results indicating interactive effects of 5-HTTLPR, val66met, and environmental stress, and suggest that family environment may have a stronger influence on genetically susceptible women than men. PMID:25347540

  11. BDNF Val66Met genotype modulates the effect of childhood adversity on subgenual anterior cingulate cortex volume in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, Lotte; Tendolkar, Indira; Franke, Barbara; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Kooijman, Sabine; Buitelaar, Jan; Fernández, Guillén; Rijpkema, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Abstract According to the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression, stress can lead to brain atrophy by modifying brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Given that BDNF secretion is affected by a common polymorphism (rs6265, Val66Met), which also is associated with depression, we investigated whether this polymorphism modifies the effect of childhood adversity (CA) on local gray matter volume in depression-relevant brain regions using data from two large cohorts of healthy s...

  12. The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism Moderates an Effect of Physical Activity on Working Memory Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Banducci, Sarah E.; Weinstein, Andrea M.; MacDonald, Angus W.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Halder, Indrani; Flory, Janine D.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity enhances cognitive performance, yet individual variability in its effectiveness limits its widespread therapeutic application. Genetic differences might be one source of this variation. For example, carriers of the methionine-specifying (Met) allele of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism have reduced secretion of BDNF and poorer memory, yet physical activity increases BDNF levels. To determine whether the BDNF polymorphism moderated an associat...

  13. Effect of the Presence of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism on the Recovery in Patients With Acute Subcortical Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Won-Seok; Lim, Jong Youb; Shin, Joon Ho; Park, Hye Kyung; Tan, Samuel Arnado; Park, Kyoung Un; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism on the recovery after subcortical stroke, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Methods Subcortical stroke patients with copies of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (n=7) were compared to their controls (n=7) without a copy of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism after matching for initial severity, location and type of stroke. The mRS scores at 1 and 3 months after discharge from the neurorehabilitation uni...

  14. BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR Genotype are Each Associated with Visual Scanning Patterns of Faces in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Antonios I.; Wallis, Yvonne; Bair, Hayley; Crawford, Hayley; Frisson, Steven; Zeegers, Maurice P; McCleery, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented both neuroplasticity-related BDNF Val66Met and emotion regulation-related 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms as genetic variants that contribute to the processing of emotions from faces. More specifically, research has shown the BDNF Met allele and the 5-HTTLPR Short allele to be associated with mechanisms of negative affectivity that relate to susceptibility for psychopathology. We examined visual scanning pathways in response to angry, happy, and neutral faces in relati...

  15. Effect of variation in BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism, smoking, and nicotine dependence on symptom severity of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamal, Mumtaz; Van der Does, Willem; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Smoking, especially nicotine dependence is associated with more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. We investigated the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) VaI(66)Met polymorphism on the seve

  16. Association of COMT (Val158Met) and BDNF (Val66Met) Gene Polymorphisms with Anxiety, ADHD and Tics in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Roohi, Jasmin; Devincent, Carla J.; Kirsch, Sarah; Hatchwell, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine rs4680 ("COMT") and rs6265 ("BDNF") as genetic markers of anxiety, ADHD, and tics. Parents and teachers completed a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for a total sample of 67 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Both "COMT" (p = 0.06) and "BDNF" (p = 0.07) genotypes were marginally significant for teacher…

  17. Lack of association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and body mass index change over time in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Pavlovic, Mladen; Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver; Barisic, Ivan; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela

    2013-06-17

    Obesity is becoming the epidemic health problem worldwide with a very complex etiology. The interaction between diverse genetic and environmental factors contributes to development of obesity. Among myriad of functions in central and peripheral tissues, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also regulates energy homeostasis, food intake and feeding behavior, and has a role in obesity and increased body mass index (BMI). BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism is associated with BMI gain, but both positive associations and non-replications are reported. Since BMI changes over time and since genetic influences on BMI vary with age, the aim of the study was to evaluate association between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and BMI gain in healthy subjects with middle or old age. The study included a cohort of 339 adult healthy Caucasians of Croatian origin, free of eating and metabolic disorders, evaluated in three time periods in the year 1972, 1982 and 2006, when the subjects were around 40, 50 and 70 years old, respectively. The results revealed a significant effect of smoking on BMI, but a lack of significant association between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and overweight or obesity, and no significant association between BDNF Val66Met and BMI changes over time. These results did not confirm the major role of BDNF Val66Met in the regulation of BMI changes in adult and old healthy subjects. PMID:23643991

  18. Towards a unified biological hypothesis for the BDNF Val66Met-associated memory deficits in humans: a model of impaired dendritic mRNA trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eBaj

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF represents promotesa key molecule for the survival and differentiation of specific populations of neurons in the central nervous system. BDNF also regulates plasticity-related processes underlying memory and learning. A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs6265 has been identified on the coding sequence of human BDNF located at 11p13. The SNP rs6265 is a single base mutation with an adenine instead of a guanine at position 196 (G196A, resulting in the amino acid substitution Val66Met. This polymorphism only exists in humans and has been associated with a plethora of effects ranging from molecular, cellular and brain structural modifications in association with deficits in social and cognitive functions. To date, the literature on Val66Met polymorphism describes a complex and often conflicting pattern of effects. In this review, we attempt to provide a unifying model of the Val66Met effects. We discuss the clinical evidence of the association between Val66Met and memory deficits, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved including the reduced transport of BDNF mRNA to the dendrites as well as the reduced processing and secretion of BDNF protein through the regulated secretory pathway.

  19. A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis Reveal BDNF Val66Met Is a Possible Risk Factor for PTSD

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    Dagmar Bruenig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a debilitating condition that develops in some people after exposure to a traumatic event. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is highly expressed in the mammalian brain and is thought to be involved in learning and memory processes. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in the BDNF gene, rs6265 (Val66Met, has been hypothesised to be associated with PTSD. Association studies examining the Val66Met polymorphism and PTSD have been inconclusive, likely due to the variability in type of trauma exposure analysed. Vietnam veterans (n=257 screened for PTSD and controlled for trauma exposure were genotyped for BDNF Val66Met. The association was not significant so we incorporated our data into a meta-analysis to obtain greater statistical power. A comprehensive search of more than 1237 articles revealed eight additional studies suitable for meta-analysis (n=3625. A random-effects meta-analysis observed a potential protective factor of the Val/Val genotype. After removing two studies with violation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, findings for the Val/Val genotype reached significance. Subgroup analyses confirmed a trend for this finding. Limitations of some studies that inform this meta-analysis include poorly screened controls and a lack of examination of population stratification. Effectively designed studies should inform this line of research in the future.

  20. An Association Study of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism and Amphetamine Response

    OpenAIRE

    Brody A Flanagin; Cook, Edwin H.; de Wit, Harriet

    2006-01-01

    Although genetic factors are known to be important in addiction, no candidate genes have yet been consistently linked to drug use or abuse. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has been implicated in the behavioral response to psychomotor stimulants and potentiates neurotransmitters that are strongly linked to addiction, is a logical candidate gene to study. Using a drug challenge approach, we tested for association between BDNF G196A (val66met) genotype and subjective responses to...

  1. BDNF-Val66Met variant and adolescent stress interact to promote susceptibility to anorexic behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madra, M; Zeltser, L M

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify therapeutic targets for anorexia nervosa (AN) because current medications do not impact eating behaviors that drive AN's high mortality rate. A major obstacle to developing new treatments is the lack of animal models that recapitulate the pattern of disease onset typically observed in human populations. Here we describe a translational mouse model to study interactions between genetic, psychological and biological risk factors that promote anorexic behavior. We combined several factors that are consistently associated with increased risk of AN-adolescent females, genetic predisposition to anxiety imposed by the BDNF-Val66Met gene variant, social isolation stress and caloric restriction (CR). Approximately 40% of the mice with all of these risk factors will exhibit severe self-imposed dietary restriction, sometimes to the point of death. We systematically varied the risk factors outlined above to explore how they interact to influence anorexic behavior. We found that the Val66Met genotype markedly increases the likelihood and severity of abnormal feeding behavior triggered by CR, but only when CR is imposed in the peri-pubertal period. Incidence of anorexic behavior in our model is dependent on juvenile exposure to social stress and can be extinguished by adolescent handling, but is discordant from anxiety-like behavior. Thus, this study characterized gene × environment interactions during adolescence that could be the underlying driver of abnormal eating behavior in certain AN patients, and represents a promising system to identify possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27045846

  2. Association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor genetic polymorphism Val66Met and susceptibility to bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zuowei; Li, Zezhi; Gao, Keming; Fang, Yiru

    2014-01-01

    Background In view of previous conflicting findings, this meta-analysis was performed to comprehensively determine the overall strength of associations between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic polymorphism Val66Met and susceptibility to bipolar disorders (BPD). Methods Literatures published and cited in Pubmed and Wanfang Data was searched with terms of ‘Val66Met’, ‘G196A’, ‘rs6265’, ‘BDNF’, ‘association’, and ‘bipolar disorder’ up to March 2014. All original case–control asso...

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene val66met polymorphism and executive functioning in patients with bipolar disorder Polimorfismo do gene do fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro val66met e função executiva em pacientes com transtorno bipolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Fernandes Tramontina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we investigate the association between the val66met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF and the performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in a sample of Caucasian Brazilian patients with bipolar disorder. METHOD: Sixty-four patients with bipolar disorder were assessed and their performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was compared with the allele frequency and genotype of the val66met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. RESULTS: The percentage of non-perseverative errors was significantly higher among patients with the val/val genotype. There was no association between (BNDF genotype frequency and other Wisconsin Card Sorting Test domains. CONCLUSION: Our results did not replicate previous descriptions of an association between a worse cognitive performance and the presence of the met allele of the val66met brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphism.OBJETIVO: O presente estudo tem por objetivo investigar a associação entre o polimorfismo val66met do gene do fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro (BDNF e o desempenho cognitivo no Teste Wisconsin de Classificação de Cartas em uma amostra de pacientes bipolares brasileiros caucasianos. MÉTODO: Sessenta e quatro pacientes com transtorno bipolar foram avaliados em relação a sua cognição por meio do Teste Wisconsin de Classificação de Cartas que foi comparada com a freqüência alélica e genotípica do polimorfismo val66met do gene do fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro. RESULTADOS: O percentual de erros não-perseverativos foi significativamente maior nos indivíduos com genótipo val/val. Não foi encontrada diferença significativa entre a freqüência genotípica do polimorfismo do BDNF e os outros domínios do Teste Wisconsin de Classificação de Cartas. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo do polimorfismo val66met em relação ao desempenho executivo em pacientes bipolares caucasianos de uma

  4. Determinants genòmics de la condició física: influència del polimorfisme BDNF val66met en la recuperació cardíaca postesforç

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Malagón, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: A commmon single nucleotide polymorphism in the human brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene (Val66met) may have a modulatory effect on the cardiac sympathovagal balance (Yang A. , Chen, Tsai, Hong, Kuo, & Yang, 2010). Recovery of the heart rate immediately after exercise is a function of vagal reactivation. During exercise the increase of the simpathetic activity and the decrease of the vagal activity produce an increase of the cardiac heart rate. The parasimpathetic act...

  5. Lack of neural compensatory mechanisms of BDNF val66met met carriers and APOE E4 carriers in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomar, Jesus J; Conejero-Goldberg, Concepcion; Huey, Edward D; Davies, Peter; Goldberg, Terry E

    2016-03-01

    Compromises in compensatory neurobiologic mechanisms due to aging and/or genetic factors (i.e., APOE gene) may influence brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism effects on temporal lobe morphometry and memory performance. We studied 2 cohorts from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: 175 healthy subjects and 222 with prodromal and established Alzheimer's disease. Yearly structural magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive performance assessments were carried out over 3 years of follow-up. Both cohorts had similar BDNF Val/Val and Met allele carriers' (including both Val/Met and Met/Met individuals) distribution. In healthy subjects, a significant trend for thinner posterior cingulate and precuneus cortices was detected in Met carriers compared to Val homozygotes in APOE E4 carriers, with large and medium effect sizes, respectively. The mild cognitive impairment/Alzheimer's disease cohort showed a longitudinal decline in entorhinal thickness in BDNF Met carriers compared to Val/Val in APOE E4 carriers, with effect sizes ranging from medium to large. In addition, an effect of BDNF genotype was found in APOE E4 carriers for episodic memory (logical memory and ADAS-Cog) and semantic fluency measures, with Met carriers performing worse in all cases. These findings suggest a lack of compensatory mechanisms in BDNF Met carriers and APOE E4 carriers in healthy and pathological aging. PMID:26923413

  6. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism moderates early deprivation effects on attention problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnar, Megan R; Wenner, Jennifer A; Thomas, Kathleen M; Glatt, Charles E; McKenna, Morgan C; Clark, Andrew G

    2012-11-01

    Adverse early care is associated with attention regulatory problems, but not all so exposed develop attention problems. In a sample of 612 youth (girls = 432, M = 11.82 years, SD = 1.5) adopted from institutions (e.g., orphanages) in 25 countries, we examined whether the Val66Met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene moderates attention problems associated with the duration of institutional care. Parent-reported attention problem symptoms were collected using the MacArthur Health and Behavior Questionnaire. DNA was genotyped for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met (rs6265) single nucleotide polymorphism. Among youth from Southeast (SE) Asia, the predominant genotype was valine/methionine (Val/Met), whereas among youth from Russia/Europe and Caribbean/South America, the predominant genotype was Val/Val. For analysis, youth were grouped as carrying Val/Val or Met/Met alleles. Being female, being from SE Asia, and being younger when adopted were associated with fewer attention regulatory problem symptoms. Youth carrying at least one copy of the Met allele were more sensitive to the duration of deprivation, yielding an interaction that followed a differential susceptibility pattern. Thus, youth with Val/Met or Met/Met genotypes exhibited fewer symptoms than Val/Val genotypes when adoption was very early and more symptoms when adoption occurred later in development. Similar patterns were observed when SE Asian youth and youth from other parts of the world were analyzed separately. PMID:23062292

  7. Gender-specific Associations of the Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism with Neurocognitive and Clinical Features in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Seon-Young; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Min; Shin, Il-Seon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore associations of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism with cognitive functioning and psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia. Methods We included 133 subjects meeting the DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia who were in the post-acute stage of the disease. BDNF Val66Met genotypes were identified via polymerase chain reaction. The computerized neurocognitive function battery, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), Social and Occupational Functioning Scale (SOFAS), and the Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptic Treatment (SWN-K) were administered. Gender-stratified sub-analysis was also conducted to identify gender-specific patterns in the findings. Results In male patients, no significant difference in any measure by BDNF genotype was evident. In female patients, scores on the CDSS and total PANSS and all subscales were significantly higher in valine (Val) carriers. In addition, scores on the SOFAS and SWN-K were significantly lower in Val carriers. In terms of neurocognitive measures, female patients with the Val allele had significantly poorer reaction times and fewer correct responses on the Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and the Trail Making Test (Parts A and B). After adjustment of PANSS total scores and log-transformed CDSS scores, CPT outcomes were significantly poorer in female patients with than in those without the Val allele. Conclusion Gender-specific associations of the Val allele with poor neurocognitive function and more severe psychopathology were evident. Further studies are required to explore the mechanisms of these differences and the potential utility of the BDNF genotype as a predictor of outcome in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27489381

  8. Association between obesity and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphism Val66Met in individuals with bipolar disorder in Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Marín ME

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mirna Edith Morales-Marín,1 Alma Delia Genis-Mendoza,1,2 Carlos Alfonso Tovilla-Zarate,3 Nuria Lanzagorta,4 Michael Escamilla,5 Humberto Nicolini1,4 1Genomics of Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases Laboratory, National Institute of Genomic Medicine (INMEGEN, CDMX, Mexico; 2Psychiatric Care Services, Child Psychiatric Hospital Dr Juan N Navarro, CDMX, Mexico; 3Genomics Research Center, Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco, Comalcalco, Mexico; 4Carracci Medical Group, CDMX, Mexico; 5Department of Psychiatry, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, El Paso TX, USA Background: The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been considered as an important candidate gene in bipolar disorder (BD; this association has been derived from several genetic and genome-wide studies. A polymorphic variant of the BDNF (Val66Met confers some differences in the clinical presentation of affective disorders. In this study, we evaluated a sample population from Mexico City to determine whether the BDNF (rs6265 Val66Met polymorphism is associated with the body mass index (BMI of patients with BD.Methods: This association study included a sample population of 357 individuals recruited in Mexico City. A total of 139 participants were diagnosed with BD and 137 were classified as psychiatrically healthy controls (all individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay was performed in 96-well plates using the TaqMan Universal Thermal Cycling Protocol. After the PCR end point was reached, fluorescence intensity was measured in a 7,500 real-time PCR system and evaluated using the SDS v2.1 software, results were analyzed with Finetti and SPSS software. Concerning BMI stratification, random groups were defined as follows: normal <25 kg/m2, overweight (Ow =25.1–29.9 kg/m2

  9. The Role of the Val66Met Polymorphism of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Coping Strategies Relevant to Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Warren; McInnis, Opal A; McQuaid, Robyn J; Liu, Gele; Stead, John D; Anisman, Hymie; Hayley, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling have been implicated in the evolution of depression, which likely arises, in part, as a result of diminished synaptic plasticity. Predictably, given stressor involvement in depression, BDNF is affected by recent stressors as well as stressors such as neglect experienced in early life. The effects of early life maltreatment in altering BDNF signalling may be particularly apparent among those individuals with specific BDNF polymorphisms. We examined whether polymorphisms of the Val66Met genotype might be influential in moderating how early-life events play out with respect to later coping styles, cognitive flexibility and depressive features. Among male and female undergraduate students (N = 124), childhood neglect was highly related to subsequent depressive symptoms. This outcome was moderated by the BDNF polymorphism in the sense that depressive symptoms appeared higher in Met carriers who reported low levels of neglect than in those with the Val/Val allele. However, under conditions of high neglect depressive symptoms only increased in the Val/Val individuals. In effect, the Met polymorphism was associated with depressive features, but did not interact with early life neglect in predicting later depressive features. It was further observed that among the Val/Val individuals, the relationship between neglect and depression was mediated by emotion-focused styles and diminished perceived control, whereas this mediation was not apparent in Met carriers. In contrast to the more typical view regarding this polymorphism, the data are consistent with the perspective that in the presence of synaptic plasticity presumably associated with the Val/Val genotype, neglect allows for the emergence of specific appraisal and coping styles, which are tied to depression. In the case of the reduced degree of neuroplasticity expected in the Met carriers, early life adverse experiences are not tied to coping styles

  10. The Role of the Val66Met Polymorphism of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Coping Strategies Relevant to Depressive Symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Caldwell

    Full Text Available Disturbances of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signalling have been implicated in the evolution of depression, which likely arises, in part, as a result of diminished synaptic plasticity. Predictably, given stressor involvement in depression, BDNF is affected by recent stressors as well as stressors such as neglect experienced in early life. The effects of early life maltreatment in altering BDNF signalling may be particularly apparent among those individuals with specific BDNF polymorphisms. We examined whether polymorphisms of the Val66Met genotype might be influential in moderating how early-life events play out with respect to later coping styles, cognitive flexibility and depressive features. Among male and female undergraduate students (N = 124, childhood neglect was highly related to subsequent depressive symptoms. This outcome was moderated by the BDNF polymorphism in the sense that depressive symptoms appeared higher in Met carriers who reported low levels of neglect than in those with the Val/Val allele. However, under conditions of high neglect depressive symptoms only increased in the Val/Val individuals. In effect, the Met polymorphism was associated with depressive features, but did not interact with early life neglect in predicting later depressive features. It was further observed that among the Val/Val individuals, the relationship between neglect and depression was mediated by emotion-focused styles and diminished perceived control, whereas this mediation was not apparent in Met carriers. In contrast to the more typical view regarding this polymorphism, the data are consistent with the perspective that in the presence of synaptic plasticity presumably associated with the Val/Val genotype, neglect allows for the emergence of specific appraisal and coping styles, which are tied to depression. In the case of the reduced degree of neuroplasticity expected in the Met carriers, early life adverse experiences are not tied

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels in genetically isolated populations: gender-specific association with anxiety disorder subtypes but not with anxiety levels or Val66Met polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, Davide; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Baj, Gabriele; Kulak, Karolina; d'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Cappellani, Stefania; Gasparini, Paolo; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are disabling chronic disorders with exaggerated behavioral response to threats. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that ADs may be associated with reduced neurotrophic activity, particularly of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and determining possible effects of genetics on serum BDNF concentrations. In 672 adult subjects from six isolated villages in North-Eastern Italy with high inbreeding, we determined serum BDNF levels and identified subjects with different ADs subtypes such as Social and Specific Phobias (PHSOC, PHSP), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), and Panic Disorder (PAD). Analysis of the population as a whole or individual village showed no significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and Val66Met polymorphism and no association with anxiety levels. Stratification of subjects highlighted a significant decrease in serum BDNF in females with GAD and males with PHSP. This study indicates low heritability and absence of any impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on circulating concentrations of BDNF. Our results show that BDNF is not a general biomarker of anxiety but serum BDNF levels correlate in a gender-specific manner with ADs subtypes. PMID:26539329

  12. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (Val66Met) and Serotonin Transporter (5-HTTLPR) Polymorphisms Modulate Plasticity in Inhibitory Control Performance Over Time but Independent of Inhibitory Control Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Sören; Fleischhauer, Monika; Gärtner, Anne; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Kliegel, Matthias; Strobel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Several studies reported training-induced improvements in executive function tasks and also observed transfer to untrained tasks. However, the results are mixed and there is a large interindividual variability within and across studies. Given that training-related performance changes would require modification, growth or differentiation at the cellular and synaptic level in the brain, research on critical moderators of brain plasticity potentially explaining such changes is needed. In the present study, a pre-post-follow-up design (N = 122) and a 3-weeks training of two response inhibition tasks (Go/NoGo and Stop-Signal) was employed and genetic variation (Val66Met) in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoting differentiation and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity was examined. Because Serotonin (5-HT) signaling and the interplay of BDNF and 5-HT are known to critically mediate brain plasticity, genetic variation in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was also addressed. The overall results show that the kind of training (i.e., adaptive vs. non-adaptive) did not evoke genotype-dependent differences. However, in the Go/NoGo task, better inhibition performance (lower commission errors) were observed for BDNF Val/Val genotype carriers compared to Met-allele ones supporting similar findings from other cognitive tasks. Additionally, a gene-gene interaction suggests a more impulsive response pattern (faster responses accompanied by higher commission error rates) in homozygous l-allele carriers relative to those with the s-allele of 5-HTTLPR. This, however, is true only in the presence of the Met-allele of BDNF, while the Val/Val genotype seems to compensate for such non-adaptive responding. Intriguingly, similar results were obtained for the Stop-Signal task. Here, differences emerged at post-testing, while no differences were observed at T1. In sum, although no genotype-dependent differences between the relevant training groups emerged

  13. COMT Val158Met, but not BDNF Val66Met, is associated with white matter abnormalities of the temporal lobe in patients with first-episode, treatment-naïve major depressive disorder: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Hayashi,1 Reiji Yoshimura,1 Shingo Kakeda,2 Taro Kishi,3 Osamu Abe,4 Wakako Umene-Nakano,1 Asuka Katsuki,1 Hikaru Hori,1 Atsuko Ikenouchi-Sugita,1 Keita Watanabe,2 Satoru Ide,2 Issei Ueda,2 Junji Moriya,2 Nakao Iwata,3 Yukunori Korogi,2 Marek Kubicki,5 Jun Nakamura1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Radiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan; 3Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 5Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: We investigated the association between the Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene, the Val66Met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, and white matter changes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and healthy subjects using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. We studied 30 patients with MDD (17 males and 13 females, with mean age ± standard deviation [SD] =44±12 years and 30 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (17 males and 13 females, aged 44±13 years. Using DTI analysis with a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS approach, we investigated the differences in fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity distribution among the three groups (patients with the COMT gene Val158Met, those with the BDNF gene Val66Met, and the healthy subjects. In a voxel-wise-based group comparison, we found significant decreases in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity within the temporal lobe white matter in the Met-carriers with MDD compared with the controls (P<0.05. No correlations in fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, or radial diffusivity were observed between the MDD patients and the controls, either among those with the BDNF Val/Val genotype or among the BDNF Met-carriers. These results suggest an association

  14. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met and Blood Glucose: A Synergistic Effect on Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Naftali Raz; Dahle, Cheryl L.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Land, Susan J.; Jacobs, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    Age-related declines in episodic memory performance are frequently reported, but their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although several genetic variants and vascular risk factors have been linked to mnemonic performance in general and age differences therein, it is unknown whether and how they modify age-related memory declines. To address that question, we investigated the effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism that affects secretion of BDNF, and fastin...

  15. Effects of interactions between post-traumatic stress disorder with brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene Val66 Met polymorphism on serum lipid profiles in adolescents%PTSD 与 BDN F基因 Val66Met 多态性相互作用对青少年血脂的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊梅; 李蓉晖; 胡敏珊; 方定志

    2015-01-01

    To test our hypothesis that the interplay may occur between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and affect serum lipid profiles .Chinese high school students were enrolled after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake .The PTSD checklist-civilian version (PCL-C) was used to measure the symp-toms of PTSD .Body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated .Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC) ,tri-glyceride (TG) ,low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ,high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and glucose were tested by routine methods . BDNF Val66Met polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and verified by DNA sequencing .The results show that the male PTSD subjects have higher TG than male subjects without PTSD in the V al/V al homozygotes .Compared with the Met allele carriers ,V al/V al homozygotes have higher TG in the males with PTSD .The female PTSD subjects have higher BMI than the female subjects without PTSD in the Met allele carriers .The results suggest that the changes of lipid profiles induced by interactions of PTSD and BDNF V al66Met polymorphism are different in adolescents with different gender .These findings will provide new insights into further exploration of factors influencing lipid profiles and the mechanism ,and precision medicine and personalized prevention of dysli-poproteinemia and cardiovascular diseases .%为验证“创伤后应激障碍(post-traumatic stress disorder ,PTSD)和脑源性神经营养因子(brain derived neurotrophic fac-tor ,BDNF)基因 BDNFVal66Met多态性之间存在相互作用并影响血脂及相关指标”的新假设,以2008年汶川地震灾区高中学生为研究对象,采用PTSD检查量表平民版(PTSD checklist-civilian version ,PCL-C)评估PTSD症状,常规体格检查并计算体质指数(body mass index

  16. Effects of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Growth Factor Val66Met Variation on Hippocampus Morphology in Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Chepenik, Lara G.; Fredericks, Carolyn; Papademetris, Xenophon; Spencer, Linda; Lacadie, Cheryl; Wang, Fei; Pittman, Brian; Duncan, James S.; Staib, Lawrence H.; Duman, Ronald S.; Gelernter, Joel; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2008-01-01

    Histological and behavioral research in bipolar disorder (BD) implicates structural abnormalities in the hippocampus. Brain-derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF) protein is associated with hippocampal development and plasticity, and in mood disorder pathophysiology. We tested the hypotheses both the BDNF val66met polymorphism and BD diagnosis are associated with decreased hippocampus volume, and individuals with BD who carry the met allele have the smallest hippocampus volumes compared to...

  17. The association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met variants and psychotic symptoms in posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Pivac, Nela; Kozarić-Kovačić, Dragica; Grubišić-Ilić, Mirjana; Nedić, Gordana; Rakoš, Iva; Nikolac, Matea; Blažev, Martina; Muck-Šeler, Dorotea

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Psychotic symptoms frequently occur in veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a major role in neurodevelopment, neuro-regeneration, neurotransmission, learning, regulation of mood and stress responses. The Met allele of the functional polymorphism, BDNF Val66Met, is associated with psychotic disorders. This study intended to assess whether the Met allele is overrepresented in unrelated Caucasian male veteran...

  18. Childhood abuse, the BDNF-Val66Met polymorphism and adult psychotic-like experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Alemany, Silvia; Arias Sampériz, Bárbara; Aguilera, Mari; Villa Martín, Elena; Moya Higueras, Jorge; Ibáñez Ribes, Manuel Ignacio; Vossen, Helen; Gastó, Cristóbal; Ortet i Fabregat, Generós; Fañanás Saura, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Individuals exposed to childhood abuse are more likely to report positive psychotic-like experiences. Met carriers reported more positive psychotic-like experiences when exposed to childhood abuse than did individuals carrying the Val/Val genotype. Therefore, the observed gene–environment interaction effect may be partially responsible for individual variation in response to childhood abuse.

  19. Childhood abuse, the BDNF-Val66Met polymorphism and adult psychotic-like experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Alemany; B. Arias; M. Aquilera; H. Villa; J. Moya; M. Ibáñez; H. Vossen; C. Gastó; G. Ortet; L. Fañanás

    2011-01-01

    Background The well-established relationship between childhood adversity and psychosis is likely to involve other factors such as genetic variants that can help us to understand why not everyone exposed to adverse events develops psychotic symptoms later in life. Aims We investigated the influence o

  20. Jung, gesund und doch vergesslich? Wie die Polymorphismen BDNF Val66Met und APO E die mnestischen Leistungen junger gesunder Probanden beeinflussen

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Schmidinger, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele: Sowohl die Varianten des brain-derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) als auch die Isoformen des Apolipoproteins E (APOE) werden mit Lern- und Gedächtnisprozessen, aber auch mit mnestischen Defiziten und Amnesie im Rahmen einer dementiellen Erkrankung in Verbindung gebracht. Dementsprechend wurden diese Geno-Phänotyp-Assoziationen überwiegend bei Probanden bzw. Patienten im höheren Lebensalter geprüft. Inwieweit isolierte und interagierende Effekte der Polymorphismen Val66...

  1. What keeps a body moving? The brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met polymorphism and intrinsic motivation to exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell Hooper, Ann E; Bryan, Angela D; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are intrinsically motivated to exercise are more likely to do so consistently. In previous research, those with at least one copy of the methionine (met) allele in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF; rs6265) had greater increases in positive mood and lower perceived exertion during exercise. This study examined whether genotype for BDNF is also related to intrinsic motivation, measured by self-report during a treadmill exercise session and a free-choice behavioral measure (continuing to exercise given the option to stop) among 89 regular exercisers (age M = 23.58, SD = 3.95). Those with at least one copy of the met allele reported greater increases in intrinsic motivation during exercise and were more likely to continue exercising when given the option to stop (55 vs. 33%). Results suggest that underlying genetic factors may partially influence perceptions of inherent rewards associated with exercise and might inform the development of individually targeted interventions. PMID:24805993

  2. Higher reward value of starvation imagery in anorexia nervosa and association with the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, J.; Ramoz, N; Fladung, A-K; Gorwood, P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies support the idea that abnormalities of the reward system contribute to onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN). Next to cues coding for overweight, other research suggest cues triggering the proposed starvation dependence to be pivotally involved in the AN pathogenesis. We assessed the characteristics of the cognitive, emotional and physiologic response toward disease-specific pictures of female body shapes, in adult AN patients compared with healthy control (HC) women. ...

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels in genetically isolated populations: gender-specific association with anxiety disorder subtypes but not with anxiety levels or Val66Met polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Carlino, Davide; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Baj, Gabriele; Kulak, Karolina; d’Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Cappellani, Stefania; Gasparini, Paolo; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are disabling chronic disorders with exaggerated behavioral response to threats. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that ADs may be associated with reduced neurotrophic activity, particularly of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and determining possible effects of genetics on serum BDNF concentrations. In 672 adult subjects from six isolated villages in North-Eastern Italy with high inbreeding, we determined serum BDNF levels and identified subjects...

  4. Association study of a brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism and short-term antidepressant response in major depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Cheng Huang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Eugene Lin1,7, Po See Chen2,6,7, Lung-Cheng Huang3,4, Sen-Yen Hsu51Vita Genomics, Inc., Wugu Shiang, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital and College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Dou-liou Branch, Yunlin, Taiwan; 7These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD is one of the most common mental disorders worldwide. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs can be used in clinical association studies to determine the contribution of genes to drug efficacy. A common SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, a methionine (Met substitution for valine (Val at codon 66 (Val66Met, is a candidate SNP for influencing antidepressant treatment outcome. In this study, our goal was to determine the relationship between the Val66Met polymorphism in the BDNF gene and the rapid antidepressant response to venlafaxine in a Taiwanese population with MDD. Overall, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism was found not to be associated with short-term venlafaxine treatment outcome. However, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism showed a trend to be associated with rapid venlafaxine treatment response in female patients. Future research with independent replication in large sample sizes is needed to confirm the role of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism identified in this study.Keywords: antidepressant response, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, major depressive disorder, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, single nucleotide polymorphisms

  5. BDNF gene polymorphisms and haplotypes in relation to cognitive performance in Polish healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiłkość, Monika; Szałkowska, Agnieszka; Skibińska, Maria; Zając-Lamparska, Ludmiła; Maciukiewicz, Małgorzata; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that plays an important role in the cell survival, axonal and dendritic growth, and synaptic plasticity. BDNF gene polymorphisms, 'functional Val66Met mainly, were shown to influence human brain structure and cognition. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between twelve BDNF gene variants and their haplotypes and cognitive performance measured using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Trail Making Test (TMT), the Stroop Test which are to a large extent connected with prefrontal cortex activity. Our sample consisted of 460 healthy participants from Polish population. We detected possible association between five BDNF polymorphisms (rs11030101, rs10835210, rs2049046, rs2030324, rs2883187) and TMT_A. Additionally, one haplotype block made from eleven BDNF variants (rs2883187, rs1401635, rs2049046, rs2030324, rs11030101, rs10835210, rs1013402, rs1401635, rs1013402), as significant linkage disequilibrium appeared. We discovered possible relationships of CACCGCGTACG and CACCGCGTACG haplotypes with TMT_A and TMT_B performance respectively. Our results confirmed the involvement of BDNF in the regulation of psychomotor speed, working memory and executive function in healthy subjects measured by a task engaging visuoperceptual abilities. PMID:27102917

  6. BDNF polymorphism associates with decline in set shifting in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kolk, Nicolien M; Speelman, Arlene D; van Nimwegen, Marlies; Kessels, Roy P C; IntHout, Joanna; Hakobjan, Marina; Munneke, Marten; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van de Warrenburg, Bart P

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key protein in brain plasticity and is particularly important for survival of dopaminergic neurons. The Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF (rs6265) has been associated with functional differences (mainly cognitive) between healthy adults and also with differences in the clinical expression of several other neuropsychiatric illnesses including PD. However, these studies used different outcome measures, have not been replicated, and were cross sectional, making it difficult to establish the role of BDNF in the clinical variability of PD. Here, a large cohort of 384 PD patients were followed up for 2 years, and associations between BDNF genotype and various clinical characteristics were examined. The BDNF Met-allele carriers showed a significantly smaller decline in set shifting during follow-up compared with the homozygous BDNF Val-allele carriers. Contrary to previous assumptions, these results indicate that mental flexibility is one of the cognitive processes that may benefit from the BDNF Met allele in PD patients. PMID:25444596

  7. Genetic contributions to age-related decline in executive function: a 10-year longitudinal study of COMT and BDNF polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk I Erickson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability in the dopaminergic and neurotrophic systems could contribute to age-related impairments in executive control and memory function. In this study we examined whether genetic polymorphisms for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were related to the trajectory of cognitive decline occurring over a 10-year period in older adults. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the COMT (Val158/108Met gene affects the concentration of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, a Val/Met substitution in the pro-domain for BDNF (Val66Met affects the regulated secretion and trafficking of BDNF with Met carriers showing reduced secretion and poorer cognitive function. We found that impairments over the 10-year span on a task-switching paradigm did not vary as a function of the COMT polymorphism. However, for the BDNF polymorphism the Met carriers performed worse than Val homozygotes at the first testing session but only the Val homozygotes demonstrated a significant reduction in performance over the 10-year span. Our results argue that the COMT polymorphism does not affect the trajectory of age-related executive control decline, whereas the Val/Val polymorphism for BDNF may promote faster rates of cognitive decay in old age. These results are discussed in relation to the role of BDNF in senescence and the transforming impact of the Met allele on cognitive function in old age.

  8. Association study between brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphisms and methamphetamine abusers in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Kanako; Hashimoto, Kenji; Shimizu, Eiji; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Ozaki, Norio; Inada, Toshiya; Harano, Mutsuo; Iwata, Nakao; Komiyama, Tokutaro; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Sora,Ichiro; Nakata, Kenji; Ujike, Hiroshi; Iyo, Masaomi

    2005-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that genetic factors might contribute to drug abuse vulnerability. Recent genomic scans for association demonstrated that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene was associated with drug abuse vulnerability. In this study, we analyzed association of two BDNF gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 132C>T (C270T named formerly) in the noncoding region of exon V and 196G >A (val66met) in the coding region of exon XIIIA, with methamphetamine (MAP)...

  9. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Santacana

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards "personalized medicine". Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD.We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories in patients with PD (N = 97 who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect.We identified two response trajectories ("high response" and "low response", and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables.We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome approaches.

  10. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacana, Martí; Arias, Bárbara; Mitjans, Marina; Bonillo, Albert; Montoro, María; Rosado, Sílvia; Guillamat, Roser; Vallès, Vicenç; Pérez, Víctor; Forero, Carlos G.; Fullana, Miquel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards “personalized medicine”. Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD). Method We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories) in patients with PD (N = 97) who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect. Results We identified two response trajectories (“high response” and “low response”), and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism) or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables. Conclusions We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome) approaches. PMID:27355213

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia: Interplay of BDNF and Childhood Trauma? A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Geetanjali; Malavade, Kishor; Jacob, Theresa

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia. These deficits can also serve as an endophenotype for the illness in genetic studies. There is evidence that suggests that cognition can be considered a reasonable target for intervention in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. One of the most studied genetic phenotypes for psychosis is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms. BDNF has an established role in neuronal development and cell survival in response to stress and is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia. Studies have shown that childhood trauma is associated with poor prognosis of schizophrenic patients. BDNF-Val66Met polymorphism has been shown to moderate the impact of childhood adversity on later expression of affective symptoms, suggesting the possibility of gene environment interactions. Considering the recent advances of neuroscience an up to date review of relevant literature is warranted in this field. This article reviews the current literature available regarding associations between the Val66Met polymorphism, childhood trauma and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:26603624

  12. BDNF genetic variants are associated with onset age of familial Parkinson disease: GenePD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamohamed, S; Latourelle, J C; Racette, B A; Perlmutter, J S; Wooten, G F; Lew, M; Klein, C; Shill, H; Golbe, L I; Mark, M H; Guttman, M; Nicholson, G; Wilk, J B; Saint-Hilaire, M; DeStefano, A L; Prakash, R; Tobin, S; Williamson, J; Suchowersky, O; Labell, N; Growdon, B N J; Singer, C; Watts, R; Goldwurm, S; Pezzoli, G; Baker, K B; Giroux, M L; Pramstaller, P P; Burn, D J; Chinnery, P; Sherman, S; Vieregge, P; Litvan, I; Gusella, J F; Myers, R H; Parsian, A

    2005-12-13

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates neuronal growth and protects nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson disease (PD). Therefore, BDNF is a candidate gene for PD. The authors investigated five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 597 cases of familial PD. Homozygosity for the rare allele of the functional BDNF G196A (Val66Met) variant was associated with a 5.3-year older onset age (p = 0.0001). These findings suggest that BDNF may influence PD onset age. PMID:16344533

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K. S.; Nielsen, A. R.; Krogh-Madsen, R.;

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis  Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and depression. These disorders are associated with type 2 diabetes, and animal models suggest that BDNF plays a role in insulin resistance. We therefore...... and a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Results  Plasma levels of BDNF in Study 1 were decreased in humans with type 2 diabetes independently of obesity. Plasma BDNF was inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, but not with insulin. No association was found between the BDNF G196A (Val66Met) polymorphism...... and diabetes or obesity. In Study 2 an output of BDNF from the human brain was detected at basal conditions. This output was inhibited when blood glucose levels were elevated. In contrast, when plasma insulin was increased while maintaining normal blood glucose, the cerebral output of BDNF was not inhibited...

  14. The serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region and brain-derived neurotrophic factor valine to methionine at position 66 polymorphisms and maternal history of depression: associations with cognitive vulnerability to depression in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Olino, Thomas M; Bufferd, Sara J; Miller, Anna; Dougherty, Lea R; Sheikh, Haroon I; Singh, Shiva M; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-08-01

    Preliminary work indicates that cognitive vulnerability to depression may be associated with variants of the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and the valine to methionine at position 66 (val66met) polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene; however, existing reports come from small samples. The present study sought to replicate and extend this research in a sample of 375 community-dwelling children and their parents. Following a negative mood induction, children completed a self-referent encoding task tapping memory for positive and negative self-descriptive traits. Consistent with previous work, we found that children with at least one short variant of the 5-HTTLPR had enhanced memory for negative self-descriptive traits. The BDNF val66met polymorphism had no main effect but was moderated by maternal depression, such that children with a BDNF methionine allele had a heightened memory for negative self-descriptive traits when mothers had experienced depression during children's lifetimes; in contrast, children with a methionine allele had low recall of negative traits when mothers had no depression history. The findings provide further support for the notion that the 5-HTTLPR is associated with cognitive markers of depression vulnerability and that the BDNF methionine allele moderates children's sensitivity to contextual factors. PMID:23880378

  15. Role of BDNF in bipolar and unipolar disorder: clinical and theoretical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    A number of lines of converging evidence suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role in the onset and treatment of bipolar disorder. We review pertinent data on BDNF from several different areas of preclinical and clinical investigation that suggest novel theoretical and treatment implications for the recurrent affective disorders. Data from several recent studies have also converged showing that the val66met allele of BDNF, a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), is associated with selective minor deficits in cognitive functioning in subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar illness, and normal controls. Yet, paradoxically, the better functioning val66val allele of BDNF appears to be associated with an increased risk for bipolar disorder and perhaps early onset or rapid cycling. All the primary antidepressant modalities, as well as the mood stabilizers lithium and valproate, increase BDNF. Stressors decrease BDNF and this effect can be blocked by antidepressants. Serum BDNF is low in proportion to the severity of mania and depression and increases with clinical improvement. Assessment of the val66val BDNF allele and a range of other SNPs as potential vulnerability factors for bipolar illness and its early onset could facilitate studies of early intervention, help reduce long delays between the onset of first symptoms and the first treatment, and help in the prediction of individual patient's likelihood of responding to a given treatment. PMID:17239400

  16. Functional and structural specific roles of activity-driven BDNF within circuits formed by single spiny stellate neurons of the barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Quan eSun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays key roles in several neurodevelopmental disorders and actions of pharmacological treatments. However it is uncealr how specific BDNF’s effects are on diffeerent circuit components. Current studies have largely focused on the role of BDNF in modification of synaptic development. The precise roles of BDNF in the refinement of a functional circuit in vivo remain unclear. Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF may be associated with increased risk for cognitive impairments and is mediated at least in part by activity-dependent trafficking and/or secretion of BDNF. Using mutant mice that lacked activity-driven BDNF expression (bdnf-KIV, we previously reported that experience regulation of the cortical GABAergic network is mediated by activity-driven BDNF expression. Here, we demonstrate that activity-driven BDNF’s effects on circuits formed by the layer IV spiny stellate cells are highly specific. Structurally, dendritic but not axonal morphology was altered in the mutant. Physiologically, GABAergic but not glutamatergic synapses were severely affected. The effects on GABA transmission occurs via presynaptic alteration of calcium-dependent release probability. These results suggest that neuronal activity through activity-driven BDNF expression, can selectively regulate specific features of layer IV circuits in vivo. We postulate that the role of activity-dependent BDNF is to modulate the computational ability of circuits that relate to the gain control (i.e. feed-forward inhibition; whereas the basic wiring of circuits relevant to the sensory pathway is spared. Gain control modulation within cortical circuits has broad impact on cognitive processing and brain state-transitions. Cognitive behavior and mode is determined by brain states, thus the studying of circuit alteration by endogenous BDNF provides insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of diseases mediated by BDNF.

  17. Effects of BDNF Polymorphisms on Antidepressant Action

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the down-regulation of the signaling pathway involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a molecular element known to regulate neuronal plasticity and survival, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of major depression. The restoration of BDNF activity induced by antidepressant treatment has been implicated in the antidepressant therapeutic mechanism. Because there is variability among patients with major depressive disorder in terms of response to antidep...

  18. Interaction Between Childhood Adversity, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor val/met and Serotonin Transporter Promoter Polymorphism on Depression : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, E; Bouma, Esther; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ormel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The three-way interaction between the functional polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene linked promoter region, the val66met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene, and childhood adversity in the prediction of depression in children, reported by Kaufman and co

  19. Genetic and Vascular Modifiers of Age-Sensitive Cognitive Skills: Effects of COMT, BDNF, ApoE and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Land, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive phenotypes emerge from multiple genetic and environmental influences. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms have been linked to neural and cognitive variation in healthy adults. We examined contribution of three polymorphisms frequently associated with individual differences in cognition (Catechol-O-Methyl-Transferase Val158Met, Brain-Derived-Neurotrophic-Factor Val66Met, and Apolipoprotein E ɛ4) and a vascular risk factor (hypertension) as well as their interactions in a sample o...

  20. Objective To explore the difference on mental rotation ability between major depressive disorders and healthy subjects.Methods Twenty-three patients with major depressive disorders and 24 healthy subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢卫红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) on the contribution of dopamine D1receptor(DRD1) to schizophrenia.Methods One single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP)(Val66Met,rs6562)

  1. The Association between COMT, BDNF, and NRG1 and Premorbid Social Functioning in Patients with Psychosis, Their Relatives, and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Walshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influences of putative candidate genes for psychosis on premorbid social adjustment and on premorbid schizoid-schizotypal traits. A family-based sample was used including 177 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder with a history of psychotic symptoms, 86 of their unaffected relatives, and 116 unrelated healthy controls. Association analyses on the combined sample were conducted using the Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology software (SAGE and adjusting for age, sex, clinical group, and the family-based nature of the data. The COMT Val158Met and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms showed no evidence of association with either phenotype. The SNP rs221533 of the NRG1 gene was significantly associated with premorbid adjustment in adolescence with TT homozygous subjects having a poorer performance than C allele carriers. In the context of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and other psychoses, this finding is plausible; however, it is preliminary and requires replication in an independent sample. In a broader sense, the use of intermediate quantitative phenotypes such as the ones presented in this study may be of help to understand the mechanism of action of genetic risk factors.

  2. No Association of BDNF, COMT, MAOA, SLC6A3, and SLC6A4 Genes and Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Healthy Colombian Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Camargo, Andrés; López-León, Sandra; Forero, Diego A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the second cause of years lived with disability around the world. A large number of studies have been carried out to identify genetic risk factors for MDD and related endophenotypes, mainly in populations of European and Asian descent, with conflicting results. The main aim of the current study was to analyze the possible association of five candidate genes and depressive symptoms in a Colombian sample of healthy subjects. Methods and Materials. The Spanish adaptation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was applied to one hundred eighty-eight healthy Colombian subjects. Five functional polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-based assays: BDNF-Val66Met (rs6265), COMT-Val158Met (rs4680), SLC6A4-HTTLPR (rs4795541), MAOA-uVNTR, and SLC6A3-VNTR (rs28363170). Result. We did not find significant associations with scores of depressive symptoms, derived from the HADS, for any of the five candidate genes (nominal p values >0.05). In addition, we did not find evidence of significant gene-gene interactions. Conclusion. This work is one of the first studies of candidate genes for depressive symptoms in a Latin American sample. Study of additional genetic and epigenetic variants, taking into account other pathophysiological theories, will help to identify novel candidates for MDD in populations around the world. PMID:26557993

  3. No Association of BDNF, COMT, MAOA, SLC6A3, and SLC6A4 Genes and Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Healthy Colombian Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeimy González-Giraldo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD is the second cause of years lived with disability around the world. A large number of studies have been carried out to identify genetic risk factors for MDD and related endophenotypes, mainly in populations of European and Asian descent, with conflicting results. The main aim of the current study was to analyze the possible association of five candidate genes and depressive symptoms in a Colombian sample of healthy subjects. Methods and Materials. The Spanish adaptation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was applied to one hundred eighty-eight healthy Colombian subjects. Five functional polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-based assays: BDNF-Val66Met (rs6265, COMT-Val158Met (rs4680, SLC6A4-HTTLPR (rs4795541, MAOA-uVNTR, and SLC6A3-VNTR (rs28363170. Result. We did not find significant associations with scores of depressive symptoms, derived from the HADS, for any of the five candidate genes (nominal p values >0.05. In addition, we did not find evidence of significant gene-gene interactions. Conclusion. This work is one of the first studies of candidate genes for depressive symptoms in a Latin American sample. Study of additional genetic and epigenetic variants, taking into account other pathophysiological theories, will help to identify novel candidates for MDD in populations around the world.

  4. Associations of Cigarette Smoking and Polymorphisms in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase with Neurocognition in Alcohol Dependent Individuals during Early Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TimothyDurazzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cigarette smoking and polymorphisms in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT are associated with neurocognition in normal controls and those with various neuropsychiatric conditions. The influence of these polymorphisms on neurocognition in alcohol dependence is unclear. The goal of this report was to investigate the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in BDNF Val66Met and COMT Val158Met with neurocognition in a treatment-seeking alcohol dependent cohort and determine if neurocognitive differences between non-smokers and smokers previously observed in this cohort persist when controlled for these functional SNPs. Genotyping was conducted on 70 primarily male treatment-seeking alcohol dependent participants (ALC who completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery after 33 ± 9 days of monitored abstinence. Smoking ALC performed significantly worse than non-smoking ALC on the domains of auditory-verbal and visuospatial learning and memory, cognitive efficiency, general intelligence, processing speed and global neurocognition. In smoking ALC, greater number of years of smoking over lifetime was related to poorer performance on multiple domains. COMT Met homozygotes were superior to Val homozygotes on measures of executive skills and showed trends for higher general intelligence and visuospatial skills, while COMT Val/Met heterozygotes showed significantly better general intelligence than Val homozygotes. COMT Val homozygotes performed better than heterozygotes on auditory-verbal memory. BDNF genotype was not related to any neurocognitive domain. The findings are consistent with studies in normal controls and neuropsychiatric cohorts that observed COMT Met carriers showed better performance on measures of executive skills and general intelligence. Overall, the findings support to the expanding clinical movement to make smoking cessation programs available at the inception of

  5. Association Study between BDNF Gene Polymorphisms and Autism by Three-Dimensional Gel-Based Microarray

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhong Lu; Yunfei Bai; Xiaoyan Ke; Beili Sun; Lu Cheng; Pengfeng Xiao; Qinyu Ge

    2009-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are important markers which can be used in association studies searching for susceptible genes of complex diseases. High-throughput methods are needed for SNP genotyping in a large number of samples. In this study, we applied polyacrylamide gel-based microarray combined with dual-color hybridization for association study of four BDNF polymorphisms with autism. All the SNPs in both patients and controls could be analyzed quickly and correctly. Among four ...

  6. Serotonin Transporter Gene 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism as a Protective Factor Against the Progression of Post-Stroke Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Guo, Yi; Yang, Dong; Yang, Tiansong; Meng, Xianghui

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphisms in the 5-HTT and BDNF genes are shown to affect their function at the molecular and serum level. Prior work has tried to correlate the polymorphisms with post-stroke depression (PSD), the results nevertheless remain indefinitive. A plausible reason accounting for the uncertainty relates to the small sample of each published trial. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive meta-analysis in order to evaluate the effects of 5-HTT and BDNF polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, STin2 VNTR, 5-HTR2a 102 T/C, Val66Met) on genetic risk of PSD. Human case-control trials were identified by computer-assisted and manual searches. The article search was performed until October 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the fixed effects meta-analysis to measure the effects 5-HTT and BDNF polymorphisms exerted on PSD. We also performed test of heterogeneity, test of publication bias, and sensitivity analysis to examine the reliability and stability of combined effects. 5-HTTLPR was clearly associated with genetic risk of PSD. The association seemed to be more pronounced in the homozygous model (OR = 0.34, 95 % CI = 0.23-0.51, P Q-test = 0.63). Both the heterozygous model and the recessive model showed 50 % decreased risk of PSD (OR = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.37-0.67, P Q-test = 0.91; OR = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.36-0.70, P Q-test = 0.43, respectively). Such significant association was also detected for Caucasian and Asian. These results were reliable and stable based on related analyses. Taken together, 5-HTTLPR polymorphism of the 5-HTT gene seems to protect against the occurrence of PSD. Small sample size for the polymorphisms within 5-HTT and BDNF genes may have caused underestimated associations, and a larger study is required to further assess the relations. PMID:25700622

  7. Association Study between BDNF Gene Polymorphisms and Autism by Three-Dimensional Gel-Based Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are important markers which can be used in association studies searching for susceptible genes of complex diseases. High-throughput methods are needed for SNP genotyping in a large number of samples. In this study, we applied polyacrylamide gel-based microarray combined with dual-color hybridization for association study of four BDNF polymorphisms with autism. All the SNPs in both patients and controls could be analyzed quickly and correctly. Among four SNPs, only C270T polymorphism showed significant differences in the frequency of the allele (χ2 = 7.809, p = 0.005 and genotype (χ2 = 7.800, p = 0.020. In the haplotype association analysis, there was significant difference in global haplotype distribution between the groups (χ2 = 28.19,p = 3.44e-005. We suggest that BDNF has a possible role in the pathogenesis of autism. The study also show that the polyacrylamide gel-based microarray combined with dual-color hybridization is a rapid, simple and high-throughput method for SNPs genotyping, and can be used for association study of susceptible gene with disorders in large samples.

  8. White matter integrity in major depressive disorder: Implications of childhood trauma, 5-HTTLPR and BDNF polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Erica L; Ramasubbu, Rajamannar; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Cortese, Filomeno; Clark, Darren; Goodyear, Bradley; Foster, Jane; Hall, Geoffrey B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined the impact of childhood neglect, serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphisms on white matter (WM) integrity in major depressive disorder (MDD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fifty-five medication-free MDD patients and 18 controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning, genotyping and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) findings revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the MDD group in the anterior internal capsule. 5-HTTLPR-S'L' heterozygotes in the MDD group exhibited reduced FA in the internal capsule relative to S'S' and reduced FA in corona radiata compared to L'L'. Probabilistic tractography revealed higher FA in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) for BDNF val/val genotype relative to met-carriers, particularly in individuals with high depression severity. High depression severity and experiences of childhood physical or emotional neglect predicted higher FA in the UF and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Reductions in FA were identified for subgroups of MDD patients who were 5-HTTLPR heterozygotes and BDNF-met carriers. An association between emotional/physical neglect and FA was observed in subjects with high depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that WM connectivity within frontal and limbic regions are affected by depression and influenced by experiences of neglect and genetic risk factors. PMID:27261564

  9. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Levels and Genotype: Association with Depression during Interferon-α Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lotrich, Francis E.; Albusaysi, Salwa; Ferrell, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Depression has been associated with inflammation, and inflammation may both influence and interact with growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Both the functional Val66Met BDNF polymorphism (rs6265) and BDNF levels have been associated with depression. It is thus plausible that decreased BDNF could mediate and/or moderate cytokine-induced depression. We therefore prospectively employed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Sca...

  10. Genetic contributions to age-related decline in executive function: a 10-year longitudinal study of COMT and BDNF polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Suever, Barbara L.; B. Magnus Francis; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability in the dopaminergic and neurotrophic systems could contribute to age-related impairments in executive control and memory function. In this study we examined whether genetic polymorphisms for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were related to the trajectory of cognitive decline occurring over a 10-year period in older adults. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the COMT (Val158/108Met) gene affects the concentration of d...

  11. Brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) and personality traits: the modifying effect of season of birth and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, A; Gaysina, D; Kutlumbetova, Yu; Kanzafarova, R; Malykh, S; Lobaskova, M; Khusnutdinova, E

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes influenced by interactions of multiple genetic variants of small effect and environmental factors. It has been suggested that the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) is involved in personality traits. Season of birth (SOB) has also been shown to affect personality traits due to its influences on brain development during prenatal and early postnatal periods. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of BDNF on personality traits; and the modifying effects of SOB and sex on associations between BDNF and personality traits. A sample of 1018 young adults (68% women; age range 17-25years) of Caucasian origin from the Russian Federation was assessed on personality traits (Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence, Persistence, Self-directedness, Cooperativeness, Self-transcendence) with the Temperament and Character Inventory-125 (TCI-125). Associations between personality traits and 12 BDNF SNPs were tested using linear regression models. The present study demonstrated the effect of rs11030102 on Persistence in females only (PFDR=0.043; r(2)=1.3%). There were significant interaction effects between Val66Met (rs6265) and SOB (PFDR=0.048, r(2)=1.4%), and between rs2030323 and SOB (PFDR=0.042, r(2)=1.3%), on Harm Avoidance. Our findings provide evidence for the modifying effect of SOB on the association between BDNF and Harm Avoidance, and for the modifying effect of sex on the association between BDNF and Persistence. PMID:25132151

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor--a major player in stimulation-induced homeostatic metaplasticity of human motor cortex?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastroeni, Claudia; Bergmann, Til Ole; Rizzo, Vincenzo;

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human motor hand area (M1HAND) can induce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability as indexed by a change in amplitude of the motor-evoked potential. The plasticity-inducing effects of rTMS in M1HAND show substantial inter-individual......Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human motor hand area (M1HAND) can induce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability as indexed by a change in amplitude of the motor-evoked potential. The plasticity-inducing effects of rTMS in M1HAND show substantial inter......-individual variability which has been partially attributed to the val(66)met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Here we used theta burst stimulation (TBS) to examine whether the BDNF val(66)met genotype can be used to predict the expression of TBS-induced homeostatic metaplasticity in...... effects was modulated by the BDNF val(66)met polymorphism, our results do not support the notion that the BDNF val(66)met genotype is a major player with regard to TBS-induced plasticity and metaplasticity in the human M1HAND....

  13. NC-03POLYMORPHISMS IN THE COMT, BDNF AND DTNBP1 GENES AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH BRAIN TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Denise; Satagopan, Jaya; Baser, Raymond; Cheung, Kenneth; DeAngelis, Lisa; Orlow, Irene

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive dysfunction is prevalen among brain tumor patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). However, little is known about genetic risk factors that may moderate their vulnerability for developing cognitive impairment. In this study, we examined the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three genes, Catechol-O-Methyl-Transferase (COMT), Brain-Derived-Neurotrophic-Factor (BDNF), and dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1), and cognitive fun...

  14. Preservation of general intelligence following traumatic brain injury: contributions of the Met66 brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron K Barbey

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promotes survival and synaptic plasticity in the human brain. The Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene interferes with intracellular trafficking, packaging, and regulated secretion of this neurotrophin. The human prefrontal cortex (PFC shows lifelong neuroplastic adaption implicating the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism in the recovery of higher-order executive functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI. In this study, we examined the effect of this BDNF polymorphism on the preservation of general intelligence following TBI. We genotyped a sample of male Vietnam combat veterans (n = 156 consisting of a frontal lobe lesion group with focal penetrating head injuries for the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism. Val/Met did not differ from Val/Val genotypes in general cognitive ability before TBI. However, we found substantial average differences between these groups in general intelligence (≈ half a standard deviation or 8 IQ points, verbal comprehension (6 IQ points, perceptual organization (6 IQ points, working memory (8 IQ points, and processing speed (8 IQ points after TBI. These results support the conclusion that Val/Met genotypes preserve general cognitive functioning, whereas Val/Val genotypes are largely susceptible to TBI.

  15. BDNF polymorphisms are linked to poorer working memory performance, reduced cerebellar and hippocampal volumes and differences in prefrontal cortex in a Swedish elderly population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Brooks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF links learning, memory and cognitive decline in elderly, but evidence linking BDNF allele variation, cognition and brain structural differences is lacking. METHODS: 367 elderly Swedish men (n = 181 and women (n = 186 from Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS were genotyped and the BDNF functional rs6265 SNP was further examined in subjects who completed the Trail Making Task (TMT, verbal fluency task, and had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM examined brain structure, cognition and links with BDNF. RESULTS: The functional BDNF SNP (rs6265, predicted better working memory performance on the TMT with positive association of the Met rs6265, and was linked with greater cerebellar, precuneus, left superior frontal gyrus and bilateral hippocampal volume, and reduced brainstem and bilateral posterior cingulate volumes. CONCLUSIONS: The functional BDNF polymorphism influences brain volume in regions associated with memory and regulation of sensorimotor control, with the Met rs6265 allele potentially being more beneficial to these functions in the elderly.

  16. Family-based association study of the BDNF, COMT and serotonin transporter genes and DSM-IV bipolar-I disorder in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biederman Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade pediatric bipolar disorder has gained recognition as a potentially more severe and heritable form of the disorder. In this report we test for association with genes coding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT. Methods Bipolar-I affected offspring triads (N = 173 were drawn from 522 individuals with 2 parents in 332 nuclear families recruited for genetic studies of pediatric psychopathology at the Clinical and Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Adult ADHD at Massachusetts General Hospital. Results We failed to identify an association with the val66 allele in BDNF (OR = 1.23, p = 0.36, the COMT-l allele (OR = 1.27, p = 0.1, or the HTTLPR short allele (OR = 0.87, p = 0.38. Conclusion Our study suggests that the markers examined thus far in COMT and SLC6A4 are not associated with pediatric bipolar disorder and that if the val66met marker in BDNF is associated with pediatric bipolar disorder the magnitude of the association is much smaller than first reported.

  17. Differential Effects of Acute and Regular Physical Exercise on Cognition and Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Michael E; Davis, F. Caroline; VanTieghem, Michelle R.; Whalen, Paul J.; Bucci, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of regular exercise versus a single bout of exercise on cognition, anxiety, and mood were systematically examined in healthy, sedentary young adults who were genotyped to determine brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) allelic status (i.e., Val-Val or Val66Met polymorphism). Participants were evaluated on novel object recognition (NOR) memory and a battery of mental health surveys before and after engaging in either a) a four-week exercise program, with exercise on the final te...

  18. BDNFVal66Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype are each associated with visual scanning patterns of faces in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios I. Christou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have documented both neuroplasticity-related BDNF Val66Met and emotion regulation-related 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms as genetic variants that contribute to the processing of emotions from faces. More specifically, research has shown the BDNF Met allele and the 5-HTTLPR Short allele to be associated with mechanisms of negative affectivity that relate to susceptibility for psychopathology. We examined visual scanning pathways in response to angry, happy, and neutral faces in relation to BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR genotyping in 49 children aged 4- to 7-years. Analyses revealed that variations in the visual processing of facial expressions of anger interacted with BDNF Val66Met genotype, such that children who carried at least one low neuroplasticity Met allele exhibited a vigilance-avoidance pattern of visual scanning compared to homozygotes for the high neuroplasticity Val allele. In a separate investigation of eye gaze towards the eye versus mouth regions of neutral faces, we observed that short allele 5-HTTLPR carriers exhibited reduced looking at the eye region compared with those with the higher serotonin uptake Long allele. Together, these findings suggest that genetic mechanisms early in life may influence the establishment of patterns of visual scanning of environmental stressors, which in conjunction with other factors such as negative life events may lead to psychological difficulties and disorders in the later adolescent and adult years.

  19. Effects of BDNF polymorphism and physical activity on episodic memory in the elderly: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Canivet, Anne; Albinet, Cédric T.; André, Nathalie; Pylouster, Jean; Rodríguez-Ballesteros, Montserrat; Kitzis, Alain; Audiffren, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration is highest in the hippocampus compared with that in other brain structures and affects episodic memory, a cognitive function that is impaired in older adults. According to the neurotrophic hypothesis, BDNF released during physical activity enhances brain plasticity and consequently brain health. However, even if the physical activity level is involved in the secretion of neurotrophin, this protein is also under the control ...

  20. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  1. BDNF Genotype Modulates Resting Functional Connectivity in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Daniel J Yoo; Glover, Gary H.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    A specific polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is associated with alterations in brain anatomy and memory; its relevance to the functional connectivity of brain networks, however, is unclear. Given that altered hippocampal function and structure has been found in adults who carry the methionine (met) allele of the BDNF gene and the molecular studies elucidating the role of BDNF in neurogenesis and synapse formation, we examined the association between BDNF gene v...

  2. BDNF genotype modulates resting functional connectivity in children

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Yoo; Glover, Gary H.

    2009-01-01

    A specific polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is associated with alterations in brain anatomy and memory; its relevance to the functional connectivity of brain networks, however, is unclear. Given that altered hippocampal function and structure has been found in adults who carry the methionine (met) allele of the BDNF gene and the molecular studies elucidating the role of BDNF in neurogenesis and synapse formation, we examined in the association between BDNF gen...

  3. Association study of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic polymorphism and obsessive-compulsive disorder%脑源性神经营养因子基因多态性与强迫症的关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘延辉; 刘世国; 寇海燕; 张心华

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)基因与强迫症(OCD)的关联性. 方法:190例OCD患者和309个健康对照为研究对象,通过聚合酶链式反应与限制性片段长度多态性(PCR-RFLP)基因分型技术对BDNF基因标签单核苷酸多态性(SNP)位点rs6265进行基因分型.以耶鲁-布朗强迫量表(Y-BOCS)评定OCD患者的病情. 结果:OCD组和对照组之间rs6265位点的基因型和等位基因频率分布差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).在起病年龄和性别方面基因型和等位基因频率分布差异也无统计学意义(P>0.05). 结论:BDNF基因rs6265多态性与OCD可能没有关联.%Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Gen-otyping for BDNF (196G/A) was performed for 190 OCD patients and 309 health controls by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. The OCD patients were assessed with Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive severity scale (Y-BOCS). Results:There were no significant differences in genotype or allele of BDNF gene between OCD patients and health controls (P > 0.05). The genotypic and allel-ic distribution of rs6265 had no relationship with the onset age,gender in OCD patients (P >0.05). Conclusion: OCD may not be associated with BDNF SNP rs6265 gene polymorphisms.

  4. BDNF is Associated With Age-Related Decline in Hippocampal Volume

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Michelle W Voss; Chaddock, Laura; Heo, Susie; McLaren, Molly; Pence, Brandt D.; Martin, Stephen A.; Vieira, Victoria J.; Jeffrey A. Woods; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal volume shrinks in late adulthood, but the neuromolecular factors that trigger hippocampal decay in aging humans remains a matter of speculation. In rodents, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the growth and proliferation of cells in the hippocampus and is important in long-term potentiation and memory formation. In humans, circulating levels of BDNF decline with advancing age and a genetic polymorphism for BDNF has been related to gray matter volume loss in old age....

  5. Association analysis between BDNF gene polymorphism and the anxiety symptoms of depressive disorder in Chinese Han population%脑源性神经营养因子基因rs6265与抑郁障碍患者焦虑症状的关联分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莎; 任燕; 杨红; 赵新苗; 刘伟; 齐志宏; 杨爱国; 张克让

    2009-01-01

    Oblectlve To explore the association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF)gene polymorphism and the anxiety symptoms of depressive disorder in Chinese Han population.Methods A total of 458 depressive patients diagnosed by DSM-Ⅳ were admitted in the study.The severity of depression and anxiety were respectively assessed with 17-item Hamilton Depression Hating Scale(17-HAMD)and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA).Polymerase chain reaction(PCR)and DNA direct sequencing technique were used to detect the genetic polymorphism of the BDNF gene.The analyses of the quantitative trait were performed by UNPHASED(version 3.0).Results There were no significant differences between HAMA score and polymorphism of the BDNF gene rs6265(alleles:X2=1.947,P=0.163;genotypes:X2=2.184,P=0.336).An association between the polymorphism and the quantitative character of anxiety symptoms were observed in the allele(mental anxious factor:X2=4.908,P=0.027;anxious mood:X2=4.312,P=0.038),but not in the genotype.Other item score of HAMA was showed no association with polymorphism of the BDNF gene rs6265(P>0.05).Conclusion The polymorphism in allele of BDNF gene may be associated with the anxiety symptoms of depressive patients.Polymorphism of the BDNF gene might constitute the appearance of the clinical manifestation-anxiety in depressive disorder.The result also suggests that the analysis of symptom phenotype may be more suitable for genetic study of depressive disorder.%目的 探讨脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)基因rs6265与抑郁障碍患者焦虑症状的关联性.方法 采用聚合酶链反应技术(PCR)对458例抑郁障碍患者BDNF基因的多态性进行基因分型;运用汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA)评估患者的焦虑症状及严重程度;采用数量性状分析比较不同等位基因及基因型间患者的焦虑症状是否有差异.结果 ①未发现抑郁障碍患者BDNF基因rs6265多态性与HAMA总分有关(等位基因:X2=1.947,P=0.163;基因型:X2=2.184,P=0

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, food intake regulation, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Vargas, Haydeé; Martínez-Ezquerro, José Darío; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that plays a fundamental role in development and plasticity of the central nervous system (CNS). It is currently recognized as a major participant in the regulation of food intake. Multiple studies have shown that different regulators of appetite such as leptin, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) potentially exert anorexigenic effects through BDNF. Low circulating levels of BDNF are associated with a higher risk of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Strict food restriction reduces BDNF and may trigger binge-eating episodes and weight gain. The existence of mutations that cause haploinsufficiency of BDNF as well as some genetic variants, notably the BDNF p.Val66Met polymorphism, are also associated with the development of obese phenotypes and hyperphagia. However, association of the Met allele with AN and BN, which have different phenotypic characteristics, shows clearly the existence of other relevant factors that regulate eating behavior. This may, in part, be explained by the epigenetic regulation of BDNF through mechanisms like DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Environmental factors, primarily during early development, are crucial to the establishment of these stable but reversible changes that alter the transcriptional expression and are transgenerationally heritable, with potential concomitant effects on the development of eating disorders and body weight control. PMID:21945389

  7. The Association of BDNF Gene Variants with Behaviour Traits in Sika Deer (Cervus nippon)

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wan-Hong; Guo Jun; Yang Yan; Lv Shen-Jin

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is involved in modulating behaviour performance induced by environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to study polymorphisms of the BDNF gene and their relationship with animal behaviour in sika deer (Cervus nippon). About 48 sika deer reared under Ping-Shan-Tang Farm (25 deers) and Zhu-Yu-Wan Park (23 deers), Yangzhou City, Jiangsu province, China were observed and blood samples taken to identify BDNF genotypes. Dat...

  8. Physical exercise during encoding improves vocabulary learning in young female adults: a neuroendocrinological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Schmidt-Kassow

    Full Text Available Acute physical activity has been repeatedly shown to improve various cognitive functions. However, there have been no investigations comparing the effects of exercise during verbal encoding versus exercise prior to encoding on long-term memory performance. In this current psychoneuroendocrinological study we aim to test whether light to moderate ergometric bicycling during vocabulary encoding enhances subsequent recall compared to encoding during physical rest and encoding after being physically active. Furthermore, we examined the kinetics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in serum which has been previously shown to correlate with learning performance. We also controlled for the BDNF val66met polymorphism. We found better vocabulary test performance for subjects that were physically active during the encoding phase compared to sedentary subjects. Post-hoc tests revealed that this effect was particularly present in initially low performers. BDNF in serum and BDNF genotype failed to account for the current result. Our data indicates that light to moderate simultaneous physical activity during encoding, but not prior to encoding, is beneficial for subsequent recall of new items.

  9. Family trios analysis of common polymorphisms in the obestatin/ghrelin, BDNF and AGRP genes in patients with Anorexia nervosa: Association with subtype, body-mass index, severity and age of onset.

    OpenAIRE

    Dardennes, Roland,; Zizzari, Philippe; Tolle, Virginie; Foulon, Christine; Kipman, Amélie; Romo, Lucia; Iancu-Gontard, Dana; Boni, Claudette; Sinet, Pierre-Marie; Bluet-Pajot, Marie-Thérèse; Estour, Bruno; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Guelfi, Julien-Daniel; Rouillon, Frédéric; Gorwood, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) affects 0.3% of young girls with a mortality of 6%/decade and is strongly familial with genetic factors. Ghrelin is an upstream regulator of the orexigenic peptides NPY and AgRP and acts as a natural antagonist to leptin's effects on NPY/AgRP-expressing neurons, resulting in an increase in feeding and body weight. Obestatin which counteracts ghrelin action on feeding is derived from the same propeptide than ghrelin. BDNF has been involved in body weight regulation and it...

  10. 抑郁症患者无抽搐电休克治疗的疗效与脑源性神经营养因子基因多态性%Relationship between the effect of modified electroconvulsive therapy and brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) gene polymorphism in patients with major depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼丹丹; 况利; 李大奇; 甘窈; 艾明; 高新学

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨抑郁症患者脑源性神经营养因子(brain-derived neurotrophic factor,BDNF)基因两个单核苷酸多态性位点的多态性与无抽搐电休克治疗(modified electroconvulsive therapy,MECT)疗效的关系.方法:采用病例对照研究,研究组为110例符合美国精神障碍诊断统计手册第4版(Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,Fourth Edition,DSM-IV)抑郁症诊断标准的门诊及住院患者,对照组为100名正常人.患者入组后连续接受MECT 8次,使用汉密顿抑郁量表(Hamilton Depression Rat.ing Scale for Depression,HRSD)进行抑郁严重程度及疗效评估.运用PCR扩增及测序的方法,分析BD-NF基因rs6265、rs7103411单核苷酸多态性的分布,分析rs6265、rs7103411基因型及等位基因频率分布与MECT疗效的关系.结果:BDNF基因rs6265、rs7103411位点基因型及等位基因频率在对照组与患者组间的差异无统计学意义,MECT后2个位点基因型及rs710341I等位基因频率在不同疗效组间的差异无统计学意义.rs6265位点A等位基因频率和G等位基因频率在减分率I>50%组分别为47.9%、52.1%;在减分率<25%组分别为27.5%、72.5%,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),且A等位基因对MECT反应好于G等位基因(OR=1.740,95%CI:1.022~2.963).结论:病情严重的抑郁症患者BDNF基因rs6265位点A等位基因可能与无抽搐电休克治疗效果有关,A等位基因携带者接受MECT的疗效较G等位基因携带者好.%Objective To explore the relation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphisms with the response to modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) . Methods: In this study, 110 patients with major depression were selected according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria, and 100 healthy person were used as controls. The patients received MECT 8 times consecutively and were assessed with

  11. Blood BDNF concentrations reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Williamson, Rebecca; Santini, Martin A;

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in synaptic plasticity, neuronal differentiation and survival of neurons. Observations of decreased serum BDNF levels in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders have highlighted the potential of BDNF as a biomarker, but so far there have been no...... studies directly comparing blood BDNF levels to brain BDNF levels in different species. We examined blood, serum, plasma and brain-tissue BDNF levels in three different mammalian species: rat, pig, and mouse, using an ELISA method. As a control, we included an analysis of blood and brain tissue from...... conditional BDNF knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Whereas BDNF could readily be measured in rat blood, plasma and brain tissue, it was undetectable in mouse blood. In pigs, whole-blood levels of BDNF could not be measured with a commercially available ELISA kit, but pig plasma BDNF levels (mean...

  12. Regulation of BDNF Expression by Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Brown, Amber N.; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. It is expressed throughout the nervous system. A unique feature of the BDNF gene is the existence of multiple mRNA transcripts, all of which are translated into BDNF protein, suggesting a multilevel regulation of expression. In particular, the BDNF exon IV promoter region is a preferential target for epigenetic alterations, as it contains binding sites for CREB and MeCP2, two transcriptional reg...

  13. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase. PMID:26758201

  14. Regulation of BDNF expression by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Brown, Amber N; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. It is expressed throughout the nervous system. A unique feature of the BDNF gene is the existence of multiple mRNA transcripts, all of which are translated into BDNF protein, suggesting a multilevel regulation of expression. In particular, the BDNF exon IV promoter region is a preferential target for epigenetic alterations, as it contains binding sites for CREB and MeCP2, two transcriptional regulators known to mediate epigenetic changes. Exposure to drugs of abuse is known to modulate epigenetic regulation of BDNF gene expression. This review will discuss how exposure to cocaine, one of the most addictive drugs known to mankind, can produce alterations in BDNF gene expression, especially in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which lead to alterations in the reward-mediated behaviors involved in addiction. PMID:23239946

  15. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. T...

  16. Blood BDNF concentrations reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Williamson, Rebecca; Santini, Martin A;

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in synaptic plasticity, neuronal differentiation and survival of neurons. Observations of decreased serum BDNF levels in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders have highlighted the potential of BDNF as a biomarker, but so far there have been ...

  17. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E

    2015-02-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here, we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the "addiction phase" examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF's potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  18. Neuroticism, depressive symptoms, and serum BDNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Lobina, Monia; Piras, Maria Grazia; Mulas, Antonella; Cannas, Alessandra; Meirelles, Osorio; Sutin, Angelina R.; Zonderman, Alan B; Uda, Manuela; Crisponi, Laura; Schlessinger, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective Animal models and clinical studies suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the pathophysiology of depression. We test whether serum and plasma levels of BDNF are associated with trait Neuroticism and its facets, and with state measure of depressive symptoms. Method In a community-based cohort (N = 2099) we measured serum and plasma BDNF concentration, administered the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Covariates included age, sex, cigarette smoking, obesity, and antidepressant use. Results Serum BDNF concentrations were inversely related to Neuroticism (r = −0.074, P < 0.001), in particular the Depression facet (r = −0.08, P < 0.001). Lower BDNF concentrations were also associated with severe depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 28; OR = 0.906; 95%CI = 0.851–0.965). The association of serum BDNF with Neuroticism was independent of depressive symptoms, indicating that serum BDNF might represent a biological correlate of Neuroticism and not just of transient depressive states. Plasma BDNF was not associated with measures of depression. Conclusions Our study suggests that lower serum BDNF is associated with both a dispositional vulnerability to depression and acute depressive states in the general population. PMID:21949427

  19. Interactive effects of age and multi-gene profile on motor learning and sensorimotor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Boyden, Nate B; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-04-01

    The interactive association of age and dopaminergic polymorphisms on cognitive function has been studied extensively. However, there is limited research on whether age interacts with the association between genetic polymorphisms and motor learning. We examined a group of young and older adults' performance in three motor tasks: explicit sequence learning, visuomotor adaptation, and grooved pegboard. We assessed whether individuals' motor learning and performance were associated with their age and genotypes. We selected three genetic polymorphisms: Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase (COMT val158met) and Dopamine D2 Receptor (DRD2 G>T), which are involved with dopaminergic regulation, and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF val66met) that modulates neuroplasticity and has been shown to interact with dopaminergic genes. Although the underlying mechanisms of the function of these three genotypes are different, the high performance alleles of each have been linked to better learning and performance. We created a composite polygene score based on the Number of High Performance Alleles (NHPA) that each individual carried. We found several associations between genetic profile, motor performance, and sensorimotor adaptation. More importantly, we found that this association varies with age, task type, and engagement of implicit versus explicit learning processes. PMID:26926580

  20. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the “addiction phase” examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF’s potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  1. BDNF signaling and survival of striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoji Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, a major component of the basal ganglia, performs multiple functions including control of movement, reward, and addiction. Dysfunction and death of striatal neurons are the main causes for the motor disorders associated with Huntington’s disease (HD. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is among factors that promote survival and proper function of this neuronal population. Here, we review recent studies showing that BDNF determines the size of the striatum by supporting survival of the immature striatal neurons at their origin, promotes maturation of striatal neurons, and facilitates establishment of striatal connections during brain development. We also examine the role of BDNF in maintaining proper function of the striatum during adulthood, summarize the mechanisms that lead to a deficiency in BDNF signaling and subsequently striatal degeneration in HD, and highlight a potential role of BDNF as a therapeutic target for HD treatment.

  2. Proteolytic Cleavage of ProBDNF into Mature BDNF in the Basolateral Amygdala Is Necessary for Defeat-Induced Social Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulka, Brooke N.; Ford, Ellen C.; Lee, Melissa A.; Donnell, Nathaniel J.; Goode, Travis D.; Prosser, Rebecca; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for memory processes. The present study tested whether proteolytic cleavage of proBDNF into mature BDNF (mBDNF) within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) regulates the consolidation of defeat-related memories. We found that acute social defeat increases the expression of mBDNF, but not proBDNF, in…

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype. PMID:25934485

  4. Association analysis of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphisms with early-onset schizophrenia in the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易正辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene Tag SNPs(rs 11030101 and rs6265) and early-onset schizophrenia in the Chinese Han population. Methods The tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag SNPs) rs11030101 and rs6265 in the BDNF gene were genotyped

  5. Easy to remember, difficult to forget: The development of fear regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Johnson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fear extinction learning is a highly adaptive process that involves the integrity of frontolimbic circuitry. Its disruption has been associated with emotional dysregulation in stress and anxiety disorders. In this article we consider how age, genetics and experiences shape our capacity to regulate fear in cross-species studies. Evidence for adolescent-specific diminished fear extinction learning is presented in the context of immature frontolimbic circuitry. We also present evidence for less neural plasticity in fear regulation as a function of early-life stress and by genotype, focusing on the common brain derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Finally, we discuss this work in the context of exposure-based behavioral therapies for the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders that are based on principles of fear extinction. We conclude by speculating on how such therapies may be optimized for the individual based on the patient's age, genetic profile and personal history to move from standard treatment of care to personalized and precision medicine.

  6. Decoding BDNF-LTP coupling in cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Li-Min; Fibuch, Eugene E.; WANG, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    BDNF is a neurotrophic peptide that regulates synaptic plasticity. New work by Lu and coworkers in this issue of Neuron now identifies BDNF as a gatekeeper of synaptic and behavioral plasticity in cocaine sensitization. In the medial prefrontal cortex, upregulated BDNF facilitates LTP and contributes to neurobehavioral adaptations to psychostimulants.

  7. Decoding BDNF-LTP coupling in cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Fibuch, Eugene E; Wang, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    BDNF is a neurotrophic peptide that regulates synaptic plasticity. New work by Lu and coworkers in this issue of Neuron now identifies BDNF as a gatekeeper of synaptic and behavioral plasticity in cocaine sensitization. In the medial prefrontal cortex, upregulated BDNF facilitates LTP and contributes to neurobehavioral adaptations to psychostimulants. PMID:20890399

  8. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor-NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  9. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P.; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor—NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  10. Propofol alleviates electroconvulsive shock-induced memory impairment by modulating proBDNF/mBDNF ratio in depressive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Ren, Li; Qin, Peipei

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of propofol and electroconvulsive shock (ECS), the analogue of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in animals, on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) as well as the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF)/mature BDNF (mBDNF) ratio in depressive rats. ECT is an effective treatment for depression, but can cause cognitive deficit. Some studies have indicated that propofol can ameliorate cognitive decline induced by ECT, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. Recent evidence has found that mBDNF and its precursor proBDNF are related to depression and cognitive function; they elicit opposite effects on cellular functions. Chronic unpredicted mild stress is widely used to induce depressive behaviors in rodents. This study found that the depression resulted in an increased expression of PAI-1 and upregulation of the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, together with a decreased level of tPA, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment, and cognitive decline. The proBDNF/mBDNF ratio was further upregulated after the ECS treatment in depressive rats, resulting in the deterioration of cognitive function and hippocampal LTP. Propofol alone did not reverse the changes in depressive rats, but when co-administered with ECS, it improved the cognitive function, alleviated the impairment of LTP, downregulated the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, and increased the tPA expression. The results of this study suggest that propofol ameliorates cognitive decline induced by ECT, which was partly by modulating the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio and reversing the excessive changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, providing a new evidence for involving the proBDNF/mBDNF system in the progression and treatment of depression. PMID:27017958

  11. Bedeutung genetischer Polymorphismen in BDNF, Bcl-2 sowie COMT und MAO-A für den Erfolg der Therapie mit Antidepressiva

    OpenAIRE

    Akdenizli, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical efficacy of antidepressants is difficult to predict and characterised by a high rate of therapeutic failure. Genetic factors contribute to individual response. This study investigated the influence of the polymorphisms COMT 1947G>A, MAO-A VNTR, BDNF 196G>A, BDNF -1360C>T and Bcl-2 127G>A on the response to antidepressants. Catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) and Monoaminoxidase-A (MAO-A) are enzymes degrading amines which play a role in the response to antidepressant...

  12. Mutation screen of the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF): identification of several genetic variants and association studies in patients with obesity, eating disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, S; Horro, F Fontenla; Wermter, A K; Geller, F; Dempfle, A; Reichwald, K; Smidt, J; Brönner, G; Konrad, K; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Warnke, A; Hemminger, U; Linder, M; Kiefl, H; Goldschmidt, H P; Siegfried, W; Remschmidt, H; Hinney, A; Hebebrand, J

    2005-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate an involvement of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in body weight regulation and activity: heterozygous Bdnf knockout mice (Bdnf(+/-)) are hyperphagic, obese, and hyperactive; furthermore, central infusion of BDNF leads to severe, dose-dependent appetite suppression and weight loss in rats. We searched for the role of BDNF variants in obesity, eating disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A mutation screen (SSCP and DHPLC) of the translated region of BDNF in 183 extremely obese children and adolescents and 187 underweight students was performed. Additionally, we genotyped two common polymorphisms (rs6265: p.V66M; c.-46C > T) in 118 patients with anorexia nervosa, 80 patients with bulimia nervosa, 88 patients with ADHD, and 96 normal weight controls. Three rare variants (c.5C > T: p.T2I; c.273G > A; c.*137A > G) and the known polymorphism (p.V66M) were identified. A role of the I2 allele in the etiology of obesity cannot be excluded. We found no association between p.V66M or the additionally genotyped variant c.-46C > T and obesity, ADHD or eating disorders. This article contains supplementary material, which may be viewed at the American Journal of Medical Genetics website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0148-7299:1/suppmat/index.html. PMID:15457498

  13. Reduced cocaine-seeking behavior in heterozygous BDNF knockout rats

    OpenAIRE

    St. Laurent, Robyn; Helm, Samuel R.; Glenn, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine generates drug-seeking behavior by creating long-lasting changes in the reward pathway. The role of the growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in facilitating these changes was investigated in the present report with a genetic rat model. Using conditioned place preference, the current study investigated the hypothesis that a partial knockout of the BDNF gene in rats (BDNF+/−) would attenuate the rewarding effects of cocaine. Wildtype rats exposed to cocaine exhibited ...

  14. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts BDNF level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep plays a pivotal role in normal biological functions. Sleep loss results in higher stress vulnerability and is often found in mental disorders. There is evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF could be a central player in this relationship. Recently, we could demonstrate that subjects suffering from current symptoms of insomnia exhibited significantly decreased serum BDNF levels compared with sleep-healthy controls. In accordance with the paradigm indicating a link between sleep and BDNF, we aimed to investigate if the stress system influences the association between sleep and BDNF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants with current symptoms of insomnia plus a former diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS and/or Periodic Limb Movement (PLM and sleep healthy controls were included in the study. They completed questionnaires on sleep (ISI, Insomnia Severity Index and stress (PSS, Perceived Stress Scale and provided a blood sample for determination of serum BDNF. We found a significant interaction between stress and insomnia with an impact on serum BDNF levels. Moreover, insomnia severity groups and score on the PSS each revealed a significant main effect on serum BDNF levels. Insomnia severity was associated with increased stress experience affecting serum BDNF levels. Of note, the association between stress and BDNF was only observed in subjects without insomnia. Using a mediation model, sleep was revealed as a mediator of the association between stress experience and serum BDNF levels. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show that the interplay between stress and sleep impacts BDNF levels, suggesting an important role of this relationship in the pathogenesis of stress-associated mental disorders. Hence, we suggest sleep as a key mediator at the connection between stress and BDNF. Whether sleep is maintained or disturbed might explain why some individuals are able to handle a certain stress load while

  15. Proteolytic cleavage of proBDNF into mature BDNF in the basolateral amygdala is necessary for defeat-induced social avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulka, Brooke N; Ford, Ellen C; Lee, Melissa A; Donnell, Nathaniel J; Goode, Travis D; Prosser, Rebecca; Cooper, Matthew A

    2016-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for memory processes. The present study tested whether proteolytic cleavage of proBDNF into mature BDNF (mBDNF) within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) regulates the consolidation of defeat-related memories. We found that acute social defeat increases the expression of mBDNF, but not proBDNF, in the BLA/central amygdala. We also showed that blocking plasmin in the BLA with microinjection of α2-antiplasmin immediately following social defeat decreases social avoidance 24 h later. These data suggest the proteolytic cleavage of BDNF in the BLA is necessary for defeat-induced social avoidance. PMID:26980783

  16. Endurance training enhances BDNF release from the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice; Wissenberg, Mads;

    2010-01-01

    + or - 108 ng x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05), with no significant change in the control subjects, but there was no training-induced increase in the release of BDNF during exercise. Additionally, eight mice completed a 5-wk treadmill running training protocol that increased the BDNF mRNA expression in...

  17. A role for BDNF in cocaine reward and relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Stalnaker, Thomas A; Shaham, Yavin

    2007-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important in regulating synaptic plasticity in the brain areas that process reward information. A new study reports that BDNF in the nucleus accumbens, a brain area critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine, promotes persistent cocaine-seeking behaviors and heightens relapse vulnerability.

  18. Working Memory Deficits, Increased Anxiety-Like Traits, and Seizure Susceptibility in BDNF Overexpressing Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Francesco; Silverman, Jill L.; Aney, Jordan; Tian, Qingjun; Barkan, Charlotte L.; Chadman, Kathryn K.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    BDNF regulates components of cognitive processes and has been implicated in psychiatric disorders. Here we report that genetic overexpression of the BDNF mature isoform (BDNF-tg) in female mice impaired working memory functions while sparing components of fear conditioning. BDNF-tg mice also displayed reduced breeding efficiency, higher…

  19. Recovery of low plasma BDNF over the course of treatment among patients with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hisashi; Yoshimura, Chiho; Nakajima, Takenori; Nagata, Toshihiko

    2012-08-15

    Recent studies have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with energy balance, eating behaviors, and psychological states such as depression. Although decreased BDNF levels in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) have been reported, the mechanism is still unclear. Few studies have investigated longitudinal changes of BDNF in BN patients. We investigated changes in the levels of plasma BDNF before and after inpatient treatment. Subjects were 16 female patients with BN and 10 control females. The levels of plasma BDNF were measured. In seven patients who completed a 4-week inpatient treatment program based on cognitive behavior therapy, levels of plasma BDNF were measured twice, before and after inpatient treatment. Plasma BDNF levels were significantly lower in BN subjects than in controls. BDNF levels were significantly higher following inpatient treatment. Increased plasma BDNF after inpatient treatment suggests that lower plasma BDNF levels in BN patients are associated with abnormal eating behaviors, especially binge eating. PMID:22425474

  20. BDNF, produced by a TPO-stimulated megakaryocytic cell line, regulates autocrine proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Shogo [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Nagasawa, Ayumi; Masuda, Yuya; Tsunematsu, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Hayasaka, Koji; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Chikara [Division of Laboratory and Transfusion Medicine, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ozaki, Yukio [Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi (Japan); Moriyama, Takanori, E-mail: moriyama@hs.hokuda.ac.jp [Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It has been thought that BDNF is not produced in the megakaryocytic lineage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEG-01 produces BDNF upon TPO stimulation and regulates its proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF accelerates proliferation of MEG-01 in an autocrine manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF may be an autocrine MEG-CSF, which regulates megakaryopoiesis. -- Abstract: While human platelets release endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) upon activation, a previous report on MEG-01, a megakaryocytic cell line, found no trace of BDNF production, and the pathophysiological function of platelet BDNF has remained elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that MEG-01 produces BDNF in the presence of TPO and that this serves to potentiate cell proliferation. Our in vitro findings suggest that BDNF regulates MEG-01 proliferation in an autocrine manner, and we suggest that BDNF may be a physiological autocrine regulator of megakaryocyte progenitors.

  1. BDNF, produced by a TPO-stimulated megakaryocytic cell line, regulates autocrine proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► It has been thought that BDNF is not produced in the megakaryocytic lineage. ► MEG-01 produces BDNF upon TPO stimulation and regulates its proliferation. ► BDNF accelerates proliferation of MEG-01 in an autocrine manner. ► BDNF may be an autocrine MEG-CSF, which regulates megakaryopoiesis. -- Abstract: While human platelets release endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) upon activation, a previous report on MEG-01, a megakaryocytic cell line, found no trace of BDNF production, and the pathophysiological function of platelet BDNF has remained elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that MEG-01 produces BDNF in the presence of TPO and that this serves to potentiate cell proliferation. Our in vitro findings suggest that BDNF regulates MEG-01 proliferation in an autocrine manner, and we suggest that BDNF may be a physiological autocrine regulator of megakaryocyte progenitors.

  2. Increased BDNF levels in long-term bipolar disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Guimarães Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bipolar disorder (BD is a prevalent, chronic and progressive illness. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in the pathophysiology of BD. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate BDNF plasma levels in BD patients with long term illness in comparison with controls. METHODS: 87 BD type I patients and 58 controls matched by age, gender and education level were enrolled in this study. All subjects were assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the patients by the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The plasma levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: On average, patients had suffered from BD for 23.4 years. In comparison with controls, BD patients with mania presented a 1.90-fold increase in BDNF plasma levels (p = .001, while BD patients in remission presented a 1.64-fold increase in BDNF plasma levels (p = .03. BDNF plasma levels were not influenced by age, length of illness or current medications. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that long-term BD patients exhibit increased circulating levels of BDNF.

  3. Levels of BDNF Impact Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Following a Cuprizone Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    VonDran, Melissa W.; Singh, Harmandeep; Honeywell, Jean Z.; Dreyfus, Cheryl F

    2011-01-01

    Previous work in culture has shown that basal forebrain (BF) oligodendrocyte (OLG) lineage cells respond to BDNF by increasing DNA synthesis and differentiation. Further, in the BF in vivo, reduced levels of BDNF as seen in BDNF +/− mice result in reduced numbers of NG2+ cells and deficits in myelin proteins throughout development and in the adult, suggesting that BDNF impacts the proliferating population of OLGs as well as differentiation in vivo. In this study, to investigate roles BDNF may...

  4. CREB-BDNF Pathway Influences Alcohol Cue-Elicited Hyperactivation in Drinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiayu; Hutchison, Kent E.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Claus, Eric; Turner, Jessica A.; Sui, Jing; Liu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is suggested to have polygenic risk factors and also exhibits neurological complications, strongly encouraging a translational study to explore the associations between aggregates of genetic variants and brain function alterations related to alcohol use. In this study, we used a semiblind multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis with multiple references (pICA-MR) to investigate relationships of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with alcohol cue elicited brain activations in 326 healthy drinkers. The genetic component derived from the CREB-BDNF pathway reference was significantly associated (r = −0.36, p = 2.98×10−11) with an imaging component reflecting hyperactivation in precuneus, superior parietal lobule, and posterior cingulate for drinkers with more severe AD scores. The highlighted brain regions participate in many cognitive processes and have been robustly implicated in craving-related studies. The genetic factor highlighted the CREB and BDNF references, as well as other genes including GRM5, GRM7, GRID1, GRIN2A, PRKCA and PRKCB. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that the genetic component was enriched in synaptic plasticity, GABA and protein kinase A signaling. In summary, our findings suggest genetic variations in various neural plasticity and signaling pathways partially explain the variance of precuneus reactivity to alcohol cue which appears to be associated with AD severity. PMID:25939814

  5. Functional interactions between steroid hormones and neurotrophin BDNF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadahiro; Numakawa; Daisaku; Yokomaku; Misty; Richards; Hiroaki; Hori; Naoki; Adachi; Hiroshi; Kunugi

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF),a critical neurotrophin,regulates many neuronal aspects including cell differentiation,cell survival,neurotransmission,and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system(CNS) .Though BDNF has two types of receptors,high affinity tropomyosin-related kinase(Trk) B and low affinity p75 receptors,BDNF positively exerts its biological effects on neurons via activation of TrkB and of resultant intracellular signaling cascades including mitogenactivated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase,phospholipase Cγ,and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways.Notably,it is possible that alteration in the expression and/or function of BDNF in the CNS is involved in the pathophysiology of various brain diseases such as stroke,Parkinson’s disease,Alzheimer’s disease,and mental disorders.On the other hand,glucocorticoids,stress-induced steroid hormones,also putatively contribute to the pathophysiology of depression.Interestingly,in addition to the reduction in BDNF levels due to increased glucocorticoid exposure,current reports demonstrate possible interactions between glucocorticoids and BDNF-mediated neuronal functions. Other steroid hormones,such as estrogen,are involved in not only sexual differentiation in the brain,but also numerous neuronal events including cell survival and synaptic plasticity.Furthermore,it is well known that estrogen plays a role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease,Alzheimer’s disease,and mental illness,while serving to regulate BDNF expression and/or function.Here,we present a broad overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between BDNF expression/function and steroid hormones(glucocorticoids and estrogen).

  6. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF contributes to the pain hypersensitivity following surgical incision in the rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian-Yi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenic role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the incisional pain is poorly understood. The present study explores the role of the BDNF in the incision-induced pain hypersensitivity. Methods A longitudinal incision was made in one plantar hind paw of isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Dorsal root ganglias (DRG and spinal cords were removed at various postoperative times (1–72 h. Expression pattern of BDNF was determined by immunohistochemistry and double-labeling immunofluorescence. Lidocaine-induced blockade of sciatic nerve function was used to determine the importance of afferent nerve activity on BDNF expression in the DRG and spinal cord after incision. BDNF antibody was administered intrathecally (IT or intraperitoneal (IP to modulate the spinal BDNF or peripheral BDNF after incision. Results After hind-paw incision, the BDNF was upregulated in the ipsilateral lumbar DRG and spinal cord whereas thoracic BDNF remained unchanged in response to incision. The upregulated BDNF was mainly expressed in the large-sized neurons in DRG and the neurons and the primary nerve terminals in the spinal cord. Sciatic nerve blockade prevented the increase of BDNF in the DRG and spinal cord. IT injection of BDNF antibody greatly inhibited the mechanical allodynia induced by incision whereas IP administration had only marginal effect. Conclusion The present study showed that incision induced the segmental upregulation of BDNF in the DRG and spinal cord through somatic afferent nerve transmission, and the upregulated BDNF contributed to the pain hypersensitivity induced by surgical incision.

  7. Spike-timing-dependent BDNF secretion and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In acute hippocampal slices, we found that the presence of extracellular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the induction of spike-timing-dependent long-term potentiation (tLTP). To determine whether BDNF could be secreted from postsynaptic dendrites in a spike-timing-dependent manner, we used a reduced system of dissociated hippocampal neurons in culture. Repetitive pairing of iontophoretically applied glutamate pulses at the dendrite with neuronal spikes could induce persistent alterations of glutamate-induced responses at the same dendritic site in a manner that mimics spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP)-the glutamate-induced responses were potentiated and depressed when the glutamate pulses were applied 20 ms before and after neuronal spiking, respectively. By monitoring changes in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence at the dendrite of hippocampal neurons expressing GFP-tagged BDNF, we found that pairing of iontophoretic glutamate pulses with neuronal spiking resulted in BDNF secretion from the dendrite at the iontophoretic site only when the glutamate pulses were applied within a time window of approximately 40 ms prior to neuronal spiking, consistent with the timing requirement of synaptic potentiation via STDP. Thus, BDNF is required for tLTP and BDNF secretion could be triggered in a spike-timing-dependent manner from the postsynaptic dendrite. PMID:24298135

  8. BDNF downregulates 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in hippocampal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, V; Santini, M A; Marcussen, Anders Bue;

    2009-01-01

    5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in primary hippocampal neuronal and mature hippocampal organotypic cultures exposed to different BDNF concentrations for either 1, 3, 5 or 7 days. In vivo effects of BDNF on hippocampal 5-HT(2A) receptor levels were further corroborated in (BDNF +/-) mice with...... reduced BDNF levels. In primary neuronal cultures, 7 days exposure to 25 and 50ng/mL BDNF resulted in downregulation of 5-HT(2A), but not of 5-HT(1A), receptor protein levels. The BDNF-associated downregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptor levels was also observed in mature hippocampal organotypic cultures...

  9. Activity-dependent BDNF release via endocytic pathways is regulated by synaptotagmin-6 and complexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yu-Hui; Lee, Chia-Ming; Xie, Wenjun; Cui, Bianxiao; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-08-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to modulate synapse development and plasticity, but the source of synaptic BDNF and molecular mechanisms regulating BDNF release remain unclear. Using exogenous BDNF tagged with quantum dots (BDNF-QDs), we found that endocytosed BDNF-QDs were preferentially localized to postsynaptic sites in the dendrite of cultured hippocampal neurons. Repetitive neuronal spiking induced the release of BDNF-QDs at these sites, and this process required activation of glutamate receptors. Down-regulating complexin 1/2 (Cpx1/2) expression eliminated activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion, although the overall activity-independent secretion was elevated. Among eight synaptotagmin (Syt) isoforms examined, down-regulation of only Syt6 impaired activity-induced BDNF-QD secretion. In contrast, activity-induced release of endogenously synthesized BDNF did not depend on Syt6. Thus, neuronal activity could trigger the release of endosomal BDNF from postsynaptic dendrites in a Cpx- and Syt6-dependent manner, and endosomes containing BDNF may serve as a source of BDNF for activity-dependent synaptic modulation. PMID:26216953

  10. Exploring the Association between Serum BDNF and Attempted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Rebecca B.; Perera, Stefan; Bawor, Monica; Dennis, Brittany B.; El-Sheikh, Wala; DeJesus, Jane; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Vair, Judith; Sholer, Heather; Hutchinson, Nicole; Iordan, Elizabeth; Mackie, Pam; Islam, Shofiqul; Dehghan, Mahshid; Brasch, Jennifer; Anglin, Rebecca; Minuzzi, Luciano; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death and a significant public health concern. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein important to nervous system function, has been implicated in psychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviour. We investigated the association between serum levels of BDNF and attempted suicide in a sample of 281 participants using a case-control study design. Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings between March 2011 and November 2014. Cases (individuals who had attempted suicide) (n = 84) were matched on sex and age (within five years) to both psychiatric controls (n = 104) and community controls (n = 93) with no history of suicide attempts. We collected fasting blood samples, socio-demographic information, physical measurements, and detailed descriptions of suicide attempts. We used linear regression analysis to determine the association between BDNF level (dependent variable) and attempted suicide (key exposure variable), adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, current smoking status, and antidepressant use. 250 participants were included in this analysis. In the linear regression model, attempted suicide was not significantly associated with BDNF level (β = 0.28, SE = 1.20, P = 0.82). Our findings suggest that no significant association exists between attempted suicide and BDNF level. However, the findings need to be replicated in a larger cohort study. PMID:27121496

  11. Whole blood BDNF levels in healthy twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Vinberg, Maj; Aznar, Susana;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with decreased blood BDNF concentrations; but it is unclear if low blood BDNF levels are a state or a trait marker of depression. METHODS: We investigated blood BDNF concentrations in a twin population including both subjects highly predisposed and prote...

  12. Transcript-specific effects of adrenalectomy on seizure-induced BDNF expression in rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauterborn, J C; Poulsen, F R; Stinis, C T;

    1998-01-01

    Activity-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is negatively modulated by circulating adrenal steroids. The rat BDNF gene gives rise to four major transcript forms that each contain a unique 5' exon (I-IV) and a common 3' exon (V) that codes for BDNF protein. Exon-specific i...

  13. Effects of phenytoin and lamotrigine treatment on serum BDNF levels in offsprings of epileptic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Handan; Doğan, Zümrüt; Kamışlı, Özden

    2016-04-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is to promote and modulate neuronal responses across neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Therefore, abnormal BDNF signaling may be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Low BDNF levels have been reported in brains and serums of patients with psychotic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of antiepileptic drugs on BDNF in developing rats. Pregnant rats were treated with phenytoin (PHT), lamotrigine (LTG) and folic acid for long-term, all through their gestational periods. Experimental epilepsy (EE) model was applied in pregnant rats. Epileptic seizures were determined with electroencephalography. After birth, serum BDNF levels were measured in 136 newborn rats on postnatal day (PND) 21 and postnatal day 38. In postnatal day 21, serum BDNF levels of experimental epilepsy group were significantly lower compared with PHT group. This decrease is statistically significant. Serum BDNF levels increased in the group LTG. This increase compared with LTG+EE group was statistically significant. In the folic acid (FA) group, levels of serum BDNF decreased statistically significantly compared to the PHT group. On postnatal day 38, no significant differences were found among the groups for serum BDNF levels. We concluded that, the passed seizures during pregnancy adversely affect fetal brain development, lowering of serum BDNF levels. PHT use during pregnancy prevents seizure-induced injury by increasing the levels of BDNF. About the increase level of BDNF, LTG is much less effective than PHT, the positive effect of folic acid on serum BDNF levels was not observed. LTG increase in BDNF is much less effective than PHT, folic acid did not show a positive effect on serum BDNF levels. Epilepsy affects fetal brain development during gestation in pregnant rats, therefore anti-epileptic therapy should be continued during pregnancy. PMID:26706181

  14. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  15. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  16. Autocrine action of BDNF on dendrite development of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Chang, Xingya; She, Liang; Xu, Duo; Huang, Wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-06-01

    Dendrite development of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus is critical for their incorporation into existing hippocampal circuits, but the cellular mechanisms regulating their dendrite development remains largely unclear. In this study, we examined the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in adult-born GCs, in regulating their dendrite morphogenesis. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfection, we found that deletion and overexpression of BDNF in adult-born GCs resulted in the reduction and elevation of dendrite growth, respectively. This effect was mainly due to the autocrine rather than paracrine action of BDNF, because deletion of BDNF only in the newborn GCs resulted in dendrite abnormality of these neurons to a similar extent as that observed in conditional knockout (cKO) mice with BDNF deleted in the entire forebrain. Furthermore, selective expression of BDNF in adult-born GCs in BDNF cKO mice fully restored normal dendrite development. The BDNF autocrine action was also required for the development of normal density of spines and normal percentage of spines containing the postsynaptic marker PSD-95, suggesting autocrine BDNF regulation of synaptogenesis. Furthermore, increased dendrite growth of adult-born GCs caused by voluntary exercise was abolished by BDNF deletion specifically in these neurons and elevated dendrite growth due to BDNF overexpression in these neurons was prevented by reducing neuronal activity with coexpression of inward rectifier potassium channels, consistent with activity-dependent autocrine BDNF secretion. Therefore, BDNF expressed in adult-born GCs plays a critical role in dendrite development by acting as an autocrine factor. PMID:26041908

  17. Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Production of BDNF following Mitogen Stimulation in Early Onset and Regressive Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Enstrom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is critical for neuronal differentiation and synaptic development. BDNF is also implicated in the development of psychological disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Previously, elevated BDNF levels were observed in neonatal blood samples from infants who were later diagnosed with autism when compared with children who developed normally, suggesting that BDNF may be involved in the development of autism. BDNF is produced by activated brain microglial cells, a cellular phenotype that shares several features with peripheral macrophages, suggesting an important role for the immune system in BDNF production. We hypothesized that under mitogenic stimulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from children with autism may have altered BDNF production compared with age-matched typically developing control subjects. In addition, we examined the differences between the production of BDNF in classic/early-onset autism and children who had a regressive form of autism. We show here that plasma levels of BDNF levels are increased in children with autism, especially in early onset autism subjects. Furthermore, under mitogenic stimulation with PHA and LPS, BDNF production is significantly increased in children with autism compared with typically developing subjects. However, stimulation with tetanus toxoid results in a decreased response in children with autism. This data suggest that immune cell-derived production of BDNF could be an important source for the increased BDNF that is detected in some subjects with autism. As a neurotrophic factor produced by immune cells, BDNF could help elucidate the role of the immune system in neurodevelopment and neuronal maintenance, which may be dysregulated in autism.

  18. Cellular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, A; Khanjian, R A; Balkowiec, A

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by both developing and adult rat visceral sensory neurons from the nodose ganglion (NG) in vivo and in vitro. We have previously shown that BDNF is released from neonatal NG neurons by activity and regulates dendritic development in their postsynaptic targets in the brainstem. The current study was carried out to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of activity-dependent BDNF expression in neonatal rat NG neurons, using our established in vitro model of neuronal activation by electrical field stimulation with patterns that mimic neuronal activity in vivo. We show that BDNF mRNA (transcript 4) increases over threefold in response to a 4-h tonic or bursting pattern delivered at the frequency of 6 Hz, which corresponds to the normal heart rate of a newborn rat. No significant increase in BDNF expression was observed following stimulation at 1 Hz. The latter effect suggests a frequency-dependent mechanism of regulated BDNF expression. In addition to BDNF transcript 4, which is known to be regulated by activity, transcript 1 also showed significant upregulation. The increases in BDNF mRNA were followed by BDNF protein upregulation of a similar magnitude after 24h of stimulation at 6 Hz. Electrical stimulation-evoked BDNF expression was inhibited by pretreating neurons with the blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels tetrodotoxin and by removing extracellular calcium. Moreover, our data show that repetitive stimulation-evoked BDNF expression requires calcium influx through N-, but not L-type, channels. Together, our study reveals novel mechanisms through which electrical activity stimulates de novo synthesis of BDNF in sensory neurons, and points to the role of N-type calcium channels in regulating BDNF expression in sensory neurons in response to repetitive stimulation. PMID:26459016

  19. Prefrontal cortical BDNF: A regulatory key in cocaine- and food-reinforced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Elizabeth G; Taylor, Jane R; Gourley, Shannon L

    2016-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects synaptic plasticity and neural structure and plays key roles in learning and memory processes. Recent evidence also points to important, yet complex, roles for BDNF in rodent models of cocaine abuse and addiction. Here we examine the role of prefrontal cortical (PFC) BDNF in reward-related decision making and behavioral sensitivity to, and responding for, cocaine. We focus on BDNF within the medial and orbital PFC, its regulation by cocaine during early postnatal development and in adulthood, and how BDNF in turn influences responding for drug reinforcement, including in reinstatement models. When relevant, we draw comparisons and contrasts with experiments using natural (food) reinforcers. We also summarize findings supporting, or refuting, the possibility that BDNF in the medial and orbital PFC regulate the development and maintenance of stimulus-response habits. Further investigation could assist in the development of novel treatment approaches for cocaine use disorders. PMID:26923993

  20. Definition of a Bidirectional Activity-Dependent Pathway Involving BDNF and Narp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Mariga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the cardinal features of neural development and adult plasticity is the contribution of activity-dependent signaling pathways. However, the interrelationships between different activity-dependent genes are not well understood. The immediate early gene neuronal-activity-regulated pentraxin (NPTX2 or Narp encodes a protein that has been associated with excitatory synaptogenesis, AMPA receptor aggregation, and the onset of critical periods. Here, we show that Narp is a direct transcriptional target of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, another highly regulated activity-dependent gene involved in synaptic plasticity. Unexpectedly, Narp is bidirectionally regulated by BDNF. Acute BDNF withdrawal results in downregulation of Narp, whereas transcription of Narp is greatly enhanced by BDNF. Furthermore, our results show that BDNF directly regulates Narp to mediate glutamatergic transmission and mossy fiber plasticity. Hence, Narp serves as a significant epistatic target of BDNF to regulate synaptic plasticity during periods of dynamic activity.

  1. BDNF promoter methylation and genetic variation in late-life depression

    OpenAIRE

    Januar, V; Ancelin, M-L; Ritchie, K.; Saffery, R.; Ryan, J

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for depression pathophysiology and epigenetic regulation of the BDNF gene may be involved. This study investigated whether BDNF methylation is a marker of depression. One thousand and twenty-four participants were recruited as part of a longitudinal study of psychiatric disorders in general population elderly (age⩾65). Clinical levels of depression were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview ...

  2. Localization of BDNF mRNA with the Huntington's disease protein in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Moses V; Tongiorgi Enrico; Baj Gabriele; Culver Brady P; Ma Bin; Tanese Naoko

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have implicated reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. Mutant huntingtin (Htt) protein was previously reported to decrease BDNF gene transcription and axonal transport of BDNF. We recently showed that wild-type Htt is associated with the Argonaute 2 microRNA-processing enzyme involved in gene silencing. In dendrites, Htt co-localizes with components of neuronal granules and mRNAs, indicating that it m...

  3. Association Between MKP-1, BDNF, and Gonadal Hormones with Depression on Perimenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Ling-Yun; Wang, Ya-Wen; Zhou, Fu-ling; Ma, Xian-cang; Yan, Run-zhi; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Quan-li; Yu, Xuewen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts effects on the neuronal function of hippocampal neurons and increases hippocampal mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression, which causes depressive behaviors in rat or mouse. Here we focus on the change of serum MKP-1, BDNF, testosterone (T), and estradiol (E2) levels, in order to test the hypothesis that dysregulation of MKP-1, BDNF, T, and E2 are associated with depression in p...

  4. BDNF Methylation and Maternal Brain Activity in a Violence-Related Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Dominik A.; Ariane Paoloni-Giacobino; Ludwig Stenz; Wafae Adouan; Aurélia Manini; Francesca Suardi; Cordero, Maria I.; Marylene Vital; Ana Sancho Rossignol; Sandra Rusconi-Serpa; François Ansermet; Dayer, Alexandre G.; Schechter, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that increased circulating glucocorticoids in the wake of excessive, chronic, repetitive stress increases anxiety and impairs Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling. Recent studies of BDNF gene methylation in relation to maternal care have linked high BDNF methylation levels in the blood of adults to lower quality of received maternal care measured via self-report. Yet the specific mechanisms by which these phenomena occur remain to be established. The present study ex...

  5. GABAA Receptor Blockade Enhances Memory Consolidation by Increasing Hippocampal BDNF Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong hyun; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Se Jin; Cai, MuDan; Liu, Xiaotong; Lee, Seungheon; Shin, Chan Young; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Memory consolidation is the process by which acquired information is converted to something concrete to be retrieved later. Here we examined a potential role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mediating the enhanced memory consolidation induced by the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide. With the administration of an acquisition trial in naïve mice using a passive avoidance task, mature BDNF (mBDNF) levels were temporally changed in the hippocampal CA1 region, and t...

  6. Microglia Control Neuronal Network Excitability via BDNF Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ferrini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia-neuron interactions play a crucial role in several neurological disorders characterized by altered neural network excitability, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. While a series of potential messengers have been postulated as substrates of the communication between microglia and neurons, including cytokines, purines, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide, the specific links between messengers, microglia, neuronal networks, and diseases have remained elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF released by microglia emerges as an exception in this riddle. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role played by microglial BDNF in controlling neuronal excitability by causing disinhibition. The efforts made by different laboratories during the last decade have collectively provided a robust mechanistic paradigm which elucidates the mechanisms involved in the synthesis and release of BDNF from microglia, the downstream TrkB-mediated signals in neurons, and the biophysical mechanism by which disinhibition occurs, via the downregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, dysrupting Cl−homeostasis, and hence the strength of GABAA- and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition. The resulting altered network activity appears to explain several features of the associated pathologies. Targeting the molecular players involved in this canonical signaling pathway may lead to novel therapeutic approach for ameliorating a wide array of neural dysfunctions.

  7. APATHY AND APOE4 ARE ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED BDNF LEVELS IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Antón; Aleixandre, Manuel; Linares, Carlos; Masliah, Eliezer; Moessler, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is considered as a pathogenic event in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the influence of apathy and apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele (APOE4) on serum BDNF values was not previously investigated in AD. We evaluated serum BDNF levels in AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and control subjects. Baseline BDNF levels were similar in AD, MCI and controls. AD patients having apathy showed lower BDNF values than patients without apathy (p<0.05). After correction for the influence of apathy, APOE4 carriers showed lower BDNF levels (p<0.01) and MMSE scores (p<0.01) than non-APOE4 carriers in the subgroup of AD females, but not in males. Significant (p<0.05) positive correlations between BDNF values and MMSE scores were only observed in subgroups of AD males and of AD patients without apathy. These results are showing the association of apathy and APOE4 with reduced serum BDNF levels in AD, and are suggesting that BDNF reductions might contribute to the worse cognitive performance exhibited by AD apathetic patients and female APOE4 carriers. PMID:25024337

  8. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. ► TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. ► BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  9. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abujamra, Ana Lucia [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Children' s Cancer Institute, 90420-140 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Schwartsmann, Gilberto [Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  10. Alterations of serum levels of BDNF-related miRNAs in patients with depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jie Li

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious and potentially life-threatening mental disorder with unknown etiology. Emerging evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microRNAs (miRNAs play critical roles in the etiology of depression. Here this study was aimed to identify and characterize the roles of BDNF and its putative regulatory miRNAs in depression. First, we identified that miR-182 may be a putative miRNA that regulates BDNF levels by bioinformatic studies, and characterized the effects of miR-182 on the BDNF levels using cell-based studies, side by side with miR-132 (a known miRNA that regulates BDNF expression. We showed that treatment of miR-132 and miR-182 respectively decreased the BDNF protein levels in a human neuronal cell model, supporting the regulatory roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF expression. Furthermore, we explored the roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF levels in depression using human subjects by assessing their serum levels. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with depression showed lower serum BDNF levels (via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and higher serum miR-132 and miR-182 levels (via the real-time PCR. Finally, the Pearson's (or Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to study whether there was a relationship among the Self-Rating Depression Scale score, the serum BDNF levels, and serum BDNF-related miRNA levels. Our results revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between the SDS scores and the serum BDNF levels, and a positive correlation between the SDS scores and miR-132 levels. In addition, we found a reverse relationship between the serum BDNF levels and the miR-132/miR-182 levels in depression. Collectively, we provided evidence supporting that miR-182 is a putative BDNF-regulatory miRNA, and suggested that the serum BDNF and its related miRNAs may be utilized as important biomarkers in the diagnosis or as therapeutic targets of depression.

  11. Control of spine maturation and pruning through proBDNF synthesized and released in dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orefice, Lauren L; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Xu, Haifei; Waterhouse, Emily G; Xu, Baoji

    2016-03-01

    Excess synapses formed during early postnatal development are pruned over an extended period, while the remaining synapses mature. Synapse pruning is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal connections and its dysregulation has been found in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders; however, the mechanism underlying synapse pruning remains largely unknown. As dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites for the vast majority of excitatory synapses, spine maturation and pruning are indicators for maturation and elimination of these synapses. Our previous studies have found that dendritically localized mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates spine maturation and pruning. Here we investigated the mechanism by which dendritic Bdnf mRNA, but not somatically restricted Bdnf mRNA, promotes spine maturation and pruning. We found that neuronal activity stimulates both translation of dendritic Bdnf mRNA and secretion of its translation product mainly as proBDNF. The secreted proBDNF promotes spine maturation and pruning, and its effect on spine pruning is in part mediated by the p75(NTR) receptor via RhoA activation. Furthermore, some proBDNF is extracellularly converted to mature BDNF and then promotes maturation of stimulated spines by activating Rac1 through the TrkB receptor. In contrast, translation of somatic Bdnf mRNA and the release of its translation product mainly as mature BDNF are independent of action potentials. These results not only reveal a biochemical pathway regulating synapse pruning, but also suggest that BDNF synthesized in the soma and dendrites is released through distinct secretory pathways. PMID:26705735

  12. Localization of BDNF mRNA with the Huntington's disease protein in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Moses V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have implicated reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. Mutant huntingtin (Htt protein was previously reported to decrease BDNF gene transcription and axonal transport of BDNF. We recently showed that wild-type Htt is associated with the Argonaute 2 microRNA-processing enzyme involved in gene silencing. In dendrites, Htt co-localizes with components of neuronal granules and mRNAs, indicating that it might play a role in post-transcriptional processing/transport of dendritic mRNAs. Results We conducted imaging experiments in cultured cortical neurons to demonstrate the co-localization of endogenous Htt and BDNF mRNA in fixed cells, and co-trafficking of BDNF 3'UTR mRNA with endogenous and fluorescently tagged Htt in live neurons. We used an enhanced technique that combines FISH and immunofluorescent staining to co-localize BDNF mRNA with Htt, Ago2, CPEB and dynein in thick vibratome sections of the rat cortex. Conclusions In cultured neurons and sections of the rat cortex, we found BDNF mRNA associated with Htt and components of neuronal RNA granules, which are centers for regulating RNA transport and local translation. Htt may play a role in post-transcriptional transport/targeting of mRNA for BDNF, thus contributing to neurotrophic support and neuron survival.

  13. Age-Dependent Deficits in Fear Learning in Heterozygous BDNF Knock-Out Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Beyond its trophic function, the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is well known to crucially mediate synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Whereas recent studies suggested that acute BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates amygdala-dependent fear learning, no impairments of cued fear learning were reported in heterozygous BDNF…

  14. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lynn Leckie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82. Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = .036. The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations.

  15. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Regina L; Oberlin, Lauren E; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika S; Szabo-Reed, Amanda; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Phillips, Siobhan M; Gothe, Neha P; Mailey, Emily; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Martin, Stephen A; Pence, Brandt D; Lin, Mingkuan; Parasuraman, Raja; Greenwood, Pamela M; Fryxell, Karl J; Woods, Jeffrey A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I

    2014-01-01

    Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82). Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = 0.036). The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations. PMID:25566019

  16. Whole blood BDNF levels in healthy twins discordant for affective disorder: association to life events and neuroticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, V.; Vinberg, M.; Aznar, S.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with decreased blood BDNF concentrations; but it is unclear if low blood BDNF levels are a state or a trait marker of depression. METHODS: We investigated blood BDNF concentrations in a twin population including both subjects highly predisposed and prote...

  17. Presynaptic GABAergic inhibition regulated by BDNF contributes to neuropathic pain induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeremy Tsung-chieh; Guo, Da; Campanelli, Dario; Frattini, Flavia; Mayer, Florian; Zhou, Luming; Kuner, Rohini; Heppenstall, Paul A; Knipper, Marlies; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gate control theory proposes the importance of both pre- and post-synaptic inhibition in processing pain signal in the spinal cord. However, although postsynaptic disinhibition caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proved as a crucial mechanism underlying neuropathic pain, the function of presynaptic inhibition in acute and neuropathic pain remains elusive. Here we show that a transient shift in the reversal potential (EGABA) together with a decline in the conductance of presynaptic GABAA receptor result in a reduction of presynaptic inhibition after nerve injury. BDNF mimics, whereas blockade of BDNF signalling reverses, the alteration in GABAA receptor function and the neuropathic pain syndrome. Finally, genetic disruption of presynaptic inhibition leads to spontaneous development of behavioural hypersensitivity, which cannot be further sensitized by nerve lesions or BDNF. Our results reveal a novel effect of BDNF on presynaptic GABAergic inhibition after nerve injury and may represent new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25354791

  18. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is not regulated by testosterone in transmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Matthias K; Hellweg, Rainer; Briken, Peer; Stalla, Günter K; T'Sjoen, Guy; Fuss, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Brain morphology significantly differs between the sexes. It has been shown before that some of these differences are attributable to the sex-specific hormonal milieu. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in myriads of neuroplastic processes and shows a sexual dimorphism. Transsexual persons may serve as a model to study sex steroid-mediated effects on brain plasticity. We have recently demonstrated that serum levels of BDNF are reduced in transwomen following 12 months of cross-sex hormone treatment. We now wanted to look at the effects of testosterone treatment on BDNF in transmen. In contrast to our initial hypothesis, BDNF levels did not significantly change, despite dramatic changes in the sex-hormonal milieu. Our data indicate that testosterone does not seem to play a major role in the regulation of BDNF in females. PMID:26753091

  19. Possible Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family of survival-promoting molecules, plays a vital role in the growth, development, maintenance, and function of several neuronal systems. The purpose of this review is to document the support for the involvement of this molecule in the maintenance of normal cognitive, emotional functioning, and to outline recent developments in the content of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current and future treatment development can be guided by developing understanding of this molecules actions in the brain and the ways the expression of BDNF can be planned. Over the years, research findings suggested a critical role played by BDNF in the development of autism including increased serum concentrations of BDNF in children with autism and identification of different forms of BDNF in families of autistic individuals. (author)

  20. ASPECTS OF CYCLON AND BDNF GENE EXPRESSION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Shishkov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the schizophrenic illness is still not fully elucidated. Many studies have been conducted revealing different aspects but may be the studies of greatest significance are studying the genetic aspects of expression of trophic factors and enzymes associated with nervous system development and plasticity. In this relation we aimed at measuring the Cyclon and BDNF genes expression in blood of patients suffering from schizophrenia and to test for correlation between them. Our result did not reveal correlation in spite of their connection with the disease

  1. Brain BDNF levels are dependent on cerebrovascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoujaafar, Hayat; Monnier, Alice; Pernet, Nicolas; Quirié, Aurore; Garnier, Philippe; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Marie, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate a link between endothelial function and cognition. Besides, several studies have identified a complex interplay between nitric oxide (NO) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin largely involved in cognition. Therefore, this study investigated the link between cerebral endothelium-derived NO and BDNF signaling. For this purpose, levels of BDNF and the phosphorylated form of endothelial NO synthase at serine 1177 (p-eNOS) were simultaneously measured in the cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to either bilateral common carotid occlusion (n = 6), physical exercise (n = 6) or a combination of both (n = 6) as experimental approaches to modulate flow-induced NO production by the cerebrovasculature. Tropomyosin-related kinase type B (TrkB) receptors and its phosphorylated form at tyrosine 816 (p-TrkB) were also measured. Moreover, we investigated BDNF synthesis in brain slices exposed to the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate. Our results showed increased p-eNOS and BDNF levels after exercise and decreased levels after vascular occlusion as compared to corresponding controls, with a positive correlation between changes in p-eNOS and BDNF (r = 0.679). Exercise after vascular occlusion did not change levels of these proteins. Gyceryl trinitrate increased proBDNF and BDNF levels in brain slices, thus suggesting a possible causal relationship between NO and BDNF. Moreover, vascular occlusion, like exercise, resulted in increased TrkB and p-TrkB levels, whereas no change was observed with the combination of both. These results suggest that brain BDNF signaling may be dependent on cerebral endothelium-derived NO production. PMID:27306299

  2. The Association Between Peer and Own Aggression is Moderated by the BDNF Val-Met Polymorphism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmer, Tina; Vitaro, Frank; Barker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Peer antisocial behavior robustly predicts adolescents' own behavior, but not all adolescents are equally vulnerable to their peers' influence and genetic factors may confer vulnerability. This study used data of n=3,081 adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine

  3. Effect of dietary fat and the circadian clock on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2016-07-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most abundant neurotrophin in the brain and its decreased levels are associated with the development of obesity and neurodegeneration. Our aim was to test the effect of dietary fat, its timing and the circadian clock on the expression of BDNF and associated signaling pathways in mouse brain and liver. Bdnf mRNA oscillated robustly in brain and liver, but with a 12-h shift between the tissues. Brain and liver Bdnf mRNA showed a 12-h phase shift when fed ketogenic diet (KD) compared with high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD). Brain or liver Bdnf mRNA did not show the typical phase advance usually seen under time-restricted feeding (RF). Clock knockdown in HT-4 hippocampal neurons led to 86% up-regulation of Bdnf mRNA, whereas it led to 60% down-regulation in AML-12 hepatocytes. Dietary fat in mice or cultured hepatocytes and hippocampal neurons led to increased Bdnf mRNA expression. At the protein level, HFD increased the ratio of the mature BDNF protein (mBDNF) to its precursor (proBDNF). In the liver, RF under LFD or HFD reduced the mBDNF/proBDNF ratio. In the brain, the two signaling pathways related to BDNF, mTOR and AMPK, showed reduced and increased levels, respectively, under timed HFD. In the liver, the reverse was achieved. In summary, Bdnf expression is mediated by the circadian clock and dietary fat. Although RF does not affect its expression phase, in the brain, when combined with high-fat diet, it leads to a unique metabolic state in which AMPK is activated, mTOR is down-regulated and the levels of mBDNF are high. PMID:27113028

  4. BDNF DNA methylation changes as a biomarker of psychiatric disorders: literature review and open access database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyakova, Galina Y; Cao, Hao; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in nervous system development and function and it is well established that BDNF is involved in the pathogenesis of a wide range of psychiatric disorders. Recently, numerous studies have associated the DNA methylation level of BDNF promoters with certain psychiatric phenotypes. In this review, we summarize data from current literature as well as from our own analysis with respect to the correlation of BDNF methylation changes with psychiatric disorders and address questions about whether DNA methylation related to the BDNF can be useful as biomarker for specific neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27267954

  5. Expression and Localization of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) mRNA and Protein in Human Submandibular Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes cell survival and differentiation in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Previously, we reported that BDNF is produced by salivary glands under acute immobilization stress in rats. However, expression of BDNF is poorly understood in humans, although salivary gland localization of BDNF in rodents has been demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated the expression and localization of BDNF in the human submandibular gland (HSG) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and ELISA. BDNF was consistently localized in HSG serous and ductal cells, as detected by ISH and IHC, with reactivity being stronger in serous cells. In addition, immunoreactivity for BDNF was observed in the saliva matrix of ductal cavities. Western blotting detected one significant immunoreactive 14 kDa band in the HSG and saliva. Immunoreactivities for salivary BDNF measured by ELISA in humans were 40.76±4.83 pg/mL and 52.64±8.42 pg/mL, in men and women, respectively. Although salivary BDNF concentrations in females tended to be higher than in males, the concentrations were not significantly different. In conclusion, human salivary BDNF may originate from salivary glands, as the HSG appears to produce BDNF

  6. Intracerebral Administration of BDNF Protects Rat Brain Against Oxidative Stress Induced by Ouabain in an Animal Model of Mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Arent, Camila O; Steckert, Amanda V; Varela, Roger B; Jornada, Luciano K; Tonin, Paula T; Budni, Josiane; Mariot, Edemilson; Kapczinski, Flávio; Quevedo, João

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and increased oxidative stress have a central role in bipolar disorder (BD). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ouabain (OUA) in rats alters oxidative stress parameters and decreases BDNF levels in the brain. In this context, the present study aims to investigate the effects of BDNF ICV administration on BDNF levels and oxidative stress parameters in brains of rats submitted to animal model of mania induced by OUA. Wistar rats received an ICV injection of OUA, artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF), OUA plus BDNF, or ACSF plus BDNF. Locomotor activity and risk-taking behavior in the rats were measured using the open-field test. In addition, we analyzed the BDNF levels and oxidative stress parameters (TBARS, Carbonyl, CAT, SOD, GR, and GPx) in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats. The BDNF was unable to reverse the ouabain-induced hyperactivity and risk-taking behavior. Nevertheless, BDNF treatment increased BDNF levels, modulated the antioxidant enzymes, and protected the OUA-induced oxidative damage in the brain of rats. These results suggest that BDNF alteration observed in BD patients may be associated with oxidative damage, both seen in this disorder. PMID:25164569

  7. Study of the profile of the neurotrophin BDNF in new leprosy cases before, during and after multidrug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin involved in the survival of neurons and growth and differentiation of dendrites and axons. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate plasma levels of BDNF of leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug therapy (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals. Plasma levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at diagnosis, during and after MDT. Plasma levels of BDNF tended to be higher in control subjects in comparison with leprosy patients, but this difference does not reach statistical significance. Interestingly, BDNF levels changed following MDT, achieving statistical difference only at the 2nd dose of MDT. These results indicate that BDNF may not be a surrogate marker of leprosy infection and/or related neuropathy. Further research is needed to investigate the meaning of BDNF level changes following leprosy treatment.

  8. Long Non-coding RNA in Neurons: New Players in Early Response to BDNF Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliperti, Vincenza; Donizetti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin family member that is highly expressed and widely distributed in the brain. BDNF is critical for neural survival and plasticity both during development and in adulthood, and dysfunction in its signaling may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Deep understanding of the BDNF-activated molecular cascade may thus help to find new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. One interesting direction is related to the early phase of BDNF-dependent gene expression regulation, which is responsible for the activation of selective gene programs that lead to stable functional and structural remodeling of neurons. Immediate-early coding genes activated by BDNF are under investigation, but the involvement of the non-coding RNAs is largely unexplored, especially the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators that can orchestrate different aspects of nervous system development, homeostasis, and plasticity, making them attractive candidate markers and therapeutic targets for brain diseases. We used microarray technology to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs in the immediate response phase of BDNF stimulation in a neuronal cell model. Our observations on the putative functional role of lncRNAs provide clues to their involvement as master regulators of gene expression cascade triggered by BDNF. PMID:26973456

  9. Repeated exposure to sublethal doses of the organophosphorus compound VX activates BDNF expression in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Jose M; Chang, Wenling E; Bah, Mariama J; Wright, Linnzi K M; Saviolakis, George A; Alagappan, Arun; Robison, Christopher L; Shah, Jinesh D; Meyerhoff, James L; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Midboe, Eric G; Lumley, Lucille A

    2012-04-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorus compound VX [O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]methylphosphonate] is an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Prolonged inhibition of AChE increases endogenous levels of acetylcholine and is toxic at nerve synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to sublethal doses of VX would affect genes associated with cell survival, neuronal plasticity, and neuronal remodeling, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We examined the time course of BDNF expression in C57BL/6 mouse brain following repeated exposure (1/day × 5 days/week × 2 weeks) to sublethal doses of VX (0.2 LD(50) and 0.4 LD(50)). BDNF messenger RNA expression was significantly (p LD(50) VX exposure. BDNF protein expression, however, was only increased in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Whether increased BDNF in response to sublethal doses of VX exposure is an adaptive response to prevent cellular damage or a precursor to impending brain damage remains to be determined. If elevated BDNF is an adaptive response, exogenous BDNF may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce the toxic effects of nerve agent exposure. PMID:22240983

  10. Fear extinction and BDNF: translating animal models of PTSD to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andero, R; Ressler, K J

    2012-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most studied neurotrophin involved in synaptic plasticity processes that are required for long-term learning and memory. Specifically, BDNF gene expression and activation of its high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are necessary in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex for the formation of emotional memories, including fear memories. Among the psychiatric disorders with altered fear processing, there is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which is characterized by an inability to extinguish fear memories. Since BDNF appears to enhance extinction of fear, targeting impaired extinction in anxiety disorders such as PTSD via BDNF signalling may be an important and novel way to enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of this review is to provide a translational point of view that stems from findings in the BDNF regulation of synaptic plasticity and fear extinction. In addition, there are different systems that seem to alter fear extinction through BDNF modulation like the endocannabinoid system and the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Recent work also finds that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and PAC1 receptor, which are upstream of BDNF activation, may be implicated in PTSD. Especially interesting are data that exogenous fear extinction enhancers such as antidepressants, histone deacetylases inhibitors and D-cycloserine, a partial N-methyl d-aspartate agonist, may act through or in concert with the BDNF-TrkB system. Finally, we review studies where recombinant BDNF and a putative TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, may enhance extinction of fear. These approaches may lead to novel agents that improve extinction in animal models and eventually humans. PMID:22530815

  11. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  12. BDNF Methylation and Maternal Brain Activity in a Violence-Related Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik A Moser

    Full Text Available It is known that increased circulating glucocorticoids in the wake of excessive, chronic, repetitive stress increases anxiety and impairs Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF signaling. Recent studies of BDNF gene methylation in relation to maternal care have linked high BDNF methylation levels in the blood of adults to lower quality of received maternal care measured via self-report. Yet the specific mechanisms by which these phenomena occur remain to be established. The present study examines the link between methylation of the BDNF gene promoter region and patterns of neural activity that are associated with maternal response to stressful versus non-stressful child stimuli within a sample that includes mothers with interpersonal violence-related PTSD (IPV-PTSD. 46 mothers underwent fMRI. The contrast of neural activity when watching children-including their own-was then correlated to BDNF methylation. Consistent with the existing literature, the present study found that maternal BDNF methylation was associated with higher levels of maternal anxiety and greater childhood exposure to domestic violence. fMRI results showed a positive correlation of BDNF methylation with maternal brain activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, regions generally credited with a regulatory function toward brain areas that are generating emotions. Furthermore we found a negative correlation of BDNF methylation with the activity of the right hippocampus. Since our stimuli focus on stressful parenting conditions, these data suggest that the correlation between vmPFC/ACC activity and BDNF methylation may be linked to mothers who are at a disadvantage with respect to emotion regulation when facing stressful parenting situations. Overall, this study provides evidence that epigenetic signatures of stress-related genes can be linked to functional brain regions regulating parenting stress, thus advancing our understanding of

  13. Age-related differences in plasma BDNF levels after prolonged bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soavi, Cecilia; Marušič, Uroš; Sanz, Juana Maria; Morieri, Mario Luca; Dalla Nora, Edoardo; Šimunič, Bostjan; Pišot, Rado; Zuliani, Giovanni; Passaro, Angelina

    2016-05-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the family of neurotrophins and has been implicated in brain resistance to insults. Murine studies have demonstrated increased hippocampal concentration after acute immobilization and decreased concentration after chronic immobilization. In humans, chronic stress and sedentary lifestyle result in decreased plasma BDNF levels, but there no data exist regarding acute immobilization. The aim of our study was to evaluate age-related responses [comparing 7 younger subjects (age 23 ± 3 yr) and 8 older subjects (age 60 ± 4 yr)] of plasma BDNF before (baseline data collection, BDC) and after 14 days (BR14) of horizontal bed rest (BR). At BDC, BDNF levels were not different between the two groups (P = 0.101), although at BR14, BDNF levels were higher in older subjects (62.02 ± 18.31) than in younger subjects (34.36 ± 15.24 pg/ml) (P = 0.002). A general linear model for repeated measures showed a significant effect of BR on BDNF (P = 0.002). The BDC BDNF levels correlated with fat-free mass in both populations (ALL) (R = 0.628, P = 0.012), (older, R = 0.753, P = 0.031; younger, R = 0.772, P = 0.042), and with total cholesterol in ALL (R = 0.647, P = 0.009) and older study subjects (R = 0.805, P = 0.016). At BR14, BDNF correlated with total cholesterol (R = 0.579, P = 0.024) and age (R = 0.647, P = 0.009) in ALL. With an increase in age, the brain could become naturally less resistant to acute stressors, including the detrimental effects of prolonged bed rest, and thus the increase in BDNF in the older study group might reflect a protective overshooting of the brain to counteract the negative effects in such conditions. PMID:26940658

  14. TOOTH PULP INFLAMMATION INCREASES BDNF EXPRESSION IN RODENT TRIGEMINAL GANGLION NEURONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsa, Leila; Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa; Kratochvil, F. James; Jenkins, Victoria K.; McLean, Anne; Brown, Alexandra; Smith, Julie Ann; Baumgartner, J. Craig; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Nociceptive pathways with first-order neurons located in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) provide sensory innervation to the head, and are responsible for a number of common chronic pain conditions, including migraines, temporomandibular disorders and trigeminal neuralgias. Many of those conditions are associated with inflammation. Yet, the mechanisms of chronic inflammatory pain remain poorly understood. Our previous studies show that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by adult rat TG neurons, and released from cultured newborn rat TG neurons by electrical stimulation and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a well-established mediator of trigeminal inflammatory pain. These data suggest that BDNF plays a role in activity-dependent plasticity at first-order trigeminal synapses, including functional changes that take place in trigeminal nociceptive pathways during chronic inflammation. The present study was designed to determine the effects of peripheral inflammation, using tooth pulp inflammation as a model, on regulation of BDNF expression in TG neurons of juvenile rats and mice. Cavities were prepared in right-side maxillary first and second molars of 4-week-old animals, and left open to oral microflora. BDNF expression in right TG was compared with contralateral TG of the same animal, and with right TG of sham-operated controls, 7 and 28 days after cavity preparation. Our ELISA data indicate that exposing the tooth pulp for 28 days, with confirmed inflammation, leads to a significant upregulation of BDNF in the TG ipsilateral to the affected teeth. Double-immunohistochemistry with antibodies against BDNF combined with one of nociceptor markers, CGRP or TRPV1, revealed that BDNF is significantly upregulated in TRPV1-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in both rats and mice, and CGRP-IR neurons in mice, but not rats. Overall, the inflammation-induced upregulation of BDNF is stronger in mice compared to rats. Thus, mouse TG provides a

  15. BDNF and its TrkB receptor in human fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Olaf; Hartmann, Sonja; Dongowski, Nicole; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Härtel, Frauke V; Noll, Thomas; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Fracture healing is a physiological process of repair which proceeds in stages, each characterized by a different predominant tissue in the fracture gap. Matrix reorganization is regulated by cytokines and growth factors. Neurotrophins and their receptors might be of importance to osteoblasts and endothelial cells during fracture healing. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) during human fracture healing. BDNF and TrkB were investigated in samples from human fracture gaps and cultured cells using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Endothelial cells and osteoblastic cell lines demonstrated a cytoplasmic staining pattern of BDNF and TrkB in vitro. At the mRNA level, BDNF and TrkB were expressed in the initial and osteoid formation phase of human fracture healing. In the granulation tissue of fracture gap, both proteins--BDNF and TrkB--are concentrated in endothelial and osteoblastic cells at the margins of woven bone suggesting their involvement in the formation of new vessels. There was no evidence of BDNF or TrkB during fracture healing in chondrocytes of human enchondral tissue. Furthermore, BDNF is absent in mature bone. Taken together, BDNF and TrkB are involved in vessel formation and osteogenic processes during human fracture healing. The detection of BDNF and its TrkB receptor during various stages of the bone formation process in human fracture gap tissue were shown for the first time. The current study reveals that both proteins are up-regulated in human osteoblasts and endothelial cells in fracture healing. PMID:24984919

  16. Chronic unpredictable stress decreases expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in mouse ovaries: relationship to oocytes developmental potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chronic stress affects oocytes developments, nor whether it affects expression of BDNF in ovary. METHODS: Mice were randomly assigned into control group, stressed group, BDNF-treated group and BDNF-treated stressed group. The chronic unpredictable mild stress model was used to produce psychosocial stress in mice, and the model was verified by open field test and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity. The methods of immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to detect BDNF protein level and distribution. The number of retrieved oocytes, oocyte maturation, embryo cleavage and the rates of blastocyst formation after parthenogenetic activation were evaluated. RESULTS: Chronic unpredictable stress decreased the BDNF expression in antral follicles, but didn't affect the BDNF expression in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. Chronic unpredictable stress also decreased the number of retrieved oocytes and the rate of blastocyst formation, which was rescued by exogenous BDNF treatment. CONCLUSION: BDNF in mouse ovaries may be related to the decreased number of retrieved oocytes and impaired oocytes developmental potential induced by chronic unpredictable stress.

  17. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. PMID:25653370

  18. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Systemic delivery of recombinant brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Giampà

    Full Text Available Loss of huntingtin-mediated BDNF gene transcription has been shown to occur in HD and thus contribute to the degeneration of the striatum. Several studies have indicated that an increase in BDNF levels is associated with neuroprotection and amelioration of neurological signs in animal models of HD. In a recent study, an increase in BDNF mRNA and protein levels was recorded in mice administered recombinant BDNF peripherally. Chronic, indwelling osmotic mini-pumps containing either recombinant BDNF or saline were surgically placed in R6/2 or wild-type mice from 4 weeks of age until euthanasia. Neurological evaluation (paw clasping, rotarod performance, locomotor activity in an open field was performed. After transcardial perfusion, histological and immunohistochemical studies were performed. We found that BDNF- treated R6/2 mice survived longer and displayed less severe signs of neurological dysfunction than the vehicle treated ones. Primary outcome measures such as brain volume, striatal atrophy, size and morphology of striatal neurons, neuronal intranuclear inclusions and microglial reaction confirmed a neuroprotective effect of the compound. BDNF was effective in increasing significantly the levels of activated CREB and of BDNF the striatal spiny neurons. Moreover, systemically administered BDNF increased the synthesis of BDNF as demonstrated by RT-PCR, and this might account for the beneficial effects observed in this model.

  20. The role of BDNF in depression on the basis of its location in the neural circuitry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui YU; Zhe-yu CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and life-threatening forms of mental illnesses and the neural circuitry underlying depression remains incompletely understood. Most attention in the field has focused on hippocampal and frontal cortical regions for their roles in depression and antidepressant action. While these regions no doubt play important roles in the mental illness, there is compelling evi-dence that other brain regions are also involved. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is broadly expressed in the developing and adult mammalian brain and has been implicated in development, neural regeneration, synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Recently BDNF has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, however there are con-troversial reports about the effects of BDNF on depression. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge concerning BDNF actions and associated intracellular signaling in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc) and amygdala as their rela-tion to depression.

  1. Striatal dopamine transporter binding correlates with serum BDNF levels in patients with striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Khalid, Usman; Klein, Anders B;

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence has shown, that neurotrophins responsible for the regulation of neuronal growth, survival, and differentiation are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas lower serum levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been observed in patients with Parkinson's dis...

  2. BDNF is a novel marker of cognitive function in ageing women: the DR's EXTRA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, P.; Pedersen, Maria; Hanninen, T.;

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the key molecules modulating brain plasticity. While low circulating levels of BDNF have been suggested to predispose to Alzheimer's disease, very little data are available on its association with cognitive function in general population. We...... evaluated the association between plasma BDNF levels and cognition in a representative population sample of ageing men and women. The subjects (n=1389) were participants of the Dose-Responses to Exercise Training (DR's EXTRA) Study and represent a random sample of Eastern Finnish people (684 men and 705...... women), 57-79 years of age at baseline of the study. Plasma BDNF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cognitive function was evaluated using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological test battery. Women had a higher mean...

  3. SorCS2 is required for BDNF-dependent plasticity in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, S; Bolcho, U; Bøggild, S;

    2016-01-01

    that hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity is eliminated in SorCS2-deficient mice. This defect was traced to the ability of SorCS2 to form complexes with the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR), required for pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to induce long...... potentiation. Neurons lacking SorCS2 failed to respond to BDNF by TrkB autophosphorylation, and activation of downstream signaling cascades, impacting neurite outgrowth and spine formation. Accordingly, Sorcs2(-/-) mice displayed impaired formation of long-term memory, increased risk taking and stimulus...... seeking behavior, enhanced susceptibility to stress and impaired prepulse inhibition. Our results identify SorCS2 as an indispensable coreceptor for p75(NTR) and TrkB in hippocampal neurons and suggest SORCS2 as the link between proBDNF/BDNF signaling and mental disorders.Molecular Psychiatry advance...

  4. Fear extinction and BDNF: Translating animal models of PTSD to the clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Andero, Raül; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most studied neurotrophin involved in synaptic plasticity processes that are required for long-term learning and memory. Specifically, BDNF gene expression and activation of its high-affinity TrkB receptor are necessary in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex for the formation of emotional memories, including fear memories. Among the psychiatric disorders with altered fear processing there is Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) whic...

  5. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Manning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous mutant mice (HET has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and WT littermates were treated during young-adulthood with METH and, following a two-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioural endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behaviour. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  6. The role of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) in stress-related brain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Giese, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been raised demonstrating the complex outcome of stress on the BDNF system and that the protein is a critical backbone in the functioning and well-being of the central nervous system. Several studies support the “neurotrophin hypothesis of depression”, which postulates that reduced brain levels of BDNF could contribute to atrophy and cell loss as observed in the hippocampus of depressed subjects. However, the precise mechanism underlying this down-regulation has not been fully un...

  7. Effect of voluntary exercise on BDNF/TrkB gene expression and alcohol intake.

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Josefine

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running is rewarding and believed to activate the same brain reward system as in alcohol and drug addiction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known growth factor widely expressed in the brain, is modulated by both voluntary exercise and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate how voluntary exercise affects the expression levels of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in brain regions involved in positive and negative reinforcement. Additionally we want...

  8. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S.; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A.; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was medi...

  9. Comparative Effect of Treadmill Exercise on Mature BDNF Production in Control versus Stroke Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Quirié, Aurore; Hervieu, Marie; Garnier, Philippe; Demougeot, Céline; Mossiat, Claude; Bertrand, Nathalie; Martin, Alain; Marie, Christine; Prigent-Tessier, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise constitutes an innovative strategy to treat deficits associated with stroke through the promotion of BDNF-dependent neuroplasticity. However, there is no consensus on the optimal intensity/duration of exercise. In addition, whether previous stroke changes the effect of exercise on the brain is not known. Therefore, the present study compared the effects of a clinically-relevant form of exercise on cerebral BDNF levels and localization in control versus stroke rats. For this ...

  10. A Longitudinal Study of BDNF Promoter Methylation and Depression in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Kim, Hye-Ran; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Myung-Geun; Yoon, Jung-Han; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is investigated in depression related to medical disorders and its secretion is influenced by epigenetic factors. We investigated the association between BDNF promoter methylation and depression following mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods In total, 309 patients with breast cancer were evaluated 1 week after mastectomy, and 244 (79%) were followed up 1 year later. Depression was diagnosed (major or minor depressive disorder) according to D...

  11. Selective DNA Methylation of BDNF Promoter in Bipolar Disorder: Differences Among Patients with BDI and BDII

    OpenAIRE

    D'Addario, Claudio; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Palazzo, Maria Carlotta; Benatti, Beatrice; Lietti, Licia; Cattaneo, Elisabetta; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cortini, Francesca; Scarpini, Elio; Arosio, Beatrice; Di Francesco, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Manuela; Romualdi, Patrizia; Candeletti, Sanzio

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is still poorly understood, involving genetic and epigenetic mechanisms as well as environmental contributions. This study aimed to investigate the degree of DNA methylation at the promoter region of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, as one of the candidate genes associated with major psychoses, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 94 patients with BD (BD I=49, BD II=45) and 52 healthy controls. A significant BDNF gene expr...

  12. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Lynn Leckie; Oberlin, Lauren E.; Voss, Michelle W.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Amanda eSzabo-Reed; Laura eChaddock-Heyman; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Gothe, Neha P.; Emily eMailey; Victoria Jeanne Vieira-Potter; Martin, Stephen A.; Pence, Brandt D.; Mingkuan eLin; Raja eParasuraman; Greenwood, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82). Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or ...

  13. BDNF Plasma Level als Marker für Alzheimer in der VITA Studie

    OpenAIRE

    Altides, Anastasia Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HINTERGRUND: Der brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) reguliert die synaptische Plastizität und spielt somit eine wichtige Rolle in der Gedächtnisbildung und -erhaltung. Deswegen gibt es eingehende Untersuchungen dieses neurotrophischen Faktors in Bezug auf Demenzerkrankungen, vor allem der Alzheimer Demenz. In dieser Studie wurde nach einem Zusammenhang zwischen BDNF Blutplasmawerten und der Alzheimer Demenz in einer longitudinalen Kohortenstudie, der Vienna-Transdanube-Aging(VITA)-Studi...

  14. Serum cortisol and BDNF in patients with major depression-effect of yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, G H; Varambally, Shivarama; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Rao, Mukund; Christopher, Rita; Gangadhar, B N

    2016-06-01

    Depression is associated with low serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and elevated levels of serum cortisol. Yoga practices have been associated with antidepressant effects, increase in serum BDNF, and reduction in serum cortisol. This study examined the association between serum BDNF and cortisol levels in drug-naïve patients with depression treated with antidepressants, yoga therapy, and both. Fifty-four drug-naïve consenting adult outpatients with Major Depression (32 males) received antidepressants only (n = 16), yoga therapy only (n = 19), or yoga with antidepressants (n = 19). Serum BDNF andcortisol levels were obtained before and after 3 months using a sandwich ELISA method. One-way ANOVA, Chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation tests were used for analysis. The groups were comparable at baseline on most parameters. Significant improvement in depression scores and serum BDNF levels, and reduction in serum cortisol in the yoga groups, have been described in previous reports. A significant negative correlation was observed between change in BDNF (pre-post) and cortisol (pre-post) levels in the yoga-only group (r = -0.59, p = 0.008). In conclusion, yoga may facilitate neuroplasticity through stress reduction in depressed patients. Further studies are needed to confirm the findings and delineate the pathways for these effects. PMID:27174729

  15. Effect of Mozart Music on Hippocampal Content of BDNF in Postnatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has shown that listening to Mozart music can potentiate spatial tasks in human; and reduce seizure attacks in epileptic patients. A few studies have reported the effects of prenatal plus postpartum exposure of mice to the Mozart music on brain-drived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus. Here we investigated the effect of postpartum exposure to The Mozart music on BDNF concentration in the hippocampus of rat.Methods: Thirty male one day old newborn Wistar rats divided randomly in two equal experimental and control groups. Experimental group exposed to slow rhythm Mozart music (Mozart Sonata for two pianos KV 448, 6 hour per day; sound pressure levels, between 80 and 100 dB for 60 successive days. The control group was kept in separate room with housing conditions like experimental group except music exposure. After 60 days the rats were euthanized and hippocampuses extracted; then the content of BDNF protein was measured using ELISA sandwich method. Results: Data analysis revealed that rats exposed to Mozart Sonata music had significantly increased BDNF content in the hippocampus as compared to control rats (P±0.01. The concentrations of BDNF were 86.30±2.26 and 94.60 ±6.22 ng/g wet weight in control and music exposure groups respectively.Discussion: Exposure to the Mozart music early in life can increase the BDNF concentration in the hippocampus in rats.

  16. Role of Stress-Related Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in the Rat Submandibular Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) family comprises NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophins (NTs)-3, -4/5, -6 and -7, all of which are collectively referred to as neurotrophins. However, the expression of neurotrophins other than NGF in the salivary gland has not been described in detail. Through interaction with the TrkB receptor, BDNF plays an important role in long-term potentiation. We found that BDNF expression increased within submandibular gland tissue in response to stress, suggesting that the salivary glands are sensitive to stress. In addition, stress caused increases in plasma BDNF derived from the submandibular gland and in TrkB receptor mRNA in the adrenal medulla. Plasma BDNF might activate TrkB receptors in the adrenal medulla during acute stress. The salivary glands are likely to influence not only oral health, but also systemic organs. This review addressed the relationship between hormone-like effects and stress-related BDNF expression in the rat submandibular gland

  17. Aerobic exercise improves hippocampal function and increases BDNF in the serum of young adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Éadaoin W; Mullally, Sinéad; Foley, Carole; Warmington, Stuart A; O'Mara, Shane M; Kelly, Aine M

    2011-10-24

    Physical activity has been reported to improve cognitive function in humans and rodents, possibly via a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-regulated mechanism. In this study of human subjects, we have assessed the effects of acute and chronic exercise on performance of a face-name matching task, which recruits the hippocampus and associated structures of the medial temporal lobe, and the Stroop word-colour task, which does not, and have assessed circulating concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in parallel. The results show that a short period of high-intensity cycling results in enhancements in performance of the face-name matching, but not the Stroop, task. These changes in cognitive function were paralleled by increased concentration of BDNF, but not IGF-1, in the serum of exercising subjects. 3 weeks of cycling training had no effect on cardiovascular fitness, as assessed by VO2 scores, cognitive function, or serum BDNF concentration. Increases in fitness, cognitive function and serum BDNF response to acute exercise were observed following 5 weeks of aerobic training. These data indicate that both acute and chronic exercise improve medial temporal lobe function concomitant with increased concentrations of BDNF in the serum, suggesting a possible functional role for this neurotrophic factor in exercise-induced cognitive enhancement in humans. PMID:21722657

  18. A significant association between BDNF promoter methylation and the risk of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuting; Ji, Huihui; Liu, Guili; Wang, Qinwen; Liu, Huifen; Shen, Wenwen; Li, Longhui; Xie, Xiaohu; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-06-10

    As a member of the neurotrophic factor family, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons. The aim of our work was to evaluate the role of BDNF promoter methylation in drug addiction. A total of 60 drug abusers (30 heroin and 30 methylamphetamine addicts) and 52 healthy age- and gender-matched controls were recruited for the current case control study. Bisulfite pyrosequencing technology was used to determine the methylation levels of five CpGs (CpG1-5) on the BDNF promoter. Among the five CpGs, CpG5 methylation was significantly lower in drug abusers than controls. Moreover, significant associations were found between CpG5 methylation and addictive phenotypes including tension-anxiety, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia, and depression-dejection. In addition, luciferase assay showed that the DNA fragment of BDNF promoter played a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Our results suggest that BDNF promoter methylation is associated with drug addiction, although further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms by which BDNF promoter methylation contributes to the pathophysiology of drug addiction. PMID:26976342

  19. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    M’Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    International audience Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague–Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilatera...

  20. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague-Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilateral CCI-SN. Their respective responses to anti-hyperalgesic drugs were assessed using the Randall-Selitto test and both immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR approaches were used to investigate molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in both models. Long lasting hyperalgesia and allodynia were induced by i.t. BDNF in intact healthy rats like those found after CCI-SN. Acute treatment with the BDNF-TrkB receptor antagonist cyclotraxin B completely prevented i.t. BDNF-induced hyperalgesia and partially reversed this symptom in both BDNF-pretreated and CCI-SN lesioned rats. Acute administration of the anticonvulsant pregabalin, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, the opioid analgesics morphine and tapentadol or the antidepressant agomelatine also transiently reversed hyperalgesia in both i.t. BDNF injected- and CCI-SN lesioned-rats. Marked induction of microglia activation markers (OX42, Iba1, P-p38), proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B and BDNF was found in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia of CCI-SN rats. A long lasting spinal BDNF overexpression was also observed in BDNF i.t. rats, indicating an autocrine self-induction, with downstream long lasting TrkB-mediated neuropathic-like pain. Accordingly, TrkB blockade appeared as a relevant approach to alleviate not only i.t. BDNF- but also nerve lesion-evoked neuropathic pain. PMID:26343858

  1. Neurochemical properties of BDNF-containing neurons projecting to rostral ventromedial medulla in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Jun-Bin; Wu, Huang-Hui; Dong, Yu-Lin; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yan-Yan; Lu, Ya-Cheng; Wu, Sheng-Xi; WANG, Wen; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) modulates nociception via a descending pathway that relays in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and terminates in the spinal cord. Previous behavioral pharmacology and electrophysiological evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in descending pain modulation, likely through the PAG-RVM pathway. However, detailed information is still lacking on the distribution of BDNF, activation of BDNF-containing neurons proj...

  2. Targeted Disruption of the BDNF Gene Perturbs Brain and Sensory Neuron Development but Not Motor Neuron Development

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Kevin R; Fariñas, Isabel; Backus, Carey; Reichardt, Louis F.

    1994-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin, enhances the survival and differentiation of several classes of neurons in vitro. To determine its essential functions, we have mutated the BDNF gene. Most homoxygote mutants die within 2 days after birth, but a fraction live for 2–4 weeks. These develop symptoms of nervous system dysfunction, including ataxia. The BDNF mutant homoxygotes have substantlaliy reduced numbers of cranlal and spinal sensory neurons. Although their central n...

  3. Cognitive dysfunction and epigenetic alterations of the BDNF gene are induced by social isolation during early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Du, Wei; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-10-15

    Early life adversity, such as social isolation, causes a variety of changes to the development of cognitive abilities and the nervous system. Increasing evidence has shown that epigenetic modifications mediate gene-environment interactions throughout the lifespan. In this study, we investigated the effect of adolescent social isolation on cognitive behaviours and epigenetic alterations of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either group-reared or isolation-reared conditions during post-natal days (PNDs) 21-34. On PND 56, all rats underwent behavioural testing and were then sacrificed for biochemical testing. Adolescent social isolation induced impaired PPI. Regarding BDNF, the isolation-reared rats demonstrated increased BDNF mRNA levels, H3 acetylation at the BDNF gene and BDNF protein expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In contrast, the BDNF mRNA levels, H3 acetylation of the BDNF gene and BDNF protein expression were decreased in the hippocampus of the isolation-reared rats. The present study indicated that epigenetic regulation of BDNF may be one of the molecular mechanisms that mediated the cognitive dysfunction. Moreover, the interaction between the mPFC and hippocampus might play an important role in the regulation of cognitive behaviour. PMID:27435421

  4. Effects of Ethanol on the Expression Level of Various BDNF mRNA Isoforms and Their Encoded Protein in the Hippocampus of Adult and Embryonic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Shojaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the effects of oral ethanol (Eth alone or combined with the phytoestrogen resveratrol (Rsv on the expression of various brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF transcripts and the encoded protein pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of pregnant and embryonic rats. A low (0.25 g/kg body weight (BW/day dose of Eth produced an increase in the expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and a decrease in that of the exon IX in embryos, but failed to affect BDNF transcript and pro-BDNF protein expression in adults. However, co-administration of Eth 0.25 g/kg·BW/day and Rsv led to increased expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and to a small but significant increase in the level of pro-BDNF protein in maternal rats. A high (2.5 g/kg·BW/day dose of Eth increased the expression of BDNF exons III and IV in embryos, but it decreased the expression of exon IX containing BDNF mRNAs in the maternal rats. While the high dose of Eth alone reduced the level of pro-BDNF in adults, it failed to change the levels of pro-BDNF in embryos. Eth differentially affects the expression pattern of BDNF transcripts and levels of pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of both adult and embryonic rats.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of BDNF in the learned helplessness-induced animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Lin; Su, Chun-Wei; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Gean, Po-Wu

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD), one of the most common mental disorders, is a significant risk factor for suicide and causes a low quality of life for many people. However, the causes and underlying mechanism of depression remain elusive. In the current work, we investigated epigenetic regulation of BDNF in the learned helplessness-induced animal model of depression. Mice were exposed to inescapable stress and divided into learned helplessness (LH) and resilient (LH-R) groups depending on the number they failed to escape. We found that the LH group had longer immobility duration in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST), which is consistent with a depression-related phenotype. Western blotting analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that the LH group had lower BDNF expression than that of the LH-R group. The LH group consistently had lower BDNF mRNA levels, as detected by qPCR assay. In addition, we found BDNF exon IV was down-regulated in the LH group. Intraperitoneal injection of imipramine or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to the LH mice for 14 consecutive days ameliorated depression-like behaviors and reversed the decrease in BDNF. The expression of HDAC5 was up-regulated in the LH mice, and a ChIP assay revealed that the level of HDAC5 binding to the promoter region of BDNF exon IV was higher than that seen in other groups. Knockdown of HDAC5 reduced depression-like behaviors in the LH mice. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic regulation of BDNF by HDAC5 plays an important role in the learned helplessness model of depression. PMID:26921875

  6. Down-regulation of BDNF in cell and animal models increases striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase 61 (STEP61 ) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Azkona, Garikoitz; Baguley, Tyler D; Saavedra, Ana; Nairn, Angus C; Ellman, Jonathan A; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lombroso, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates synaptic strengthening and memory consolidation, and altered BDNF expression is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. BDNF potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function through activation of Fyn and ERK1/2. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is also implicated in many of the same disorders as BDNF but, in contrast to BDNF, STEP opposes the development of synaptic strengthening. STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2B promotes internalization of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, while dephosphorylation of the kinases Fyn, Pyk2, and ERK1/2 leads to their inactivation. Thus, STEP and BDNF have opposing functions. In this study, we demonstrate that manipulation of BDNF expression has a reciprocal effect on STEP61 levels. Reduced BDNF signaling leads to elevation of STEP61 both in BDNF(+/-) mice and after acute BDNF knockdown in cortical cultures. Moreover, a newly identified STEP inhibitor reverses the biochemical and motor abnormalities in BDNF(+/-) mice. In contrast, increased BDNF signaling upon treatment with a tropomyosin receptor kinase B agonist results in degradation of STEP61 and a subsequent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of STEP substrates in cultured neurons and in mouse frontal cortex. These findings indicate that BDNF-tropomyosin receptor kinase B signaling leads to degradation of STEP61 , while decreased BDNF expression results in increased STEP61 activity. A better understanding of the opposing interaction between STEP and BDNF in normal cognitive functions and in neuropsychiatric disorders will hopefully lead to better therapeutic strategies. Altered expression of BDNF and STEP61 has been implicated in several neurological disorders. BDNF and STEP61 are known to regulate synaptic strengthening, but in opposite directions. Here, we report that reduced BDNF signaling leads to elevation of STEP61 both in

  7. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  8. Potential antidepressant properties of cysteamine on hippocampal BDNF levels and behavioral despair in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Chu-Hsin; Hong, Chen-Jee; Huang, Yn-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2008-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that antidepressants increase central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, suggesting that BDNF signaling is important for the therapeutic mechanism of antidepressants. Recent work has found that cysteamine and its related agent, cystamine, are neuroprotective in Huntington's disease mice, and act by enhancing the secretion of central BDNF. In the present study, the potential antidepressant effects of cysteamine were examined by behavioral paradigms and biochemical assay. Male BALB/CByJ mice were given a single dose of normal saline, 10 mg/kg of imipramine or either 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg of cysteamine (i.p.) 30 min before undergoing the forced-swimming test (FST) or the tail suspension test (TST). Other groups of mice treated with the same drugs and doses, without behavioral tests, were sacrificed for hippocampal BDNF measurements. We found that, compared with the control group, the cysteamine 200-mg/kg group showed a significant reduction in immobility time in the FST (Pcysteamine 200-mg/kg group (Pcysteamine may possess an antidepressant-like effect, which may be mediated by increasing central BDNF levels. PMID:18582526

  9. Cysteamine-related agents could be potential antidepressants through increasing central BDNF levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2006-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common mental disease, but with an unknown etiology. Antidepressants are the main biological treatment for MDD. However, current antidepressive agents have a slow onset of effect and a substantial proportion of MDD patients do not clinically improve, despite maximal medication. Thus, the exploration for new antidepressants with novel strategies may help to develop faster and more effective antidepressant agents. Studies in the recent decades have demonstrated that antidepressants increase central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and activating the BDNF-signaling pathway may play an important role in their therapeutic mechanism. Cysteamine is a natural product of cells and constitutes the terminal region of the CoA molecule. Recent work has found that cysteamine and a related agent, cystamine, have neuroprotective effects in Huntington's disease (HD) mice, through enhancing central BDNF levels. Furthermore, cystamine or cysteamine injection could increase serum BDNF levels in wild-type mice as well as HD mice. Since activation of the BDNF-dependent pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of antidepressant therapeutic action, cystamine or its derivatives could have potential antidepressant therapeutic effects. Among these agents, pantethine may be one of the most promising agents. It is a naturally occurring compound which can be administered orally with negligible side effects, and is metabolized to cysteamine. Further evaluation of the therapeutic and toxic effects of these cysteamine-related antidepressant agents in MDD animal models is needed before any clinical application. PMID:16797865

  10. Essential role of presynaptic NMDA receptors in activity-dependent BDNF secretion and corticostriatal LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungju; Popescu, Andrei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-12-01

    Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in postsynaptic dendrites is required for long-term potentiation (LTP) of many excitatory synapses, but the role of presynaptic axonal NMDARs in synaptic plasticity remains to be clarified. Here we report that axonal NMDARs play an essential role in LTP induction at mouse corticostriatal synapses by triggering activity-induced presynaptic secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Genetic depletion of either BDNF or the NMDAR subunit GluN1 specifically in cortical axons abolished corticostriatal LTP in response to theta burst stimulation (TBS). Furthermore, functional axonal NMDARs were required for TBS-triggered prolonged axonal Ca(2+) elevation and BDNF secretion, supporting the notion that activation of axonal NMDARs induces BDNF secretion via enhancing Ca(2+) signals in the presynaptic nerve terminals. These results demonstrate that presynaptic NMDARs are equally important as postsynaptic NMDARs in LTP induction of corticostriatal synapses due to their role in mediating activity-induced presynaptic BDNF secretion. PMID:25467984

  11. Comparison of the Adulthood Chronic Stress Effect on Hippocampal BDNF Signaling in Male and Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknazar, Somayeh; Nahavandi, Arezo; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Peyvandi, Hassan; Akhtari, Amin Shams; Karimi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    Studies show that gender plays an important role in stress-related disorders, and women are more vulnerable to its effect. The present study was undertaken to investigate differences in the change in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its tyrosine intracellular kinase-activating receptor (TrkB) genes in the male and female rats' hippocampus (HPC) under chronic mild repeated stress (CMRS) conditions. In this experiment, male and female Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: the CMRS and the control group. To induce stress, a repeated forced swimming paradigm was employed daily for adult male and female rats for 21 days. At the end of the stress phase, elevated plus maze (EPM) was used for measuring the stress behavioral effects. Serum corticosterone level was measured by ELISA. BDNF and TrkB gene methylation and protein expression in the HPC were detected using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Chronic stress in the adolescence had more effects on anxiety-like behavior and serum corticosterone concentration in female rats than males. Furthermore, stressed female rats had higher methylation levels and following reduced protein expression of BDNF but not TrkB compared to stressed male rats. These findings suggest that in exposure to a stressor, sex differences in BDNF methylation may be root cause of decreased BDNF levels in females and may underlie susceptibility to pathology development. PMID:26189832

  12. Amitriptyline induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression through ERK-dependent modulation of multiple BDNF mRNA variants in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Kajitani, Naoto; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shigetou, Takahiro; Kasai, Miho; Matsumoto, Chie; Yokoe, Toshiki; Azuma, Honami; Takebayashi, Minoru; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A significant role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been previously implicated in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. To ascertain the contribution of specific cell types in the brain that produce BDNF following antidepressant treatment, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on rat primary neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cortical cultures were examined. Amitriptyline increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in astrocytic and microglial cultures but not neuronal cultures. Antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, such as clomipramine, duloxetine and fluvoxamine, also increased BDNF mRNA expression in astrocytic and microglial cultures. There are multiple BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IIA, IV and VI) expressed in astrocytes and microglia and the variant induced by antidepressants has yet to be elaborated. Treatment with antidepressants increased the expression of exon I, IV and VI in astrocyte and microglia. Clomipramine alone significantly upregulated expression of exon IIA. The amitriptyline-induced expression of both total and individual BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IV and VI) were blocked by MEK inhibitor U0126, indicating MEK/ERK signaling is required in the expression of BDNF. These findings indicate that non-neural cells are a significant target of antidepressants and further support the contention that glial production of BDNF is crucial role in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. The current data suggest that targeting of glial function could lead to the development of antidepressants with a truly novel mechanism of action. PMID:26764533

  13. Viral depletion of VTA BDNF in rats modulates social behavior, consequences of intermittent social defeat stress, and long-term weight regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Fanous, Sanya; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Hammer, Ronald P.; Nikulina, Ella M.

    2011-01-01

    Mesolimbic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in sustained behavioral changes following chronic social stress, and its depletion may reduce susceptibility to such behavioral alterations. Enhanced mesolimbic BDNF is proposed as pro-depressive and anhedonic, while depleting ventral tegmetal area (VTA) BDNF increases weight by enhancing hedonic eating. Here, we questioned whether depletion of VTA BDNF would alleviate social defeat stress-induced deficits in weight regulation,...

  14. Plasma BDNF Is Reduced among Middle-Aged and Elderly Women with Impaired Insulin Function: Evidence of a Compensatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentoft, Alyssa; Sweat, Victoria; Starr, Vanessa; Oliver, Stephen; Hassenstab, Jason; Bruehl, Hannah; Tirsi, Aziz; Javier, Elizabeth; McHugh, Pauline F.; Convit, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and has been linked to glucose regulation and cognition. Associations among plasma BDNF, cognition, and insulin function were explored. Forty-one participants with impaired insulin function (IIF), ranging from insulin resistance to…

  15. Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Sama F; Henry, Jeffrey; Al-Haddad, Rami; El Hayek, Lauretta; Abou Haidar, Edwina; Stringer, Thomas; Ulja, Devyani; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Holson, Edward B; Ratan, Rajiv R; Ninan, Ipe; Chao, Moses V

    2016-01-01

    Exercise induces beneficial responses in the brain, which is accompanied by an increase in BDNF, a trophic factor associated with cognitive improvement and the alleviation of depression and anxiety. However, the exact mechanisms whereby physical exercise produces an induction in brain Bdnf gene expression are not well understood. While pharmacological doses of HDAC inhibitors exert positive effects on Bdnf gene transcription, the inhibitors represent small molecules that do not occur in vivo. Here, we report that an endogenous molecule released after exercise is capable of inducing key promoters of the Mus musculus Bdnf gene. The metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate, which increases after prolonged exercise, induces the activities of Bdnf promoters, particularly promoter I, which is activity-dependent. We have discovered that the action of β-hydroxybutyrate is specifically upon HDAC2 and HDAC3, which act upon selective Bdnf promoters. Moreover, the effects upon hippocampal Bdnf expression were observed after direct ventricular application of β-hydroxybutyrate. Electrophysiological measurements indicate that β-hydroxybutyrate causes an increase in neurotransmitter release, which is dependent upon the TrkB receptor. These results reveal an endogenous mechanism to explain how physical exercise leads to the induction of BDNF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15092.001 PMID:27253067

  16. Low serum BDNF levels in depressed patients cannot be attributed to individual depressive symptoms or symptom cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B. A. A.; Molendijk, M. L.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Buitelaar, J. K.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B. M.; Oude Voshaar, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low serum BDNF levels have been found in depressed patients. No study has systematically investigated whether individual symptoms or symptom profiles within a depressed population contribute to low BDNF levels found in depressed subjects. METHODS: All 1070 patients with a past 6-month di

  17. Low serum BDNF levels in depressed patients cannot be attributed to individual depressive symptoms or symptom cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B.A.; Molendijk, M.L.; Penninx, B.W.; Buitelaar, J.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B.M.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. Low serum BDNF levels have been found in depressed patients. No study has systematically investigated whether individual symptoms or symptom profiles within a depressed population contribute to low BDNF levels found in depressed subjects. Methods. All 1070 patients with a past 6

  18. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels as a possible predictor of psychopathology in healthy twins at high and low risk for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a potential biomarker of affective disorder. However, longitudinal studies evaluating a potential predictive role of BDNF on subsequent psychopathology are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF alone or in interaction with the...

  19. HBpF-proBDNF: A New Tool for the Analysis of Pro-Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptor Signaling and Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaub, Perrine; de Léon, Andrès; Gibon, Julien; Soubannier, Vincent; Dorval, Geneviève; Séguéla, Philippe; Barker, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins activate intracellular signaling pathways necessary for neuronal survival, growth and apoptosis. The most abundant neurotrophin in the adult brain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is first synthesized as a proBDNF precursor and recent studies have demonstrated that proBDNF can be secreted and that it functions as a ligand for a receptor complex containing p75NTR and sortilin. Activation of proBDNF receptors mediates growth cone collapse, reduces synaptic activity, and facilitates developmental apoptosis of motoneurons but the precise signaling cascades have been difficult to discern. To address this, we have engineered, expressed and purified HBpF-proBDNF, an expression construct containing a 6X-HIS tag, a biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) sequence, a PreScission™ Protease cleavage site and a FLAG-tag attached to the N-terminal part of murine proBDNF. Intact HBpF-proBDNF has activities indistinguishable from its wild-type counterpart and can be used to purify proBDNF signaling complexes or to monitor proBDNF endocytosis and retrograde transport. HBpF-proBDNF will be useful for characterizing proBDNF signaling complexes and for deciphering the role of proBDNF in neuronal development, synapse function and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26950209

  20. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM, as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF.

  1. Changes in spatial memory and BDNF expression to simultaneous dietary restriction and forced exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Alzubi, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that learning and memory formation can be influenced by diet and exercise. In the current study, we investigated the combined effects of forced swimming exercise (FSE) and every other day fasting (EODF) on spatial memory formation and on the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Wistar male rats. The radial arm water maze (RAWM) paradigm was used to assess changes in learning and memory formation, whereas ELISA assay was used to measure BDNF protein levels. The FSE and/or EODF were simultaneously instituted for 6 weeks. Results show that FSE improved learning, short-term as well as long-term memory formation, and significantly increased BDNF protein in the hippocampus (p0.05). In addition, EODF did not modulate beneficial effect of swimming exercise on cognitive function (p>0.05). Thus exercise enhanced, while EODF did not affect spatial learning and memory formation. PMID:23000024

  2. Effect of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF in Organotypic Retinal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Gavrilova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To study the influence of recombinant brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF on organotypic retinal cultures. Material and methods Experiments were performed in human and rat retinal explants cultured in culture dishes, flasks and flasks for roller cultivation. BDNF was added at the concentration of 100 ng⁄ml. Cultures were tested for viability and stained immunohistochemically for neuronal markers. Culture conditions and results of cultivation were controlled using phase contrast and fluorescent microscopes. Conclusions Results of the study showed that cultivation of organotypic cultures of the human and rat retina in the presence of BDNF at the concentration of 100 ng⁄ml increases viability of retinal cells. Active cell migration and outgrowth of β-III-tubulin-positive axon-like processes of neuronal origin outside the borders of explants were observed.

  3. Late protein synthesis-dependent phases in CTA long-term memory: BDNF requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Escobar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that long-term memory persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related long-term memory when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC, a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA, have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis dependent in different time-windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 hours after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T. Piepmeier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that improvements in cognitive performance may be observed following an acute bout of exercise. However, evidence in support of the biological mechanisms of this effect is still limited. Findings from both rodent and human studies suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on memory. The molecular properties of BDNF allow this protein to be assessed in the periphery (pBDNF (i.e., blood serum, blood plasma, making measurements of acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentration relatively accessible. Studies exploring the acute exercise–pBDNF–cognitive performance relationship have had mixed findings, but this may be more reflective of methodological differences between studies than it is a statement about the role of BDNF. For example, significant associations have been observed between acute exercise-induced changes in pBDNF concentration and cognitive performance in studies assessing memory, and non-significant associations have been found in studies assessing non-memory cognitive domains. Three suggestions are made for future research aimed at understanding the role of BDNF as a biological mechanism of this relationship: 1 Assessments of cognitive performance may benefit from a focus on various types of memory (e.g., relational, spatial, long-term; 2 More fine-grained measurements of pBDNF will allow for the assessment of concentrations of specific isoforms of the BDNF protein (i.e., immature, mature; 3 Statistical techniques designed to test the mediating role of pBDNF in the acute exercise-cognitive performance relationship should be utilized in order to make causal inferences.

  5. BDNF and Exercise Enhance Neuronal DNA Repair by Stimulating CREB-Mediated Production of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chuang, Pei-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the survival and growth of neurons during brain development and mediates activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and associated learning and memory in the adult. BDNF levels are reduced in brain regions affected in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases, and elevation of BDNF levels can ameliorate neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in experimental models of these diseases. Because neurons accumulate oxidative lesions in their DNA during normal activity and in neurodegenerative disorders, we determined whether and how BDNF affects the ability of neurons to cope with oxidative DNA damage. We found that BDNF protects cerebral cortical neurons against oxidative DNA damage-induced death by a mechanism involving enhanced DNA repair. BDNF stimulates DNA repair by activating cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which, in turn, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair pathway. Suppression of either APE1 or TrkB by RNA interference abolishes the ability of BDNF to protect neurons against oxidized DNA damage-induced death. The ability of BDNF to activate CREB and upregulate APE1 expression is abolished by shRNA of TrkB as well as inhibitors of TrkB, PI3 kinase, and Akt kinase. Voluntary running wheel exercise significantly increases levels of BDNF, activates CREB, and upregulates APE1 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby exercise may protect neurons from oxidative DNA damage. Our findings reveal a previously unknown ability of BDNF to enhance DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair enzyme APE1. PMID:24114393

  6. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Salih; Varol, Sefer; Ozdemir, Hasan H; Agacayak, Elif; Aydın, Birsen; Kapan, Oktay; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tunc, Saban; Cevik, Mehmet Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurological diseases worldwide. Migraine pathophysiology is very complex. Genetic factors play a major role in migraine. Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), play an important role in central nervous system functioning, development, and modulation of pain. This study investigates whether polymorphisms in the BDNF and NGF genes are associated with migraine disease in a Turkish case-control population. Overall, 576 subjects were investigated (288 patients with migraine and 288 healthy controls) for the following polymorphisms: rs6265(G/A), rs8192466(C/T), rs925946(G/T), rs2049046(A/T), and rs12273363(T/C) in the BDNF gene, and rs6330(C/T), rs11466112(C/T), rs11102930(C/A), and rs4839435(G/A) in the NGF gene using 5'-exonuclease allelic discrimination assays. We found no differences in frequency of the analyzed eight polymorphisms between migraine and control groups. However, the frequency of minor A alleles of rs6265 in BDNF gene was borderline significant in the patients compared with the healthy controls (P=0.049; odds ratios [ORs] [95% confidence intervals {CIs}] =0.723 [0.523-0.999]). Moreover, when the migraine patients were divided into two subgroups, migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), the minor TT genotype of rs6330 in NGF was significantly higher in MA patients than in MO patients (P=0.036) or healthy controls (P=0.026), and this disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Also, the rs6330*T minor allele was more common in the MA group than in the MO group or controls (P=0.011, ORs [95% CIs] =1.626 [1.117-2.365] or P=0.007, ORs [95% CIs] =1.610 [1.140-2.274], respectively). In conclusion, this is the first clinical study to evaluate the association between BDNF and NGF polymorphisms in migraine patients compared with health controls. Our findings suggest that the NGF rs6330*T minor allele might be nominated as a risk factor for

  7. Molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) translation in dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Vera Lúcia Margarido

    2010-01-01

    A especificidade espacial e temporal subjacente à diversidade de processos de plasticidade sináptica que ocorrem no sistema nervoso central está profundamente relacionada com a disponibilidade da proteína brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) em domínios sub-celulares distintos, especialmente na área pós-sináptica. Contudo, os mecanismos moleculares que regulam a síntese proteica de BDNF nas dendrites estão ainda por desvendar. Assim, o principal objectivo deste trabalho foi...

  8. Juvenile methylphenidate reduces prefrontal cortex plasticity via D3 receptor and BDNF in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L Andersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early drug intervention in childhood disorders aims to maximize individual potential in the short- and long-term. Consistently, juvenile exposure to psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (MPH, reduces risk for substance use in animals and sub-populations of individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. We investigated the effects of MPH on brain plasticity via dopamine receptor D3 (D3R and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in developing rats. Methods: Between postnatal days 20-35, rat pups were administered saline vehicle (Veh or MPH (2 mg/kg, the D3R-preferring agonist ± 7-OHDPAT, or the antagonist nafadotride (0.05 mg/kg alone, or in combination with MPH twice a day. In adulthood, subjects were challenged to Veh or cocaine (10 mg/kg for two days. The prefrontal cortex was analyzed for protein and mRNA levels of total BDNF, its splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI, and D3 receptors. A separate group of subjects was assessed for splice variants at 20, 35, 40 and 60 days. Results: Across age strong correlations were evident between Drd3 and Bdnf mRNA levels (r=0.65 and a negative relationship between Drd3 and exon IIc after MPH exposure (r=-0.73. BDNF protein levels did not differ between Veh- and MPH subjects at baseline, but were significantly lower in MPH-treated and cocaine challenged subjects (30.3 ± 9.7%. Bdnf mRNA was significantly higher in MPH subjects, and reversed upon exposure to cocaine. This effect was blocked by nafadotride. Furthermore, Bdnftotal and Bdnf splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI changed across the transitions between juvenility and late adolescence. Conclusions: These data suggest a sensitive window of vulnerability to modulations of BDNF expression around adolescence, and that compared to normal animals, juvenile exposure to MPH permanently reduces prefrontal BDNF transcription and translation upon cocaine exposure in adulthood by a D3R

  9. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related long-term memo...

  10. BDNF and Huntingtin protein modifications by manganese: implications for striatal medium spiny neuron pathology in manganese neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Bichell, Terry Jo; Bowman, Aaron B; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2014-12-01

    High levels of manganese (Mn) exposure decrease striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendritic length and spine density, but the mechanism(s) are not known. The Huntingtin (HTT) gene has been functionally linked to cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) support of striatal MSNs via phosphorylation at serine 421. In Huntington's disease, pathogenic CAG repeat expansions of HTT decrease synthesis and disrupt transport of cortical-striatal BDNF, which may contribute to disease, and Mn is a putative environmental modifier of Huntington's disease pathology. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that changes in MSN dendritic morphology Mn due to exposure are associated with decreased BDNF levels and alterations in Htt protein. We report that BDNF levels are decreased in the striatum of Mn-exposed non-human primates and in the cerebral cortex and striatum of mice exposed to Mn. Furthermore, proBDNF and mature BDNF concentrations in primary cortical and hippocampal neuron cultures were decreased by exposure to Mn confirming the in vivo findings. Mn exposure decreased serine 421 phosphorylation of Htt in cortical and hippocampal neurons and increased total Htt levels. These data strongly support the hypothesis that Mn-exposure-related MSN pathology is associated with decreased BDNF trophic support via alterations in Htt. PMID:25099302

  11. Expression and Role of the BDNF Receptor-TrkB in Rat Adrenal Gland under Acute Immobilization Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported that plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was maximally elevated following a 60-min period of acute immobilization stress and that salivary glands were the main source of plasma BDNF under this stress condition. However, the expression pattern of the BDNF receptor, Tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), under this condition has yet to be determined. We therefore investigated the effect of this stress on the expression level of TrkB in various rat organs using real-time PCR. No significant differences were found between controls and 60 min-stressed rats with respect to TrkB level in various organs. Only adrenal glands showed significantly increased TrkB mRNA levels after 60 min of stress. TrkB mRNA and protein were observed to localize in chromaffin cells. In addition, we investigated whether BDNF-TrkB interaction influences the release of stress hormones from PC12 cells, derived from chromaffin cells. Truncated receptor, TrkB-T1, was identified in PC12 cells using RT-PCR. Exposure of PC12 cells to BDNF induced the release of catecholamine. This BDNF-evoked release was totally blocked by administration of the K252a in which an inhibitor of Trk receptors. Thus, BDNF-TrkB interactions may modulate catecholamine release from adrenal chromaffin cells under acute stress conditions

  12. Nitric oxide regulates BDNF release from nodose ganglion neurons in a pattern-dependent and cGMP-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-ya; Robertson, Carolyn L; Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2010-05-01

    Activity of arterial baroreceptors is modulated by neurohumoral factors, including nitric oxide (NO), released from endothelial cells. Baroreceptor reflex responses can also be modulated by NO signaling in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the primary central target of cardiovascular afferents. Our recent studies indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed by developing and adult baroreceptor afferents in vivo, and released from cultured nodose ganglion (NG) neurons by patterns of baroreceptor activity. Using electrical field stimulation and ELISA in situ, we show that exogenous NO nearly abolishes BDNF release from newborn rat NG neurons in vitro stimulated with single pulses delivered at 6 Hz, but not 2-pulse bursts delivered at the same 6-Hz frequency, that corresponds to a rat heart rate. Application of L-NAME, a specific inhibitor of endogenous NO synthases, does not have any significant effect on activity-dependent BDNF release, but leads to upregulation of BDNF expression in an activity-dependent manner. The latter effect suggests a novel mechanism of homeostatic regulation of activity-dependent BDNF expression with endogenous NO as a key player. The exogenous NO-mediated effect does not involve the cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, but is largely inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and TEMPOL that are known to prevent S-nitrosylation. Together, our current data identify previously unknown mechanisms regulating BDNF availability, and point to NO as a likely regulator of BDNF at baroafferent synapses in the NTS. PMID:19937808

  13. Yueju Pill Rapidly Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects and Acutely Enhances BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenda Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional antidepressants have a major disadvantage in delayed onset of efficacy, and the emerging fast-acting antidepressant ketamine has adverse behavioral and neurotoxic effects. Yueju pill, an herb medicine formulated eight hundred years ago by Doctor Zhu Danxi, has been popularly prescribed in China for alleviation of depression-like symptoms. Although several clinical outcome studies reported the relative short onset of antidepressant effects of Yueju, this has not been scientifically investigated. We, therefore, examined the rapid antidepressant effect of Yueju in mice and tested the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that acute administration of ethanol extract of Yueju rapidly attenuated depressive-like symptoms in learned helpless paradigm, and the antidepressant-like effects were sustained for at least 24 hours in tail suspension test in ICR mice. Additionally, Yueju, like ketamine, rapidly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus, whereas the BDNF mRNA expression remained unaltered. Yueju rapidly reduced the phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2, leading to desuppression of BDNF synthesis. Unlike ketamine, both the BDNF expression and eEF2 phosphorylation were revered at 24 hours after Yueju administration. This study is the first to demonstrate the rapid antidepressant effects of an herb medicine, offering an opportunity to improve therapy of depression.

  14. Action control is mediated by prefrontal BDNF and glucocorticoid receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Shannon L; Swanson, Andrew M; Jacobs, Andrea M; Howell, Jessica L; Mo, Michelle; Dileone, Ralph J; Koleske, Anthony J; Taylor, Jane R

    2012-12-11

    Stressor exposure biases decision-making strategies from those based on the relationship between actions and their consequences to others restricted by stimulus-response associations. Chronic stressor exposure also desensitizes glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and diminishes motivation to acquire food reinforcement, although causal relationships are largely not established. We show that a history of chronic exposure to the GR ligand corticosterone or acute posttraining GR blockade with RU38486 makes rodents less able to perform actions based on their consequences. Thus, optimal GR binding is necessary for the consolidation of new response-outcome learning. In contrast, medial prefrontal (but not striatal) BDNF can account for stress-related amotivation, in that selective medial prefrontal cortical Bdnf knockdown decreases break-point ratios in a progressive-ratio task. Knockdown also increases vulnerability to RU38486. Despite the role of BDNF in dendritic spine reorganization, deep-layer spine remodeling does not obviously parallel progressive-ratio response patterns, but treatment with the Na(+)-channel inhibitor riluzole reverses corticosteroid-induced motivational deficits and restores prefrontal BDNF expression after corticosterone. We argue that when prefrontal neurotrophin systems are compromised, and GR-mediated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis feedback is desensitized (as in the case of chronic stress hormone exposure), amotivation and inflexible maladaptive response strategies that contribute to stress-related mood disorders result. PMID:23185000

  15. Antihypoxic and Neuroprotective Properties of BDNF and GDNF in vitro and in vivo Under Hypoxic Conditions

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    Vedunova М.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess antihypoxic and neuroprotective properties of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF during in vitro and in vivo hypoxia models. Materials and Methods. In vitro studies were performed using hippocampal cells dissociated from 18-days embryonic CBA mice and cultured on multielectrode arrays (MEA60. Hypoxia modeling was performed on day 14 of culture development in vitro by replacing the normoxic culture medium with a medium containing low oxygen for 10 min. In vivo experiments were carried out on C57BL/6j male mice weighing 18–20 g. For acute hypobaric hypoxia a vacuum flow-through chamber was used at the ambient temperature of 20–22°C. We studied the resistance of animals to hypoxia, as well as their spatial memory retention in the Morris water maze upon expiration of 24 h following hypoxia model. Results. The carried out in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that BDNF and GDNF have strong antihypoxic and neuroprotective effects. Preventive application of BDNF plus GDNF before testing in the Morris water maze, contributed less animal resistance and retention of spatial memory as well as the viability of cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures was decreased in comparison with the isolated effect each of these factors. Conclusion. Application of BDNF in combination with GDNF under hypoxic conditions reduces the positive individual effect these neurotrophic factors.

  16. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

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    Yang Yang

    Full Text Available Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose, 60 ppm Zn (high dose or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit.

  17. Gastric Bypass Surgery Reverses Diabetic Phenotypes in Bdnf-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shujun; Wang, Qinghua; Huang, Zan; Song, Anying; Peng, Yu; Hou, Siyuan; Guo, Shiying; Zhu, Weiyun; Yan, Sheng; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Duodenum-jejunum gastric bypass (DJB) has been used to treat morbid diabetic patients. However, neither the suitability among patients nor the mechanisms of this surgical treatment is clear. Previously, we reported a new mouse strain named Timo as type 2 diabetes model caused by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) deficiency. In this study, we found that DJB on Timo mice reversed their metabolic abnormalities without altering the expression of Bdnf. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were improved greatly, along with reduction of fat accumulation in liver and white adipose tissue. The gut flora population was altered by DJB with increased proportion of Firmicutes and decreased Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria in the ileum after surgery. Systemic inflammation in Timo mice was greatly suppressed with less macrophage infiltration and lower tumor necrosis factor-α levels in liver and white adipose tissue after surgery. Interestingly, the alteration of gut microflora abundance and improved metabolism preceded the inflammation alleviation after DJB surgery. These results suggested that DJB can reverse Bdnf deficiency-associated metabolic abnormality. In addition, the reduced inflammation may not be the initial cause for the DJB-associated metabolic and microbiota alterations. The increased BDNF protein levels in hypothalamus and hippocampus may result from microbiota change after DJB surgery. PMID:27418549

  18. BDNF selectively regulates GABAA receptor transcription by activation of the JAK/STAT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Ingrid V; Hu, Yinghui; Raol, YogendraSinh H; Benham, Rebecca S; Faris, Ramona; Russek, Shelley J; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R

    2008-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor in the brain. Its multiple subunits show regional, developmental, and disease-related plasticity of expression; however, the regulatory networks controlling GABA(A)R subunit expression remain poorly understood. We report that the seizure-induced decrease in GABA(A)R alpha1 subunit expression associated with epilepsy is mediated by the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF- and seizure-dependent phosphorylation of STAT3 cause the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) family member ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) to bind with phosphorylated CREB at the Gabra1:CRE site. JAK/STAT pathway inhibition prevents the seizure-induced decrease in GABA(A)R alpha1 abundance in vivo and, given that BDNF is known to increase the abundance of GABA(A)R alpha4 in a JAK/STAT-independent manner, indicates that BDNF acts through at least two distinct pathways to influence GABA(A)R-dependent synaptic inhibition. PMID:18922788

  19. Altered social cognition in male BDNF heterozygous mice and following chronic methamphetamine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Elizabeth E; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-05-15

    Growing clinical evidence suggests that persistent psychosis which occurs in methamphetamine users is closely related to schizophrenia. However, preclinical studies in animal models have focussed on psychosis-related behaviours following methamphetamine, and less work has been done to assess endophenotypes relevant to other deficits observed in schizophrenia. Altered social behaviour is a feature of both the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, and significantly impacts patient functioning. We recently found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) heterozygous mice show disrupted sensitization to methamphetamine, supporting other work suggesting an important role of this neurotrophin in the pathophysiology of psychosis and the neuronal response to stimulant drugs. In the current study, we assessed social and cognitive behaviours in methamphetamine-treated BDNF heterozygous mice and wildtype littermate controls. Following chronic methamphetamine exposure male wildtype mice showed a 50% reduction in social novelty preference. Vehicle-treated male BDNF heterozygous mice showed a similar impairment in social novelty preference, with a trend for no further disruption by methamphetamine exposure. Female mice were unaffected in this task, and no groups showed any changes in sociability or short-term spatial memory. These findings suggest that chronic methamphetamine alters behaviour relevant to disruption of social cognition in schizophrenia, supporting other studies which demonstrate a close resemblance between persistent methamphetamine psychosis and schizophrenia. Together these findings suggest that dynamic regulation of BDNF signalling is necessary to mediate the effects of methamphetamine on behaviours relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:26965573

  20. Exercise-induced improvement in cognitive performance after traumatic brain injury in rats is dependent on BDNF activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace Sophia; Hovda, David Allen; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    We have previously shown that voluntary exercise upregulates brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) within the hippocampus and is associated with an enhancement of cognitive recovery after a lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI). In order to determine if BDNF is critical to this effect we used an immunoadhesin chimera (TrkB-IgG) that inactivates free BDNF. This BDNF inhibitor was administered to adult male rats two weeks after they had received a mild fluid percussion injury (FPI) or sham surgery. These animals were then housed with or without access to a running wheel (RW) from post-injury-day (PID) 14 to 20. On PID 21, rats were tested for spatial learning in a Morris Water Maze. Results showed that exercise counteracted the cognitive deficits associated with the injury. However this exercise-induced cognitive improvement was attenuated in the FPI-RW rats that were treated with TrkB-IgG. Molecules important for synaptic plasticity and learning were measured in a separate group of rats that were sacrificed immediately after exercise (PID 21). Western blot analyses showed that exercise increased the mature form of BDNF, synapsin I and cyclic-AMP response-element-binding protein (CREB) in the vehicle treated Sham-RW group. However, only the mature form of BDNF and CREB were increased in the vehicle treated FPI-RW group. Blocking BDNF (pre administration of TrkB-IgG) greatly reduced the molecular effects of exercise in that exercise-induced increases of BDNF, synapsin I and CREB were not observed. These studies provide evidence that BDNF has a major role in exercise's cognitive effects in traumatically injured brain. PMID:19555673

  1. Regulated release of BDNF by cortical oligodendrocytes is mediated through metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes), the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1)-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate), receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C) pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3) receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane) and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  2. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on serotonin neurotransmission in the hippocampus of adult rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, Saloua; Deltheil, Thierry; Piotrowski, Jonathan; Nicolas, Lorelei; Reperant, Christelle; Gardier, Alain M; Frazer, Alan; David, Denis J

    2008-06-10

    Whereas SSRIs produce rapid blockade of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in vitro and in vivo, the onset of an observable clinical effect takes longer to occur and a variety of pharmacological effects caused by antidepressants have been speculated to be involved either in initiating antidepressant effects and/or enhancing their effects on serotonergic transmission so as to cause clinical improvement. Among such secondary factors is increased activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires the Tropomyosine-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) for its effects. To begin an analysis of the influence of BDNF on serotonergic activity, we studied the acute effects of BDNF on SERT activity. A single BDNF injection (either intracerebroventricularly or directly into the CA3 region of hippocampus) decreased the signal amplitude and clearance rate produced by exogenously applied 5-HT compared to what was measured in control rats, shown using in vivo chronoamperometry. It also reduced the ability of a locally applied SSRI to block the clearance of 5-HT. In awake freely moving mice, acute intrahippocampal injection of BDNF decreased extracellular levels of 5-HT in the hippocampus, as measured using microdialysis. In addition, perfusion with BDNF decreased KCl-evoked elevations of 5-HT. These effects of BDNF were blocked by the non-selective antagonist of TrkB receptors, K252a. Overall, it may be inferred that in the hippocampus, through TrkB activation, a single injection of BDNF enhances SERT function. Such acute effects of BDNF would be expected to counter early effects of SSRIs, which might, in part, account for some delay in therapeutic effect. PMID:18474368

  3. TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α INCREASES BDNF EXPRESSION IN TRIGEMINAL GANGLION NEURONS IN AN ACTIVITY-DEPENDENT MANNER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa; Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Many chronic trigeminal pain conditions, such as migraine or temporo-mandibular disorders, are associated with inflammation within peripheral endings of trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons. A critical role in mechanisms of neuroinflammation is attributed to proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) that also contribute to mechanisms of persistent neuropathic pain resulting from nerve injury. However, the mechanisms of cytokine-mediated synaptic plasticity and nociceptor sensitization are not completely understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of TNFα on neuronal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), whose role in synaptic plasticity and sensitization of nociceptive pathways is well documented. We show that 4- and 24-hr treatment with TNFα increases BDNF mRNA and protein, respectively, in neuron-enriched dissociated cultures of rat TG. TNFα increases the phosphorylated form of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor involved in regulation of BDNF expression in neurons, and activates transcription of BDNF exon IV (former exon III) and, to a lesser extent, exon VI (former exon IV), but not exon I. TNFα-mediated increase in BDNF expression was accompanied by increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which is consistent with previously published studies, and indicates that both peptides are similarly regulated in TG neurons by inflammatory mediators. The effect of TNFα on BDNF expression is dependent on sodium influx through TTX-sensitive channels and on p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase. Moreover, electrical stimulation and forskolin, known to increase intracellular cAMP, potentiate the TNFα-mediated upregulation of BDNF expression. This study provides new evidence for a direct action of proinflammatory cytokines on TG primary sensory neurons, and reveals a mechanism through which TNFα stimulates de novo

  4. Early life stress increases stress vulnerability through BDNF gene epigenetic changes in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Kyoung; Ly, Nguyen Ngoc; Lee, Chan Hong; Cho, Hye Yeon; Choi, Cheol Min; Nhu, Le Hoa; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Bong Ju; Kim, Gyung-Mee; Yoon, Bong June; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Young Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Early life stress (ELS) exerts long-lasting epigenetic influences on the brain and makes an individual susceptible to later depression. It is poorly understood whether ELS and subsequent adult chronic stress modulate epigenetic mechanisms. We examined the epigenetic mechanisms of the BDNF gene in the hippocampus, which may underlie stress vulnerability to postnatal maternal separation (MS) and adult restraint stress (RS). Rat pups were separated from their dams (3 h/day from P1-P21). When the pups reached adulthood (8 weeks old), we introduced RS (2 h/day for 3 weeks) followed by escitalopram treatment. We showed that both the MS and RS groups expressed reduced levels of total and exon IV BDNF mRNA. Furthermore, RS potentiated MS-induced decreases in these expression levels. Similarly, both the MS and RS groups showed decreased levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 at BDNF promoter IV, and RS exacerbated MS-induced decreases of H3 and H4 acetylation. Both the MS and RS groups had increased MeCP2 levels at BDNF promoter IV, as well as increased HDAC5 mRNA, and the combination of MS and RS exerted a greater effect on these parameters than did RS alone. In the forced swimming test, the immobility time of the MS + RS group was significantly higher than that of the RS group. Additionally, chronic escitalopram treatment recovered these alterations. Our results suggest that postnatal MS and subsequent adult RS modulate epigenetic changes in the BDNF gene, and that these changes may be related to behavioral phenotype. These epigenetic mechanisms are involved in escitalopram action. PMID:26877199

  5. BDNF modulates GABAA receptors microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to Xenopus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, E.; Torchia, G.; Limatola, C.; Trettel, F.; Arcella, A.; Cantore, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Manfredi, M.; Esposito, V.; Quarato, P. P.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Cell membranes isolated from brain tissues, obtained surgically from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and from one nonepileptic patient afflicted with a cerebral oligodendroglioma, were injected into frog oocytes. By using this approach, the oocytes acquire human GABAA receptors, and we have shown previously that the “epileptic receptors” (receptors transplanted from epileptic brains) display a marked run-down during repetitive applications of GABA. It was found that exposure to the neurotrophin BDNF increased the amplitude of the “GABA currents” (currents elicited by GABA) generated by the epileptic receptors and decreased their run-down; both events being blocked by K252A, a neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor B inhibitor. These effects of BDNF were not mimicked by nerve growth factor. In contrast, the GABAA receptors transplanted from the nonepileptic human hippocampal uncus (obtained during surgical resection as part of the nontumoral tissue from the oligodendroglioma margins) or receptors expressed by injecting rat recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor subunit cDNAs generated GABA currents whose time-course and run-down were not altered by BDNF. Loading the oocytes with the Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetate-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), or treating them with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent PKA, did not alter the GABA currents. However, staurosporine (a broad spectrum PK inhibitor), bisindolylmaleimide I (a PKC inhibitor), and U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor) blocked the BDNF-induced effects on the epileptic GABA currents. Our results indicate that BDNF potentiates the epileptic GABAA currents and antagonizes their use-dependent run-down, thus strengthening GABAergic inhibition, probably by means of activation of tyrosine kinase receptor B receptors and of both PLC and PKC. PMID:15665077

  6. Intensional Effect Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Yuheng; Liu, Yu David; Rajan, Hridesh

    2015-01-01

    Type-and-effect systems are a powerful tool for program construction and verification. We describe intensional effect polymorphism, a new foundation for effect systems that integrates static and dynamic effect checking. Our system allows the effect of polymorphic code to be intensionally inspected through a lightweight notion of dynamic typing. When coupled with parametric polymorphism, the powerful system utilizes runtime information to enable precise effect reasoning, while at the same time...

  7. Polymorphous computing fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  8. No exercise-induced increase in serum BDNF after cycling near a major traffic road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, I; Jacobs, L; Nawrot, T S; de Geus, B; Torfs, R; Int Panis, L; Degraeuwe, B; Meeusen, R

    2011-08-15

    Commuting by bike has a clear health enhancing effect. Moreover, regular exercise is known to improve brain plasticity, which results in enhanced cognition and memory performance. Animal research has clearly shown that exercise upregulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF - a neurotrophine) enhancing brain plasticity. Studies in humans found an increase in serum BDNF concentration in response to an acute exercise bout. Recently, more evidence is emerging suggesting that exposure to air pollution (such as particulate matter (PM)) is higher in commuter cyclists compared to car drivers. Furthermore, exposure to PM is linked to negative neurological effects, such as neuroinflammation and cognitive decline. We carried-out a cross-over experiment to examine the acute effect of exercise on serum BDNF, and the potential effect-modification by exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Thirty eight physically fit, non-asthmatic volunteers (mean age: 43, 26% women) performed two cycling trials, one near a major traffic road (Antwerp Ring, R1, up to 260,000 vehicles per day) and one in an air-filtered room. The air-filtered room was created by reducing fine particles as well as ultrafine particles (UFP). PM10, PM2.5 and UFP were measured. The duration (∼20min) and intensity of cycling were kept the same for each volunteer for both cycling trials. Serum BDNF concentrations were measured before and 30min after each cycling trial. Average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 64.9μg/m(3) and 24.6μg/m(3) in cycling near a major ring way, in contrast to 7.7μg/m(3) and 2.0μg/m(3) in the air-filtered room. Average concentrations of UFP were 28,180 particles/cm(3) along the road in contrast to 496 particles/cm(3) in the air-filtered room. As expected, exercise significantly increased serum BDNF concentration after cycling in the air-filtered room (+14.4%; p=0.02). In contrast, serum BDNF concentrations did not increase after cycling near the major traffic route (+0.5%; p

  9. BDNF and Huntingtin protein modifications by Manganese: Implications for striatal medium spiny neuron pathology in manganese neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Bowman, Aaron B.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of manganese (Mn) exposure decreases striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendritic length and spine density, but the mechanism(s) are not known. The Huntingtin (HTT) gene has been functionally linked to cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) support of striatal MSNs via phosphorylation at serine 421 (S421). In Huntington's disease, pathogenic CAG-repeat expansions of HTT decrease synthesis and disrupt transport of cortical-striatal BDNF contributing to disease, and Mn is...

  10. Antidepressant effects of crocin and its effects on transcript and protein levels of CREB, BDNF, and VGF in rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Vahdati Hassani, Faezeh; Naseri, Vahideh; Razavi, BiBi Marjan; Mehri, Soghra; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background Antidepressants have been shown to affect levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and VGF (non-acronymic) whose transcriptions are dependent on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in long term treatment. The aim of this study was to verify the subacute antidepressant effects of crocin, an active constituent of saffron (Crocus sativus L.), and its effects on CREB, BDNF, and VGF proteins, transcript levels and amount of active, phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) protein...

  11. Association of decreased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in early pregnancy with antepartum depression

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Jenny; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Rondon, Marta B; Sanchez, Sixto E; Barrios, Yasmin V; Hevner, Karin; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antepartum depression is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality in the prenatal period. There is accumulating evidence for the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression. The present study examines the extent to which maternal early pregnancy serum BDNF levels are associated with antepartum depression. Method A total of 968 women were recruited and interviewed in early pregnancy. Antepartum depression prevalence and ...

  12. Association of decreased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in early pregnancy with antepartum depression

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Jenny; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Rondon, Marta B; Sanchez, Sixto E; Barrios, Yasmin V; Hevner, Karin; Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antepartum depression is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality in the prenatal period. There is accumulating evidence for the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression. The present study examines the extent to which maternal early pregnancy serum BDNF levels are associated with antepartum depression. Method A total of 968 women were recruited and interviewed in early pregnancy. Antepartum depression prevalence and...

  13. Chronic Unpredictable Stress Decreases Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Mouse Ovaries: Relationship to Oocytes Developmental Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Min Wu; Mei-Hong Hu; Xian-Hong Tong; Hui Han; Ni Shen; Ren-Tao Jin; Wei Wang; Gui-Xiang Zhou; Guo-Ping He; Yu-Sheng Liu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chroni...

  14. Effects of ganoderic acids on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons: insights from alterations of BDNF,TRPC3 and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-wei; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2016-06-01

    Recently, Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS) have shown anti-epileptic effects. However, there are no reports on the anti-epileptic effects of its chemical constituents ganoderic acids (GAs), and more research is needed to better understand the mechanism of GLS activity. In this work, rat primary hippocampal neurons in an in vitro model were used to assess the intervention effects of GAs on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of both BDNF and TRPC3, with the aid of immunofluorescence, MTT method and flow cytometry. It was found that BDNF and TRPC3 are expressed in all cells and were mainly localized in the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensities of BDNF and TRPC3 in GAs groups were higher than those of normal control and model groups, especially at 80 μg/ml (P < 0.05). The apoptosis rate of neurons was inversely proportional to BDNF and TRPC3 changes (P < 0.01). Therefore, BDNF and TRPC3 should be involved in the occurrence and development of epilepsy. GAs might indirectly inhibit mossy fiber sprouting and adjust the synaptic reconstructions by promoting the expression of BDNF and TRPC3. Besides, GAs could exert a protective effect on hippocampal neurons by promoting neuronal survival and the recovery of injured neurons. PMID:27455554

  15. Is BDNF sufficient for information transfer between microglia and dorsal horn neurons during the onset of central sensitization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanyan Sridhar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerve injury activates spinal microglia. This leads to enduring changes in the properties of dorsal horn neurons that initiate central sensitization and the onset of neuropathic pain. Although a variety of neuropeptides, cytokines, chemokines and neurotransmitters have been implicated at various points in this process, it is possible that much of the information transfer between activated microglia and neurons, at least in this context, may be explicable in terms of the actions of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Microglial-derived BDNF mediates central sensitization in lamina I by attenuating inhibitory synaptic transmission. This involves an alteration in the chloride equilibrium potential as a result of down regulation of the potassium-chloride exporter, KCC2. In lamina II, BDNF duplicates many aspects of the effects of chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve on excitatory transmission. It mediates an increase in synaptic drive to putative excitatory neurons whilst reducing that to inhibitory neurons. CCI produces a specific pattern of changes in excitatory synaptic transmission to tonic, delay, phasic, transient and irregular neurons. A very similar 'injury footprint' is seen following long-term exposure to BDNF. This review presents new information on the action of BDNF and CCI on lamina II neurons, including the similarity of their actions on the kinetics and distributions of subpopulations of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC. These findings raise the possibility that BDNF functions as a final common path for a convergence of perturbations that culminate in the generation of neuropathic pain.

  16. Correlation between hedgehog (hh) protein family and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) in autism spectrum disorder (asd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the correlation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Study Design: An observational, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Autism Research and Treatment Center, Al-Amodi Autism Research Chair, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: Serum levels of SHH, IHH and BDNF were determined in recently diagnosed autistic patients and age matched healthy children (n=25), using the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was used for the assessment of autistic severity. Spearman correlation co-efficient-r was determined. Results: The serum levels of IHH and SHH were significantly higher in autistic subjects than those of control subjects. There was significant correlation between age and IHH (r = 0.176, p = 0.03), BDNF and severe IHH (r = 0.1763, p = 0.003), and severe BDNF and severe SHH (r = 0.143, p < 0.001). However, there were no significant relationships among the serum levels of SHH, IHH and BDNF and the CARS score, age or gender. Conclusion: The findings support a correlation between SHH, IHH and BDNF in autistic children, suggesting their pathological role in autism. (author)

  17. Neurosteroids reduce social isolation-induced behavioral deficits: a proposed link with neurosteroid-mediated upregulation of BDNF expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Schüler Nin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological action of SSRI antidepressants may include a normalization of the decreased brain levels of neurosteroids such as that of the progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone and that of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which are decreased in patients with depression and PTSD. Allopregnanolone and BDNF decrease in these patients is associated with behavioral symptom severity. Antidepressant treatment upregulates both allopregnanolone levels and the expression of BDNF in a manner that significantly correlates with improved symptomatology, which suggests that neurosteroid biosynthesis and BDNF expression may be interrelated. Preclinical studies using the socially isolated mouse as an animal model of behavioral deficits that resemble some of the symptoms observed in PTSD patients have shown that fluoxetine and derivatives improve anxiety-like behavior, fear responses, and aggressive behavior by elevating the corticolimbic levels of allopregnanolone and BDNF mRNA expression. These actions appeared to be independent and more selective from the action of these drugs on 5-HT reuptake inhibition.Hence, this review addresses the hypothesis that in PTSD or depressed patients brain allopregnanolone levels and BDNF expression upregulation may be part of the mechanisms involved in the beneficial actions of antidepressants or other selective brain steroidogenic stimulant (SBSS molecules.

  18. Postnatal BDNF Expression Profiles in Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus of a Rat Schizophrenia Model Induced by MK-801 Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors represents one of experimental animal models for schizophrenia. This study is to investigate the long-term brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression profiles in different regions and correlation with “schizophrenia-like” behaviors in the adolescence and adult of this rat model. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 was administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats on postnatal days (PND 5 through 14. Open-field test was performed on PND 42, and PND 77 to examine the validity of the current model. BDNF protein levels in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC were analyzed on PND 15, PND 42, and PND 77. Results showed that neonatal challenge with MK-801 persistently elevated locomotor activity as well as BDNF expression; the alterations in BDNF expression varied at different developing stages and among brain regions. However, these findings provide neurochemical evidence that the blockade of NMDA receptors during brain development results in long-lasting alterations in BDNF expression and might contribute to neurobehavioral pathology of the present animal model for schizophrenia. Further study in the mechanisms and roles of the BDNF may lead to better understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  19. Methylation of BDNF in women with bulimic eating syndromes: associations with childhood abuse and borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Lea; Gauvin, Lise; Joober, Ridha; Groleau, Patricia; de Guzman, Rosherrie; Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Israel, Mimi; Wilson, Samantha; Steiger, Howard

    2014-10-01

    DNA methylation allows for the environmental regulation of gene expression and is believed to link environmental stressors to such mental-illness phenotypes as eating disorders. Numerous studies have shown an association between bulimia nervosa (BN) and variations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF has also been linked to borderline personality disorder (BPD) and to such traits as reward dependence. We examined the extent to which BDNF methylation corresponded to bulimic or normal-eater status, and also to the presence of comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and childhood abuse. Our sample consisted of 64 women with BN and 32 normal-eater (NE) control women. Participants were assessed for eating-disorder symptoms, comorbid psychopathology, and childhood trauma, and then they were required to provide blood samples for methylation analyses. We observed a significant site×group (BN vs. NE) interaction indicating that women with BN showed increases in methylation at specific regions of the BDNF promoter. Furthermore, examining effects of childhood abuse and BPD, we observed significant site×group interactions such that groups composed of individuals with childhood abuse or BPD had particularly high levels of methylation at selected CpG sites. Our findings suggest that BN, especially when co-occurring with childhood abuse or BPD, is associated with a propensity towards elevated methylation at specific BDNF promoter region sites. These findings imply that hypermethylation of the BDNF gene may be related to eating disorder status, developmental stress exposure, and comorbid psychopathology. PMID:24801751

  20. BDNF-induced LTP is associated with rapid Arc/Arg3.1-dependent enhancement in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Sjoukje D; Trentani, Andrea; Tiron, Adrian; Mao, Xiaosong; Kuhl, Dietmar; Bramham, Clive R

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a remarkable phenomenon involved in various aspects of learning and memory as well as disease pathophysiology. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) represents a major player in the regulation of this unique form of neuroplasticity, yet the mechanisms underlying its pro-neurogenic actions remain unclear. Here, we examined the effects associated with brief (25 min), unilateral infusion of BDNF in the rat dentate gyrus. Acute BDNF infusion induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of medial perforant path-evoked synaptic transmission and, concomitantly, enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis bilaterally, reflected by increased dentate gyrus BrdU + cell numbers. Importantly, inhibition of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) translation through local, unilateral infusion of anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (ArcAS) prior to BDNF infusion blocked both BDNF-LTP induction and the associated pro-neurogenic effects. Notably, basal rates of proliferation and newborn cell survival were unaltered in homozygous Arc/Arg3.1 knockout mice. Taken together these findings link the pro-neurogenic effects of acute BDNF infusion to induction of Arc/Arg3.1-dependent LTP in the adult rodent dentate gyrus. PMID:26888068

  1. BDNF and Schizophrenia: from Neurodevelopment to Neuronal Plasticity, Learning and Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RodrigoNieto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin that has been related not only to neurodevelopment and neuroprotection, but also to synapse regulation, learning and memory. Research focused on the neurobiology of schizophrenia has emphasized the relevance of neurodevelompental and neurotoxicity-related elements in the pathogenesis of this disease. Research focused on the clinical features of schizophrenia in the past decades has emphasized the relevance of cognitive deficits of this illness, considered a core manifestation and an important predictor for functional outcome. Variations in neurotrophins such as BDNF may have a role as part of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, from the neurodevelopmental alterations to the molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia.

  2. Social defeat during adolescence and adulthood differentially induce BDNF-regulated immediate early genes

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    Caroline M. Coppens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Stressful life events generally enhance the vulnerability for the development of human psychopathologies such as anxiety disorders and depression. The incidence rates of adult mental disorders steeply rises during adolescence in parallel with a structural and functional reorganization of the neural circuitry underlying stress reactivity. However, the mechanisms underlying susceptibility to stress and manifestation of mental disorders during adolescence are little understood. We hypothesized that heightened sensitivity to stress during adolescence reflects age-dependent differences in the expression of activity-dependent genes involved in synaptic plasticity. Therefore, we compared the effect of social stress during adolescence with social stress in adulthood on the expression of a panel of genes linked to induction of long-term potentiation (LTP and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling. We show that social defeat during adolescence and adulthood differentially regulates expression of the immediate early genes BDNF, Arc, Carp, and Tieg1, as measured by qPCR in tissue lysates from prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus. In the hippocampus, mRNA levels for all four genes were robustly elevated following social defeat in adolescence, whereas none were induced by defeat in adulthood. The relationship to coping style was also examined using adult reactive and proactive coping rats. Gene expression levels of reactive and proactive animals were similar in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. However, a trend toward a differential expression of BDNF and Arc mRNA in the nucleus accumbens was detected. BDNF mRNA was increased in the nucleus accumbens of proactive defeated animals, whereas the expression level in reactive defeated animals was comparable to control animals. The results demonstrate striking differences in immediate early gene expression in response to social defeat in adolescent and adult rats.

  3. Continuous Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Infusion After Methylprednisolone Treatment in Severe Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Daniel H.; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Although methylprednisolone (MP) is the standard of care in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), its functional outcome varies in clinical situation. Recent report demonstrated that MP depresses the expression of growth-promoting neurotrophic factors after acute SCI. The present study was designed to investigate whether continuous infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after MP treatment promotes functional recovery in severe SCI. Contusion injury was produced at the T10 vertebral le...

  4. Motoneuron BDNF/TrkB Signaling Enhances Functional Recovery after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Mantilla, Carlos B.; Gransee, Heather M.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    A C2 cervical spinal cord hemisection (SH) interrupts descending inspiratory-related drive to phrenic motoneurons located between C3 and C5 in rats, paralyzing the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm muscle. There is gradual recovery of rhythmic diaphragm muscle activity ipsilateral to cervical spinal cord injury over time, consistent with neuroplasticity and strengthening of spared, contralateral descending premotor input to phrenic motoneurons. Brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling throug...

  5. Expression and localisation of BDNF, NT4 and TrkB in proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi-Nouri, Seyed M S; Ellis, James S; Moss, Stephen; Limb, G Astrid; Charteris, David G

    2008-05-01

    Exogenous brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to rescue ganglion cell death after optic nerve injury. Its mechanism of action is believed to be indirect via glial cells in the retina. In this study we investigated the changes in expression and localisation of BDNF, neurotrophin-4 (NT4) and their common receptor (TrkB) in retinectomy sections of patients with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Nine full-thickness retinectomy specimens obtained at retinal reattachment surgery for PVR were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde immediately after excision and compared to similarly processed normal donor retinas (4 eyes). Agarose-embedded sections (100 microm thick) were double labelled for immunohistochemistry by confocal microscopy, with antibodies against BDNF, NT4, TrkB, rod opsin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) and Brn3. This study demonstrates expression of NT4 by ganglion cells and shows expression of BDNF and NT4 in the outer photoreceptor segments is downregulated during PVR, whilst NT4 is markedly upregulated throughout the retina during this condition. The findings here suggest that NT4 may play a neural protective role during the development of PVR. It also shows that upregulation of NT4 in PVR is localised to Müller glial cells, indicating either over-expression of this factor by Müller cells or that Müller cells internalise NT4 for trafficking across the retina. TrkB expression was not observed in PVR retina. The observations that Müller glia demonstrate upregulation of NT4 suggests that retinal injury may lead to activation of this neurotrophin by Müller cells as part of their neuroprotective functions. PMID:18405896

  6. Age-related changes in plasma levels of BDNF in Down syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Licastro Federico; Galliera Emanuela; Dogliotti Giada; Corsi Massimiliano M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of coronary artery diseases is low among Down Syndrome (DS) patients and they rarely die of atherosclerotic complications. Histopathological investigations showed no increase in atherosclerosis, or even a total lack of atherosclerotic changes, in DS Aim The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between age and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Down Syndrome (DS). Subjects and methods Three groups of DS patients were studied: th...

  7. BDNF–TrkB signaling as a therapeutic target in neuropsychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, R. Anne

    2014-01-01

    Xin Du,1 Yeewen C Wu,1,2 Rachel Anne Hill1 1Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia Abstract: Research evidence points to abnormal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling being a common and vital participant in the etiology and pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. To inc...

  8. Atorvastatin induction of VEGF and BDNF promotes brain plasticity after stroke in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jieli; Zhang, Chunling; Jiang, Hao; Li, Yi; Zhang, Lijie; Robin, Adam; Katakowski, Mark; Lu, Mei; Chopp, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the role of statins in the induction of brain plasticity and subsequent improvement of neurologic outcome after treatment of stroke have not been adequately investigated. Here, we use both in vivo and in vitro studies to investigate the potential roles of two prominent factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in mediating brain plasticity after treatment of stroke with atorvastatin. Treatment of stroke in ...

  9. Chronic lipopolysaccharide exposure induces cognitive dysfunction without affecting BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Ding, Jie; Liu, Ning; WANG Da-ming; Ding, Liang-cai; YANG, CHUN

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has the potential to cause cognitive dysfunction. However, the underlying pathogenesis has yet to be fully elucidated. Increasing attention is being focused on infection in the central nervous system. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the behavioral performance of rats receiving intraperitoneal injections of LPS and to determine the expression levels of amyloid-β (Aβ), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-in...

  10. Aerobic exercise improves hippocampal function and increases BDNF in the serum of young adult males

    OpenAIRE

    WARMINGTON, STUART; O'Mara, Shane; GRIFFIN, EADAOIN; KELLY, AINE

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Physical activity has been reported to improve cognitive function in humans and rodents, possibly via a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-regulated mechanism. In this study of human subjects, we have assessed the effects of acute and chronic exercise on performance of a face-name matching task, which recruits the hippocampus and associated structures of the medial temporal lobe, and the Stroop word-colour task, which does not, and have assessed circulating concentrations o...

  11. Association between BDNF rs6265 and Obesity in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

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    Xian-Yong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been associated with regulation of body weight and appetite. The goal of this study was to examine the interactions of a functional variant (rs6265 in the BDNF gene with dietary intake for obesity traits in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. BDNF rs6265 was genotyped in 1147 Puerto Rican adults and examined for association with obesity-related traits. Men (n=242 with the GG genotype had higher BMI (P=0.009, waist circumference (P=0.002, hip (P=0.002, and weight (P=0.03 than GA or AA carriers (n=94. They had twice the risk of being overweight (BMI≥25 relative to GA or AA carriers (OR = 2.08, CI = 1.02–4.23, and P=0.043. Interactions between rs6265 and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA intake were associated with BMI, hip, and weight, and n-3 : n-6 PUFA ratio with waist circumference in men. In contrast, women (n=595 with the GG genotype had significantly lower BMI (P=0.009, hip (P=0.029, and weight (P=0.027 than GA or AA carriers (n=216. Women with the GG genotype were 50% less likely to be overweight compared to GA or AA carriers (OR = 0.05, CI = 0.27–0.91, and P=0.024. In summary, BDNF rs6265 is differentially associated with obesity risk by sex and interacts with PUFA intake influencing obesity traits in Boston Puerto Rican men.

  12. Mood Disorders and BDNF Relationship with Alcohol Drinking Trajectories among PLWH Receiving Care

    OpenAIRE

    Míguez-Burbano, María José; Espinoza, Luis; Vargas, Mayra; LaForest, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the excessive rates of Hazardous Alcohol Use (HAU) among people living with HIV (PLWH), although largely speculated, psychological and physiological components associated with HAU, has not been actively measured. Therefore, the present study was geared toward determining: 1) the rates of mood disorders and its relationship with HAU, and 2) to assess the impact of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), a well-known regulator of alcohol and mood disorders. Methods For this...

  13. Reduced cortical BDNF expression and aberrant memory in Carf knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    McDowell, Kelli A.; Hutchinson, Ashley N.; Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J.E.; Presby, Matthew M.; Su, Dan; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Law, Krystal C.; Williams, Christina L.; Wetsel, William C.; West, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are a key point of convergence between the cell-intrinsic and extracellular signals that guide synaptic development and brain plasticity. Calcium-Response Factor (CaRF) is a unique transcription factor first identified as a binding protein for a calcium-response element in the gene encoding Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (Bdnf). We have now generated Carf knockout (KO) mice to characterize the function of this factor in vivo. Intriguingly, Carf KO mice have selectivel...

  14. Differential Expression and Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) mRNA Isoforms in Brain Cells from Mecp2(308/y) Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaud, Audrey; Delépine, Chloé; Nectoux, Juliette; Billuart, Pierre; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disease caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), which encodes a transcriptional modulator of many genes including BDNF. BDNF comprises nine distinct promoter regions, each triggering the expression of a specific transcript. The role of this diversity of transcripts remains unknown. MeCP2 being highly expressed in neurons, RTT was initially considered as a neuronal disease. However, recent studies have shown that MeCP2 was also expressed in astrocytes. Though several studies explored Bdnf IV expression in Mecp2-deficient mice, the differential expression of Bdnf isoforms in Mecp2-deficient neurons and astrocytes was never studied. By using TaqMan technology and a mouse model expressing a truncated Mecp2 (Mecp2(308/y)), we firstly showed in neurons that Bdnf transcripts containing exon I, IIb, IIc, IV, and VI are prominently expressed, whereas in astrocytes, Bdnf transcript containing exon VI is preferentially expressed, suggesting a specific regulation of Bdnf expression at the cellular level. Secondly, we confirmed the repressive role of Mecp2 only on the expression of Bdnf VI in neurons. Our data suggested that the truncated Mecp2 protein maintains its function on Bdnf expression regulation in neurons and in astrocytes. Interestingly, we observed that Bdnf transcripts (I and IXA), regulated by neural activity induced by bicuculline in Mecp2(308/y) neurons, were not affected by histone deacetylase inhibition. In contrast, Bdnf transcripts (IIb, IIc, and VI), regulated by histone deacetylation, were not affected by bicuculline treatment in wild-type and Mecp2(308/y) neurons. All these results reflect the complexity of regulation of Bdnf gene. PMID:25634725

  15. INTERMITTENT SOCIAL DEFEAT STRESS ENHANCES MESOCORTICOLIMBIC ΔFOSB/BDNF CO-EXPRESSION AND PERSISTENTLY ACTIVATES CORTICOTEGMENTAL NEURONS: IMPLICATION FOR VULNERABILITY TO PSYCHOSTIMULANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulina, E.M.; Lacagnina, M.J.; Fanous, S.; Wang, J.; Hammer, R P

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent social defeat stress exposure augments behavioral response to psychostimulants in a process termed cross-sensitization. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates synaptic plasticity and cellular responses to stress and drugs of abuse. We previously showed that repeated social defeat stress persistently alters BDNF and activates ΔFosB expression in mesocorticolimbic regions. Here, we hypothesized that social defeat stress would increase ΔFosB expression in BDNF-containing ...

  16. Low-Level Stress Induces Production of Neuroprotective Factors in Wild-Type but Not BDNF+/- Mice: Interleukin-10 and Kynurenic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Dugan, Allison M.; Parrott, Jennifer M.; Redus, Laney; Hensler, Julie G.; O’Connor, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficiency confers vulnerability to stress, but the mechanisms are unclear. BDNF+/- mice exhibit behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical changes following low-level stress that are hallmarks of major depression. After immune challenge, neuroinflammation-induced changes in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway mediate depressive-like behaviors. Methods: We hypothesized that BDNF+/- mice would be more susceptible to stress-i...

  17. Demethylation regulation of BDNF gene expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons is implicated in opioid-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Chieh; Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Guo, Ruijuan; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Chen; Shi, Rong; Guan, Yun; Yue, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Repeated administration of morphine may result in opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), which involves altered expression of numerous genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Yet, it remains unclear how BDNF expression is increased in DRG neurons after repeated morphine treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression. In the current study, we hypothesized that the demethylation regulation of certain BDNF gene promoters in DRG neurons may contribute to the development of OIH. Real-time RT-PCR was used to assess changes in the mRNA transcription levels of major BDNF exons including exon I, II, IV, VI, as well as total BDNF mRNA in DRGs from rats after repeated morphine administration. The levels of exon IV and total BDNF mRNA were significantly upregulated by repeated morphine administration, as compared to that in saline control group. Further, ELISA array and immunocytochemistry study revealed a robust upregulation of BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons after repeated morphine exposure. Correspondingly, the methylation levels of BDNF exon IV promoter showed a significant downregulation by morphine treatment. Importantly, intrathecal administration of a BDNF antibody, but not control IgG, significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity that developed in rats after repeated morphine treatment. Conversely, intrathecal administration of an inhibitor of DNA methylation, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) markedly upregulated the BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons and enhanced the mechanical allodynia after repeated morphine exposure. Together, our findings suggest that demethylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter may be implicated in the development of OIH through epigenetic control of BDNF expression in DRG neurons. PMID:26970395

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral striatum increases BDNF in the fear extinction circuit

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    Fabricio H Do-Monte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS reduces the symptoms of treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, and improves response to extinction-based therapies. We recently reported that DBS-like stimulation of a rat homologue of VC/VS, the dorsal-VS, reduced conditioned fear and enhanced extinction memory (Rodriguez-Romaguera et al, 2012. In contrast, DBS of the ventral-VS had the opposite effects. To examine possible mechanisms, we assessed the effects of VS DBS on the expression of the neural activity marker Fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key mediator of extinction plasticity in prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Consistent with decreased fear expression, DBS of dorsal-VS increased Fos expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices and in the lateral division of the central nucleus of amygdala, an area that inhibits amygdala output. Consistent with improved extinction memory, we found that DBS of dorsal-VS, but not ventral-VS, increased neuronal BDNF expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices. These rodent findings are consistent with the idea that clinical DBS of VC/VS may augment fear extinction through an increase in BDNF expression.

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral striatum increases BDNF in the fear extinction circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Monte, Fabricio H; Rodriguez-Romaguera, Jose; Rosas-Vidal, Luis E; Quirk, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) reduces the symptoms of treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and improves response to extinction-based therapies. We recently reported that DBS-like stimulation of a rat homologue of VC/VS, the dorsal-VS, reduced conditioned fear and enhanced extinction memory (Rodriguez-Romaguera et al., 2012). In contrast, DBS of the ventral-VS had the opposite effects. To examine possible mechanisms of these effects, we assessed the effects of VS DBS on the expression of the neural activity marker Fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key mediator of extinction plasticity in prefrontal-amygdala circuits. Consistent with decreased fear expression, DBS of dorsal-VS increased Fos expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices and in the lateral division of the central nucleus of amygdala, an area that inhibits amygdala output. Consistent with improved extinction memory, we found that DBS of dorsal-VS, but not ventral-VS, increased neuronal BDNF expression in prelimbic and infralimbic prefrontal cortices. These rodent findings are consistent with the idea that clinical DBS of VC/VS may augment fear extinction through an increase in BDNF expression. PMID:23964215

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val⁶⁶Met polymorphism affects resting regional cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity differentially in women versus men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shau-Ming; Eisenberg, Daniel P; Kohn, Philip D; Kippenhan, Jonathan S; Kolachana, Bhaskar S; Weinberger, Daniel R; Berman, Karen F

    2012-05-16

    The human Val⁶⁶Met single nucleotide polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene impacts BDNF signaling at the cellular level. At the neural-systems level, it is associated with differences in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal function during performance of cognitive and affective tasks. Because the impact of this variant on basal prefrontal and hippocampal activity is not known but may be relevant to understanding the function of this gene in health and disease, we studied 94 healthy individuals with H₂ ¹⁵O PET to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during rest and tested for between-genotype differences. Because BDNF and gonadal steroid hormones conjointly influence neuronal growth, survival, and plasticity in hippocampus and PFC, we also tested for sex × genotype interactions. Finally, in light of the known impact of BDNF on plasticity and dendritic arborization, we complimented direct rCBF comparisons with connectivity analyses to determine how activity in hippocampal and prefrontal regions showing between-genotype group differences covaries with rCBF in other nodes throughout the brain in a genotype- or sex-dependent manner. Compared with Val homozygotes, Met carriers had higher rCBF in prefrontal (BA25 extending into BA10) and hippocampal/parahippocampal regions. Moreover, there were significant sex × genotype interactions in regions (including frontal, parahippocampal, and lateral temporal cortex) in which Val homozygotes showed higher rCBF in females than males, but Met carriers showed the opposite relationship. Functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that correlations of BA25, hippocampus, and parahippocampus with frontal and temporal networks were positive for Val homozygotes and negative for Met carriers. In addition, sex × genotype analysis of functional connectivity revealed that genotype affected directionality of the inter-regional correlations differentially in men versus women. Our data indicate

  1. A selective histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor improves BDNF trafficking in hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout mice:implications for Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. One of the most prominent gene targets of MeCP2 is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, a potent modulator of activity-dependent synaptic development, function and plasticity. Dysfunctional BDNF signaling has been demonstrated in several pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT disease progression. To evaluate whether the dynamics of BDNF trafficking is affected by Mecp2 deletion, we analyzed movements of BDNF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in cultured hippocampal neurons by time-lapse fluorescence imaging. We found that both anterograde and retrograde vesicular trafficking of BDNF-YFP are significantly impaired in Mecp2 knockout hippocampal neurons. Selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 show neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases and stimulate microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking of BDNF-containing dense core vesicles. Here, we show that the selective HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin-A increased the velocity of BDNF-YFP vesicles in Mecp2 knockout neurons in both directions by increasing αtubulin acetylation. Tubastatin-A also restored activity-dependent BDNF release from Mecp2 knockout neurons to levels comparable to those shown by wildtype neurons. These findings demonstrate that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor is a potential pharmacological strategy to reverse cellular and synaptic impairments in RTT resulting from impaired BDNF signaling.

  2. Role of accumbens BDNF and TrkB in cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization, conditioned-place preference, and reinstatement in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bahi, Amine; Boyer, Frederic; Vijay, Chandrasekar; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the survival and function of midbrain DA neurons. BDNF action is mediated by the TrkB receptor–tyrosine kinase, and both BDNF and TrkB transcripts are widely expressed in the rat mesolimbic pathway, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral tegmentum area (VTA). Objective BDNF was previously shown to be involved in cocaine reward and relapse, as assessed in rat models. The goal of this study is to explore the role ...

  3. The CB₁ cannabinoid receptor signals striatal neuroprotection via a PI3K/Akt/mTORC1/BDNF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, C; Chiarlone, A; Bellocchio, L; Resel, E; Pruunsild, P; García-Rincón, D; Sendtner, M; Timmusk, T; Lutz, B; Galve-Roperh, I; Guzmán, M

    2015-10-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is the most abundant G protein-coupled receptor in the mammalian brain. In particular, the CB1 receptor is highly expressed in the basal ganglia, mostly on terminals of medium-sized spiny neurons, where it plays a key neuromodulatory function. The CB1 receptor also confers neuroprotection in various experimental models of striatal damage. However, the assessment of the physiological relevance and therapeutic potential of the CB1 receptor in basal ganglia-related diseases is hampered, at least in part, by the lack of knowledge of the precise mechanism of CB1 receptor neuroprotective activity. Here, by using an array of pharmacological, genetic and pharmacogenetic (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug) approaches, we show that (1) CB1 receptor engagement protects striatal cells from excitotoxic death via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway, which, in turn, (2) induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression through the selective activation of BDNF gene promoter IV, an effect that is mediated by multiple transcription factors. To assess the possible functional impact of the CB1/BDNF axis in a neurodegenerative-disease context in vivo, we conducted experiments in the R6/2 mouse, a well-established model of Huntington's disease, in which the CB1 receptor and BDNF are known to be severely downregulated in the dorsolateral striatum. Adeno-associated viral vector-enforced re-expression of the CB1 receptor in the dorsolateral striatum of R6/2 mice allowed the re-expression of BDNF and the concerted rescue of the neuropathological deficits in these animals. Collectively, these findings unravel a molecular link between CB1 receptor activation and BDNF expression, and support the relevance of the CB1/BDNF axis in promoting striatal neuron survival. PMID:25698444

  4. Serum BDNF levels before and after the development of mood disorders: a case-control study in a population cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, K; Yoshida, H; Jones, P B; Hashizume, M; Suzuki, Y; Ishijima, H; Kim, H K; Suzuki, T; Hachisu, M

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are low in major depressive disorder (MDD), and were recently shown to decrease in chronic depression, but whether this is a trait or state marker of MDD remains unclear. We investigated whether serum BDNF levels decrease before or after the developments of MDD and other mood disorders through a case-control study nested in a cohort of 1276 women aged 75-84 years in 2008. Psychiatrists using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV identified incident cases of mood disorders at follow-up surveys in 2010 and 2012: 28 of MDDs, 39 of minor depressive disorders (minDDs) and 8 of minor depressive episodes with a history of major depressive episodes (minDEs with MDE history). A total of 106 representative non-depressed controls were also identified in the 2012 follow-up. We assayed BDNF levels in preserved sera of cases and controls at baseline and at follow-up. Serum BDNF levels at baseline in cases of MDD, minDD or minDE with MDE history were no lower than those in controls. The decrease in the serum BDNF level from baseline to follow-up was greater in cases of MDD or minDE with MDE history than in controls or cases of minDD. These results show that serum BDNF levels are not a trait marker of MDD in old women but appeared to be a state marker. The different changes in BDNF levels among diagnostic groups suggest that MDD has a pathophysiologic relation to minDE with MDE history, rather than to minDD. PMID:27070410

  5. Interactive actions of Bdnf methylation and cell metabolism for building neural resilience under the influence of diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ethika; Zhuang, Yumei; Agrawal, Rahul; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Quality nutrition during the period of brain formation is a predictor of brain functional capacity and plasticity during adulthood; however it is not clear how this conferred plasticity imparts long-term neural resilience. Here we report that early exposure to dietary omega-3 fatty acids orchestrates key interactions between metabolic signals and Bdnf methylation creating a reservoir of neuroplasticity that can protect the brain against the deleterious effects of switching to a Western diet (WD). We observed that the switch to a WD increased Bdnf methylation specific to exon IV, in proportion to anxiety-like behavior, in Sprague Dawley rats reared in low omega-3 fatty acid diet, and these effects were abolished by the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Blocking methylation also counteracted the reducing action of WD on the transcription regulator CTCF binding to Bdnf promoter IV. In vitro studies confirmed that CTCF binding to Bdnf promoter IV is essential for the action of DHA on BDNF regulation. Diet is also intrinsically associated to cell metabolism, and here we show that the switch to WD downregulated cell metabolism (NAD/NADH ratio and SIRT1). The fact that DNA methyltransferase inhibitor did not alter these parameters suggests they occur upstream to methylation. In turn, the methylation inhibitor counteracted the action of WD on PGC-1α, a mitochondrial transcription co-activator and BDNF regulator, suggesting that PGC-1α is an effector of Bdnf methylation. Results support a model in which diet can build an "epigenetic memory" during brain formation that confers resilience to metabolic perturbations occurring in adulthood. PMID:25283985

  6. Evidence for single nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepankiewicz A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Szczepankiewicz1,21Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, 2Department of Psychiatric Genetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Bipolar disorder (BD is a complex disorder with a number of susceptibility genes and environmental risk factors involved in its pathogenesis. In recent years, huge progress has been made in molecular techniques for genetic studies, which have enabled identification of numerous genomic regions and genetic variants implicated in BD across populations. Despite the abundance of genetic findings, the results have often been inconsistent and not replicated for many candidate genes/single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Therefore, the aim of the review presented here is to summarize the most important data reported so far in candidate gene and genome-wide association studies. Taking into account the abundance of association data, this review focuses on the most extensively studied genes and polymorphisms reported so far for BD to present the most promising genomic regions/SNPs involved in BD. The review of association data reveals evidence for several genes (SLC6A4/5-HTT [serotonin transporter gene], BDNF [brain-derived neurotrophic factor], DAOA [D-amino acid oxidase activator], DTNBP1 [dysbindin], NRG1 [neuregulin 1], DISC1 [disrupted in schizophrenia 1] to be crucial candidates in BD, whereas numerous genome-wide association studies conducted in BD indicate polymorphisms in two genes (CACNA1C [calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit], ANK3 [ankyrin 3] replicated for association with BD in most of these studies. Nevertheless, further studies focusing on interactions between multiple candidate genes/SNPs, as well as systems biology and pathway analyses are necessary to integrate and improve the way we analyze the currently available association data.Keywords: candidate gene, genome-wide association study, SLC6A4, BDNF, DAOA, DTNBP1, NRG1, DISC1

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis following environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Chiara; Angelucci, Andrea; Costantin, Laura; Braschi, Chiara; Mazzantini, Mario; Babbini, Francesco; Fabbri, Maria Elena; Tessarollo, Lino; Maffei, Lamberto; Berardi, Nicoletta; Caleo, Matteo

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis continues to occur in the adult mammalian hippocampus and is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors. It is known that exposure to an enriched environment enhances the number of newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus. However, the mechanisms by which enriched housing produces these effects are poorly understood. To test a role for neurotrophins, we used heterozygous knockout mice for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF+/-) and mice lacking neurotrophin-4 (NT-4-/-) together with their wild-type littermates. Mice were either reared in standard laboratory conditions or placed in an enriched environment for 8 weeks. Animals received injections of the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newborn cells. Enriched wild-type and enriched NT-4-/- mice showed a two-fold increase in hippocampal neurogenesis as assessed by stereological counting of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and double labelling for BrdU and the neuronal marker NeuN. Remarkably, this enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis was not seen in enriched BDNF+/- mice. Failure to up-regulate BDNF accompanied the lack of a neurogenic response in enriched BDNF heterozygous mice. We conclude that BDNF but not NT-4 is required for the environmental induction of neurogenesis. PMID:17040481

  8. Cystamine and cysteamine increase brain levels of BDNF in Huntington disease via HSJ1b and transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell-Pagès, Maria; Canals, Josep M.; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Parker, J. Alex; Pineda, José R.; Grange, Ghislaine; Bryson, Elzbieta A.; Guillermier, Martine; Hirsch, Etienne; Hantraye, Philippe; Cheetham, Michael E.; Néri, Christian; Alberch, Jordi; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Saudou, Frédéric; Humbert, Sandrine

    2006-01-01

    There is no treatment for the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington disease (HD). Cystamine is a candidate drug; however, the mechanisms by which it operates remain unclear. We show here that cystamine increases levels of the heat shock DnaJ-containing protein 1b (HSJ1b) that are low in HD patients. HSJ1b inhibits polyQ-huntingtin–induced death of striatal neurons and neuronal dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans. This neuroprotective effect involves stimulation of the secretory pathway through formation of clathrin-coated vesicles containing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Cystamine increases BDNF secretion from the Golgi region that is blocked by reducing HSJ1b levels or by overexpressing transglutaminase. We demonstrate that cysteamine, the FDA-approved reduced form of cystamine, is neuroprotective in HD mice by increasing BDNF levels in brain. Finally, cysteamine increases serum levels of BDNF in mouse and primate models of HD. Therefore, cysteamine is a potential treatment for HD, and serum BDNF levels can be used as a biomarker for drug efficacy. PMID:16604191

  9. Brain BDNF levels elevation induced by physical training is reduced after unilateral common carotid artery occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoujaafar, Hayat; Van Hoecke, Jacques; Mossiat, Claude M; Marie, Christine

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the contribution of blood flow elevation in the cerebrovasculature to physical training-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels elevation in the brain. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels were measured in the motor cortex 24 h after the last session of a forced treadmill walking (30 minutes a day, 18 m/minute for 7 consecutive days). Unilateral common carotid artery occlusion and modulation of exercise intensity (0 versus -10% inclination of the treadmill) were used as strategies to reduce the (normal) elevation of flow in the cerebrovasculature occurring during exercise. Administration of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 60 mg/kg before each exercise sessions) and genetic hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats) were used as approaches to reduce stimulation of nitric oxide production in response to shear stress elevation. Vascular occlusion totally and partially abolished the effect of physical training on BDNF levels in the hemisphere ipsilateral and contralateral to occlusion, respectively. BDNF levels were higher after high than low exercise intensity. In addition, both genetic hypertension and L-NAME treatment blunted the effects of physical training on BDNF. From these results, we propose that elevation of brain BDNF levels elicited by physical training involves changes in cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25052557

  10. Comparison of high-intensity vs. high-volume resistance training on the BDNF response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, David D; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Wang, Ran; La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the acute and chronic response of circulating plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to high-intensity low-volume (HI) and low-intensity high volume (HV) resistance training. Twenty experienced resistance-trained men (23.5 ± 2.6 y, 1.79 ± 0.05 m, 75.7 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Before the resistance training program (PRE), participants performed an acute bout of exercise using either the HI [3-5 reps; 90% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] or HV (10-12 reps; 70% 1RM) training paradigm. The acute exercise protocol was repeated after 7 wk of training (POST). Blood samples were obtained at rest (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), and 60 min (60P) post exercise at PRE and POST. A three-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze acute changes in BDNF concentrations during HI and HV resistance exercise and the effect of 7 wk of training. No training × time × group interaction in BDNF was noted (P = 0.994). Significant main effects for training (P = 0.050) and time (P effect were noted in the BDNF area under the curve response. Results indicate that BDNF concentrations are increased after an acute bout of resistance exercise, regardless of training paradigm, and are further increased during a 7-wk training program in experienced lifters. PMID:27231312

  11. Increased Olfactory Bulb BDNF Expression Does Not Rescue Deficits in Olfactory Neurogenesis in the Huntington's Disease R6/2 Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Shamayra; Bahga, Dalbir; McDole, Brittnee; Guthrie, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) interferes with the actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and BDNF signaling is reduced in the diseased striatum. Loss of this trophic support is thought to contribute to loss of striatal medium spiny neurons in HD. Increasing BDNF in the adult striatum or ventricular ependyma slows disease progression in HD mouse models, and diverts subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts from their normal destination, the olfactory bulb, to the striatum, where some survive and develop features of mature neurons. Most neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb differentiate as granule cells, with approximately half surviving whereas others undergo apoptosis. In the R6/2 HD mouse model, survival of adult-born granule cells is reduced. Newly maturing cells express the BDNF receptor TrkB, suggesting that mhtt may interfere with normal BDNF trophic activity, increasing their loss. To determine if augmenting BDNF counteracts this, we examined granule cell survival in R6/2 mice that overexpress BDNF in olfactory bulb. Although we detected a decline in apoptosis, increased BDNF was not sufficient to normalize granule cell survival within their normal target in R6/2 mice. PMID:26783111

  12. Aging and depression vulnerability interaction results in decreased serotonin innervation associated with reduced BDNF levels in hippocampus of rats bred for learned helplessness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A;

    2010-01-01

    density. Hippocampal BDNF protein levels were measured by ELISA. An exacerbated age-related loss of serotonin fiber density specific for the CA1 area was observed in the cLH animals, whereas reduced hippocampal BDNF levels were seen in young and old cLH when compared with age-matched cNLH controls...

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances GABA transport by modulating the trafficking of GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) from the plasma membrane of rat cortical astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, Sandra H; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia;

    2011-01-01

    /MAPK pathway and requires active adenosine A(2A) receptors. Transport through GAT-3 is not affected by BDNF. To elucidate if BDNF affects trafficking of GAT-1 in astrocytes, we generated and infected astrocytes with a functional mutant of the rat GAT-1 (rGAT-1) in which the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope was...

  14. Potentiation of Methylmercury-Induced Death in Rat Cerebellar Granular Neurons Occurs by Further Decrease of Total Intracellular GSH with BDNF via TrkB in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Maki, Takehiro; Kaneko, Takuya; Hemmi, Natsuko; Sekiguchi, Hitomi; Horio, Tomoyo; Kadowaki, Erina; Ozawa, Aisa; Yamamoto, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a principal factor for neurogenesis, neurodevelopment and neural survival through a BDNF receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) B, while BDNF can also cause a decrease in the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level. We investigated the exacerbation of methylmercury-induced death of rat cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs) by BDNF in vitro. Since methylmercury can decrease intracellular GSH levels, we hypothesized that a further decrease of the intracellular GSH level is involved in the process of the exacerbation of neuronal cell death. In the present study, we established that in CGN culture, a decrease of the intracellular GSH level was further potentiated with BDNF in the process of the methylmercury-induced neuronal death and also in GSH reducer-induced neuronal death. BDNF treatment promoted the decrease in GSH levels induced by methylmercury and also by L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and diethyl maleate (DEM). The promoting effect of BDNF was observed in a TrkB-vector transformant of the rat neuroblastoma B35 cell line but not in the mock-vector transformant. These results indicate that the exacerbating effect of BDNF on methylmercury-induced neuronal death in cultures of CGNs includes a further decrease of intracellular GSH levels, for which TrkB is essential. PMID:27251509

  15. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes Catarina; Ferreira Raquel; George Jimmy; Sanches Rui; Rodrigues Diana I; Gonçalves Nélio; Cunha Rodrigo A

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the...

  16. Increased expression of BDNF transcript with exon VI in hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Levy, G A; Rocha, L; Lubin, F D; Alonso-Vanegas, M A; Nani, A; Buentello-García, R M; Pérez-Molina, R; Briones-Velasco, M; Recillas-Targa, F; Pérez-Molina, A; San-Juan, D; Cienfuegos, J; Cruz-Fuentes, C S

    2016-02-01

    A putative role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in epilepsy has emerged from in vitro and animal models, but few studies have analyzed human samples. We assessed the BDNF expression of transcripts with exons I (BDNFI), II (BDNFII), IV (BDNFIV) and VI (BDNFVI) and methylation levels of promoters 4 and 6 in the hippocampi of patients with pharmaco-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (n=24). Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and pre-surgical pharmacological treatment were considered as clinical independent variables. A statistical significant increase for the BDNFVI (pTPM) (N=3) was associated to a decrease in BDNFVI expression (pTPM. These results suggest an up-regulated expression of a specific BDNF transcript in patients with TLE, an effect that seems to be dependent on the use of specific drugs. PMID:26621122

  17. A pilot study on the effect of cognitive training on BDNF serum levels in individuals with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Angelucci

    2015-03-01

    Thus, in this pilot study we evaluated the effect of a cognitive rehabilitation protocol focused on the training of executive functioning and measured BDNF serum levels in a group of PD patients with mild cognitive impairment, as compared to the effect of a placebo treatment (n=7/8 group. The results showed that PD patients undergoing the cognitive rehabilitation, besides improving their cognitive performance as measured with the Zoo Map test, also displayed increased serum BDNF levels as compared to the placebo group. These findings suggest that BDNF serum levels may represent a biomarker of the effects of cognitive rehabilitation in PD patients affected by MCI. However, the functional significance of this increase in PD as well as other neuropathological conditions remains to be determined.

  18. Noopept stimulates the expression of NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Zaplina, A P; Vahitova, Ju V; Salimgareeva, M H; Jamidanov, R S; Seredenin, S B

    2008-09-01

    We studied the effect of original dipeptide preparation Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) with nootropic and neuroprotective properties on the expression of mRNA for neurotropic factors NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus. Expression of NGF and BDNF mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was studied by Northern blot analysis. Taking into account the fact that pharmacological activity of Noopept is realized after both acute and chronic treatment, we studied the effect of single and long-term treatment (28 days) with this drug. Expression of the studied neurotropic factors in the cerebral cortex was below the control after single administration of Noopept, while chronic administration caused a slight increase in BDNF expression. In the hippocampus, expression of mRNA for both neurotrophins increased after acute administration of Noopept. Chronic treatment with Noopept was not followed by the development of tolerance, but even potentiated the neurotrophic effect. These changes probably play a role in neuronal restoration. We showed that the nootropic drug increases expression of neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that neurotrophin synthesis in the hippocampus determines cognitive function, particularly in consolidation and delayed memory retrieval. Published data show that neurotrophic factor deficiency in the hippocampus is observed not only in advanced Alzheimer's disease, but also at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (pre-disease state). In light of this our findings suggest that Noopept holds much promise to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, therapeutic effectiveness of Noopept should be evaluated at the initial stage of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19240853

  19. Hydroxysafflor yellow A increases BDNF and NMDARs in the hippocampus in a vascular dementia rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengya; Sun, Qingna; Wang, Yiyi; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a drug that exerts angiogenesis regulatory and neuroprotective effects and has become an effective therapy for brain and heart ischemic disorders. There is no definite evidence supporting a therapeutic effect of HSYA in vascular dementia (VaD). We used HSYA in a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia to determine its potential therapeutic effects in VaD. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate spatial cognitive function, and long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested as a marker of synaptic plasticity. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and two subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR; GluN2A and GluN2B) in the hippocampus were measured via western blotting. The MWM results showed that the experimental VaD group had longer escape latencies than the sham group, whereas the HSYA group had a decreased escape latency compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus was also enhanced in the HSYA compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The western blotting results revealed lower hippocampal BDNF and GluN2B expression in the VaD group compared with the sham group and significantly higher hippocampal expression in the HSYA group compared with the VaD group. No significant change in GluN2A expression was detected. The results indicate that HSYA may enhance the endogenous expression of BDNF and GluN2B, which are associated with the synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus, and may improve spatial learning and memory abilities in a rat model of VaD. PMID:27086971

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona;

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We are...... after neuronal depolarization produced by high potassium. This study emphasizes the role of BDNF as an important regulator of receptor compositions in the synapse and provides further evidence that BDNF directly regulates important drug targets involved in cognition and mood. Synapse 67:794-800, 2013...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  1. Paternal alcohol exposure in mice alters brain NGF and BDNF and increases ethanol-elicited preference in male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccanti, Mauro; Coccurello, Roberto; Carito, Valentina; Ciafrè, Stefania; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Tirassa, Paola; Chaldakov, George N; Pascale, Esterina; Ceccanti, Marco; Codazzo, Claudia; Fiore, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure during pregnancy induces cognitive and physiological deficits in the offspring. However, the role of paternal alcohol exposure (PAE) on offspring EtOH sensitivity and neurotrophins has not received much attention. The present study examined whether PAE may disrupt nerve growth factor (NGF) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and affect EtOH preference/rewarding properties in the male offspring. CD1 sire mice were chronically addicted for EtOH or administered with sucrose. Their male offsprings when adult were assessed for EtOH preference by a conditioned place preference paradigm. NGF and BDNF, their receptors (p75(NTR) , TrkA and TrkB), dopamine active transporter (DAT), dopamine receptors D1 and D2, pro-NGF and pro-BDNF were also evaluated in brain areas. PAE affected NGF levels in frontal cortex, striatum, olfactory lobes, hippocampus and hypothalamus. BDNF alterations in frontal cortex, striatum and olfactory lobes were found. PAE induced a higher susceptibility to the EtOH rewarding effects mostly evident at the lower concentration (0.5 g/kg) that was ineffective in non-PAE offsprings. Moreover, higher ethanol concentrations (1.5 g/kg) produced an aversive response in PAE animals and a significant preference in non-PAE offspring. PAE affected also TrkA in the hippocampus and p75(NTR) in the frontal cortex. DAT was affected in the olfactory lobes in PAE animals treated with 0.5 g/kg of ethanol while no differences were found on D1/D2 receptors and for pro-NGF or pro-BDNF. In conclusion, this study shows that: PAE affects NGF and BDNF expression in the mouse brain; PAE may induce ethanol intake preference in the male offspring. PMID:25940002

  2. Stage-dependent association of BDNF and TGF-β1 with lung function in stable COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoll Paul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is characterised by complex inflammatory, neuronal and fibrotic changes. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF is a key regulator of neuronal plasticity, whereas Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1 plays a crucial role in tissue repair and emphysema pathogenesis. Both mediators are stored in platelets and released from platelets in inflammatory conditions and during serum preparation. In patients with asthma, it was previously shown that elevated serum BDNF concentrations correlate with disease severity, whereas TGF-β1 concentrations were normal. Methods In the present study, 63 patients with stable COPD (spirometric GOLD stages 2–4 and 17 age- and comorbidity-matched controls were studied. Lung function, smoking history, medication, platelet concentrations in peripheral blood and serum concentrations of BDNF, TGF-β1 and Serotonin (5-HT were assessed in all participants. Results Serum levels of both BDNF and TGF-β1 (but not concentrations of platelets in peripheral blood were significantly elevated in all stages of COPD as compared to controls. Highest BDNF concentrations were found in spirometric GOLD stage 3, whereas highest TGF-β1 serum levels were found in spirometric GOLD stage 4. There were specific, stage-dependent correlations of these mediators with lung function parameters of the patients. Conclusions Taken together, we show that, in contrast to asthma, COPD is characterised by elevated concentrations of both BDNF and TGF-β1 in serum. The stage-dependent association with lung function supports the hypothesis that these platelet mediators may play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  3. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine;

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction in...... hypocretin neurons in hypothalamus in post-mortem tissue. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are important for activity-dependent neuronal function and synaptic modulation and it is considered that these mechanisms are important in sleep regulation. We hypothesised that...

  4. BDNF up-regulates evoked GABAergic transmission in developing hippocampus by potentiating presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, P; Novara, M; Carabelli, V; Hernández-Guijo, J M; Carbone, E

    2002-12-01

    Chronic application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induces new selective synthesis of non-L-type Ca2+ channels (N, P/Q, R) at the soma of cultured hippocampal neurons. As N- and P/Q-channels support neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus, this suggests that BDNF-treatment may enhance synaptic transmission by increasing the expression of presynaptic Ca2+ channels as well. To address this issue we studied the long-term effects of BDNF on miniature and stimulus-evoked GABAergic transmission in rat embryo hippocampal neurons. We found that BDNF increased the frequency of miniature currents (mIPSCs) by approximately 40%, with little effects on their amplitude. BDNF nearly doubled the size of evoked postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) with a marked increase of paired-pulse depression, which is indicative of a major increase in presynaptic activity. The potentiation of eIPSCs was more relevant during the first two weeks in culture, when GABAergic transmission is depolarizing. BDNF action was mediated by TrkB-receptors and had no effects on: (i) the amplitude and dose-response of GABA-evoked IPSCs and (ii) the number of GABA(A) receptor clusters and the total functioning synapses, suggesting that the neurotrophin unlikely acted postsynaptically. In line with this, BDNF affected the contribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels mediating evoked GABAergic transmission. BDNF drastically increased the fraction of evoked IPSCs supported by N- and P/Q-channels while it decreased the contribution associated with R- and L-types. This selective action resembles the previously observed up-regulatory effects of BDNF on somatic Ca2+ currents in developing hippocampus, suggesting that potentiation of presynaptic N- and P/Q-channel signalling belongs to a manifold mechanism by which BDNF increases the efficiency of stimulus-evoked GABAergic transmission. PMID:12492424

  5. Differential brain and spinal cord cytokine and BDNF levels in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are modulated by prior and regular exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Danielle; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina; Silva, Thiago Vitarelli da; Faraco, Camila Cristina Fraga; Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Santos, Daniel Moreira dos; Bethea, John R; Brambilla, Roberta; Orian, Jacqueline M; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2013-11-15

    The interactions between a prior program of regular exercise and the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-mediated responses were evaluated. In the exercised EAE mice, although there was no effect on infiltrated cells, the cytokine and derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were altered, and the clinical score was attenuated. Although, the cytokine levels were decreased in the brain and increased in the spinal cord, BDNF was elevated in both compartments with a tendency of lesser demyelization volume in the spinal cord of the exercised EAE group compared with the unexercised. PMID:24054000

  6. Polymorphic ecthymatoid dermosporidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorpade A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a young Chhattisgarhi male with polymorphic dermosporidiosis (cutaneous rhinosporidiosis. He had multiple subcutaneous nodules and an ecthymatoid skin lesion along with nasal rhinosporidiosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstration of sporangia with endospores in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, histopathology, and imprint smear from the skin lesions. Treatment was by surgical excision, electrocoagulation, and dapsone. There was no recurrence. Dermatologists should be aware of the diverse cutaneous manifestations of this primarily nasal disease. This is the second published report of polymorphic dermosporidiosis, and the first one reporting an ecthymatoid lesion.

  7. Polymorphs of Pridopidine Hydrochloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, A.; Frostrup, B.; Bond, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Pridopidine hydrochloride (Huntexil, Neuro-Search A/S, Ballerup, Denmark) is a dopaminergic stabilizer, currently in development for the treatment of motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease. In this study, two polymorphic forms are characterized, forms I and II. The crystal structures...... crystallization to form II is observed. The polymorphs are enantiotropically related, form I being stable at ambient conditions and form II being stable above 127 degrees C. At around 180 degrees C, the differential scanning calorimetry thermogram of a mixture of forms land II shows a solid-state transition from...

  8. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HarishBabu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  9. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclothiazide (CTZ has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  10. Nature vs. nurture: can enrichment rescue the behavioural phenotype of BDNF heterozygous mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourbaji, Sabine; Brandwein, Christiane; Vogt, Miriam A; Dormann, Christof; Hellweg, Rainer; Gass, Peter

    2008-10-10

    In earlier experiments we have demonstrated that group-housing in a rather impoverished "standard" environment can be a crucial stress factor in male C57Bl/6 mice. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of combining a probable genetic vulnerability--postulated by the "Neurotrophin Hypothesis of Depression"--with the potentially modulating influence of a stressful environment such as "impoverished" standard housing conditions. For that purpose mice with a partial deletion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were group-housed under standard and enriched housing conditions and analysed in a well-established test battery for emotional behaviours. Standard group-housing affected emotional behaviour in male and female BDNF heterozygous mice, causing an increase in anxiety, changes in exploration as well as nociception. Providing the animals' cages with supplementary enrichment, however, led to a rescue of emotional alterations, which emphasises the significance of external factors and their relevance for a valid investigation of genetic aspects in these mutants as well as others, which may be examined in terms of stress-responsiveness or emotionality. PMID:18538870

  11. Gradually Increased Training Intensity Benefits Rehabilitation Outcome after Stroke by BDNF Upregulation and Stress Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical training is necessary for effective rehabilitation in the early poststroke period. Animal studies commonly use fixed training intensity throughout rehabilitation and without adapting it to the animals' recovered motor ability. This study investigated the correlation between training intensity and rehabilitation efficacy by using a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion surgery. Sixty rats with successful stroke were then randomly assigned into four groups: control (CG, n=15, low intensity (LG, n=15, gradually increased intensity (GIG, n=15, and high intensity (HG, n=15. Behavioral tests were conducted daily to evaluate motor function recovery. Stress level and neural recovery were evaluated via plasma corticosterone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration, respectively. GIG rats significantly (P<0.05 recovered motor function and produced higher hippocampal BDNF (112.87 ± 25.18 ng/g. GIG and LG rats exhibited similar stress levels (540.63 ± 117.40 nM/L and 508.07 ± 161.30 nM/L, resp., which were significantly lower (P<0.05 than that (716.90 ± 156.48 nM/L of HG rats. Training with gradually increased intensity achieved better recovery with lower stress. Our observations indicate that a training protocol that includes gradually increasing training intensity should be considered in both animal and clinical studies for better stroke recovery.

  12. Teaching polymorphism early

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Is it possible to teach dynamic polymorphism early? What techniques could facilitate teaching it in Java. This panel will bring together people who have considered this question and attempted to implement it in various ways, some more completely than others. It will also give participants an...

  13. Enzyme polymorphisms in Canarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-two accessions of Canarium involving seven species, C. ovatum, C. album, C. megalanthum, C. harveyi, C. indicum, C. mehenbethene, and C. odontophyllum were studied for isozyme polymorphisms. Starch gel electrophoresis with a histidine-citrate buffer system (pH 6.5) was employed to assay six en...

  14. Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-08-01

    The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to β- and γ-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the α and γ forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

  15. BDNF-induced presynaptic facilitation of GABAergic transmission in the hippocampus of young adults is dependent of TrkB and adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino-Oliveira, Mariana; Rombo, Diogo M; Dias, Raquel B; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and adenosine are widely recognized as neuromodulators of glutamatergic transmission in the adult brain. Most BDNF actions upon excitatory plasticity phenomena are under control of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). Concerning gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated transmission, the available information refers to the control of GABA transporters. We now focused on the influence of BDNF and the interplay with adenosine on phasic GABAergic transmission. To assess this, we evaluated evoked and spontaneous synaptic currents recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells in acute hippocampal slices from adult rat brains (6 to 10 weeks old). BDNF (10-100 ng/mL) increased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) frequency, but not amplitude, as well as increased the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked by afferent stimulation. The facilitatory action of BDNF upon GABAergic transmission was lost in the presence of a Trk inhibitor (K252a, 200 nM), but not upon p75(NTR) blockade (anti-p75(NTR) IgG, 50 μg/mL). Moreover, the facilitatory action of BDNF onto GABAergic transmission was also prevented upon A2AR antagonism (SCH 58261, 50 nM). We conclude that BDNF facilitates GABAergic signaling at the adult hippocampus via a presynaptic mechanism that depends on TrkB and adenosine A2AR activation. PMID:26897393

  16. Impaired TrkB Signaling Underlies Reduced BDNF-Mediated Trophic Support of Striatal Neurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q; Rymar, Vladimir V; Sadikot, Abbas F

    2016-01-01

    The principal projection neurons of the striatum are critically dependent on an afferent supply of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for neurotrophic support. These neurons express TrkB, the cognate receptor for BDNF, which activates signaling pathways associated with neuronal survival and phenotypic maintenance. Impairment of the BDNF-TrkB pathway is suspected to underlie the early dysfunction and prominent degeneration of striatal neurons in Huntington disease (HD). Some studies in HD models indicate that BDNF supply is reduced, while others suggest that TrkB signaling is impaired earlier in disease progression. It remains important to determine whether a primary defect in TrkB signaling underlies reduced neurotrophic support and the early vulnerability of striatal neurons in HD. Using the transgenic R6/2 mouse model of HD we found that prior to striatal degeneration there are early deficits in striatal protein levels of activated phospho-TrkB and the downstream-regulated protein DARPP-32. In contrast, total-TrkB and BDNF protein levels remained normal. Primary neurons cultured from R6/2 striatum exhibited reduced survival in response to exogenous BDNF applications. Moreover, BDNF activation of phospho-TrkB and downstream signal transduction was attenuated in R6/2 striatal cultures. These results suggest that neurotrophic support of striatal neurons is attenuated early in disease progression due to defects in TrkB signal transduction in the R6/2 model of HD. PMID:27013968

  17. Advances in the research of BDNF with cerebral ischemia%脑源性神经营养因子与脑缺血的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付美红; 李海涛

    2012-01-01

    脑源性神经营养因子(brain derived neurotrophic factor,BDNF)是在脑内形成的一类神经营养因子.BDNF通过作用于其特异性受体TrkB、P75促进神经元的生长发育同时修复受损的神经元.BDNF对缺血性脑损伤的保护机制是通过下调钙离子浓度,减小Bax/Bcl-2比值,对抗NO毒性等途径实现的.该文介绍了BDNF的基本作用及其与脑缺血的相关作用研究,综述了BDNF的应用方法研究.%Brain derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF ) is a class of neurotrophic factor formed within the brain. BDNF promotes the growth and development of the neurons and repair the damaged neurons acting on its specific receptors TrkB and P75. BDNF plays a key role in ischemic damage protection mainly by eliminating oxygen-derived free radicals, reducing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, regulating the low levels of ca2 + and against NO toxicity as well. This paper introduces the basic function of BDNF and the related research of BDNF on ischemic damage. The article reviews the research of the application methods of BDNF.

  18. Music exposure improves spatial cognition by enhancing the BDNF level of dorsal hippocampal subregions in the developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingshou; Chen, Wenxi; Wang, Yanran; Jing, Wei; Gao, Shan; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has shown that dorsal hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory process. Music exposure can enhance brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression level in dorsal hippocampus (DH) and thus enhance spatial cognition ability. But whether music experience may affect different subregions of DH in the same degree remains unclear. Here, we studied the effects of exposure to Mozart K.448 on learning behavior in developing rats using the classical Morris water maze task. The results showed that early music exposure could enhance significantly learning performance of the rats in the water maze test. Meanwhile, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA3 (dCA3) and dentate gyrus (dDG) was significantly enhanced in rats exposed to Mozart music as compared to those without music exposure. In contrast, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA1 (dCA1) was not affected. The results suggest that the spatial memory improvement by music exposure in rats may be associated with the enhanced BDNF/TrkB level of dCA3 and dDG. PMID:26802511

  19. Activation of the cAMP Pathway Induces RACK1-Dependent Binding of β-Actin to BDNF Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neasta, Jeremie; Fiorenza, Anna; He, Dao-Yao; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kiely, Patrick A.; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    RACK1 is a scaffolding protein that contributes to the specificity and propagation of several signaling cascades including the cAMP pathway. As such, RACK1 participates in numerous cellular functions ranging from cell migration and morphology to gene transcription. To obtain further insights on the mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates cAMP-dependent processes, we set out to identify new binding partners of RACK1 during activation of the cAMP signaling using a proteomics strategy. We identified β-actin as a direct RACK1 binding partner and found that the association between β-actin and RACK1 is increased in response to the activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, we show that cAMP-dependent increase in BDNF expression requires filamentous actin. We further report that β-actin associates with the BDNF promoter IV upon the activation of the cAMP pathway and present data to suggest that the association of β-actin with BDNF promoter IV is RACK1-dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that β-actin is a new RACK1 binding partner and that the RACK1 and β-actin association participate in the cAMP-dependent regulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:27505161

  20. Spirulina non-protein components induce BDNF gene transcription via HO-1 activity in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kyoji; Itoh, Mari; Nishibori, Naoyoshi; Her, Song; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green algae are known to contain biologically active proteins and non-protein substances and considered as useful materials for manufacturing the nutritional supplements. Particularly, Spirulina has been reported to contain a variety of antioxidants, such as flavonoids, carotenoids, and vitamin C, thereby exerting their protective effects against the oxidative damage to the cells. In addition to their antioxidant actions, polyphenolic compounds have been speculated to cause the protection of neuronal cells and the recovery of neurologic function in the brain through the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in glial cells. Then, the protein-deprived extract was prepared by removing the most part of protein components from aqueous extract of Spirulina platensis, and the effect of this extract on BDNF gene transcription was examined in C6 glioma cells. Consequently, the protein-deprived extract was shown to cause the elevation of BDNF mRNA levels following the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the glioma cells. Therefore, the non-protein components of S. platensis are considered to stimulate BDNF gene transcription through the HO-1 induction in glial cells, thus proposing a potential ability of the algae to indirectly modulate the brain function through the glial cell activity. PMID:25349086

  1. CART attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress response induced by cerebral ischemia and reperfusion through upregulating BDNF synthesis and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Hu, Shengdi; Liu, Libing; Chen, Man; Wang, Lai; Zeng, Xianwei; Zhu, Shigong

    2013-07-12

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a neuropeptide, has shown strong neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report a new effect of CART on ER stress which is induced by cerebral I/R in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured cortical neurons, as well as a new functionality of BDNF in the neuroprotection by CART against the ER stress in cerebral I/R. The results showed that CART was effective in reducing the neuronal apoptosis and expression of ER stress markers (GRP78, CHOP and cleaved caspase12), and increasing the BDNF expression in I/R injury rat cortex both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the effects of CART on ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis and ER stress were suppressed by tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) IgG, whereas the effects of CART on BDNF transcription, synthesis and secretion were abolished by CREB siRNA. This work suggests that CART is functional in inhibiting the cerebral I/R-induced ER stress and neuronal apoptosis by facilitating the transcription, synthesis and secretion of BDNF in a CREB-dependent way. PMID:23770418

  2. Exposure to sub-chronic unpredictable stress accounts for antidepressant-like effects in hamsters treated with BDNF and CNQX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alò, Raffaella; Mele, Maria; Fazzari, Gilda; Avolio, Ennio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidences indicate that cerebral neurotrophic factors like vascular endothelial growth factor plus signaling pathways of the glutamatergic neuroreceptor system (L-Glu) are determinant modulators of depression-like states. In the present study, the type of interaction(s) exerted by the AMPAergic antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxalin-2,3-dione (CNQX) and the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depression-like behaviors in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) were investigated. Sub-chronic administration of BDNF in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of stressed hamsters was responsible for very evident (pdepression states, were reduced following treatment with both compounds. Contextually, marked mRNA expression levels of the BDNF receptor (tropomyosin-related kinase B; TrkB) were detected in DG and the oriens-pyramidalis of HIP (Or-Py) while a moderate (pcaused moderate increases of the major stress protein (Hsp70) in DG and Or-Py. Conversely, while CNQX induced similar TrkB expression levels, it instead accounted for a moderate reduction of Hsp70 mRNAs in the same brain areas. Overall these results support crucial roles played by BDNF and AMPAergic neurosignaling mechanisms during distinct adaptive responses of depression- and anxiety-like states in hamsters. PMID:26409118

  3. Curcumin Improves Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42 Induced Spatial Memory Deficits through BDNF-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the most active component of turmeric, has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. Previous studies have suggested that curcumin reduces the levels of amyloid and oxidized proteins and prevents memory deficits and thus is beneficial to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin's effect on cognitive functions are not well-understood. In the present study, we examined the working memory and spatial reference memory in rats that received a ventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42, representing a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The rats treated with Aβ1-42 exhibited obvious cognitive deficits in behavioral tasks. Chronic (seven consecutive days, once per day but not acute (once a day curcumin treatments (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg improved the cognitive functions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the beneficial effect of curcumin is accompanied by increased BDNF levels and elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the cognition enhancement effect of curcumin could be mimicked by the overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus and blocked by either bilateral hippocampal injections with lentiviruses that express BDNF shRNA or a microinjection of ERK inhibitor. These findings suggest that chronic curcumin ameliorates AD-related cognitive deficits and that upregulated BDNF-ERK signaling in the hippocampus may underlie the cognitive improvement produced by curcumin.

  4. Involvement of BDNF/ERK signaling in spontaneous recovery from trimethyltin-induced hippocampal neurotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sueun; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Son, Yeonghoon; Kim, Jinwook; Kang, Sohi; Ahn, Wooseok; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Taekyun; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2016-03-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) toxicity causes histopathological damage in the hippocampus and induces seizure behaviors in mice. The lesions and symptoms recover spontaneously over time; however, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying this recovery from TMT toxicity. We investigated changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (BDNF/ERK) signaling pathways in the mouse hippocampus following TMT toxicity. Mice (7 weeks old, C57BL/6) administered TMT (2.6mg/kg intraperitoneally) showed acute and severe neurodegeneration with increased TUNEL-positive cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. The mRNA and protein levels of BDNF in the hippocampus were elevated by TMT treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that TMT treatment markedly increased phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression in the mouse hippocampus 1-4 days after TMT treatment, although the intensity of ERK immunoreactivity in mossy fiber decreased at 1-8 days post-treatment. In addition, ERK-immunopositive cells were localized predominantly in doublecortin-positive immature progenitor neurons in the DG. In primary cultured immature hippocampal neurons (4 days in vitro), BDNF treatment alleviated TMT-induced neurotoxicity, via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, we suggest that BDNF/ERK signaling pathways may be associated with cell differentiation and survival of immature progenitor neurons, and will eventually lead to spontaneous recovery in TMT-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration. PMID:26772626

  5. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment (valproic acid, fluoxetine, risperidone, lorazepam). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical responses at baseline and at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8 and IL-1β) and BDNF levels were also measured. Mixed models repeated measurement was used to examine the therapeutic effect and changes in BDNF and cytokine levels between the groups. HDRS and YMRS scores significantly (P < 0.001) declined in both groups, the SBP group had significantly lower levels of BDNF (P = 0.005) and TGF-β1 (P = 0.02). Patients with SBP and BP-II respond similarly to treatment, but SBP patients may have different neuroinflammation marker expression. PMID:27270858

  6. Does PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF Elicit the Beneficial Effects of Exercise on Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran; Megraw, Timothy L; Curtiss, Jennifer; Shirani Faradonbeh, Mahsa; Vaziri, Pooneh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have high prevalence among the elderly. Many strategies have been established to alleviate the symptoms experienced by affected individuals. Recent studies have shown that exercise helps patients with neurological disorders to regain lost physical abilities. PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF has emerged recently as a critical pathway for neuroprotection. PGC1α is a highly conserved co-activator of transcription factors that preserves and protects neurons against destruction. PGC1α regulates FNDC5 and its processed and secreted peptide Irisin, which has been proposed to play a critical role in energy expenditure and to promote neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. FNDC5 may also increase the expression of the neurotrophic factor BDNF, a neuroprotective agent, in the hippocampus. BDNF is secreted from hippocampus, amygdala, cerebral cortex and hypothalamus neurons and initiates intracellular signaling pathways through TrkB receptors. These pathways have positive feedback on CREB activities and lead to enhancement in PGC1α expression in neurons. Therefore, FNDC5 could behave as a key regulator in neuronal survival and development. This review presents recent findings on the PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF pathway and its role in neuroprotection, and discusses the controversial promise of irisin as a mediator of the positive benefits of exercise. PMID:26611102

  7. Histone deacetylase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in a pharmacological model of mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Stertz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of repeated D-amphetamine (AMPH exposure, a well-accepted animal model of acute mania in bipolar disorder (BD, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors on locomotor behavior and HDAC activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of rats. Moreover, we aimed to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and mRNA levels in these samples. Methods: We treated adult male Wistar rats with 2 mg/kg AMPH or saline intraperitoneally for 14 days. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received 47.5 mg/kg lithium (Li, 200 mg/kg sodium valproate (VPT, 2 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB, or saline. We evaluated locomotor activity in the open-field task and assessed HDAC activity in the PFC and PBMCs, and BDNF levels in the PFC and plasma. Results: AMPH significantly increased locomotor activity, which was reversed by all drugs. This hyperactivity was associated with increased HDAC activity in the PFC, which was partially reversed by Li, VPT, and SB. No differences were found in BDNF levels. Conclusion: Repeated AMPH administration increases HDAC activity in the PFC without altering BDNF levels. The partial reversal of HDAC increase by Li, VPT, and SB may account for their ability to reverse AMPH-induced hyperactivity.

  8. Changes in the BDNF-immunopositive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongwon; Kang, Sung Goo; Kam, Kyung-Yoon

    2015-04-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family and is widely distributed in the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex. BDNF plays an important role in normal neural development, survival of existing neurons, and activity-dependent neuroplasticity. BDNF can also be neuroprotective and evoke neurogenesis in certain pathological conditions, such as cerebral ischemia. Neocortical layer I is an important region that can integrate feedforward and feedback information from other cortical areas and subcortical regions. In addition, it has recently been proposed as a possible source of neuronal progenitor cells after ischemia. Therefore, we investigated changes in the BDNF-immunoreactive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia in rats. In unaffected condition, the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I was significantly less than in layer II/III in the cingulate cortex and in the motor and sensory areas. The increase in the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I 8 days after MCAO was more remarkable than layer II/III, in all regions except the area of cingulate cortex farthest from the infarct core. Only BDNF(+)-Ox-42(+) cells showed a tendency to increase consistently toward the infarct core in both layers I and II/III, implying a major source of BDNF for response to ischemic injury. The present study suggests that some beneficial effects during recovery from ischemic injury, such as increased supportive microglia/macrophages, occur owing to a sensitive response of BDNF in layer I. PMID:25681548

  9. The cumulative effect of genetic polymorphisms on depression and brain structural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Milutin; Canu, Elisa; Agosta, Federica; Munjiza, Ana; Novakovic, Ivana; Dobricic, Valerija; Maria Ferraro, Pilar; Miler Jerkovic, Vera; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), the need to study multiple-gene effect on brain structure is emerging. Our aim was to assess the effect of accumulation of specific SERT, BDNF and COMT gene functional polymorphisms on brain structure in MDD patients. Seventy-seven MDD patients and 66 controls underwent a clinical assessment, genetic testing and MRI scan. Compared with controls, patients were more BDNF-Val homozygotes, COMT-Met carriers and SERT-L' carriers. Thus, subjects were split into three groups: 1. High-frequency susceptibility polymorphism group (hfSP, subjects with all three SPs); 2. Intermediate-frequency SP group (ifSP, two SPs); and 3. Low-frequency SP group (lfSP, one/none SP). Cortical thickness, volumetry of hippocampus, amygdala and subcortical structures, and white matter (WM) tract integrity were assessed. Compared to controls, hfSP patients showed thinning of the middle frontal cortex bilaterally, left frontal pole, and right lateral occipital cortex, and smaller hippocampal volume bilaterally; and both hfSP and lfSP patient groups showed thinning of the left inferior parietal cortex and reduced WM integrity of the corpus callosum. Compared to patients, hfSP controls showed greater integrity of the fronto-occipital cortices and corpus callosum. We showed that cortical prefrontal and occipital damage of MDD patients is modulated by the SP accumulation, while damage to the parietal cortex and corpus callosum seem to be independent of genetic accumulation. HfSP controls may experience protective mechanisms leading to a preserved integrity of critical cortical and WM regions. Investigating the effect of multiple genes is promising to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying MDD. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2173-2184, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26956059

  10. Baclofen prevents the elevated plus maze behavior and BDNF expression during naloxone precipitated morphine withdrawal in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrón, Valeria T; Varani, André P; Balerio, Graciela N

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies we have shown that baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, prevents the somatic expression and reestablishes the dopamine and μ-opioid receptors levels, modified during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome in male and female mice. There are no previous reports regarding sex differences in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the expression of BDNF in morphine-withdrawn mice. The present study analyses the behavioral and biochemical variations during morphine withdrawal in mice of both sexes, and whether these variations are prevented with baclofen. Swiss-Webster albino prepubertal mice received morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) twice daily, for 9 consecutive days. On the 10th day, one group of morphine-treated mice received naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist; 6 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h after the last dose of morphine to precipitate withdrawal. A second group received baclofen (2 mg/kg, i.p.) before naloxone administration. The EPM behavior was measured during 15 min after naloxone injection. The expression of BDNF-positive cells was determined by immunohistochemistry. Withdrawn male mice showed a higher percentage of time spent and number of entries to the open arms compared to withdrawn female mice. Baclofen prevented this behavior in both sexes. BDNF expression decreased in the AcbC, BNST, CeC, and CA3 of the hippocampus while increased in the BLA of morphine withdrawn male. Baclofen pretreatment prevented the BDNF expression observed in morphine withdrawn male mice in all the brain areas studied except in the CeC. Baclofen prevention of the EPM behavior associated to morphine withdrawal could be partially related to changes in BDNF expression. PMID:26789010

  11. Chronic stress-induced memory deficits are reversed by regular exercise via AMPK-mediated BDNF induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D-M; Leem, Y-H

    2016-06-01

    Chronic stress has a detrimental effect on neurological insults, psychiatric deficits, and cognitive impairment. In the current study, chronic stress was shown to impair learning and memory functions, in addition to reducing in hippocampal Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. Similar reductions were also observed for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synaptophysin, and post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) levels, all of which was counter-regulated by a regime of regular and prolonged exercise. A 21-day restraint stress regimen (6 h/day) produced learning and memory deficits, including reduced alternation in the Y-maze and decreased memory retention in the water maze test. These effects were reversed post-administration by a 3-week regime of treadmill running (19 m/min, 1 h/day, 6 days/week). In hippocampal primary culture, phosphorylated-AMPK (phospho-AMPK) and BDNF levels were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by 5-amimoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) treatment, and AICAR-treated increase was blocked by Compound C. A 7-day period of AICAR intraperitoneal injections enhanced alternation in the Y-maze test and reduced escape latency in water maze test, along with enhanced phospho-AMPK and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. The intraperitoneal injection of Compound C every 4 days during exercise intervention diminished exercise-induced enhancement of memory improvement during the water maze test in chronically stressed mice. Also, chronic stress reduced hippocampal neurogenesis (lower Ki-67- and doublecortin-positive cells) and mRNA levels of BDNF, synaptophysin, and PSD-95. Our results suggest that regular and prolonged exercise can alleviate chronic stress-induced hippocampal-dependent memory deficits. Hippocampal AMPK-engaged BDNF induction is at least in part required for exercise-induced protection against chronic stress. PMID:26975895

  12. Tiled Polymorphic Temporal Media

    OpenAIRE

    Hudak, Paul; Janin, David

    2014-01-01

    International audience Tiled Polymorphic Temporal Media (Tiled PTM) is an algebraic approach to specifying the composition of multimedia values having an inherent temporal quality --- for example sound clips, musical scores, computer animations, and video clips. Mathematically, one can think of a tiled PTM as a tiling in the one dimension of time. A tiled PTM value has two synchronization marks that specify, via an effective notion of tiled product, how the tiled PTMs are positioned in tim...

  13. Polymorphism of Atorvastatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Martina; Brus, Jiří; Šeděnková, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Kratochvíl, B.; Maixner, J.

    Zagreb : Ruder Boškovic Institute, 2008 - (Smreč, V.). s. 20 ISBN 978-953-6690-77-0. [Central European NMR Symposium and Bruker NMR Users Meeting CEUM 2008 /10./. 29.09.2008-30.09.2008, Zagreb] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymorphism * atorvastatin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. AT2-receptor stimulation enhances axonal plasticity after spinal cord injury by upregulating BDNF expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namsolleck, Pawel; Boato, Francesco; Schwengel, Katja;

    2013-01-01

    21). Complementary experiments in primary neurons and organotypic cultures served to identify underlying mechanisms. Functional recovery and plasticity of corticospinal tract (CST) fibers following SCI were monitored after application of C21 (0,3mg/kg/dayi.p.) or vehicle for 4weeks. Organotypic co...... recovery after SCI compared to controls, and this significantly correlated with the increased the number of CST fibers caudal to the lesion site. In vitro, C21 significantly promoted reinnervation in organotypic brain slice co-cultures (+50%) and neurite outgrowth of primary neurons (+25%). C21-induced...... neurite outgrowth was absent in neurons derived from AT2R-KO mice. In primary neurons, treatment with C21 further induced RNA expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 (+75.7%), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (+53.7%), the neurotrophin receptors TrkA (+57.4%) and TrkB (+67.9%) and a marker for neurite...

  15. Increased serum levels of sortilin are associated with depression and correlated with BDNF and VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Demontis, Ditte; Ollendorff, Mathias Kaas;

    2015-01-01

    was influenced by several other factors. Alcohol intake and body mass index, as well as depression, serum BDNF and serum VEGF were identified as predictors of serum sortilin levels in our final multivariate model. In conclusion, the results suggest a role of circulating sortilin in depression which......Neurotrophic factors have been investigated in relation to depression. The aim of the present study was to widen this focus to sortilin, a receptor involved in neurotrophic signalling. The serum sortilin level was investigated in 152 individuals with depression and 216 control individuals, and...... eight genetic markers located within the SORT1 gene were successfully analysed for association with depression. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. All the individuals returned a questionnaire and participated in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. Sortilin levels were...

  16. 脑源性神经营养因子基因多态性与散发性多发性硬化的关联研究%Relationship between brain-deried neurotrophic factor gene polymorphism and sporadic multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季晓飞; 董惠洁

    2012-01-01

    To explore the relationship between brain - deried neurotrophie factor ( BDNF) gene polymorphism in the Han population in north of China and sporadic multiple sclerosis. [Methods] The tagSNPs were selected by Hap-Map and Haploview. Fifty sporadic multiple sclerosis and 50 controls were analysis by PCR - RFLP. [ Results] There was one block in BDNF gene polymorphism of Han population in north China. The rs6265, rs2049046 and rs962369 were selected as tagSNP. The tagSNP and Haploview analysis showed there is no significant association between the multiple sclerosis and controls (P>0. 05). [Conclusion] There is no relationship between BDNF gene polymorphism and sporadic multiple sclerosis.%[目的]探讨脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)基因多态性与中国北方汉族人群中的散发性多发性硬化症的关联.[方法]经过HapMap和Haploview分析,选取tagSNP并通过PCR - RFLP方法,对50例非家族遗传性多发性硬化患者和50例健康对照者的BDNF基因多态性分型进行病例对照研究.[结果]中国北方汉族人群BDNF基因存在一个基因连锁区域,选取rs6265、rs2049046和rs962369三个SNP作为tagSNP.在病例对照研究中,tagSNP分析及rs6265与rs2049046间的Haploview分析,P均>0.05.[结论]脑源性神经营养因子基因多态性与散发性多发性硬化无明显关联.

  17. Exercise therapy normalizes BDNF upregulation and glial hyperactivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Cayo; DeMaman, Aline; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cadetti, Flaviane; Ravanelli, Maria Ida; Queiroz, André L; Sousa, Thais A; Zanon, Sonia; Silveira, Leonardo R; Lucas, Guilherme

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain is a clinical challenge likely because of the time-dependent changes in many neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, ionic channels, membrane receptors, transcription factors, and recruitment of different cell types. Conversely, an increasing number of reports have shown the ability of extended and regular physical exercise in alleviating neuropathic pain throughout a wide range of mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the effect of swim exercise on molecules associated with initiation and maintenance of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. BALB/c mice were submitted to partial ligation of the sciatic nerve followed by a 5-week aerobic exercise program. Physical training reversed mechanical hypersensitivity, which lasted for an additional 4 weeks after exercise interruption. Swim exercise normalized nerve injury-induced nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced expression in the dorsal root ganglion, but had no effect on the glial-derived neurotrophic factor. However, only BDNF remained at low levels after exercise interruption. In addition, exercise training significantly reduced the phosphorylation status of PLCγ-1, but not CREB, in the spinal cord dorsal horn in response to nerve injury. Finally, prolonged swim exercise reversed astrocyte and microglia hyperactivity in the dorsal horn after nerve lesion, which remained normalized after training cessation. Together, these results demonstrate that exercise therapy induces long-lasting analgesia through various mechanisms associated with the onset and advanced stages of neuropathy. Moreover, the data support further studies to clarify whether appropriate exercise intensity, volume, and duration can also cause long-lasting pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:25687543

  18. Glycyrrhiza uralensis flavonoids inhibit brain microglial cell TNF-α secretion, p-IκB expression, and increase brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita P. Patil

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: ASHMI and its effective flavonoid, isoliquiritigenin, inhibited TNF-α production by LPS stimulated microglial cells and elevated BDNF levels, which may prove to have anti-CNS inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects.

  19. Aging and depression vulnerability interaction results in decreased serotonin innervation associated with reduced BDNF levels in hippocampus of rats bred for learned helplessness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A;

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a strong genetic contribution to the risk for depression. Both reduced hippocampal serotonin neurotransmission and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels have been associated with increased depression vulnerability and are also regulated during aging...

  20. Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, N B; King, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins can be detected in human lymphocytes by sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Using an SDS-polyacrylamide 8 M urea system, 17 mitochondrially encoded proteins are distinguishable. Three of these (ME-6, ME-8, and ME-17) were polymorphic among 92 individuals screened, and these polymorphisms are reported here for the first time. With SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis without urea, 18 mitochondrial proteins are de...

  1. Expression of BDNF and TrkB Phosphorylation in the Rat Frontal Cortex During Morphine Withdrawal are NO Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregud, Danil I; Yakovlev, Alexander A; Stepanichev, Mikhail Yu; Onufriev, Mikhail V; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates pharmacological effects of opiates including dependence and abstinence. Modulation of NO synthesis during the induction phase of morphine dependence affects manifestations of morphine withdrawal syndrome, though little is known about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Neurotrophic and growth factors are involved in neuronal adaptation during opiate dependence. NO-dependent modulation of morphine dependence may be mediated by changes in expression and activity of neurotrophic and/or growth factors in the brain. Here, we studied the effects of NO synthesis inhibition during the induction phase of morphine dependence on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as well as their receptors in rat brain regions after spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent animals. Morphine dependence in rats was induced within 6 days by 12 injections of morphine in increasing doses (10-100 mg/kg), and NO synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) was given 1 h before each morphine injection. The expression of the BDNF, GDNF, NGF, IGF1, and their receptors in the frontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and midbrain was assessed 40 h after morphine withdrawal. L-NAME treatment during morphine intoxication resulted in an aggravation of the spontaneous morphine withdrawal severity. Morphine withdrawal was accompanied by upregulation of BDNF, IGF1, and their receptors TrkB and IGF1R, respectively, on the mRNA level in the frontal cortex, and only BDNF in hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME administration during morphine intoxication decreased abstinence-induced upregulation of these mRNAs in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME prevented from abstinence-induced elevation of mature but not pro-form of BDNF polypeptide in the frontal cortex. While morphine abstinence did not affect Trk

  2. Antidepressant drugs transactivate TrkB neurotrophin receptors in the adult rodent brain independently of BDNF and monoamine transporter blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. METHODOLOGY: In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a chemical-genetic TrkB(F616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf⁻/⁻ knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01, indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the

  3. Dysregulation of BDNF-TrkB Signaling in Developing Hippocampal Neurons by Pb2+: Implications for an Environmental Basis of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Pilsner, J. Richard; Lu, Quan; Wright, Robert O.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of synaptic development and function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders and mental disease. A neurotrophin that has an important function in neuronal and synaptic development is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In this communication, we examined the effects of lead (Pb2+) exposure on BDNF-tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling during the period of synaptogenesis in cultured neurons derived from embryonic rat hippocampi. We s...

  4. Abnormal hippocampal BDNF and miR-16 expression is associated with depression-like behaviors induced by stress during early life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Bai

    Full Text Available Some environmental stressors lead to the onset of depression via inhibiting hippocampal BDNF expression, but other environmental stressors-induced depression exhibits no change in BDNF expression. The underlying mechanisms behind the divergence remain unknown. In this study, depression-like behaviors were induced in rats by maternal deprivation (MD and chronic unpredictable stress (CUPS. Depression-like behaviors were tested by open field test, forced swimming test, and sucrose consumption test. BDNF and miR-16 expressions in the hippocampus were examined by real-time PCR. MD and CUPS rats crawled less distance, exhibited decreased vertical activity, and produced more fecal pellets than control rats in the open field test. However, MD rats crawled less distance and produced significantly less fecal pellets than CUPS rats. In the forced swimming and sucrose consumption tests, CUPS and MD rats exhibited longer floating time and consumed less sucrose than control rats, but MD rats exhibited shorter floating time and consumed less sucrose than CUPS rats. MD but not CUPS rats showed lower BDNF mRNA and higher miR-16 expression than control rats. In MD rats, BDNF mRNA expression negatively correlated with the expression of miR-16. BDNF expression positively correlated with the total distance rats crawled and vertical activity in the open field test while miR-16 expression negatively correlated the two behaviors. BDNF positively correlated with sucrose preference rate while miR-16 negatively correlated with sucrose preference rate of the sucrose consumption test. Our study suggests that MD and CUPS induced different depression-like behaviors in rats. Depression induced by MD but not CUPS was significantly associated with upregulation of miR-16 and possibly subsequent downregulation of BDNF in hippocampus.

  5. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, a small molecular TrkB agonist, is useful for treating various BDNF-implicated human disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chaoyang; Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a variety of biological processes predominantly via binding to the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB. It is a potential therapeutic target in numerous neurological, mental and metabolic disorders. However, the lack of efficient means to deliver BDNF into the body imposes an insurmountable hurdle to its clinical application. To address this challenge, we initiated a cell-based drug screening to search for small molecules that act as ...

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene: a gender-specific role in cognitive function during normal cognitive aging of the MEMO-Study?

    OpenAIRE

    Laing, Katharine R.; Mitchell, David; Wersching, Heike; Czira, Maria E.; Berger, Klaus; Baune, Bernhard T

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive aging processes are underpinned by multiple processes including genetic factors. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been suggested to be involved in age-related cognitive decline in otherwise healthy individuals. The gender-specific role of the BDNF gene in cognitive aging remains unclear. The identification of genetic biomarkers might be a useful approach to identify individuals at risk of cognitive decline during healthy aging processes. The aim of this study was to ...

  7. GLIA DETERMINE THE COURSE OF BDNF-MEDIATED DENDRITOGENESIS AND PROVIDE A SOLUBLE INHIBITORY CUE TO DENDRITIC GROWTH IN THE BRAINSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica L.; Brown, Alexandra L.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory control neurons in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) undergo dramatic expansion of dendritic arbors during the early postnatal period, when functional remodeling takes place within the NTS circuitry. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of morphological maturation of NTS neurons are largely unknown. Our previous studies point to the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is abundantly expressed by NTS-projecting primary sensory neurons, as a candidate mediator of NTS dendritogenesis. In the current study, we used neonatal rat NTS neurons in vitro to examine the role of BDNF in the dendritic development of neurochemically-identified subpopulations of NTS neurons. In the presence of abundant glia, BDNF promoted NTS dendritic outgrowth and complexity, with the magnitude of the BDNF effect dependent on neuronal phenotype. Surprisingly, BDNF switched from promoting to inhibiting NTS dendritogenesis upon glia depletion. Moreover, glia depletion alone led to a significant increase in NTS dendritic outgrowth. Consistent with this result, astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM), which promoted hippocampal dendritogenesis, inhibited dendritic growth of NTS neurons. The latter effect was abolished by heat-inactivation of ACM, pointing to a diffusible astrocyte-derived negative regulator of NTS dendritic growth. Together, these data demonstrate a role for BDNF in the postnatal development of NTS neurons, and reveal novel effects of glia on this process. Moreover, previously documented dramatic increases in NTS glial proliferation in victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) underscore the importance of our findings and the need to better understand the role of glia and their interactions with BDNF during NTS circuit maturation. Furthermore, while it has previously been demonstrated that the specific effects of BDNF on dendritic growth are context-dependent, the role of glia in this process is unknown. Thus, our data

  8. A longitudinal study of alterations of hippocampal volumes and serum BDNF levels in association to atypical antipsychotics in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Rizos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus, which have been suggested to play an important role in the formation and emergence of schizophrenia syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia exhibit significant bilateral hippocampal volume reduction and progressive hippocampal volume decrease in first-episode patients with schizophrenia has been shown in many neuroimaging studies. Dysfunction of the neurotrophic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The initiation of antipsychotic medication alters the levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF levels. However it is unclear whether treatment with antipsychotics is associated with alterations of hippocampal volume and BDNF levels. METHODS: In the present longitudinal study we investigated the association between serum BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes in a sample of fourteen first-episode drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia (FEP. MRI scans, BDNF and clinical measurements were performed twice: at baseline before the initiation of antipsychotic treatment and 8 months later, while the patients were receiving monotherapy with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs. RESULTS: We found that left hippocampal volume was decreased (corrected left HV [t = 2.977, df = 13, p = .011] at follow-up; We also found that the higher the BDNF levels change the higher were the differences of corrected left hippocampus after 8 months of treatment with atypical antipsychotics (Pearson r = 0.597, p = 0.024. CONCLUSIONS: The association of BDNF with hippocampal volume alterations in schizophrenia merits further investigation and replication in larger longitudinal studies.

  9. Conditioned taste aversion prevents the long-lasting BDNF-induced enhancement of synaptic transmission in the insular cortex: A metaplastic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Olvera, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2016-04-01

    Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms dynamically adjust synaptic strengths to promote stability that is crucial for memory storage. Metaplasticity is an example of these forms of plasticity that modify the capacity of synapses to experience subsequent Hebbian modifications. In particular, training in several behavioral tasks modifies the ability to induce long-term potentiation (LTP). Recently, we have reported that prior training in conditioned taste aversion (CTA) prevents the subsequent induction of LTP generated by high frequency stimulation in the projection from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (Bla) to the insular cortex (IC). One of the key molecular players that underlie long-term synaptic plasticity is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Previous studies from our group reported that acute microinfusion of BDNF in the IC induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy at the Bla-IC projection. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze whether CTA training modifies the ability to induce subsequent BDNF-induced potentiation of synaptic transmission in the Bla-IC projection in vivo. Accordingly, CTA trained rats received intracortical microinfusion of BDNF in order to induce lasting potentiation 48h after the aversion test. Our results show that CTA training prevents the induction of in vivo BDNF-LTP in the Bla-IC projection. The present results provide evidence that CTA modulates BDNF-dependent changes in IC synaptic strength. PMID:26854904

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Protects against Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus by Upregulation of BDNF-TrkB Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Tan, Hui-Ying; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Ping; Gu, Hong-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induces hippocampal oxidative stress. H2S functions as a neuroprotectant against oxidative stress in brain. We have previously shown the upregulatory effect of H2S on BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus of rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that H2S prevents CUMS-generated oxidative stress by upregulation of BDNF-TrkB pathway. We showed that NaHS (0.03 or 0.1 mmol/kg/day) ameliorates the level of hippocampal oxidative stress, including reduced levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (4-HNE), as well as increased level of glutathione (GSH) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hippocampus of CUMS-treated rats. We also found that H2S upregulated the level of BDNF and p-TrkB protein in the hippocampus of CUMS rats. Furthermore, inhibition of BDNF signaling by K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, blocked the antioxidant effects of H2S on CUMS-induced hippocampal oxidative stress. These results reveal the inhibitory role of H2S in CUMS-induced hippocampal oxidative stress, which is through upregulation of BDNF/TrkB pathway. PMID:27525050

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Pereira, Vania; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg;

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent DNA sequence variations in the genome. They have been studied extensively in the last decade with various purposes in mind. In this chapter, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using SNPs for human identification and...... briefly describe the methods that are preferred for SNP typing in forensic genetics. In addition, we will illustrate how SNPs can be used as investigative leads in the police investigation by discussing the use of ancestry informative markers and forensic DNA phenotyping. Modern DNA sequencing...

  12. Behavioral phenotype and BDNF differences related to apoE isoforms and sex in young transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reverte, Ingrid; Klein, Anders Bue; Ratner, Cecilia;

    2012-01-01

    , very little information is available on apoE2 genotype. In the present study, we have characterized behavioral and learning phenotypes in young transgenic mice apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4 of both sexes. We have also determined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB in...... exploration of an open-field, which is compatible with a hyperactive behavior, was found in apoE2 females, while a decreased activity was observed in apoE4 mice. Increased BDNF levels in the frontal cortex were observed in apoE2 mice compared to apoE3. These results underscore behavioral differences between...

  13. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Promotes Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Cell Survival and Function in Deafened, Developing Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Leake, Patricia A.; Hradek, Gary T.; Hetherington, Alexander M.; Stakhovskaya, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal development and survival of spiral ganglion (SG) neurons depend upon both neural activity and neurotrophic support. Our previous studies showed that electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant only partly prevents SG degeneration after early deafness. Thus, neurotrophic agents that might be combined with an implant to improve neural survival are of interest. Recent studies reporting that BDNF promotes SG survival after deafness, have been conducted in rodents and limited to relat...

  14. Nonneuronal cells regulate synapse formation in the vestibular sensory epithelium via erbB-dependent BDNF expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Casati, Maria E; MURTIE, JOSHUA C.; Rio, Carlos; Stankovic, Konstantina; Liberman, M. Charles; Corfas, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that molecules released by glia can induce synapse formation. However, what induces glia to produce such signals, their identity, and their in vivo relevance remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that supporting cells of the vestibular organ—cells that have many characteristics of glia—promote synapse formation only when induced by neuron-derived signals. Furthermore, we identify BDNF as the synaptogenic signal produced by these nonneuronal cells. Mice in which...

  15. Postnatal BDNF Expression Profiles in Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus of a Rat Schizophrenia Model Induced by MK-801 Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Chunmei Guo; Yang Yang; Yun'ai Su; Tianmei Si

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors represents one of experimental animal models for schizophrenia. This study is to investigate the long-term brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression profiles in different regions and correlation with “schizophrenia-like” behaviors in the adolescence and adult of this rat model. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 was administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats on postnatal days (PND) 5 through 14. Open-field test was perfo...

  16. Antidepressant-like effects of curcumin in WKY rat model of depression is associated with an increase in hippocampal BDNF

    OpenAIRE

    Laura L. Hurley; Akinfiresoye, Luli; Nwulia, Evaristus; Kamiya, Atsushi; Kulkarni, Amol; Tizabi, Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin is the principal active ingredient found in turmeric (Curcuma longa), a plant used in traditional Asian diets and herbal medicines. It is known to have a wide range of biological actions including antidepressant-like effects which have been observed in stress-induced depression models. This study was designed to investigate the antidepressant potential of curcumin in a non-induced model of depression. Moreover, since brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in ant...

  17. BDNF and COX-2 participate in anti-depressive mechanisms of catalpol in rats undergoing chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ming; Yang, Lian-He; Zhang, Yue-Yue; Niu, Chun-Ling; Cui, Ying; Feng, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Fang

    2015-11-01

    Catalpol, a major compound in Rehmannia glutinosa with both medicinal and nutritional values, has been previously confirmed to shorten the duration of immobility in mice exposed to tail suspension and forced swimming tests. This study attempted to examine the anti-depressive mechanisms of catalpol in rats undergoing chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) by involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). CUMS-exposed rats were given catalpol daily (5, 10, and 20mg/kg, ig) or a reference drug, fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH, 10mg/kg, ig), at 5 weeks after starting the CUMS procedure. Sucrose preference test was performed to observe depression-like behavior, and serum and brain tissues were used for neurochemical and fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis. CUMS induced depression-like behavior, whereas catalpol and FH administration attenuated this symptom. Moreover, CUMS caused excessively elevated levels of serum corticosterone, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivation, in a manner attenuated by catalpol and FH administration. Catalpol administration also further decreased BDNF activities, downregulated the mRNA expression of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), and reversed the excessive elevation in the activities and mRNA expression levels of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats undergoing CUMS. Results indicate that catalpol can ameliorate CUMS-induced depression-like behavior, and suggest its mechanisms may partially be ascribed to restoring HPA axis dysfunctions, upregulating BDNF expression and its cognate receptor TrkB, and downregulating COX-2 expression, thereby reducing PGE2 levels in the brain. PMID:26255123

  18. Neuropeptide S and BDNF gene expression in the amygdala are influenced by social decision-making under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin P; Achua, Justin K; Summers, Tangi R; Ronan, Patrick J; Summers, Cliff H

    2014-01-01

    In a newly developed conceptual model of stressful social decision-making, the Stress-Alternatives Model (SAM; used for the 1st time in mice) elicits two types of response: escape or remain submissively. Daily (4d) aggressive social interaction in a neutral arena between a C57BL6/N test mouse and a larger, novel aggressive CD1 mouse, begin after an audible tone (conditioned stimulus; CS). Although escape holes (only large enough for smaller test animals) are available, and the aggressor is unremittingly antagonistic, only half of the mice tested utilize the possibility of escape. During training, for mice that choose to leave the arena and social interaction, latency to escape dramatically decreases over time; this is also true for control C57BL6/N mice which experienced no aggression. Therefore, the open field of the SAM apparatus is intrinsically anxiogenic. It also means that submission to the aggressor is chosen despite this anxiety and the high intensity of the aggressive attacks and defeat. While both groups that received aggression displayed stress responsiveness, corticosterone levels were significantly higher in animals that chose submissive coexistence. Although both escaping and non-escaping groups of animals experienced aggression and defeat, submissive animals also exhibited classic fear conditioning, freezing in response to the CS alone, while escaping animals did not. In the basolateral amygdala (BLA), gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was diminished, at the same time neuropeptide S (NPS) expression was significantly elevated, but only in submissive animals. This increase in submission-evoked NPS mRNA expression was greatest in the central amygdala (CeA), which coincided with decreased BDNF expression. Reduced expression of BDNF was only found in submissive animals that also exhibit elevated NPS expression, despite elevated corticosterone in all socially interacting animals. The results suggest an interwoven relationship

  19. Neuropeptide S and BDNF gene expression in the amygdala are influenced by social decision-making under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin P. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a newly developed conceptual model of stressful social decision making, the Stress-Alternatives Model (SAM; used for the 1st time in mice elicits two types of response: escape or remain submissively. Daily (4d aggressive social interaction in a neutral arena between a C57BL6/N test mouse and a larger, novel aggressive CD1 mouse, begin after an audible tone (conditioned stimulus; CS. Although escape holes (only large enough for smaller test animals are available, and the aggressor is unremittingly antagonistic, only half of the mice tested utilize the possibility of escape. During training, for mice that choose to leave the arena and social interaction, latency to escape dramatically decreases over time; this is also true for control C57BL6/N mice which experienced no aggression. Therefore, the open field of the SAM apparatus is intrinsically anxiogenic. It also means that submission to the aggressor is chosen despite this anxiety and the high intensity of the aggressive attacks and defeat. While both groups that received aggression displayed stress responsiveness, corticosterone levels were significantly higher in animals that chose submissive coexistence. Although both escaping and non-escaping groups of animals experienced aggression and defeat, submissive animals also exhibited classic fear conditioning, freezing in response to the CS alone, while escaping animals did not. In the basolateral amygdala, gene expression of BDNF was diminished, but NPS expression was significantly elevated, but only in submissive animals. This increase in submission-evoked NPS mRNA expression was greatest in the central amygdala, which coincided with decreased BDNF expression. Reduced expression of BDNF is only in submissive animals that also exhibit elevated NPS expression, despite elevated corticosterone in all socially interacting animals. The results suggest an interwoven relationship, linked by social context, between amygdalar BDNF, NPS and plasma

  20. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Yun Wang; Sheng-Yu Lee; Shiou-Lan Chen; Yun-Hsuan Chang; Liang-Jen Wang; Po See Chen; Shih-Heng Chen; Chun-Hsien Chu; San-Yuan Huang; Nian-Sheng Tzeng; Chia-Ling Li; Yi-Lun Chung; Tsai-Hsin Hsieh; I Hui Lee; Kao Chin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacologica...

  1. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on HPA Axis Activity and Expression of BDNF and Trkb in the Hippocampus of Pregnant Rats: Possible Contribution in Depression during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Nader; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ghaempanah, Zahra; Ardekani, Ali M.; Nooshinfar, Elahe; Tahzibi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus are targets for adverse effects of stress paradigms; in addition, BDNF and its receptor play key role in the pathology of brain diseases like depression. In the present study, we evaluated the possible role of hippocampal BDNF in depression during pregnancy, Methods To achieve the purpose, repeated restrain stress (1 or 3 hours daily for 7 days) during the last week of pregnancy was used and alter...

  2. 脑源性神经营养因子基因与生活事件交互作用对抑郁自杀未遂的影响%Interaction between BDNF Gene and Life Events on Depressive Suicide Attempters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任燕; 王彦芳; 彭菊意; 杜巧荣; 张克让; 杨红

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨脑源性神经营养因子( BDNF)基因与生活事件交互作用对于抑郁障碍自杀未遂患者的影响。方法收集伴自杀未遂行为的重性抑郁障碍患者和无自杀未遂的重性抑郁障碍患者各80例,评定汉密尔顿抑郁量表、生活事件量表,采用聚合酶链反应技术( PCR)对BDNF基因多态性进行基因分型,应用MDR软件包分析基因-环境交互作用。结果①与重性抑郁障碍无自杀未遂组相比,重性抑郁障碍自杀未遂组rs6265 AA 基因型频率较高,差异具有统计学意义(χ2=7.380,P =0.025);自杀未遂组A等位基因频率较高,差异具有统计学意义(χ2=4.081,P=0.043)。②MDR结果显示,BDNF rs6265基因多态性与负性生活事件存在交互作用模型,该模型的检验样本误差较小(0.4686),交叉验证一致性为10/10,符号检验P<0.001。结论 BDNF rs6265基因多态性与负性生活事件之间存在交互作用,该交互作用与重性抑郁障碍自杀未遂行为发生相关。%Objective To investigate the interaction between brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene and life events ,and reveal its af-fect on the depressive patients attempting suicide .Methods A total of 80 major depressive disorder patients with suicide attempts and 80 major depressive disorder patients without suicide attempts were assessed using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Life Events Scale,polymerase chain reaction(PCR)were used to detect the genetic polymorphism of the BDNF gene and MDR software were applied to test the gene-environment interactions .Results ① Compared with major depressive disorder patients without suicide attempts , the rs6265 AA genotype frequency was higher in those with suicides attempts (χ2 =7.380,P<0.05);The A allele frequency was also statis-tically significantly higher (χ2 =4.081,P<0.05).②There was a best model of interaction between BDNF rs 6265 and

  3. Effects of maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy on learning, memory and hippocampal BDNF in rat pups: Beneficial effects of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Seyed Morteza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Hypothyroidism during early development leads to numerous morphological, biochemical and functional changes in developing brain. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary and treadmill exercise on learning, memory and hippocampal BDNF levels in both hypothyroid male and female rat pups. To induce hypothyroidism in the mothers, 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) was added to their drinking water (100mg/L) from their embryonic day 6 to their postnatal day (PND) 21. For 14days, from PNDs 31 to 44, the rat pups were trained with one of the two different exercise protocols, namely the mild treadmill exercise and the voluntary wheel exercise. On PNDs 45-52, a water maze was used for testing their learning and memory ability. The rats were sacrificed one day later and their BDNF levels were then measured in the hippocampus. The findings of the present study indicate that hypothyroidism during the fetal period and the early postnatal period is associated with the impairment of spatial learning and memory and reduced hippocampal BDNF levels in both male and female rat offspring. Both the short-term treadmill exercise and the voluntary wheel exercise performed during the postnatal period reverse the behavioral and neurochemical deficits induced by developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency in both male and female rat offspring. The findings of this study thus demonstrate a marked reversibility of both behavioral and neurochemical disorders induced by developmental thyroid hormone insufficiency through the performance of exercise. PMID:27181637

  4. Use of induced pluripotent stem cell derived neurons engineered to express BDNF for modulation of stressor related pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gele; Rustom, Nazneen; Litteljohn, Darcy; Bobyn, Jessica; Rudyk, Chris; Anisman, Hymie; Hayley, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Combined cell and gene-based therapeutic strategies offer potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions that have been associated with structural brain disturbances. In the present investigation, we used a novel virus-free re-programming method to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and then subsequently transformed these cells into neural cells which over-expressed brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Importantly, the infusion of iPSC derived neural cells (as a cell replacement and gene delivery tool) and BDNF (as a protective factor) influenced neuronal outcomes. Specifically, intracerebroventricular transplantation of iPSC-derived neural progenitors that over-expressed BDNF reversed the impact of immune (lipopolysaccharide) and chronic stressor challenges upon subventricular zone adult neurogenesis, and the iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells alone blunted the stressor-induced corticosterone response. Moreover, our findings indicate that mature dopamine producing neurons can be generated using iPSC procedures and appear to be viable when infused in vivo. Taken together, these data could have important implications for using gene-plus-cell replacement methods to modulate stressor related pathology. PMID:25352778

  5. Use of induced pluripotent stem cell derived neurons engineered to express BDNF for modulation of stressor related pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hymie Anisman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Combined cell and gene-based therapeutic strategies offer potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions that have been associated with structural brain disturbances. In the present investigation, we used a novel virus-free re-programming method to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and then subsequently transformed these cells into neural cells which over-expressed brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Importantly, the infusion of iPSC derived neural cells (as a cell replacement and gene delivery tool and BDNF (as a protective factor influenced neuronal outcomes Specifically, intracerebroventricular transplantation of iPSC-derived neural progenitors that over-expressed BDNF reversed the impact of immune (lipopolysaccharide and chronic stressor challenges upon subventricular zone adult neurogenesis and the iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells alone blunted the stressor induced corticosterone response. Moreover, our findings also indicate that mature dopamine producing neurons can also be generated using iPSC procedures and these cells appeared to be viable when infused in vivo. Taken together, these data could have important implications for using gene-plus-cell replacement methods to modulate stressor related pathology.

  6. Effect of 8 weeks Resistance Training on BDNF and TrkB in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

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    S Mojtahedi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise enhances the synaptic plasticity and neuroprotective effects in the adult brain. However, it remains unknown that how plasticity molecules change following types of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of eight weeks resistance training on protein levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor(BDNF and receptor of TrkB, in the hippocampus of adult male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, twelve adult male rats, 8 weeks of age, with an average weight of 200 to 225 grams were randomly divided into two groups, control and exercise respectively. The exercise was to increase the weight on the ladder. 24 hours after their last training session. The animals were killed and the hippocampus was removed for further testing. ELISA determined changes in protein levels. Data were analyzed by independent t test. Results: There was a significant difference between train and control groups In protein level of variables statically (p≤0.05. In addition, protein levels of BDNF and TrkB in the hippocampus of rats increased. Conclusion: Resistance training is beneficial for promoting hippocampal plasticity associated with BDNF signaling and consequently functional and cognitive benefits.

  7. Consequences of changes in BDNF levels on serotonin neurotransmission, 5-HT transporter expression and function: studies in adult mice hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deltheil, Thierry; Guiard, Bruno P; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Nicolas, Lorelei; Deloménie, Claudine; Repérant, Christelle; Le Maitre, Erwan; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Benmansour, Saloua; Coudoré, François; David, Denis J; Gardier, Alain M

    2008-08-01

    In vivo intracerebral microdialysis is an important neurochemical technique that has been applied extensively in genetic and pharmacological studies aimed at investigating the relationship between neurotransmitters. Among the main interests of microdialysis application is the infusion of drugs through the microdialysis probe (reverse dialysis) in awake, freely moving animals. As an example of the relevance of intracerebral microdialysis, this review will focus on our recent neurochemical results showing the impact of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) on serotonergic neurotransmission in basal and stimulated conditions. Indeed, although the elevation of 5-HT outflow induced by chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) causes an increase in BDNF protein levels and expression (mRNA) in the hippocampus of rodents, the reciprocal interaction has not been demonstrated yet. Thus, the neurochemical sight of this question will be addressed here by examining the consequences of either a constitutive decrease or increase in brain BDNF protein levels on hippocampal extracellular levels of 5-HT in conscious mice. PMID:17980409

  8. Antidepressant-like effects of curcumin in WKY rat model of depression is associated with an increase in hippocampal BDNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Laura L.; Akinfiresoye, Luli; Nwulia, Evaristus; Kamiya, Atsushi; Kulkarni, Amol; Tizabi, Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin is the principal active ingredient found in turmeric (Curcuma longa), a plant used in traditional Asian diets and herbal medicines. It is known to have a wide range of biological actions including antidepressant-like effects which have been observed in stress-induced depression models. This study was designed to investigate the antidepressant potential of curcumin in a non-induced model of depression. Moreover, since brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in antidepressant effects of many drugs, we also evaluated the effects of curcumin on BDNF in the hippocampus. Adult male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative model of depression, were injected acutely or chronically (10 d) with 50, 100, and 200mg/kg curcumin. Open field locomotor activity (OFLA) and forced swim test (FST), a measure of helplessness, were measured 1 hour after acute and 18–20 hours after last chronic injection. Results showed a dose-dependent reduction of immobility in the FST by curcumin in both acute and chronic studies, without any significant effect on OFLA. The effect of higher chronic curcumin dose in FST was still evident a week later. Chronic curcumin also resulted in a dose-dependent increase in hippocampal BDNF. This data provides evidence for an antidepressant-like effect of curcumin, possibly through increased neurotrophic activity, in the WKY model of depression, and support the notion that curcumin may prove an effective and lasting natural antidepressant. PMID:23142609

  9. Environmental and Genetic Activation of Hypothalamic BDNF Modulates T-cell Immunity to Exert an Anticancer Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Run; Bergin, Stephen M; Huang, Wei; Slater, Andrew M; Liu, Xianglan; Judd, Ryan T; Lin, En-Ju D; Widstrom, Kyle J; Scoville, Steven D; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Cao, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Macroenvironmental factors, including a patient's physical and social environment, play a role in cancer risk and progression. Our previous studies show that living in an enriched environment (EE) providing complex stimuli confers an anticancer phenotype in mice mediated, in part by a specific neuroendocrine axis, with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key brain mediator. Here, we investigated how an EE modulated T-cell immunity and its role in the EE-induced anticancer effects. Our data demonstrated that CD8 T cells were required to mediate the anticancer effects of an EE in an orthotropic model of melanoma. In secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT), an EE induced early changes in the phenotype of T-cell populations, characterized by a decrease in the ratio of CD4 T helper to CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Overexpression of hypothalamic BDNF reproduced EE-induced T-cell phenotypes in SLT, whereas knockdown of hypothalamic BDNF inhibited EE-induced immune modulation in SLT. Both propranolol and mifepristone blocked the EE-associated modulation of CTLs in SLT, suggesting that both the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis were involved. Our results demonstrated that enhanced anticancer effect of an EE was mediated at least in part through modulation of T-cell immunity and provided support to the emerging concept of manipulating a single gene in the brain to improve cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 488-97. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27045020

  10. Lactoferrin Promotes Early Neurodevelopment and Cognition in Postnatal Piglets by Upregulating the BDNF Signaling Pathway and Polysialylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Xi; Shi, Yujie; Tian, Dandan; Zhao, Fengjuan; Liu, Ni; Hüppi, Petra S; Troy, Frederic A; Wang, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a sialic acid (Sia)-rich, iron-binding milk glycoprotein that has multifunctional health benefits. Its potential role in neurodevelopment and cognition remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that Lf may function to improve neurodevelopment and cognition, the diet of postnatal piglets was supplemented with Lf from days 3 to 38. Expression levels of selected genes and their cognate protein profiles were quantitatively determined. The importance of our new findings is that Lf (1) upregulated several canonical signaling pathways associated with neurodevelopment and cognition; (2) influenced ~10 genes involved in the brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the hippocampus and upregulated the expression of polysialic acid, a marker of neuroplasticity, cell migration and differentiation of progenitor cells, and the growth and targeting of axons; (3) upregulated transcriptional and translational levels of BDNF and increased phosphorylation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein, CREB, a downstream target of the BDNF signaling pathway, and a protein of crucial importance in neurodevelopment and cognition; and (4) enhanced the cognitive function and learning of piglets when tested in an eight-arm radial maze. The finding that Lf can improve neural development and cognition in postnatal piglets has not been previously described. PMID:25146846

  11. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with panic disorder: as a biological predictor of response to group cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Shimizu, Eiji; Hashimoto, Kenji; Mitsumori, Makoto; Koike, Kaori; Okamura, Naoe; Koizumi, Hiroki; Ohgake, Shintaro; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Zhang, Lin; Nakazato, Michiko; Iyo, Masaomi

    2005-06-01

    Little is known about biological predictors of treatment response in panic disorder. Our previous studies show that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorders and eating disorders. Assuming that BDNF may be implicated in the putative common etiologies of depression and anxiety, the authors examined serum BDNF levels of the patients with panic disorder, and its correlation with therapeutic response to group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Group CBT (10 consecutive 1 h weekly sessions) was administered to the patients with panic disorder after consulting the panic outpatient special service. Before treatment, serum concentrations of BDNF and total cholesterol were measured. After treatment, we defined response to therapy as a 40% reduction from baseline on Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) score as described by [Barlow, D.H., Gorman, J.M., Shear, M.K., Woods, S.W., 2000. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine, or their combination for panic disorder: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 283, 2529-2536]. There were 26 good responders and 16 poor responders. 31 age- and sex-matched healthy normal control subjects were also recruited in this study. The serum BDNF levels of the patients with poor response (25.9 ng/ml [S.D. 8.7]) were significantly lower than those of the patients with good response (33.7 ng/ml [S.D. 7.5]). However, there were no significant differences in both groups of the patients, compared to the normal controls (29.1 ng/ml [S.D. 7.1]). No significant differences of other variables including total cholesterol levels before treatment were detected between good responders and poor responders. These results suggested that BDNF might contribute to therapeutic response of panic disorder. A potential link between an increased risk of secondary depression and BDNF remains to be investigated in the future. PMID:15905010

  12. Serum BDNF correlates with connectivity in the (pre)motor hub in the aging human brain--a resting-state fMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Arelin, Katrin; Möller, Harald E; Sacher, Julia; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Villringer, Arno; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2016-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been discussed to be involved in plasticity processes in the human brain, in particular during aging. Recently, aging and its (neurodegenerative) diseases have increasingly been conceptualized as disconnection syndromes. Here, connectivity changes in neural networks (the connectome) are suggested to be the most relevant and characteristic features for such processes or diseases. To further elucidate the impact of aging on neural networks, we investigated the interaction between plasticity processes, brain connectivity, and healthy aging by measuring levels of serum BDNF and resting-state fMRI data in 25 young (mean age 24.8 ± 2.7 (SD) years) and 23 old healthy participants (mean age, 68.6 ± 4.1 years). To identify neural hubs most essentially related to serum BDNF, we applied graph theory approaches, namely the new data-driven and parameter-free approach eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping. The analysis revealed a positive correlation between serum BDNF and EC in the premotor and motor cortex in older participants in contrast to young volunteers, where we did not detect any association. This positive relationship between serum BDNF and EC appears to be specific for older adults. Our results might indicate that the amount of physical activity and learning capacities, leading to higher BDNF levels, increases brain connectivity in (pre)motor areas in healthy aging in agreement with rodent animal studies. Pilot results have to be replicated in a larger sample including behavioral data to disentangle the cause for the relationship between BDNF levels and connectivity. PMID:26827656

  13. Changes in expression of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75NTR in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic ethanol consumption can produce learning and memory deficits. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors affect the pathogenesis of alcoholism. In this study, we examined the expression of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence. Twenty domestic dogs (9-10 months old, 15-20 kg; 10 males and 10 females) were obtained from Harbin Medical University. A stable alcoholism model was established through ad libitum feeding, and anti-alcohol drug treatment (Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling, the main ingredient was the stems of watermelon; developed in our laboratory), at low- and high-doses, was carried out. The Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling was effective for the alcoholism in dogs. The morphology of hippocampal neurons was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The number and morphological features of BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG), and the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions of the hippocampus were observed using immunohistochemistry. One-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR expression. BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive cells were mainly localized in the granular cell layer of the DG and in the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions (DG>CA1>CA3>CA4). Expression levels of both BDNF and TrkB were decreased in chronic alcoholism, and increased after abstinence. The CA4 region appeared to show the greatest differences. Changes in p75NTR expression were the opposite of those of BDNF and TrkB, with the greatest differences observed in the DG and CA4 regions

  14. Changes in expression of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75NTR in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R.; Duan, S.R.; Zhao, J.W.; Wang, C.Y. [Neurology Ward of Internal Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province (China)

    2015-06-23

    Chronic ethanol consumption can produce learning and memory deficits. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors affect the pathogenesis of alcoholism. In this study, we examined the expression of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence. Twenty domestic dogs (9-10 months old, 15-20 kg; 10 males and 10 females) were obtained from Harbin Medical University. A stable alcoholism model was established through ad libitum feeding, and anti-alcohol drug treatment (Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling, the main ingredient was the stems of watermelon; developed in our laboratory), at low- and high-doses, was carried out. The Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling was effective for the alcoholism in dogs. The morphology of hippocampal neurons was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The number and morphological features of BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG), and the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions of the hippocampus were observed using immunohistochemistry. One-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR expression. BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive cells were mainly localized in the granular cell layer of the DG and in the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions (DG>CA1>CA3>CA4). Expression levels of both BDNF and TrkB were decreased in chronic alcoholism, and increased after abstinence. The CA4 region appeared to show the greatest differences. Changes in p75NTR expression were the opposite of those of BDNF and TrkB, with the greatest differences observed in the DG and CA4 regions.

  15. Polymorphic Evolutionary Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, I present an analytical framework for polymorphic evolutionary games suitable for explicitly modeling evolutionary processes in diploid populations with sexual reproduction. The principal aspect of the proposed approach is adding diploid genetics cum sexual recombination to a traditional evolutionary game, and switching from phenotypes to haplotypes as the new game׳s pure strategies. Here, the relevant pure strategy׳s payoffs derived by summing the payoffs of all the phenotypes capable of producing gametes containing that particular haplotype weighted by the pertinent probabilities. The resulting game is structurally identical to the familiar Evolutionary Games with non-linear pure strategy payoffs (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998. Cambridge University Press), and can be analyzed in terms of an established analytical framework for such games. And these results can be translated into the terms of genotypic, and whence, phenotypic evolutionary stability pertinent to the original game. PMID:27016340

  16. Trophic mechanisms for exercise-induced stress resilience: Potential role of interactions between BDNF and galanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip V Holmes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of the neurobiology of stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression emphasize disruptions in neural plasticity and neurotrophins. The potent trophic actions of exercise therefore represent not only an effective means for prevention and treatment of these disorders, they also afford the opportunity to employ exercise paradigms as a basic research tool to uncover the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these disorders. Novel approaches to studying stress-related disorders focus increasingly on trophic factor signaling in corticolimbic circuits that both mediate and regulate cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses to deleterious stress. Recent evidence demonstrates that the neural plasticity supported by these trophic mechanisms is vital for establishing and maintaining resilience to stress. Therapeutic interventions that promote these mechanisms, be they pharmacological, behavioral, or environmental, may therefore prevent or reverse stress-related mental illness by enhancing resilience. The present paper will provide an overview of trophic mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of resilience by voluntary exercise with an emphasis on BDNF, galanin, and interactions between these two trophic factors.

  17. Antidepressant Effects of AMPA and Ketamine Combination: Role of Hippocampal BDNF, Synapsin, and mTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiresoye, Luli; Tizabi, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Rationale A number of preclinical and clinical studies suggest ketamine, a glutamate NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonist, has a rapid and lasting antidepressant effect when administered either acutely or chronically. It has been postulated that this effect is due to stimulation of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl–4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors. Objective In this study, we tested whether AMPA alone has an antidepressant effect and if the combination of AMPA and ketamine provides added benefit in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative animal model of depression. Results Chronic AMPA treatment resulted in a dose dependent antidepressant effect in both the forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Moreover, chronic administration (10–11d) of combinations of AMPA and ketamine, at doses that were ineffective on their own, resulted in a significant antidepressant effect. The behavioral effects were associated with increases in hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conclusion These findings are the first to provide evidence for an antidepressant effect of AMPA, and suggest the usefulness of AMPA-ketamine combination in treatment of depression. Furthermore, these effects appear to be associated with increases in markers of hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, suggesting a mechanism of their action. PMID:23732839

  18. Physical exercise neuroprotects ovariectomized 3xTg-AD mice through BDNF mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Revilla, Susana; Gómez-Cabrera, M Carmen; Gambini, Juan; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Cristòfol, Rosa; Viña, José; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2014-07-01

    Postmenopausal women may be more vulnerable to cognitive loss and Alzheimer's disease (AD) than premenopausal women because of their deficiency in estrogens, in addition to their usually older age. Aerobic physical exercise has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for maintaining health and well-being in postmenopausal women, and for improving brain health and plasticity in populations at high risk for AD. To study the neuroprotective mechanisms of physical exercise in a postmenopausal animal model, we submitted previously ovariectomized, six-month old non-transgenic and 3xTg-AD mice to three months of voluntary exercise in a running wheel. At nine months of age, we observed lower grip strength and some exacerbation of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)-like involving active exploratory activities. A similar major cognitive impairment was observed of ovariectomized 3xTg-AD mice in comparison with sham-operated 3xTg-AD mice. A reduction of bodily fitness and lack of retention of memory were observed in the ovariectomized non-transgenic mice. Physical exercise protected against all deleterious behaviors and normalized learning and memory. It also protected against body frailty, as expected. Analyses of hippocampal key markers of antioxidant and neuroplasticity signaling pathways, showed that ovariectomy impairs the activation of CREB through physical exercise. Furthermore, molecular and behavioral correlates suggested a central role of BDNF in the neuroprotection mediated by physical exercise therapy against apathy and memory loss induced by ovariectomy and the AD-genotype. PMID:24845186

  19. Learning abilities, NGF and BDNF brain levels in two lines of TNF-alpha transgenic mice, one characterized by neurological disorders, the other phenotypically normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, L; Properzi, F; Probert, L; Akassoglou, K; Kassiotis, G; Micera, A; Fiore, M

    1999-09-01

    In this study we used two lines of transgenic mice overexpressing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the central nervous system (CNS), one characterized by reactive gliosis, inflammatory demyelination and neurological deficits (Tg6074) the other showing no neurological or phenotypical alterations (TgK3) to investigate the effect of TNF-alpha on brain nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and learning abilities. The results showed that the amount of NGF in the brain of Tg6074 and TgK3 transgenic mice is low in the hippocampus and in the spinal cord, increases in the hypothalamus of Tg6074 and showed no significant changes in the cortex. BDNF levels were low in the hippocampus and spinal cord of TgK3. BDNF increased in the hypothalamus of TgK3 and Tg6074 while in the cortex, BDNF increased only in Tg6074 mice. Transgenic mice also had memory impairments as revealed by the Morris Water Maze test. These findings indicate that TNF-alpha significantly influences BDNF and NGF synthesis, most probably in a dose-dependent manner. Learning abilities were also differently affected by overexpression of TNF-alpha, but were not associated with inflammatory activity. The possible functional implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:10517960

  20. Reduced Hippocampal Dendritic Spine Density and BDNF Expression following Acute Postnatal Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Male Long Evans Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Catherine A.; Holahan, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats. PMID:25295592

  1. Diurnal pattern of serum BDNF before partial sleep deprivation in stress-related mood disorders – an association with therapy response in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giese

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Depression is one of the most prevalent forms of mood disorders. Compelling evidence suggests that mood disorders are characterized by reduced neuronal plasticity, which can be brought about by exposure to stress. Furthermore, there is good agreement in considering key proteins such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, as a central player for the effects of stress on brain function and plasticity and psychopathological implications. Still, there is a high non-responder rate in antidepressant therapy, which explains the need to find reliable predictors for adequate treatment. Previous studies revealed that plasma and serum BDNF levels in depressed patients were significantly lower than in healthy controls. Since the protein can cross the blood brain-barrier serum content correspondingly correlates with cortical BDNF concentrations suggesting BDNF levels as a promising candidate biomarker for depression and antidepressant treatment response. Methods : To investigate the association between serum BDNF levels and treatment outcome, blood was drawn from 28 patients with a major depressive episode (DMS-IV, ICD-10 that participated in a double-blind placebo controlled treatment study. All patients were treated with a stable mirtazapine monotherapy. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD was performed after one week. Placebo controlled additional morning treatment with the stimulant modafinil to reduce microsleep throughout the day was started during PSD and maintained over two weeks. Serum concentrations of BDNF and cortisol were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from day 1 (“before PSD” at 8 am, 2 pm, 8 pm and day 2 (“after PSD” at 8 am, 2 pm and 8 pm. Samples were appropriately diluted and detection of soluble BDNF or cortisol was carried out in an antibody sandwich format in duplicates and means were calculated for the corresponding group. Moreover, sleep EEG and microsleep episodes were

  2. Reversal of corticosterone-induced BDNF alterations by the natural antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid alone and combined with desvenlafaxine: Emphasis on the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Silva, Márcia Calheiros Chaves; da Silva, Jéssica Calheiros; Macêdo, Danielle; de Lucena, David Freitas; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2015-12-15

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to the pathophysiology of depression. We hypothesized that BDNF is one of the neurobiological pathways related to the augmentation effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) when associated with antidepressants. Female mice were administered vehicle or CORT 20mg/kg during 14 days. From the 15th to 21st days the animals were divided in groups that were further administered: vehicle, desvenlafaxine (DVS) 10 or 20mg/kg, ALA 100 or 200mg/kg or the combinations of DVS10+ALA100, DVS20+ALA100, DVS10+ALA200 or DVS20+ALA200. ALA or DVS alone or in combination reversed CORT-induced increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test and decrease in sucrose preference, presenting, thus, an antidepressant-like effect. DVS10 alone reversed CORT-induced decrease in BDNF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The same was observed in the HC and ST of ALA200 treated animals. The combination of DVS and ALA200 reversed CORT-induced alterations in BDNF and even, in some cases, increased the levels of this neurotrophin when compared to vehicle-treated animals in HC and ST. Taken together, these results suggest that the combination of the DVS+ALA may be valuable for treating conditions in which BDNF levels are decreased, such as depression. PMID:26350703

  3. Comparative hydrodynamics of bacterial polymorphism

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2011-01-01

    Most bacteria swim through fluids by rotating helical flagella which can take one of twelve distinct polymorphic shapes. The most common helical waveform is the "normal" form, used during forward swimming runs. To shed light on the prevalence of the normal form in locomotion, we gather all available experimental measurements of the various polymorphic forms and compute their intrinsic hydrodynamic efficiencies. The normal helical form is found to be the most hydrodynamically efficient of the twelve polymorphic forms by a significant margin - a conclusion valid for both the peritrichous and polar flagellar families, and robust to a change in the effective flagellum diameter or length. The hydrodynamic optimality of the normal polymorph suggests that, although energetic costs of locomotion are small for bacteria, fluid mechanical forces may have played a significant role in the evolution of the flagellum.

  4. A monoclinic polymorph of theophylline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A monoclinic polymorph of theophylline, C7H8N4O2, has been obtained from a chloroform/methanol mixture by evaporation under ambient conditions. The new polymorph crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure features intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in the formation of dimers between two crystallographically different molecules; each molecule acts as both donor and acceptor.

  5. New polymorphous computing fabric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces a new polymorphous computing Fabric well suited to DSP and Image Processing and describes its implementation on a Configurable System on a Chip (CSOC). The architecture is highly parameterized and enables customization of the synthesized Fabric to achieve high performance for a specific class of application. For this reason it can be considered to be a generic model for hardware accelerator synthesis from a high level specification. Another important innovation is the Fabric uses a global memory concept, which gives the host processor random access to all the variables and instructions on the Fabric. The Fabric supports different computing models including MIMD, SPMD and systolic flow and permits dynamic reconfiguration. We present a specific implementation of a bank of FIR filters on a Fabric composed of 52 cells on the Altera Excalibur ARM running at 33 MHz. The theoretical performance of this Fabric is 1.8 GMACh. For the FIR application we obtain 1.6 GMAC/s real performance. Some automatic tools have been developed like the tool to provide a host access utility and assembler.

  6. Polymorphism of lead oxoborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyulyupa, A.G. [Middle School, Sablinskoe, Stavropol region, 356322 (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P.P., E-mail: ppfedorov@yandex.ru [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Pb{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} melt undergoes statistical undercooling. • Orthorhombic nonlinear optical crystal Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is the metastable γ-polymorph. • Temperature of metastable melting of γ-Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is equal to 530 °C. - Abstract: The study of lead borate melt crystallization by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that, for Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (or 4PbO·B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) stoichiometric compound, its well-known orthorhombic modification (non-centrosymmetric Aba2 space symmetry group (SSG), a = 15.472(1), b = 10.802(1), c = 9.9486(6) Å unit cell parameters) is metastable. It forms from the undercooled melt and has a melting point of 530 ± 5 °C.

  7. Multimarker analysis suggests the involvement of BDNF signaling and microRNA biosynthesis in suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulay, Attila J; Réthelyi, János M

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates the genetics of suicidal behavior remains unclear, genome-wide association and candidate gene studies focusing on single nucleotide associations reported inconsistent findings. Our study explored biologically informed, multimarker candidate gene associations with suicidal behavior in mood disorders. We analyzed the GAIN Whole Genome Association Study of Bipolar Disorder version 3 (n = 999, suicidal n = 358) and the GAIN Major Depression: Stage 1 Genomewide Association in Population-Based Samples (n = 1,753, suicidal n = 245) datasets. Suicidal behavior was defined as severe suicidal ideation or attempt. Candidate genes were selected based on literature search (Geneset1, n = 35), gene expression data of microRNA genes, (Geneset2, n = 68) and their target genes (Geneset3, n = 11,259). Quality control, dosage analyses were carried out with PLINK. Gene-based associations of Geneset1 were analyzed with KGG. Polygenic profile scores of suicidal behavior were computed in the major depression dataset both with PRSice and LDpred and validated in the bipolar disorder data. Several nominally significant gene-based associations were detected, but only DICER1 associated with suicidal behavior in both samples, while only the associations of NTRK2 in the depression sample reached family wise and experiment wise significance. Polygenic profile scores negatively predicted suicidal behavior in the bipolar sample for only Geneset2, with the strongest prediction by PRSice at Pt  < 0.03 (Nagelkerke R(2)  = 0.01, P < 0.007). Gene-based association results confirmed the potential involvement of the BDNF-NTRK2-CREB pathway in the pathogenesis of suicide and the cross-disorder association of DICER1. Polygenic risk prediction of the selected miRNA genes indicates that the miRNA system may play a mediating role, but with considerable pleiotropy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26921221

  8. BDNF pathway is involved in the protective effects of SS-31 on isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Mingqiang; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoru; Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2016-05-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the earliest pathogenesis of isoflurane-induced cognitive impairments in developing or aging mammalian brain. However, its molecular mechanism is poorly understood and a pharmacologic treatment to rapidly reverse mitochondrial dysfunction is lacking. Fifteen-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to isoflurane for two hours following intraperitoneal administration of mitochondrion-targeted peptide SS-31 or vehicle with 30min interval. The hippocampus was immediately removed for biochemical assays and mitochondria isolation after inhalation. Behavioral tests were evaluated by the open field test and fear conditioning test 24h after the experiment. We showed that cognitive deficits induced by exposure of the aging mice to isoflurane were accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in hippocampus due to loss of the enzymatic activity of complex I. This loss resulted in the increase of reactive oxygen species production, decrease of ATP production and mitochondrial membrane potential, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Further, we provided evidence that the BDNF signaling pathway was involved in this process to regulate synaptic plasticity-related proteins, for instance, downregulation of synapsin 1, PSD-95 and p-CREB, and upregulation of NR2A, NR2B, CaMKIIα and CaMKIIβ. Of note, the isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits were rescued by SS-31 through reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction, which facilitated the regulation of BDNF signaling including the expression reversal of aforementioned important synaptic-signaling proteins in aging mice. Our data demonstrate that reversing mitochondrial dysfunction by SS-31 enhances BDNF signaling pathway and synaptic plasticity, and provides protective effects on cognitive function, thereby support the notion that SS-31 may have therapeutic benefits for elderly humans undertaking anesthesia. PMID:26944333

  9. Gestational stress induces depressive-like and anxiety-like phenotypes through epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression in offspring hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Fan, Weidong; Zhang, Xianquan; Dong, Erbo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stressful life events during pregnancy exerts profound effects on neurodevelopment and increases the risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders including major depression. The mechanisms underlying the consequences of gestational stress are complex and remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the effects of gestational stress on depressive-like behavior and epigenetic modifications in young adult offspring. Gestational stress was induced by a combination of restraint and 24-hour light disturbance to pregnant dams throughout gestation. Depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors of young adult offspring were examined. The expression and promoter methylation of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured using RT-qPCR, Western blot, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In addition, the expressions of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetylated histone H3 lysine 14 (AcH3K14) were also analyzed. Our results show that offspring from gestational stress dams exhibited depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors. Biochemically, stress-offspring showed decreased expression of BDNF, increased expression of DNMT1, HDAC1, and HDAC2, and decreased expression of AcH3K14 in the hippocampus as compared to non-stress offspring. Data from MeDIP and ChIP assays revealed an increased methylation as well as decreased binding of AcH3K14 on specific BDNF promoters. Pearson analyses indicated that epigenetic changes induced by gestational stress were correlated with depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors. These data suggest that gestational stress may be a suitable model for understanding the behavioral and molecular epigenetic changes observed in patients with depression. PMID:26890656

  10. Comparison of efficacy, safety and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients of major depressive disorder, treated with fluoxetine and desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, R; Gupta, R; Bhatia, M S; Tripathi, A K; Gupta, L K

    2015-12-01

    This randomized, open label, prospective, observational study compared clinical efficacy, safety alongwith plasma BDNF levels in outpatients of depression treated with fluoxetine and desvenlafaxine. Patients (aged 18-60 years) with moderate to severe major depressive disorder (MDD) diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥14, who were prescribed fluoxetine or desvenlafaxine were included (n=30 in each group). Patients were followed up for 12 weeks for evaluation of clinical efficacy, safety along with BDNF levels. In the fluoxetine group, HAM-D scores at the start of treatment was 19±4.09 which significantly (p<0.05) reduced to 9.24±3.98 at 12 weeks. In the desvenlafaxine group, HAM-D scores at the start of treatment was 18±3.75 which significantly (p<0.05) reduced to 10±3.75 at 12 weeks. The BDNF levels in the fluoxetine group were 775.32±30.38pg/ml at the start of treatment which significantly (p<0.05) increased to 850.3±24.92pg/ml at 12 weeks. The BDNF levels in the desvenlafaxine group were 760.5±28.53pg/ml at the start of treatment which significantly (p<0.05) increased to 845.8±32.82pg/ml at 12 weeks. Both the antidepressants were found to be safe and well tolerated. The efficacy and the safety profile of desvenlafaxine is comparable to fluoxetine in patients of MDD. BDNF levels were significantly increased post-treatment with both the antidepressive agents. Whether BDNF may have a prognostic value in predicting treatment response to antidepressant drugs needs to be investigated in a larger patient population. PMID:26514447

  11. BDNF Meditated trkB and Synapsin I Changes within the Hippocampus after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat:Reflections of Injury-induced Neuroplasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionTraumatic brain injury (TBI) can produce chronic cognitive learning/memory deficits that are thought to be mediated, in part, by impaired hippocampal function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its signal transduction receptor trkB and its downstream effector synapsin I are involved in this period. BDNF, trkB and the slope of field excitatory post-synaptic potential(fEPSP) were measured in the hippocampus of rat after fluid percussion brain injury (FPI). Isofluorane anaesthe- tizeed 50...

  12. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  13. Resveratrol abrogates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior, neuroinflammatory response, and CREB/BDNF signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Hansen; Liu, Song; Xue, Hao; Wang, Xueer; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-12-01

    Current evidence supports that depression is accompanied by the activation of the inflammatory-response system, and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. Resveratrol has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-depressant-like properties. Using an animal model of depression induced by a single administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the present study investigated the effects of resveratrol on LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and inflammatory-response in adult mice. Our results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol (80mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days reversed LPS-increased the immobility time in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test, and LPS-reduced sucrose preference test. Moreover, the antidepressant action of resveratrol was paralleled by significantly reducing the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and up-regulating phosphorylated cAMP response-element-binding protein (pCREB)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. In addition, resveratrol ameliorated LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the PFC and hippocampus. The results demonstrate that resveratrol may be an effective therapeutic agent for LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, partially due to its anti-inflammatory aptitude and by modulating pCREB and BDNF expression in the brain region of mice. PMID:26485503

  14. Serum inducible kinase is a positive regulator of cortical dendrite development and is required for BDNF-promoted dendritic arborization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Ling Guo; Guo-He Tan; Shuai Li; Xue-Wen Cheng; Ya Zhou; Yun-Fang Jia; Hui Xiong; Jiong Tao; Zhi-Qi Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Serum inducible kinase (SNK),also known as (p)olo-(l)ike (k)inase 2 (PLK2),is a known regulator of mitosis,synaptogenesis and synaptic homeostasis.However,its role in early cortical development is unknown.Herein,we show that snk is expressed in the cortical plate from embryonic day 14,but not in the ventricular/subventricular zones (VZ/SVZ),and SNK protein localizes to the soma and dendrites of cultured immature cortical neurons.Loss of SNK impaired dendritic but not axonal arborization in a dose-dependent manner and overexpression had opposite effects,both in vitro and in vivo.Overexpression of SNK also caused abnormal branching of the leading process of migrating cortical neurons in electroporated cortices.The kinase activity was necessary for these effects.Extracellular signalregulated kinase (ERK) pathway activity downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulation led to increases in SNK protein expression via transcriptional regulation,and this upregulation was necessary for the growth-promoting effect of BDNF on dendritic arborization.Taken together,our results indicate that SNK is essential for dendrite morphogenesis in cortical neurons.

  15. Tribenzoatobismuth(III: a new polymorph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Boldyreva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new polymorph (β was obtained for an active pharmaceutical ingredient, bismuth tribenzoate, [Bi(C6H5CO23]. The new β-polymorph is 1.05 times denser than the previously known polymorph [Rae et al. (1998. Acta Cryst. B54, 438–442]. In the β-polymorph, the Bi atom is linked with three benzoate anions, each of them acting as a bidentate ligand, and these assemblies with C3 point symmetry can be considered as `molecules'. The structure of the β-polymorph has no polymeric chains, in contrast to the previously known polymorph. The `molecules' in the β-polymorph are stacked along [001], so that the phenyl rings of the neighbouring molecules are parallel to each other. Based on the pronounced difference in the crystal structures, one can suppose that two polymorphs should differ in the dissolution kinetics and bioavailability.

  16. The evolution of polymorphic compatibility molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de

    1995-01-01

    Several primitive colonial organisms distinguish self from nonself by means of polymorphic compatibility molecules bearing similarity to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The evolution of such polymorphisms is generally explained in terms of resistance to parasites. Ignoring parasites, I d

  17. Amplified fragment length polymorphism and virulence polymorphism in Puccinia hordei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinia hordei is the causal agent of barley leaf rust. To study the genetic diversity in P. hordei, 45 isolates with diverse virulence patterns and geographical origins were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers. Two pathotypes of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici and one is...

  18. Abeta(1-42) injection causes memory impairment, lowered cortical and serum BDNF levels, and decreased hippocampal 5-HT(2A) levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, R; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2008-01-01

    Aggregation of the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is believed to be causally involved in a neurodegenerative cascade. In patients with AD, reduced levels of serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding has recent...

  19. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the chronic unpredictable stress rat model and the effects of chronic antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne H; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) is a widely used animal model of depression. The present study was undertaken to investigate behavioral, physiological and molecular effects of CUS and/or chronic antidepressant treatment (venlafaxine or imipramine) in the same set of animals. Anhedonia, a core ...... of the dorsal hippocampus correlated with chronic antidepressant treatment emphasizing a role for BDNF in the mechanisms underlying antidepressant activity....

  20. Long-term treadmill exercise improves spatial memory of male APPswe/PS1dE9 mice by regulation of BDNF expression and microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, J Y; Li, S C; Sun, Y X; Zhang, X S; Dong, Z Z; Zhong, P; Sun, X R

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that physical activity could delay or attenuate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). But the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. To investigate the effect of long-term treadmill exercise on the spatial memory of AD mice and the possible role of β-amyloid, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and microglia in the effect, male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice aged 4 months were subjected to treadmill exercise for 5 months with 6 sessions per week and gradually increased load. A Morris water maze was used to evaluate the spatial memory. Expression levels of β-amyloid, BDNF and Iba-1 (a microglia marker) in brain tissue were detected by immunohistochemistry. Sedentary AD mice and wildtype C57BL/6J mice served as controls. The results showed that 5-month treadmill exercise significantly decreased the escape latencies (P BDNF-positive cells and decreased the ratios of activated microglia in both the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. However, treadmill exercise did not significantly alleviate the accumulation of β-amyloid in either the cerebral cortex or the hippocampus of the AD mice (P > 0.05). The study suggested that long-term treadmill exercise could improve the spatial memory of the male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice. The increase in BDNF-positive cells and decrease in activated microglia might underpin the beneficial effect. PMID:26681831

  1. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  2. YY162 prevents ADHD-like behavioral side effects and cytotoxicity induced by Aroclor1254 via interactive signaling between antioxidant potential, BDNF/TrkB, DAT and NET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yunsung; Shin, Eun-Joo; Shin, Seung Woo; Lim, Yong Kwang; Jung, Jong Ho; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ha, Jong Ryul; Chae, Jong Seok; Ko, Sung Kwon; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) has become the primary drug of choice for treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, its psychotropic effects severely hamper long-term clinical use. We evaluated the effects of YY162, which consists of terpenoid-strengthened Ginkgo biloba and ginsenoside Rg3, on the ADHD-like condition induced by Aroclor1254, because both components have been suggested to modulate oxidative stress, dopaminergic neurotransmission, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, which may be critical targets for understanding the pathogenesis of ADHD. YY162 attenuated the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in BDNF levels induced by Aroclor1254 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. YY162 significantly attenuated Aroclor1254-induced ADHD-like behavior and oxidative stress in ICR mice. Furthermore, YY162 attenuated reductions in p-TrkB, BDNF, dopamine transporter (DAT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression. These attenuating effects of YY162 were comparable to those of MP. Importantly, K252a, a TrkB antagonist, counteracted the protective effects of YY162. Our results suggest that YY162 possesses significant protective activities against ADHD-like conditions with negligible behavioral side effects, and that interactive signaling between antioxidant potential and BDNF/TrkB receptor for the positive modulation of the DAT and NET is important for YY162-mediated neuroprotective activity. PMID:24394491

  3. Variants in doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1, a gene up-regulated by BDNF, are associated with memory and general cognitive abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Le Hellard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human memory and general cognitive abilities are complex functions of high heritability and wide variability in the population. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in mammalian memory formation. METHODOLOGY / PRINCIPAL FINDING: Based on the identification of genes markedly up-regulated during BDNF-induced synaptic consolidation in the hippocampus, we selected genetic variants that were tested in three independent samples, from Norway and Scotland, of adult individuals examined for cognitive abilities. In all samples, we show that markers in the doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1 (DCLK1 gene, are significantly associated with general cognition (IQ scores and verbal memory function, resisting multiple testing. DCLK1 is a complex gene with multiple transcripts which vary in expression and function. We show that the short variants are all up-regulated after BDNF treatment in the rat hippocampus, and that they are expressed in the adult human brain (mostly in cortices and hippocampus. We demonstrate that several of the associated variants are located in potential alternative promoter- and cis-regulatory elements of the gene and that they affect BDNF-mediated expression of short DCLK1 transcripts in a reporter system. CONCLUSION: These data present DCLK1 as a functionally pertinent gene involved in human memory and cognitive functions.

  4. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarow, Richard; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Munsch, Thomas; Zehendner, Christoph; Brigadski, Tanja; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin-induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthase activity, TrkB signaling, and intracellular calcium elevation. The effect of NO signaling on neurotrophin secretion was analyzed in BDNF-GFP, and NT-3-GFP transfected hippocampal neurons. Exogenous application of the NO donor sodium-nitroprusside markedly inhibited neurotrophin secretion. However, endogenously generated NO in response to depolarization and neurotrophin stimulation, both did not result in a negative feedback on neurotrophin secretion. These results suggest that a negative feedback of NO signaling on synaptic secretion of neurotrophins operates only at high intracellular levels of nitric oxide that are under physiological conditions not reached by depolarization or BDNF signaling. PMID:25426021

  5. Running throughout middle-age improves memory function, hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF levels in female C57Bl/6J mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Marlatt; M.C. Potter; P.J. Lucassen; H. van Praag

    2012-01-01

    Age-related memory loss is considered to commence at middle-age and coincides with reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neurotrophin levels. Consistent physical activity at midlife may preserve brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, new cell genesis and learning. In the present study

  6. Maternal Exercise during Pregnancy Increases BDNF Levels and Cell Numbers in the Hippocampal Formation but Not in the Cerebral Cortex of Adult Rat Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence has shown that physical exercise during pregnancy may alter brain development and improve cognitive function of offspring. However, the mechanisms through which maternal exercise might promote such effects are not well understood. The present study examined levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and absolute cell numbers in the hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex of rat pups born from mothers exercised during pregnancy. Additionally, we evaluated the cognitive abilities of adult offspring in different behavioral paradigms (exploratory activity and habituation in open field tests, spatial memory in a water maze test, and aversive memory in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Results showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy increased BDNF levels and absolute numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the hippocampal formation of offspring. No differences in BDNF levels or cell numbers were detected in the cerebral cortex. It was also observed that offspring from exercised mothers exhibited better cognitive performance in nonassociative (habituation and associative (spatial learning mnemonic tasks than did offspring from sedentary mothers. Our findings indicate that maternal exercise during pregnancy enhances offspring cognitive function (habituation behavior and spatial learning and increases BDNF levels and cell numbers in the hippocampal formation of offspring.

  7. Maternal Exercise during Pregnancy Increases BDNF Levels and Cell Numbers in the Hippocampal Formation but Not in the Cerebral Cortex of Adult Rat Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Fernandes, Jansen; Lopim, Glauber Menezes; Cabral, Francisco Romero; Scerni, Débora Amado; de Oliveira-Pinto, Ana Virgínia; Lent, Roberto; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2016-01-01

    Clinical evidence has shown that physical exercise during pregnancy may alter brain development and improve cognitive function of offspring. However, the mechanisms through which maternal exercise might promote such effects are not well understood. The present study examined levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and absolute cell…

  8. NGF and BDNF long-term variations in the thyroid, testis and adrenal glands of a mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Ceccanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD due to prenatal ethanol consumption may induce long-lasting changes to the newborns affecting also the endocrine system and the nerve growth factor (NGF and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate in the thyroid, testis and adrenal glands of a FASD mouse model the long-lasting effects of ethanol exposure during pregnancy and lactation on NGF and BDNF and their main receptors, TrkA and TrkB, including their phosphorylated patterns. METHODS: We used aged male CD-1 mice early exposed to ethanol solution or red wine at same ethanol concentration (11% vol. RESULTS We found elevations in NGF and BDNF in the thyroid of aged mice exposed to ethanol solution only but not in the red wine group. In the testis NGF resulted to be increased only in the ethanol solution group. In the adrenal glands data showed an elevation in NGF in both the ethanol solution group and red wine. No changes in TrkA, TrkB, phospho-TrkA and phospho-TrkB were revealed in all tissues examined. CONCLUSIONS Early administration of ethanol may induce long-lasting changes in the mouse thyroid, testis and adrenal glands at NGF and BDNF levels.

  9. Expression of BDNF mRNA in Porcine Reproductive Tissues During Follicular Phase and Luteal Phase and Oocytes in GV and in vitro Matured MII Stage

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    Xu Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins (NTs belong to a family of soluble homodimeric polypeptide growth factors and are widely recognized for their essential roles in central and peripheral nervous systems. One such neurotrophin, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF was originally described in the nervous system but has now been shown to be expressed in reproductive system. In this study, the researchers examined the presence and different expression levels of BDNF mRNA in porcine reproductive organs during different stages of estrous cycle and in pig oocytes in Germinal Vesicle (GV and in vitro matured Metaphase II (MII stage. In oviduct and uterus, BDNF mRNA expression was higher than that in ovary (p0.05, a similar but more significant change occurred in oviduct (pin vitro matured MII oocytes with significantly higher amounts in GV oocytes than in MII oocytes (p<0.01. These results suggest a possible role for BDNF in the regulation and modulation of pig reproductive function and oocyte maturation.

  10. A BDNF loop-domain mimetic acutely reverses spontaneous apneas and respiratory abnormalities during behavioral arousal in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kron

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. In Mecp2 mutant mice, BDNF deficits have been associated with breathing abnormalities, a core feature of RTT, as well as with synaptic hyperexcitability within the brainstem respiratory network. Application of BDNF can reverse hyperexcitability in acute brainstem slices from Mecp2-null mice, suggesting that therapies targeting BDNF or its receptor, TrkB, could be effective at acute reversal of respiratory abnormalities in RTT. Therefore, we examined the ability of LM22A-4, a small-molecule BDNF loop-domain mimetic and TrkB partial agonist, to modulate synaptic excitability within respiratory cell groups in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS and to acutely reverse abnormalities in breathing at rest and during behavioral arousal in Mecp2 mutants. Patch-clamp recordings in Mecp2-null brainstem slices demonstrated that LM22A-4 decreases excitability at primary afferent synapses in the nTS by reducing the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents and the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. In vivo, acute treatment of Mecp2-null and -heterozygous mutants with LM22A-4 completely eliminated spontaneous apneas in resting animals, without sedation. Moreover, we demonstrate that respiratory dysregulation during behavioral arousal, a feature of human RTT, is also reversed in Mecp2 mutants by acute treatment with LM22A-4. Together, these data support the hypothesis that reduced BDNF signaling and respiratory dysfunction in RTT are linked, and establish the proof-of-concept that treatment with a small-molecule structural mimetic of a BDNF loop domain and a TrkB partial agonist can acutely reverse abnormal breathing at rest and in response to

  11. Effects of sleep deprivation on behaviors and abnormal hippocampal BDNF/miR-10B expression in rats with chronic stress depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    Being sleep-deprived can relieve the depressed emotions in rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, male rats were divided into 3 groups: normal control (NC), chronicunpredictable stress (CUPS) and sleep-deprived (SD). All of the groups were examined using the sucrose consumption test and the open field test. The sucrose consumption test and the open field test were performed for all three groups. The BDNF and miR-10B expressions were examined using real-time PCR and the level of BNDF was discovered by western blotting. In the sucrose consumption test and the open field test, the CUPS rats consumed less sucrose and got fewer score than the NC rats, however the SD rats consumed significantly more sucrose and received higher scores than the CUPS rats. Both the expression of BNDF and the protein levels in the CUPS group was significantly lower than in the NC group. Also, the CUPS group also showed a higher miR-10B expression than the NC group. However, the SD group demonstrated higher BDNF expression and lower miR-10B expression when compared with the CUPS group. Further investigation demonstrated that the BDNF is the direct target gene of miR-10B and BDNF expression, which is negatively correlated with the expression of miR-10B. In the sucrose consumption test, BNDF expression is positively correlated with the sucrose preference rate whereas miR-10B has an opposing correlation. Moreover, the open field test demonstrated that BNDF expression is positively correlated with the scores and the miR-10B expression is negatively correlated. These results indicate that sleep deprivation is closely linked with the downregulation of miR-10B and possibly the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus in the CUPS rats. PMID:25755749

  12. Brain ischaemia induces shedding of a BDNF-scavenger ectodomain from TrkB receptors by excitotoxicity activation of metalloproteinases and γ-secretases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S; Ayuso-Dolado, Sara; Arbeteta, Raquel; Esteban-Ortega, Gema M; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world with limited therapies available to restrict brain damage or improve functional recovery after cerebral ischaemia. A promising strategy currently under investigation is the promotion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling through tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors, a pathway essential for neuronal survival and function. However, TrkB and BDNF-signalling are impaired by excitotoxicity, a primary pathological process in stroke also associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Pathological imbalance of TrkB isoforms is critical in neurodegeneration and is caused by calpain processing of BDNF high affinity full-length receptor (TrkB-FL) and an inversion of the transcriptional pattern of the Ntrk2 gene, to favour expression of the truncated isoform TrkB-T1 over TrkB-FL. We report here that both TrkB-FL and neuronal TrkB-T1 also undergo ectodomain shedding by metalloproteinases activated after ischaemic injury or excitotoxic damage of cortical neurons. Subsequently, the remaining membrane-bound C-terminal fragments (CTFs) are cleaved by γ-secretases within the transmembrane region, releasing their intracellular domains (ICDs) into the cytosol. Therefore, we identify TrkB-FL and TrkB-T1 as new substrates of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), a mechanism that highly contributes to TrkB-T1 regulation in ischaemia but is minor for TrkB-FL which is mainly processed by calpain. However, since the secreted TrkB ectodomain acts as a BDNF scavenger and significantly alters BDNF/TrkB signalling, the mechanism of RIP could contribute to neuronal death in excitotoxicity. These results are highly relevant since they reveal new targets for the rational design of therapies to treat stroke and other pathologies with an excitotoxic component. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26712630

  13. Time-dependent co-relation of BDNF and CREB mRNAs in adult rat brains following acute psychological stress in the communication box paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongying; Wang, Yanmei; Yan, Min; Ma, Hongxia; Gao, Yanjie; Li, Zexuan; Li, Changqi; Tian, Hongjun; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-06-15

    Psychological stress affects human health, and chronic stress leads to life-threatening diseases, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychological stress coping mechanisms involve the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and downstream cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which are targets of the adverse effects of stress paradigms. Fourty-seven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, physical stress and six psychological stress groups which were assayed at 0h, 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h and 24h after communication box (CB) stress induction. Behavioral assessment using open field and elevated plus maze tests determined that CB stress significantly increased anxiety. After CB stress, the alternation of mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were assessed at different time points by in situ hybridization. The mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were significantly decreased, then gradually recovered over 24h to maximum levels in the hippocampus (CA1 region), prefrontal cortex (PFC), central amygdaloid nuclei (AG), shell of accumbens nucleus (NAC), periaqueductal gray (PAG) and ventral tegmental area, except for the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, mRNA levels of BDNF and CREB were positively correlated in all examined brain regions, except for the VTA region at 0 and 24h after CB stress induction. These findings suggest that BDNF and CREB may belong to the same pathway and be involved in psychological stress response mechanisms, and protect the organism from stress induced, aversive processes leading to disease. PMID:27132084

  14. Hippocampal damage and kainic acid injection induce a rapid increase in mRNA for BDNF and NGF in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarín, M; Ernfors, P; Lindefors, N; Persson, H

    1991-10-01

    In situ hybridization and Northern blots were used to study expression of mRNAs for members of the nerve growth factor family in the rat brain following an excitatory stimulus. One hour after a unilateral needle insertion or saline injection into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA increased markedly in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus and in the piriform cortex ipsilateral to the injection. The same treatment also increased the level of NGF mRNA in granular neurons of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus. The rapid increase in BDNF and NGF mRNA after a needle insertion or injection of saline was transient and preceded by an increase in c-fos mRNA in the same brain regions. In contrast to a needle insertion per se or a saline injection, 7 h after a unilateral injection of kainic acid into the dorsal hippocampus, the level of BDNF mRNA was dramatically increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus, as well as in the ipsilateral frontoparietal, piriform and perihinal cortex, the amygdaloid complex, claustrum, and ventromedial hypothalamus. A less pronounced increase was also seen in these brain areas on the contralateral side. Northern blots revealed that the level of BDNF mRNA increased 5- and 40-fold in the contra- and ipsilateral hippocampus, respectively, compared to sham-operated control animals. In contrast to BDNF and NGF, the level of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrohin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA was not altered by either needle insertion or injection of saline or kainic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1915733

  15. Stress dynamically regulates behavior and glutamatergic gene expression in hippocampus by opening a window of epigenetic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasca, Carla; Zelli, Danielle; Bigio, Benedetta; Piccinin, Sonia; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Nisticò, Robert; McEwen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Excitatory amino acids play a key role in both adaptive and deleterious effects of stressors on the brain, and dysregulated glutamate homeostasis has been associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. Here, we elucidate mechanisms of epigenetic plasticity in the hippocampus in the interactions between a history of chronic stress and familiar and novel acute stressors that alter expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. We demonstrate that acute restraint and acute forced swim stressors induce differential effects on these behaviors in naive mice and in mice with a history of chronic-restraint stress (CRS). They reveal a key role for epigenetic up- and down-regulation of the putative presynaptic type 2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors and the postsynaptic NR1/NMDA receptors in the hippocampus and particularly in the dentate gyrus (DG), a region of active neurogenesis and a target of antidepressant treatment. We show changes in DG long-term potentiation (LTP) that parallel behavioral responses, with habituation to the same acute restraint stressor and sensitization to a novel forced-swim stressor. In WT mice after CRS and in unstressed mice with a BDNF loss-of-function allele (BDNF Val66Met), we show that the epigenetic activator of histone acetylation, P300, plays a pivotal role in the dynamic up- and down-regulation of mGlu2 in hippocampus via histone-3-lysine-27-acetylation (H3K27Ac) when acute stressors are applied. These hippocampal responses reveal a window of epigenetic plasticity that may be useful for treatment of disorders in which glutamatergic transmission is dysregulated. PMID:26627246

  16. The regulated secretory pathway and human disease: insights from gene variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eSalton

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulated secretory pathway provides critical control of peptide, growth factor, and hormone release from neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, and neurons, maintaining physiological homeostasis. Propeptides and prohormones are packaged into dense core granules (DCGs, where they frequently undergo tissue-specific processing as the DCG matures. Proteins of the granin family are DCG components, and although their function is not fully understood, data suggest they are involved in DCG formation and regulated protein/peptide secretion, in addition to their role as precursors of bioactive peptides. Association of gene variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with neuropsychiatric, endocrine and metabolic diseases, has implicated specific secreted proteins and peptides in disease pathogenesis. For example, a SNP at position 196 (G/A of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene dysregulates protein processing and secretion and leads to cognitive impairment. This suggests more generally that variants identified in genes encoding secreted growth factors, peptides, hormones, and proteins involved in DCG biogenesis, protein processing, and the secretory apparatus, could provide insight into the process of regulated secretion as well as disorders that result when it is impaired.

  17. Hippocampal noradrenergic activation is necessary for object recognition memory consolidation and can promote BDNF increase and memory persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Gayer, Mateus Cristofari; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Previously we showed that activation of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NTS)-Nucleus Paragigantocellularis (PGi)-Locus coeruleus (LC) pathway, which theoretically culminates with norepinephrine (NE) release in dorsal hippocampus (CA1 region) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is necessary for the consolidation of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that, while the microinjection of the beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker timolol into CA1 impairs OR memory consolidation, the microinjection of norepinephrine (NE) promotes the persistence of this type of memory. Further, we show that OR consolidation is attended by an increase of norepinephrine (NE) levels and of the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus, which are impaired by inactivation of the NTS-PGi-LC pathway by the infusion of muscimol into the NTS. PMID:26691781

  18. The effects of paraquat on regional brain neurotransmitter activity, hippocampal BDNF and behavioural function in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litteljohn, Darcy; Nelson, Eric; Bethune, Cheri; Hayley, Shawn

    2011-09-20

    Accumulating evidence implicates pesticides such as paraquat in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Indeed, paraquat exposure is associated with an increased risk of PD and when administered to rodents the pesticide recapitulates many of the neuropathological and behavioural features of the disease. However, it is unclear whether any sexual dimorphism exists in the in vivo murine response to paraquat intoxication, since most studies have used exclusively males. Accordingly, we sought to determine the impact of repeated paraquat exposure on a range of neural and behavioural outcomes in female C57BL/6J mice. The present investigation revealed that the female mice were largely resistant to the paraquat-induced nigrostriatal dopamine changes and locomotor deficits that were reported previously in males. Similarly, in contrast to the reductions of hippocamapal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) previously reported in paraquat treated male mice, the herbicide actually increased levels of the trophic factor in females. Yet, similar to our previous findings in males, paraquat increased norepinephrine utilization within the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of the female mice. However, these changes did not translate into anxiety- or- depression-like behaviours in the open field test, as the females actually seemed to show enhanced exploration. Consistent with reports of a greater incidence of PD in males, these data suggest that female mice may be less susceptible than males to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic and motor effects of environmental toxins. The augmented hippocampal BDNF and noradrenergic changes observed could conceivably act to buffer female mice against some of the deleterious behavioural effects of parquat. PMID:21835224

  19. IPD: the Immuno Polymorphism Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James; Marsh, Steven G E

    2007-01-01

    The Immuno Polymorphism Database (IPD) (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/) is a set of specialist databases related to the study of polymorphic genes in the immune system. IPD currently consists of four databases: IPD-KIR, contains the allelic sequences of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs); IPD-MHC, a database of sequences of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of different species; IPD-HPA, alloantigens expressed only on platelets; and IPD-ESTAB, which provides access to the European Searchable Tumour Cell Line Database, a cell bank of immunologically characterized melanoma cell lines. The IPD project works with specialist groups or nomenclature committees who provide and curate individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. The IPD project stores all the data in a set of related databases. Those sections with similar data, such as IPD-KIR and IPD-MHC, share the same database structure. PMID:18449992

  20. BDNF is associated with SFRP1 expression in luminal and basal-like breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer tissues: a novel role in tumor suppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    Full Text Available Secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1 functions as an important inhibitor of the Wnt pathway and is a known tumor suppressor gene, which is epigenetically silenced in a variety of tumors e.g. in breast cancer. However, it is still unclear how SFRP1 exactly affects the Wnt pathway. Our aim was to decipher SFRP1 involvement in biochemical signaling in dependency of different breast cancer subtypes and to identify novel SFRP1-regulated genes. We generated SFRP1 over-expressing in vitro breast cancer models, reflecting the two major subtypes by using basal-like BT20 and luminal-like HER2-positive SKBR3 cells. DNA microarray expression profiling of these models revealed that SFRP1 expression potentially modulates Bone morphogenetic protein- and Smoothened signaling (p<0.01, in addition to the known impact on Wnt signaling. Importantly, further statistical analysis revealed that in dependency of the cancer subtype model SFRP1 may affect the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathway (p<0.01, respectively. While SFRP1 re-expression generally mediated distinct patterns of transcriptionally induced or repressed genes in BT20 and SKBR3 cells, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF was identified as a SFRP1 induced gene in both cell lines. Although BDNF has been postulated as a putative oncogene, the co-regulation with SFRP1 indicates a potential suppressive function in breast cancer. Indeed, a positive correlation between SFRP1 and BDNF protein expression could be shown (p<0.001 in primary breast cancer samples. Moreover, TCGA dataset based analysis clearly underscores that BDNF mRNA is down-regulated in primary breast cancer samples predicting a poor prognosis of these patients. In line, we functionally provide evidence that stable BDNF re-expression in basal-like BT20 breast cancer cells blocks tumor cell proliferation. Hence, our results suggest that BDNF might rather mediate suppressive than promoting function in human breast cancer whose mode of

  1. Effects of chronic multiple stress on learning and memory and the expression of Fyn, BDNF, TrkB in the hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-heng; LIU Neng-bao; ZHANG Min-hai; ZHOU Yan-ling; LIAO Jia-wan; LIU Xiang-qian; CHEN Hong-wei

    2007-01-01

    Background The effect of chronic stress on cognitive functions has been one of the hot topics in neuroscience. But there has been much controversy over its mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic multiple stress on spatial learning and memory as well as the expression of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB in the hippocampus of rats.Methods Adult rats were randomly divided into control and chronic multiple stressed groups. Rats in the multiple stressed group were irregularly and alternatively exposed to situations of vertical revolution, sleep expropriation and restraint lasting for 6 weeks, 6 hours per day with night illumination for 6 weeks. Before and after the period of chronic multiple stresses, the performance of spatial learning and memory of all rats was measured using the Morris Water Maze (MWM). The expression of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB proteins in the hippocampus was assayed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. The levels of Fyn and TrkB mRNAs in the hippocampus of rats were detected by RT-PCR technique.Results The escape latency in the control group and the stressed group were 15.63 and 8.27 seconds respectively.The performance of spatial learning and memory of rats was increased in chronic multiple stressed group (P<0.05). The levels of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB proteins in the stressed group were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). The results of immunoreactivity showed that Fyn was present in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and BDNF positive particles were distributed in the nuclei of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells as well as DG granular cells. Quantitative analysis indicated that level of Fyn mRNA was also upregulated in the hippocampus of the stressed group (P<0.05).Conclusions Chronic multiple stress can enhance spatial learning and memory function of rats. The expression of Fyn,BDNF and TrkB proteins and the level of Fyn mRNA are increased in the stessed rat hippocampus. These suggest that Fyn and BDNF

  2. Maternal Voluntary Exercise during Pregnancy Enhances the Spatial Learning Acquisition but not the Retention of Memory in Rat Pups via a TrkB-mediated Mechanism: The Role of Hippocampal BDNF Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Maziar M Akhavan; Hossein Miladi-Gorji; Mitra Emami-Abarghoie; Manouchehr Safari; Bizhan Sadighi-Moghaddam; Abbas A. Vafaei; Ali Rashidy-Pour

    2013-01-01

      Objective(s): The effect of maternal voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF level in rat offspring was studied. In addition, the possible role of hippocampal BDNF receptors in maternal exercise induced enhancement of learning in the rat pups was investigated.   Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats have been randomly assigned to sedentary control or voluntary exercise groups. Each of the exercising pregnant rats was given access to a cage that was equipped with a running wheel until the end ...

  3. BDNF Overexpression in the Ventral Tegmental Area Prolongs Social Defeat Stress-induced Cross-Sensitization to Amphetamine and Increases ΔFosB Expression in Mesocorticolimbic Regions of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junshi; Fanous, Sanya; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Bass, Caroline E.; Hammer, Ronald P; Nikulina, Ella M.

    2013-01-01

    Social defeat stress induces persistent cross-sensitization to psychostimulants, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cross-sensitization remain unclear. One candidate is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The present research examined whether ventral tegmental area (VTA) BDNF overexpression would prolong the time course of cross-sensitization after a single social defeat stress, which normally produces transient cross-sensitization lasting

  4. Restraint stress and repeated CRF receptor activation in the amygdala both increase amyloid β precursor protein (APP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide but have divergent effects on BDNF and pre-synaptic proteins in the prefrontal cortex of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Balmiki; Gaskins, Denise L.; Sajdyk, Tammy J.; Spence, John P.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2011-01-01

    Both environmental stress and anxiety may represent important risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Previous studies demonstrate that restraint stress is associated with increased amyloid beta (Aβ) and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the brain. Aβ deposition, synaptic loss, and neurodegeneration define major hallmarks of AD, and BDNF is responsible for the maintenance of neurons. In contrast to restraint stress, repeated injections of sub-anxioge...

  5. Eating disorders and obesity: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jemma; Ternouth, Andrew; Collier, David A

    2009-01-01

    The eating disorders anorexia and bulimia nervosa have traditionally been regarded as entirely separate from obesity. Eating disorders have been regarded as Western culture-bound syndromes, arising in societies with excessive emphasis on weight, shape and appearance, and best treated by psychological therapies, in particular cognitive behavioural therapy or family-based interventions. In contrast, obesity has been considered a medical illness with metabolic and genetic origins, and thought to be best treated by mainstream medicine, involving dietary, drug or surgical treatment. We believe that this polarisation is fundamentally flawed, and research and treatment of both types of disorder would be better served by greater appreciation of the psychosocial components of obesity and the biological and genetic components of eating disorders. There are similarities in phenotype (such as excessive attempts at weight control, binge eating behaviours) and in risk factors (such as low self-esteem, external locus of control, childhood abuse and neglect, dieting, media exposure, body image dissatisfaction, weight-related teasing and shared susceptibility genes). One example of shared genetic risk is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) gene, in which the valine allele of the Val66Met amino acid polymorphism predisposes to obesity, whereas the methionine allele predisposes to eating disorders. Thus the evidence suggests that these disorders will have both shared and distinct susceptibility factors; some will predispose to both types of disorder, some will push in opposite directions, and some will separate them. PMID:19526739

  6. APOE and COMT polymorphisms are complementary biomarkers of status, stability, and transitions in normal aging and early mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A Dixon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Research has reported associations among selected genetic susceptibility biomarkers and risk of (a normal cognitive aging decrements, (b established mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and (c sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In focusing on the transitional normal-to-early MCI phase, we examine associations among three theoretically relevant polymorphisms (APOE [rs429358, rs7412], BDNF [rs6265], COMT [rs4680] and both baseline cognitive status (MCI versus normal aging and two-wave (four-year longitudinal stability or change profiles. The latter included three profiles: (a stable as normal aging, (b stable or chronic impairment (MCI-to-MCI, and (c emergence of impairment (normal-to-MCI. Method: Genotyped older adults (n = 237 at baseline; age range = 64-91; 62% women from the Victoria Longitudinal Study were examined for (a independent and interactive associations of three genetic polymorphisms with (b two objectively classified cognitive status groups (not-impaired controls (NIC and MCI at (c both baseline and across a two-wave (four-year longitudinal interval. Results: First, logistic regression revealed that the presence of at least one APOE ε4 allele (the risk factor for AD was linked to greater baseline risk of objective MCI. Second, multinomial logistic regression revealed that (a the presence of an APOE ε4 allele was associated with an increased risk of 4-year MCI status stability (chronicity, and (b the COMT homozygous risk genotype (G/G or Val/Val was associated with an increased risk of both MCI-to-MCI stability (chronicity and emerging NIC-to-MCI conversion. Discussion: Both chronicity and emergence of objectively classified early cognitive impairment may be genetically heterogeneous phenomena, with influences from a panel of both normal cognitive aging (COMT and AD-related (APOE polymorphisms.

  7. Maternal Voluntary Exercise during Pregnancy Enhances the Spatial Learning Acquisition but not the Retention of Memory in Rat Pups via a TrkB-mediated Mechanism: The Role of Hippocampal BDNF Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar M Akhavan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: The effect of maternal voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF level in rat offspring was studied. In addition, the possible role of hippocampal BDNF receptors in maternal exercise induced enhancement of learning in the rat pups was investigated.   Materials and Methods: Pregnant rats have been randomly assigned to sedentary control or voluntary exercise groups. Each of the exercising pregnant rats was given access to a cage that was equipped with a running wheel until the end of their pregnancy. On post natal day (PND 36, two groups consisted of 7 male rat pups in each group from sedentary or exercised mothers were sacrificed and the hippocampus was dissected for BDNF proteins level determination. Also, bilateral injection of K252a to the hippocampus was used to block the hippocampal BDNF action on PND59 in the rat pups. Results: Voluntary exercise during pregnancy significantly increased the level of BDNF protein in the hippocampus of the rat pups on PND36 compared to the control group (P=0.048. Inhibiting BDNF action abolished the exercise-induced improvement of learning acquisition in offspring in training trials (P=0.0001. No difference was observed in the platform location latency and the time spent in the target in the probe test between two groups. Conclusion : This study demonstrates that voluntary exercise during pregnancy via a TrkB-mediated mechanism enhances the spatial learning acquisition, however, not the retention of memory in the rat pups.

  8. Aspects and Polymorphism in AspectJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, David Harel; Ernst, Erik

    -oriented programming (AOP). In AOP, pieces of crosscutting behavior are extracted from the base code and localized in aspects, losing as a result their polymorphic capabilities while introducing new and unexplored issues. In this paper, we explore what kinds of polymorphism AOP languages should support, using Aspect......J as the basis for the presentation. The results are not exclusive to AspectJ---aspectual polymorphism may make aspects in any comparable AOSD language more expressive and reusable across programs, while preserving safety....

  9. Preparation and Crystallographic Analysis of Gliclazide Polymorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamma, A. J.; S B Sateesha; Narode, M. K.; V R S S Prashanth; A M Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of gliclazide in the pharmaceutical industry, a large number of research groups have been engaged in various investigations aiming to enhance its biomedical application. But, very limited efforts have been made to study polymorphism of gliclazide. Therefore, this study focuses on solvent-induced polymorphism of gliclazide and its characterization by thermal methods. Three polymorphs namely, Form-I, II and III and an amorphous powder were produced from different solvents...

  10. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphism and Endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wieser, Fritz; Wenzl, Rene; Tempfer, Clemens; Worda, Christoph; Huber, Johannes; Schneeberger, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inactivates the estradiol metabolites, 2-hydroxy and 4-hydroxy catechols, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. A COMT valine to methionine polymorphism (G-to-A) in exon 4 of the COMT gene is polymorphic in the human population, with 25% of Caucasians being homozygous for the low-activity allele (COMT-L) of the enzyme. In a case-control study we investigated whether this COMT polymorphism is associated with endometriosis.

  11. Effect of Prenatal Protein Malnutrition on Long-Term Potentiation and BDNF Protein Expression in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex after Neocortical and Hippocampal Tetanization

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    Alejandro Hernández

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of the protein content from 25 to 8% casein in the diet of pregnant rats results in impaired neocortical long-term potentiation (LTP of the offspring together with lower visuospatial memory performance. The present study was aimed to investigate whether this type of maternal malnutrition could result in modification of plastic capabilities of the entorhinal cortex (EC in the adult progeny. Unlike normal eutrophic controls, 55–60-day-old prenatally malnourished rats were unable to develop LTP in the medial EC to tetanizing stimulation delivered to either the ipsilateral occipital cortex or the CA1 hippocampal region. Tetanizing stimulation of CA1 also failed to increase the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the EC of malnourished rats. Impaired capacity of the EC of prenatally malnourished rats to develop LTP and to increase BDNF levels during adulthood may be an important factor contributing to deficits in learning performance having adult prenatally malnourished animals.

  12. Diurnal pattern of serum BDNF before partial sleep deprivation in stress-related mood disorders – an association with therapy response in major depression

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Giese; Beck, J; Serge Brand; Muheim, F.; Martin Hatzinger; Edith Holsboer-Trachsler; Anne Eckert

    2012-01-01

    Background : Depression is one of the most prevalent forms of mood disorders. Compelling evidence suggests that mood disorders are characterized by reduced neuronal plasticity, which can be brought about by exposure to stress. Furthermore, there is good agreement in considering key proteins such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), as a central player for the effects of stress on brain function and plasticity and psychopathological implications. Still, there is a high non-responde...

  13. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on malathion induced depressive-like behavior in subacute exposure and protective effects of crocin

    OpenAIRE

    Somaye Ardebili Dorri; Hossein Hosseinzadeh; Khalil Abnous; Faezeh Vahdati Hasani; Rezvan Yazdian Robati; Bibi Marjan Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study the effect of crocin, a carotenoid isolated from saffron, on malathion (an organophosphate insecticide) induced depressive- like behavior in subacute exposure was investigated. Moreover the molecular mechanism of malathion induced depressive- like behavior and its decreasing effect on the level of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were exposed to malathion (50 m...

  14. Peripheral leukocyte expression of the potential biomarker proteins Bdnf, Sirt1, and Psen1 is not regulated by promoter methylation in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Lucia; Lattanzio, Francesca; Candeletti, Sanzio; Porcellini, Elisa; Raschi, Elena; Licastro, Federico; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2015-09-25

    The identification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers is crucial to support drug discovery. Within putative biomarkers, peripheral Bdnf levels correlate with cognitive decline and AD, although conflicting findings are reported. Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) serum levels are lower in AD patients and Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is expressed by blood cells. DNA methylation is altered in AD patients, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms play a role in AD pathophysiology. The objective of this study was to investigate promoter methylation levels of potential biomarkers in AD cases and controls. Peripheral blood DNA methylation levels were analysed by methylation-specific primer real-time PCR. Bdnf promoter methylation levels did not differ between AD patients and controls. Similarly, Sirt1 promoter revealed minimal levels of methylation which did not display significant differences between groups. No significant difference was revealed between AD patients and controls also in Psen1 methylation, showing a large variability of values among subjects. Although peripheral Bdnf expression is associated with differential promoter methylation in psychiatric and neurological disorders, our results suggest that different mechanisms take place in AD. The finding that the control of Sirt1 protein levels in blood is not exerted through the repression of mRNA expression by promoter hypermethylation is in agreement with previous data. In contrast, other studies reported that Psen1 methylation may be increased or decreased in AD patients, suggesting that additional studies are required. In conclusion, this study shows that peripheral levels of the potential AD biomarker proteins Bdnf, Sirt1, and Psen1 are not regulated by different promoter methylation. PMID:26275347

  15. The Effects of Oxytocin on Cognitive Defect Caused by Chronic Restraint Stress Applied to Adolescent Rats and on Hippocampal VEGF and BDNF Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dayi, Ayfer; Cetin, Ferihan; Sisman, Ali Riza; Aksu, Ilkay; Tas, Aysegul; Gönenc, Sevil; Uysal, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Background Because brain development continues during adolescence, the effects of chronic stress on hippocampal changes that occur during that period are permanent. Oxytocin, which is synthesized in the hypothalamus and has many receptors in brain regions, including the hippocampus, may affect learning-memory. This study aimed to investigate chronic restraint stress on hippocampal functions, and hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)...

  16. Immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and functional analysis of axonal regeneration through peripheral nerve grafts containing Schwann cells expressing BDNF, CNTF or NT3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Godinho

    Full Text Available We used morphological, immunohistochemical and functional assessments to determine the impact of genetically-modified peripheral nerve (PN grafts on axonal regeneration after injury. Grafts were assembled from acellular nerve sheaths repopulated ex vivo with Schwann cells (SCs modified to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a secretable form of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, or neurotrophin-3 (NT3. Grafts were used to repair unilateral 1 cm defects in rat peroneal nerves and 10 weeks later outcomes were compared to normal nerves and various controls: autografts, acellular grafts and grafts with unmodified SCs. The number of regenerated βIII-Tubulin positive axons was similar in all grafts with the exception of CNTF, which contained the fewest immunostained axons. There were significantly lower fiber counts in acellular, untransduced SC and NT3 groups using a PanNF antibody, suggesting a paucity of large caliber axons. In addition, NT3 grafts contained the greatest number of sensory fibres, identified with either IB4 or CGRP markers. Examination of semi- and ultra-thin sections revealed heterogeneous graft morphologies, particularly in BDNF and NT3 grafts in which the fascicular organization was pronounced. Unmyelinated axons were loosely organized in numerous Remak bundles in NT3 grafts, while the BDNF graft group displayed the lowest ratio of umyelinated to myelinated axons. Gait analysis revealed that stance width was increased in rats with CNTF and NT3 grafts, and step length involving the injured left hindlimb was significantly greater in NT3 grafted rats, suggesting enhanced sensory sensitivity in these animals. In summary, the selective expression of BDNF, CNTF or NT3 by genetically modified SCs had differential effects on PN graft morphology, the number and type of regenerating axons, myelination, and locomotor function.

  17. Glycyrrhiza uralensis flavonoids inhibit brain microglial cell TNF-α secretion, p-IκB expression, and increase brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Sangita P; Changda Liu; Joseph Alban; Nan Yang; Xiu-Min Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Asthma sufferers exhibit high prevalence of anxiety/depression. Elevated tumor-necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in peripheral system and central nervous system (CNS) are associated with anxiety/depression, whereas brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) has anti-depressant effects. An anti-asthma herbal medicine intervention ASHMI inhibits peripheral TNF-α secretion in an animal model of asthma. We hypothesize that ASHMI and its compounds may have modulatory effects on CNS TNF-...

  18. Disruption of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity in the human Kölliker-Fuse nucleus in victims of unexplained fetal and infant death

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Maria Lavezzi

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the neurotrophin brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the appropriate development of the central respiratory network, a neuronal complex in the brainstem of vital importance to sustaining life. The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) is a fundamental component of this circuitry with strong implications in the pre- and postnatal breathing control. This study provides detailed account for the cytoarchitecture, the physiology and the ...

  19. Chronic binge-like alcohol consumption in adolescence causes depression-like symptoms possibly mediated by the effects of BDNF on neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Briones, Teresita L.; Woods, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Here we investigated whether changes in neurogenesis and BDNF expression are possible mechanisms involved in the depression-like symptom during the withdrawal/abstinence period after chronic binge-pattern alcohol consumption given the limited number of studies addressing the link between these factors in the adolescent brain. Forty-seven male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study and the experimental protocol started when rats were 25-days old. Rats were assigned to either: (a) ethanol o...

  20. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF but not nerve growth factor (NGF or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values

  1. GLIA DETERMINE THE COURSE OF BDNF-MEDIATED DENDRITOGENESIS AND PROVIDE A SOLUBLE INHIBITORY CUE TO DENDRITIC GROWTH IN THE BRAINSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jessica L.; Brown, Alexandra L.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory control neurons in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) undergo dramatic expansion of dendritic arbors during the early postnatal period, when functional remodeling takes place within the NTS circuitry. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of morphological maturation of NTS neurons are largely unknown. Our previous studies point to the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is abundantly expressed by NTS-projecting primary sensory neur...

  2. A γ-secretase inhibitor, but not a γ-secretase modulator, induced defects in BDNF axonal trafficking and signaling: evidence for a role for APP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April M Weissmiller

    Full Text Available Clues to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis come from a variety of different sources including studies of clinical and neuropathological features, biomarkers, genomics and animal and cellular models. An important role for amyloid precursor protein (APP and its processing has emerged and considerable interest has been directed at the hypothesis that Aβ peptides induce changes central to pathogenesis. Accordingly, molecules that reduce the levels of Aβ peptides have been discovered such as γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs and modulators (GSMs. GSIs and GSMs reduce Aβ levels through very different mechanisms. However, GSIs, but not GSMs, markedly increase the levels of APP CTFs that are increasingly viewed as disrupting neuronal function. Here, we evaluated the effects of GSIs and GSMs on a number of neuronal phenotypes possibly relevant to their use in treatment of AD. We report that GSI disrupted retrograde axonal trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, suppressed BDNF-induced downstream signaling pathways and induced changes in the distribution within neuronal processes of mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. In contrast, treatment with a novel class of GSMs had no significant effect on these measures. Since knockdown of APP by specific siRNA prevented GSI-induced changes in BDNF axonal trafficking and signaling, we concluded that GSI effects on APP processing were responsible, at least in part, for BDNF trafficking and signaling deficits. Our findings argue that with respect to anti-amyloid treatments, even an APP-specific GSI may have deleterious effects and GSMs may serve as a better alternative.

  3. Effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the changes of cognitive function, BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, In Ho; Seo, Eun Jung; Lim, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the cognitive function by using K-WAB and BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities. [Methods] All subjects were 15 male with intellectual disabilities who were participating in the aquatic training program and CES treatment during 12 weeks at rehabilitation center. The subjects were divided into control group, exercise group, and exercise+CES group. Blood samples ...

  4. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, a small molecular TrkB agonist, is useful for treating various BDNF-implicated human disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoyang; Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a variety of biological processes predominantly via binding to the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB. It is a potential therapeutic target in numerous neurological, mental and metabolic disorders. However, the lack of efficient means to deliver BDNF into the body imposes an insurmountable hurdle to its clinical application. To address this challenge, we initiated a cell-based drug screening to search for small molecules that act as the TrkB agonist. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is our first reported small molecular TrkB agonist, which has now been extensively validated in various biochemical and cellular systems. Though binding to the extracellular domain of TrkB, 7,8-DHF triggers TrkB dimerization to induce the downstream signaling. Notably, 7,8-DHF is orally bioactive that can penetrate the brain blood barrier (BBB) to exert its neurotrophic activities in the central nervous system. Numerous reports suggest 7,8-DHF processes promising therapeutic efficacy in various animal disease models that are related to deficient BDNF signaling. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on the binding activity and specificity, structure-activity relationship, pharmacokinetic and metabolism, and the pre-clinical efficacy of 7,8-DHF against some human diseases. PMID:26740873

  5. Neural Stem Cells Rescue Cognitive and Motor Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Dementia with Lewy Bodies through a BDNF-Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R.S. Goldberg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn into insoluble aggregates occurs in several related disorders collectively referred to as synucleinopathies. To date, studies have used neural stem cells (NSCs to examine questions about α-syn propagation, but have overlooked the therapeutic potential of NSC transplantation to modulate cognition in disorders such as dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson’s disease dementia. Here, we show that striatal transplantation of NSCs into aged α-syn transgenic mice significantly improves performance in multiple cognitive and motor domains. This recovery is associated with NSC expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which restores depleted levels and modulates dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems. Most importantly, transplantation of BDNF-depleted NSCs fails to improve behavior, whereas AAV-mediated BDNF delivery mimics the benefits of NSC transplantation, supporting a critical role for this neurotrophin in functional improvement. Thus, NSC transplantation could offer a promising approach to treat the understudied yet devastating cognitive components of many synucleinopathies.

  6. Intravenous administration of adipose tissue-derived stem cells enhances nerve healing and promotes BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling in a rat stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Wei; Bai, Hongying; Wang, Jin; Wei, Ruili; Wen, Hongtao; Ning, Hanbing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transplantation in stroke. However, the molecular mechanism by which transplanted ADSCs promote nerve healing is not yet elucidated. In order to make clear the molecular mechanism for the neuroprotective effects of ADSCs and investigate roles of the BDNF–TrkB signaling in neuroprotection of ADSCs, we, therefore, examined the neurological function, brain water content, and the protein expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats with or without ADSCs transplantation. ADSCs were transplanted intravenously into rats at 30 minutes after MCAO. K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, was administered into rats by intraventricular and brain stereotaxic injection. Modified neurological severity score tests were performed to measure behavioral outcomes. The results showed that ADSCs significantly alleviated neurological deficits and reduced brain water content in MCAO rats. The protein expression levels of BDNF and TrkB significantly increased in the cortex of MCAO rats with ADSCs treatment. However, K252a administration reversed the ADSCs-induced elevation of BDNF, TrkB, and Bcl-2 and reduction of Bax protein in MCAO rats. ADSCs promote BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling and improve functional neurological recovery in stroke rats.

  7. Neonatal prebiotic (BGOS) supplementation increases the levels of synaptophysin, GluN2A-subunits and BDNF proteins in the adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah; Chen, Li; Savignac, Helene M; Tzortzis, George; Anthony, Daniel C; Burnet, Philip W J

    2016-03-01

    Compelling data suggest that perturbations in microbial colonization of the gut in early-life, influences neurodevelopment and adult brain function. If this is the case, then ensuring the growth of beneficial bacteria at an early age will lead to optimal brain development and maturation. We have tested whether feeding neonatal rats daily (from post-natal days 3-21) with a galacto-oligosaccharide prebiotic (Bimuno®, BGOS) or a control solution, alters the levels of hippocampal N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits (GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B), synaptic proteins (synaptophysin, MAP2, and GAP43) and brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), at post-natal days 22 and 56. The administration of BGOS significantly elevated GluN2A subunits, synaptophysin and BDNF in the hippocampus of 22 day old rats. The effect was also observed on day 56 (26 days after the feeding ceased). The levels of all other proteins (GluN1, GluN2B, MAP2, GAP43) remained unaltered. Increased GluN2A, synaptophysin, BDNF, but not MAP2, may suggest that neonatal BGOS feeding alters neurotransmission rather than synaptic architecture. Although the functional consequences of our findings require further investigation, the current study confirms that the manipulation of gut bacteria in early-life, has central effects that persist until at least young adulthood. PMID:26682524

  8. Two-Stage Translational Control of Dentate Gyrus LTP Consolidation Is Mediated by Sustained BDNF-TrkB Signaling to MNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Panja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BDNF signaling contributes to protein-synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the dynamics of TrkB signaling and mechanisms of translation have not been defined. Here, we show that long-term potentiation (LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus of live rodents requires sustained (hours BDNF-TrkB signaling. Surprisingly, this sustained activation maintains an otherwise labile signaling pathway from TrkB to MAP-kinase-interacting kinase (MNK. MNK activity promotes eIF4F translation initiation complex formation and protein synthesis in mechanistically distinct early and late stages. In early-stage translation, MNK triggers release of the CYFIP1/FMRP repressor complex from the 5′-mRNA cap. In late-stage translation, MNK regulates the canonical translational repressor 4E-BP2 in a synapse-compartment-specific manner. This late stage is coupled to MNK-dependent enhanced dendritic mRNA translation. We conclude that LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus is mediated by sustained BDNF signaling to MNK and MNK-dependent regulation of translation in two functionally and mechanistically distinct stages.

  9. Haemoglobin Polymorphism in Malabari Goats

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    K. A. Bindu and K. C. Raghavan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Malabari Goat populations of Tanur, Thalassery and Badagara were studied for haemoglobin polymorphism. Two variants were observed for haemoglobin, Hb A and Hb B with a frequency of 0.987 and 0.012, respectively, suggestive of three phenotypes, viz. Hb AA, Hb AB and Hb BB, and indicating the predominance of Hb A in the pooled population. Hb B variant was observed only in the Thalassery population (gene frequency 0.038. [Vet. World 2010; 3(2.000: 74-75

  10. A study on the relationship between adiponectin, BDNF and leptin with abdominal fat thickness in male workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiponectin (AdipoN), brain-derived nerotrophic factor (BDNF) and leptin (LeP) are mainly secreted from adipose tissue and are known to be involved in regulation of the development of obese. However, there are not many studies on the association between abdominal fat and neuropeptides such as AdipoN, BDNF and LeP. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the association between abdominal fat thickness, neuropeptides and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The participants in the study were 138 male employees without CVD. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute. Written informed consent for the participants in this study was obtained from all individuals. We obtained subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) and visceral fat thickness (VFT) by using ultrasonography and neuropeptides levels were measured with ELISA kit according to the method suggested by kit manufacturer. The mean SFT and VFT were 1.58±0.51 and 4.52±1.44 cm. The mean concentrations of AdipoN, BDNF and LeP were 3.14±3.52 ng/ml, 24.11+8.52 pg/ml and 4.27±2.38 ng/ml, respectively. VFT were positively correlated with total cholesterol (r=0.217, p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol (r=0.271, p<0.01), triglyceride (r=0.233, p<0.05) and insulin (r=0.338, p<0.01), but was inversely correlated with HDL- cholesterol (r=-420, p<0.01). AdipoN levels were positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol (r=0.220, p<0.05) and were inversely correlated with total cholesterol (r=-0.196, p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol (r=-0.190, p<0.05), triglyceride (r=-0.199, p<0.05), SFT (r=-0.195, p<0.05) and VFT (r=-0.412, p<0.01). However, LeP levels showed a reverse trend to AdipoN. AdipoN level was significantly higher in non-obese participants (BMI<25 kg/m), but LeP concentration was significantly higher in obese participants (BMI>25 kg/m) than in non-obese. On multiple logistic regression analysis, obese were significantly associated with AdipoN (odds ratio=0

  11. A study on the relationship between adiponectin, BDNF and leptin with abdominal fat thickness in male workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kyung Sun; Choi, Yoon Jung [Center for Occupational Health Research, Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute, KOSHA, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Adiponectin (AdipoN), brain-derived nerotrophic factor (BDNF) and leptin (LeP) are mainly secreted from adipose tissue and are known to be involved in regulation of the development of obese. However, there are not many studies on the association between abdominal fat and neuropeptides such as AdipoN, BDNF and LeP. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the association between abdominal fat thickness, neuropeptides and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The participants in the study were 138 male employees without CVD. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute. Written informed consent for the participants in this study was obtained from all individuals. We obtained subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) and visceral fat thickness (VFT) by using ultrasonography and neuropeptides levels were measured with ELISA kit according to the method suggested by kit manufacturer. The mean SFT and VFT were 1.58±0.51 and 4.52±1.44 cm. The mean concentrations of AdipoN, BDNF and LeP were 3.14±3.52 ng/ml, 24.11+8.52 pg/ml and 4.27±2.38 ng/ml, respectively. VFT were positively correlated with total cholesterol (r=0.217, p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol (r=0.271, p<0.01), triglyceride (r=0.233, p<0.05) and insulin (r=0.338, p<0.01), but was inversely correlated with HDL- cholesterol (r=-420, p<0.01). AdipoN levels were positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol (r=0.220, p<0.05) and were inversely correlated with total cholesterol (r=-0.196, p<0.05), LDL-cholesterol (r=-0.190, p<0.05), triglyceride (r=-0.199, p<0.05), SFT (r=-0.195, p<0.05) and VFT (r=-0.412, p<0.01). However, LeP levels showed a reverse trend to AdipoN. AdipoN level was significantly higher in non-obese participants (BMI<25 kg/m), but LeP concentration was significantly higher in obese participants (BMI>25 kg/m) than in non-obese. On multiple logistic regression analysis, obese were significantly associated with AdipoN (odds ratio=0

  12. Effects of dietary Na+ deprivation on epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC, BDNF, and TrkB mRNA expression in the rat tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stähler Frauke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rodents, dietary Na+ deprivation reduces gustatory responses of primary taste fibers and central taste neurons to lingual Na+ stimulation. However, in the rat taste bud cells Na+ deprivation increases the number of amiloride sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC, which are considered as the "receptor" of the Na+ component of salt taste. To explore the mechanisms, the expression of the three ENaC subunits (α, β and γ in taste buds were observed from rats fed with diets containing either 0.03% (Na+ deprivation or 1% (control NaCl for 15 days, by using in situ hybridization and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. Since BDNF/TrkB signaling is involved in the neural innervation of taste buds, the effects of Na+ deprivation on BDNF and its receptor TrkB expression in the rat taste buds were also examined. Results In situ hybridization analysis showed that all three ENaC subunit mRNAs were found in the rat fungiform taste buds and lingual epithelia, but in the vallate and foliate taste buds, only α ENaC mRNA was easily detected, while β and γ ENaC mRNAs were much less than those in the fungiform taste buds. Between control and low Na+ fed animals, the numbers of taste bud cells expressing α, β and γ ENaC subunits were not significantly different in the fungiform, vallate and foliate taste buds, respectively. Similarly, qRT-PCR also indicated that Na+ deprivation had no effect on any ENaC subunit expression in the three types of taste buds. However, Na+ deprivation reduced BDNF mRNA expression by 50% in the fungiform taste buds, but not in the vallate and foliate taste buds. The expression of TrkB was not different between control and Na+ deprived rats, irrespective of the taste papillae type. Conclusion The findings demonstrate that dietary Na+ deprivation does not change ENaC mRNA expression in rat taste buds, but reduces BDNF mRNA expression in the fungiform taste buds. Given the roles of BDNF in survival of

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induces sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation through the up-regulation of surface transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels in rodent microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Kato, Takahiro A; Seki, Yoshihiro; Ohgidani, Masahiro; Sagata, Noriaki; Horikawa, Hideki; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Sato-Kasai, Mina; Hayakawa, Kohei; Inoue, Ryuji; Kanba, Shigenobu; Monji, Akira

    2014-06-27

    Microglia are immune cells that release factors, including proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), and neurotrophins, following activation after disturbance in the brain. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) is important for microglial functions such as the release of cytokines and NO from activated microglia. There is increasing evidence suggesting that pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders is related to the inflammatory responses mediated by microglia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin well known for its roles in the activation of microglia as well as in pathophysiology and/or treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we sought to examine the underlying mechanism of BDNF-induced sustained increase in [Ca(2+)]i in rodent microglial cells. We observed that canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) channels contribute to the maintenance of BDNF-induced sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation. Immunocytochemical technique and flow cytometry also revealed that BDNF rapidly up-regulated the surface expression of TRPC3 channels in rodent microglial cells. In addition, pretreatment with BDNF suppressed the production of NO induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which was prevented by co-adiministration of a selective TRPC3 inhibitor. These suggest that BDNF induces sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation through the up-regulation of surface TRPC3 channels and TRPC3 channels could be important for the BDNF-induced suppression of the NO production in activated microglia. We show that TRPC3 channels could also play important roles in microglial functions, which might be important for the regulation of inflammatory responses and may also be involved in the pathophysiology and/or the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24811179

  14. Transcranial low-level laser therapy increases memory, learning, neuroprogenitor cells, BDNF and synaptogenesis in mice with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weijun; Huang, Liyi; Vatansever, Fatma; Agrawal, Tanupriya; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Increasing concern is evident over the epidemic of traumatic brain injury in both civilian and military medicine, and the lack of approved treatments. Transcranial low level laser therapy tLLLT) is a new approach in which near infrared laser is delivered to the head, penetrates the scalp and skull to reach the brain. We asked whether tLLLT at 810-nm could improve memory and learning in mice with controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury. We investigated the mechanism of action by immunofluorescence studies in sections from brains of mice sacrificed at different times. Mice with TBI treated with 1 or 3 daily laser applications performed better on Morris Water Maze test at 28 days. Laser treated mice had increased BrdU incorporation into NeuN positive cells in the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone indicating formation of neuroprogenitor cells at 7 days and less at 28 days. Markers of neuron migration (DCX and Tuj1) were also increased, as was the neurotrophin, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at 7 days. Markers of synaptogenesis (formation of new connections between existing neurons) were increased in the perilesional cortex at 28 days. tLLLT is proposed to be able to induce the brain to repair itself after injury. However its ability to induce neurogenesis and synaptogenesis suggests that tLLLT may have much wider applications to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

  15. Structural plasticity in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons produced by drugs of abuse: critical role of BDNF and dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginetta eCollo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons were suggested to be a critical physiopathology substrate for addiction disorders. Among neuroadaptive processes to addictive drugs, structural plasticity has attracted attention. While structural plasticity occurs at both pre- and post-synaptic levels in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, the present review focuses only on dopaminergic neurons. Exposures to addictive drugs determine two opposite structural responses, hypothrophic plasticity produced by opioids and cannabinoids (in particular during the early withdrawal phase and hypertrophic plasticity, mostly driven by psychostimulants and nicotine. In vitro and in vivo studies indentified BDNF and extracellular dopamine as two critical factors in determining structural plasticity, the two molecules sharing similar intracellular pathways involved in cell soma and dendrite growth, the MEK-ERK1/2 and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR, via preferential activation of TrkB and dopamine D3 receptors, respectively. At present information regarding specific structural changes associated to the various stages of the addiction cycle is incomplete. Encouraging neuroimaging data in humans indirectly support the preclinical evidence of hypotrophic and hypertrophic effects, suggesting a possible differential engagement of dopamine neurons in parallel and partially converging circuits controlling motivation, stress and emotions.

  16. Effects of Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS) on Bdnf DNA Methylation and Telomere Length in the Adult Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaze, Jennifer; Asok, A.; Moyer, E. L.; Roth, T. L.; Ronca, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    In utero exposure to stress can shape neurobiological and behavioral outcomes in offspring, producing vulnerability to psychopathology later in life. Animal models of prenatal stress likewise have demonstrated long-­-term alterations in brain function and behavioral deficits in offspring. For example, using a rodent model of unpredictable variable prenatal stress (UVPS), in which dams are exposed to unpredictable, variable stress across pregnancy, we have found increased body weight and anxiety-­-like behavior in adult male, but not female, offspring. DNA methylation (addition of methyl groups to cytosines which normally represses gene transcription) and changes in telomere length (TTAGGG repeats on the ends of chromosomes) are two molecular modifications that result from stress and could be responsible for the long-­-term effects of UVPS. Here, we measured methylation of brain-­-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), a gene important in development and plasticity, and telomere length in the brains of adult offspring from the UVPS model. Results indicate that prenatally stressed adult males have greater methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to non-­-stressed controls, while females have greater methylation in the ventral hippocampus compared to controls. Further, prenatally stressed males had shorter telomeres than controls in the mPFC. These findings demonstrate the ability of UVPS to produce epigenetic alterations and changes in telomere length across behaviorally-­-relevant brain regions, which may have linkages to the phenotypic outcomes.

  17. Immune dysregulation and cognitive vulnerability in the aging brain: Interactions of microglia, IL-1β, BDNF and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    Older individuals often experience declines in cognitive function after events (e.g. infection, or injury) that trigger activation of the immune system. This occurs at least in part because aging sensitizes the response of microglia (the brain's resident immune cells) to signals triggered by an immune challenge. In the aging brain, microglia respond to these signals by producing more pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. interleukin-1beta or IL-1β) and producing them for longer than microglia in younger brains. This exaggerated inflammatory response can compromise processes critical for optimal cognitive functioning. Interleukin-1β is central to the inflammatory response and is a key mediator and modulator of an array of associated biological functions; thus its production and release is usually very tightly regulated. This review will focus on the impact of dysregulated production of IL-1β on hippocampus dependent-memory systems and associated synaptic plasticity processes. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) helps to protect neurons from damage caused by infection or injury, and it plays a critical role in many of the same memory and hippocampal plasticity processes compromised by dysregulated production of IL-1β. This suggests that an exaggerated brain inflammatory response, arising from aging and a secondary immune challenge, may erode the capacity to provide the BDNF needed for memory-related plasticity processes at hippocampal synapses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'. PMID:25549562

  18. Progesterone in the treatment of neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and acute seizures: Role of BDNF/TrkB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Fahim; Yousuf, Seema; Stein, Donald G

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal stroke is among the top ten causes of childhood death and permanent disability in survivors, but no safe and effective acute treatments exist. To advance understanding of its neuroprotective mechanisms, we examined the effects of progesterone (PROG) on local and systemic inflammation (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα), brain derived neurotrophic factor/Tropomyosin receptor kinase B (BDNF/TrkB) signaling, vascular damage (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)), acute behavioral seizures and brain infarction size following neonatal arterial ischemic stroke in mice. CD1 mouse pups (postnatal day 12, mixed gender) received permanent unilateral right common carotid ligation (pUCCL) or sham surgery. Pups showing seizure activity during the first hour post-pUCCL were randomly assigned to receive PROG (8 mg/kg) or vehicle injections. PROG treatment significantly (p sex differences on any other markers of the injury at this early stage of development. PROG treatment is neuroprotective through a number of signaling pathways and can be beneficial in treating neonatal arterial ischemic stroke in CD1 mice. PMID:27039043

  19. Cocoa powder triggers neuroprotective and preventive effects in a human Alzheimer's disease model by modulating BDNF signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Annamaria; Gentile, Roberta; D'Angelo, Barbara; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Cristiano, Loredana; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Giordano, Antonio; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2013-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms linking Aβ to the onset of neurotoxicity are still largely unknown, but several lines of evidence point to reactive oxygen species, which are produced even under the effect of nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ-oligomers. The consequent oxidative stress is considered as the mediator of a cascade of degenerative events in many neurological disorders. Epidemiological studies indicate that dietary habits and antioxidants from diet can influence the incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In the recent years, a number of reviews have reported on neuroprotective effects of polyphenols in cell and animal models. However, the majority of these studies have focused only on the anti-oxidant properties of these compounds and less on the mechanism/s of action at cellular level. In this work we investigated the effect of cocoa polyphenolic extract on a human AD in vitro model. The results obtained, other than confirming the anti-oxidant properties of cocoa, demonstrate that cocoa polyphenols triggers neuroprotection by activating BDNF survival pathway, both on Aβ plaque treated cells and on Aβ oligomers treated cells, resulting in the counteraction of neurite dystrophy. On the light of the results obtained the use of cocoa powder as preventive agent for neurodegeneration is further supported. PMID:23554028

  20. HSV-1感染对神经胶质瘤细胞NGF和BDNF表达变化的研究%Study of NGF and BDNF expression in HSV-1 infected human glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯云; 王斌; 李玲; 胡明; 辛晓妮; 钱冬萌; 闫志勇; 赵巍; 宋旭霞

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨单纯疱疹病毒1型(HSV-1)感染时神经胶质细胞内源性神经生长因子(NGF)和脑源性神经生长因子(BDNF)的表达变化.方法:采用RT-PCR法检测HSV-1糖蛋白D(gD)基因扩增,RT-PCR法和Western blotting法检测正常培养和感染HSV-1的神经胶质瘤(U251)细胞的NGF和BDNF.结果:HSV-1可感染U251细胞;正常U251细胞可表达NGF和BDNF;HSV-1感染U251细胞后,NGF和BDNF在感染后第6小时达高峰,之后随感染时间延长逐渐降低.结论:HSV-1可诱导U251细胞中的NGF和BDNF表达异常.%Objective To investigate endogenic nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in herpes simplex type-1-virus (HSV-1) -infected neuroglia cells. Methods U251 human glioma cells were cultured in RPMI-I640 medium and infected with HSV-1 in vitro to estahlish a cell model of viral infection. Establishment of HSV-1-infected U251 cells was identified by HSV-1 gD mRNA expression. NGF and BDNF expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting , respectively, in normal U251 cells and HSV-1-infected U251 cells. Results HSV-1 could efficiently infect U251 cells. NGF and BDNF was identified to he expressed in U251. NGF and BDNF expression reached a maximum at 6 hours post HSV-1 infection, then NGF and BDNF expression decreased in time-dependent manner. Conclusions HSV-1 infection could dysregulate NGF and BDNF expression in the U251 cells.

  1. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V. [RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl{sub 3} over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm{sup -1}) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl{sub 3} type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A{sub 1g}), 201 (E{sub g}), 112 (E{sub g}), 88 (A{sub 1g}), and 63 (E{sub g}). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl{sub 3} C{sub 2h}{sup 3} symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  2. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl3 over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm-1) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl3 type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A1g), 201 (Eg), 112 (Eg), 88 (A1g), and 63 (Eg). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl3 C2h3 symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  3. Clinical polymorphism of endocrine ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Likhvantseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze clinical polymorphism of endocrine ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves’ disease.Methods: Clinical and radiological data of 18 cases with clinical manifestations of lacrimal gland increase were analyzed and compared with data retrieved from 50 patients without increasing of lacrimal gland.Results: the characteristics of clinical manifestations of endocrine ophthalmopathy with lacrimal gland increase were presented. this form differs, as the organ of the target, along with orbital fat and/or eye muscles becomes the glandula lacrimalis. A correlation between fact involving, on the one hand, and the intensity and severity of the autoimmune process in orbit, on the other hand were identified.Conclusion: Involvement of this secretion organ in the autoimmune process makes the clinical course of endocrine ophthalmopa-thy more complicated, and leads to eye dry syndrome creation.

  4. Crystallization and Polymorphism of Felodipine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surov, A. O.; Solanko, K. A.; Bond, A. D.;

    2012-01-01

    . The crystal structures of the new forms III and IV were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Forms I, II, and III were obtained in bulk form and characterized by a variety of analytical methods, including thermal analysis, solution calorimetry, intrinsic dissolution rate measurement...... and the effective pH value in the presence of the cocrystal former, and it was possible subsequently to produce the four polymorphs by pH adjustment using H2SO4(aq) or NaOH(aq). This suggests that there is no distinct "structure-directing" role for the molecular additives present during the cocrystallization trials...... the new form III is practically isoenergetic. Form II shows the highest solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate, consistent with the lowest thermodynamic stability. Forms I, II, and III are all monotropically related....

  5. Vibrational study of tamoxifen citrate polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, M. C.; Baraldi, C.; Tinti, A.; Palazzoli, F.; Ferioli, V.

    2007-09-01

    The trans isomer of ( Z)-2-[ p-(1,2-diphenyl-butenyl)phenoxy]- N, N-dimethyletylamine (tamoxifen) is well known for its endocrine activity as an antiestrogenic agent. Its citrate salt, a widely used pharmaceutical agent, appears in three main polymorphic forms, two of which are well known (I and II) and another form not yet well evidenced. A vibrational study has been conducted for identifying the two known polymorphic forms of tamoxifen citrate (I and II) and for characterising the other form (form III) examined in this study. Other techniques for the characterization of the different polymorphs, such as XRDP, have been used.

  6. Rivastigmine hydrogen tartrate polymorphs: Solid-state characterisation of transition and polymorphic conversion via milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Maria Inês; Simon, Alice; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira; Healy, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Rivastigmine (RHT) is an active pharmaceutical ingredient that is used for the treatment of mild to moderately severe dementia in Alzheimer's disease, and is known to present two polymorphic forms and to amorphise upon granulation. To date there is no information in the scientific or patent literature on polymorphic transition and stability. Hence, the aim of the current study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the polymorphic forms by (1) evaluating RHT thermodynamic stability (monotropy or enantiotropy) and (2) investigating the potential for polymorphic transformation upon milling. The two polymorphic and amorphous forms were characterised using X-ray powder diffractometry, thermal analyses, infra-red spectroscopy and water sorption analysis. The polymorphic transition was found to be spontaneous (ΔG0 < 0) and exothermic (ΔH0 < 0), indicative of a monotropic polymorph pair. The kinetic studies showed a fast initial polymorphic transition characterised by a heterogeneous nucleation, followed by a slow crystal growth. Ball milling can be used to promote the polymorphic transition and for the production of RHT amorphous form.

  7. Polymorphous light eruption - some interesting aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of polymorphous light eruption (PLE) is Latin America is reported. The clinical lesions, the course, histopathology, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment and systemic photoprotection are discussed. Treatment with ultraviolet radiation is included. (C.F.)

  8. MHC polymorphism under host-pathogen coevolution

    OpenAIRE

    Borghans, J.A.M.; J.B. Beltman; de Boer, R J

    2004-01-01

    The genes encoding major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules are among the most polymorphic genes known for vertebrates. Since MHC molecules play an important role in the induction of immune responses, the evolution of MHC polymorphism is often explained in terms of increased protection of hosts against pathogens. Two selective pressures that are thought to be involved are (1) selection favoring MHC heterozygous hosts, and (2) selection for rare MHC alleles by host-pathogen coevolution. We hav...

  9. Distinct effect of CacyBP/SIP on the ERK1/2-CREB-BDNF pathway in undifferentiated and differentiated neuroblastoma NB2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Sara; Leśniak, Wiesława; Filipek, Anna

    2016-07-01

    CacyBP/SIP, a protein expressed to high extent in the brain, has been shown to act as ERK1/2 phosphatase in vitro and in cultured cells. It has been demonstrated recently that CacyBP/SIP can modulate the activity of some transcription factors in neurons and glioma cells. In the present work we have examined the effect of CacyBP/SIP overexpression and silencing on the phosphorylation/activity of ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) and CREB (pCREB) and on the level of BDNF mRNA in differentiated and undifferentiated neuroblastoma NB2a cells. We have shown that in undifferentiated cells the amount of pERK1/2 decreased upon CacyBP/SIP overexpression. Further studies have shown that the activity of CREB and the level of BDNF mRNA, downstream effectors of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, also depended on the CacyBP/SIP level and strictly matched the level of pERK1/2. Interestingly, in differentiated NB2a cells, overexpression of CacyBP/SIP appeared to have a distinct effect on the pERK1/2 level from that observed in undifferentiated cells. Subsequent studies have revealed that distinct function of CacyBP/SIP in undifferentiated and differentiated NB2a cells might be due to changes in its posttranslational modifications and protein ligands. Altogether, our studies suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in the ERK1/2-CREB-BDNF pathway and that it might regulate this pathway depending on the stage of NB2a cell differentiation. PMID:27180052

  10. Effects of dexmedetomidine on P2X4Rs, p38-MAPK and BDNF in spinal microglia in rats with spared nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-tian; Wu, Jing-ru; Chen, Zi-yang; Liu, Zhen-xiu; Miao, Bei

    2014-06-01

    Microglia in the spinal cord is evidenced to play a crucial role in neuropathic pain. Spinal P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs), which are mainly expressed in microglia, have been investigated for their roles in neuropathic pain. Dexmedetomidine (DEX), a highly selective agonist of α2-adrenergic receptors, is clinically applied to sedation and analgesia. Despite the proposed mechanisms underlying DEX-induced analgesia, the possible interactions between DEX and P2X4Rs at a molecular level have not been elucidated. We designated the spared nerve injury (SNI) to establish the neuropathic pain model. Mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (MWT) was measured to evaluate the sensitivity of neuropathic pain in rats. MWT was significantly decreased in SNI rats versus control rats. Expressions of spinal P2X4Rs, phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38-MAPK) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were upregulated in SNI rats. Immunofluorescence assay indicated higher densities of microglia and P2X4Rs, which appeared yellow in colour, suggesting they were co-labelled. Intraperitoneal injections of DEX 40μg/kg for 14 consecutive days markedly reversed the SNI-induced decline of MWT; the activation of microglia was markedly inhibited; in addition, the protein expressions of P2X4Rs, p-p38-MAPK and BDNF were significantly downregulated. Thus, DEX could attenuate the neuropathic pain in SNI rats, of which the mechanism might be related to the down-expressed P2X4Rs, p-p38 and BDNF in microglia of spinal dorsal horn. PMID:24792496

  11. The presence of cortical neurons in striatal-cortical co-cultures alters the effects of dopamine and BDNF on Medium Spiny Neuron dendritic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D Penrod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Medium spiny neurons (MSNs are the major striatal neuron and receive synaptic input from both glutamatergic and dopaminergic afferents. These synapses are made on MSN dendritic spines, which undergo density and morphology changes in association with numerous disease and experience-dependent states. Despite wide interest in the structure and function of mature MSNs, relatively little is known about MSN development. Furthermore, most in vitro studies of MSN development have been done in simple striatal cultures that lack any type of non-autologous synaptic input, leaving open the question of how MSN development is affected by a complex environment that includes other types of neurons, glia, and accompanying secreted and cell-associated cues. Here we characterize the development of MSNs in striatal-cortical co-culture, including quantitative morphological analysis of dendritic arborization and spine development, describing progressive changes in density and morphology of developing spines. Overall, MSN growth is much more robust in the striatal-cortical co-culture compared to striatal mono-culture. Inclusion of dopamine in the co-culture further enhances MSN dendritic arborization and spine density, but the effects of dopamine on dendritic branching are only significant at later times in development. In contrast, exogenous Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF has only a minimal effect on MSN development in the co-culture, but significantly enhances MSN dendritic arborization in striatal mono-culture. Importantly, inhibition of NMDA receptors in the co-culture significantly enhances the effect of exogenous BDNF, suggesting that the efficacy of BDNF depends on the cellular environment. Combined, these studies identify specific periods of MSN development that may be particularly sensitive to perturbation by external factors and demonstrate the importance of studying MSN development in a complex signaling environment.

  12. Xanthoceras sorbifolia extracts ameliorate dendritic spine deficiency and cognitive decline via upregulation of BDNF expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinjie; Xu, Jikai; Xu, Pu; Song, Shijie; Liu, Peng; Chi, Tianyan; Ji, Xuefei; Jin, Ge; Qiu, Shimeng; Hou, Yapeng; Zheng, Chen; Wang, Lili; Meng, Dali; Zou, Libo

    2016-08-26

    Xanthoceras sorbifolia, a traditional Chinese folk medicine with anti-inflammatory effects, has been used for a long time in China, especially in the Inner Mongolian area for the treatment of rheumatism. Inflammation is one of the main causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques, neurofibrillary tangle formation, synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. To investigate whether Xanthoceras sorbifolia extracts (XSE) improve cognition and protect dendritic spines, we performed behavioral tests to investigate learning and memory in an Aβ25-35-induced dementia animal model of AD as well as Golgi staining to observe dendritic spine formation in CA1 pyramidal neurons and western blots to test the expression levels of PSD95, BDNF and downstream signaling pathways. Our results indicated that oral treatment with XSE significantly reduced cognitive impairments in behavioral tests (passive avoidance test, novel object recognition test, Y-maze test and Morris water maze test). Golgi staining results revealed that XSE ameliorated dendritic spine density deficits in CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis suggested that XSE upregulated PSD95, which is the major scaffolding protein in synapses. BDNF levels and the ratio of p-TrkB/TrkB increased, and the expression of the RhoA, a member of the Rho-GTPase family, and its downstream target protein ROCK2 decreased in the dementia animal model following treatment with XSE. Therefore, the cognition-improving effects of XSE probably resulted from dendritic spine protection effects through regulation of BDNF signaling pathways. PMID:27412235

  13. Glycidamide genotoxicity modulated by Caspases genes polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João Pereira; Silva, Susana N; Rueff, José; Pingarilho, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is amongst acknowledged carcinogenic dietary factors. Its DNA-reactive metabolite is glycidamide (GA). The present study intended to correlate the role of key polymorphic genes of apoptosis (CASP7, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, LTA and TNFRSF1B) with biomarkers of effect of DNA damage, namely the sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE) and the comet assay in whole blood cells exposed to GA. The aim was to assess as a proof of concept the role that pro-apoptotic effector proteins might have in the yields of genotoxic effects when those effector proteins are coded by polymorphic genes. Whole blood from a small group of volunteers was exposed to GA to assess DNA damage and the volunteers were genotyped for polymorphic genes related to apoptosis pathways. A relation between the induction of SCE and several variants of the polymorphism CASP8 rs1035142 G>T was observed. Also, a relation between the % tail DNA and the CASP10 I522L polymorphism was found. Furthermore, associations between % tail DNA and several SNP-SNP interactions of CASP8 and CASP10 were found. A possible correlation between DNA damage and the genetic susceptibility, bestowed by polymorphic genes in the apoptosis inducing pathways was verified. PMID:27062911

  14. Involvement of dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors and BDNF in the neuroprotective effects of S32504 and pramipexole against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium in terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presgraves, Steve P; Borwege, Sabine; Millan, Mark J; Joyce, Jeffrey N

    2004-11-01

    Anti-parkinsonian agents possessing both D(2) and D(3) receptor agonist properties are neuroprotective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity in a variety of in vitro models. The mechanisms underlying protection by these D(2)/D(3) receptor agonists remain poorly defined. To test if the D(3) receptor preferring agonists S32504 and pramipexole act through D(2) or D(3) receptors and via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent pathways, we utilized a terminally differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line exhibiting a dopaminergic phenotype. The cytotoxic effects of MPP(+) (LD(50) of 100 microM) were stereospecifically antagonized by S32504 (EC(50) = 2.0 microM) and, less potently, by pramipexole (EC(50) = 64.3 microM), but not by their inactive stereoisomers, R(+) pramipexole and S32601, respectively. Neuroprotective effects afforded by EC(50) doses of S32504 and pramipexole were antagonized by the selective D(3) antagonists S33084, U99194A, and SB269652, and by the D(2)/D(3) antagonist raclopride. However, the preferential D(2) receptor antagonist LY741626 was ineffective as was the D1 antagonist SCH23390. BDNF (1 nM) potently protected against MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. Antibody directed against BDNF concentration-dependently blocked both the neuroprotective effects of BDNF and those of pramipexole and S32504 against MPP(+). The protection afforded by BDNF was blocked by the P3K-AKT pathway inhibitor LY249002 and less so by the MEK/MAPKK pathway inhibitor PD98059. LY249002, but not PD98059, blocked the neuroprotective effects of pramipexole and S32504 against MPP(+) toxicity. In conclusion, S32504 and, less potently, pramipexole show robust, stereospecific, and long-lasting neuroprotective effects against MPP(+) toxicity that involve D(3) receptors. Their actions also reflect downstream recruitment of BDNF and via a PK3-AKT pathway. PMID:15473989

  15. Effects of sleep deprivation on behaviors and abnormal hippocampal BDNF/miR-10B expression in rats with chronic stress depression

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    Being sleep-deprived can relieve the depressed emotions in rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, male rats were divided into 3 groups: normal control (NC), chronicunpredictable stress (CUPS) and sleep-deprived (SD). All of the groups were examined using the sucrose consumption test and the open field test. The sucrose consumption test and the open field test were performed for all three groups. The BDNF and miR-10B expressions were examined using real-time PCR and...

  16. Huperzine A Alleviates Oxidative Glutamate Toxicity in Hippocampal HT22 Cells via Activating BDNF/TrkB-Dependent PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Li, Xi; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative glutamate toxicity is involved in diverse neurological disorders including epilepsy and ischemic stroke. Our present work aimed to assess protective effects of huperzine A (HupA) against oxidative glutamate toxicity in a mouse-derived hippocampal HT22 cells and explore its potential mechanisms. Cell survival and cell injury were analyzed by MTT method and LDH release assay, respectively. The production of ROS was measured by detection kits. Protein expressions of BDNF, phosphor-TrkB (p-TrkB), TrkB, phosphor-Akt (p-Akt), Akt, phosphor-mTOR (p-mTOR), mTOR, phosphor-p70s6 (p-p70s6) kinase, p70s6 kinase, Bcl-2, Bax, and β-actin were assayed via Western blot analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was employed to measure the contents of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4). Our findings illustrated 10 μM HupA for 24 h significantly protected HT22 from cellular damage and suppressed the generation of ROS. Additionally, after treating with LY294002 or wortmannin [the selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)], HupA dramatically prevented the down-regulations of p-Akt, p-mTOR, and p-p70s6 kinase in HT22 cells under oxidative toxicity. Furthermore, it was observed that the protein levels of BDNF and p-TrkB were evidently enhanced after co-treatment with HupA and glutamate in HT22 cells. The elevations of p-Akt and p-mTOR were abrogated under toxic conditions after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG. Cellular apoptosis was significantly suppressed (decreased caspase-3 activity and enhanced Bcl-2 protein level) after HupA treatment. It was concluded that HupA attenuated oxidative glutamate toxicity in murine hippocampal HT22 cells via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:26440805

  17. A novel in vivo model of focal light emitting diode-induced cone-photoreceptor phototoxicity: neuroprotection afforded by brimonidine, BDNF, PEDF or bFGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Ortín-Martínez

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED-induced phototoxicity (LIP on cone-photoreceptors and their protection with brimonidine (BMD, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In anesthetized, dark adapted, adult albino rats a blue (400 nm LED was placed perpendicular to the cornea (10 sec, 200 lux and the effects were investigated using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT and/or analysing the retina in oriented cross-sections or wholemounts immune-labelled for L- and S-opsin and counterstained with the nuclear stain DAPI. The effects of topical BMD (1% or, intravitreally injected BDNF (5 µg, PEDF (2 µg, CNTF (0.4 µg or bFGF (1 µg after LIP were examined on wholemounts at 7 days. SD-OCT showed damage in a circular region of the superotemporal retina, whose diameter varied from 1,842.4±84.5 µm (at 24 hours to 1,407.7±52.8 µm (at 7 days. This region had a progressive thickness diminution from 183.4±5 µm (at 12 h to 114.6±6 µm (at 7 d. Oriented cross-sections showed within the light-damaged region of the retina massive loss of rods and cone-photoreceptors. Wholemounts documented a circular region containing lower numbers of L- and S-cones. Within a circular area (1 mm or 1.3 mm radius, respectively in the left and in its corresponding region of the contralateral-fellow-retina, total L- or S-cones were 7,118±842 or 661±125 for the LED exposed retinas (n = 7 and 14,040±1,860 or 2,255±193 for the fellow retinas (n = 7, respectively. BMD, BDNF, PEDF and bFGF but not CNTF showed significant neuroprotective effects on L- or S-cones. We conclude that LIP results in rod and cone-photoreceptor loss, and is a reliable, quantifiable model to study cone-photoreceptor degeneration. Intravitreal BDNF, PEDF or bFGF, or topical BMD afford significant cone neuroprotection in this model.

  18. Long-term treadmill exercise improves spatial memory of male APPswe/PS1dE9 mice by regulation of BDNF expression and microglia activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, JY; Li, SC; Sun, YX; Zhang, XS; Dong, ZZ; Zhong, P.; Sun, XR

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that physical activity could delay or attenuate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). But the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. To investigate the effect of long-term treadmill exercise on the spatial memory of AD mice and the possible role of β-amyloid, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and microglia in the effect, male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice aged 4 months were subjected to treadmill exercise for 5 months with 6 sessions per week and...

  19. New polymorphs of an old drug: conformational and synthon polymorphism of 5-nitrofurazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Dorota; Janczak, Jan; Videnova-Adrabinska, Veneta

    2016-04-01

    Two new polymorphic forms of 5-nitrofurazone (5-nitro-2-furaldehyde semicarbazone) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction methods, vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and temperature Raman), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Hirshfeld surface analysis. The compound crystallizes in three different polymorphic forms P21/a (polymorph α), P21 (polymorph β) and P21/c (polymorph γ), the crystal structures of two of which (polymorphs β and γ) represent new structure determinations. The solid-state molecular organization in the three crystal forms is analyzed and discussed in terms of molecular conformation, crystal packing and hydrogen-bonded networks. All three crystals are formed from trans geometrical isomers, but the molecular conformation of the α-polymorph is syn-anti-anti-anti, while that of β- and γ-polymorphs is syn-anti-syn-syn. As a consequence of this the hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor sites of the molecules are oriented differently, which in turn results in different hydrogen-bond connectivity and packing patterns. PMID:27048728

  20. Mixture of Peanut Skin Extract and Fish Oil Improves Memory in Mice via Modulation of Anti-Oxidative Stress and Regulation of BDNF/ERK/CREB Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-term use of fish oil (FO is known to induce oxidative stress and increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. In the present study, peanut skin extract (PSE, which has strong antioxidant capacity, was mixed with FO to reduce its side effects while maintaining its beneficial properties. Twelve-week Institute of Cancer Research (ICR mice were used to conduct animal behavior tests in order to evaluate the memory-enhancing ability of the mixture of peanut skin extract and fish oil (MPF. MPF significantly increased alternations in the Y-maze and cognitive index in the novel object recognition test. MPF also improved performance in the water maze test. We further sought to understand the mechanisms underlying these effects. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and an increase in malonyldialdehyde (MDA in plasma were observed in the FO group. The MPF group showed reduced MDA level and increased SOD activity in the plasma, cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB in the hippocampus were increased in the MPF group, while phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and CREB in the hippocampus were enhanced. MPF improves memory in mice via modulation of anti-oxidative stress and activation of BDNF/ERK/CREB signaling pathways.