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Sample records for bdnf mimetics activate

  1. Are BDNF and glucocorticoid activities calibrated?

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    Jeanneteau, Freddy; Chao, Moses V.

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for the onset and severity of neurological disorders is the loss of trophic support. Indeed, changes in the levels and activities of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) occur in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. A deficit promotes vulnerability whereas a gain of function facilitates recovery by enhancing survival, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. Implementation of ‘BDNF therapies’, however, faces numerous methodological and pharmacokinetic issues. Identifying BDNF mimetics that activate the BDNF receptor or downstream targets of BDNF signaling represent an alternative approach. One mechanism that shows great promise is to study the interplay of BDNF and glucocorticoid hormones, a major class of natural steroid secreted during stress reactions and in synchrony with circadian rhythms. While small amounts of glucocorticoids support normal brain function, excess stimulation by these steroid hormones precipitate stress-related affective disorders. To date, however, because of the paucity of knowledge of underlying cellular mechanisms, deleterious effects of glucocorticoids are not prevented following extreme stress. In the present review, we will discuss the complementary roles share by BDNF and glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity, and delineate possible signaling mechanisms mediating these effects. PMID:23022538

  2. Heparin mimetics with anticoagulant activity.

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    Nahain, Abdullah Al; Ignjatovic, Vera; Monagle, Paul; Tsanaktsidis, John; Ferro, Vito

    2018-02-15

    Heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide belonging to the glycosaminoglycan family, has been widely used as an anticoagulant drug for decades and remains the most commonly used parenteral anticoagulant in adults and children. However, heparin has important clinical limitations and is derived from animal sources which pose significant safety and supply problems. The ever growing shortage of the raw material for heparin manufacturing may become a very significant issue in the future. These global limitations have prompted much research, especially following the recent well-publicized contamination scandal, into the development of alternative anticoagulants derived from non-animal and/or totally synthetic sources that mimic the structural features and properties of heparin. Such compounds, termed heparin mimetics, are also needed as anticoagulant materials for use in biomedical applications (e.g., stents, grafts, implants etc.). This review encompasses the development of heparin mimetics of various structural classes, including synthetic polymers and non-carbohydrate small molecules as well as sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides, and fondaparinux derivatives and conjugates, with a focus on developments in the past 10 years. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A BDNF loop-domain mimetic acutely reverses spontaneous apneas and respiratory abnormalities during behavioral arousal in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

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    Miriam Kron

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. In Mecp2 mutant mice, BDNF deficits have been associated with breathing abnormalities, a core feature of RTT, as well as with synaptic hyperexcitability within the brainstem respiratory network. Application of BDNF can reverse hyperexcitability in acute brainstem slices from Mecp2-null mice, suggesting that therapies targeting BDNF or its receptor, TrkB, could be effective at acute reversal of respiratory abnormalities in RTT. Therefore, we examined the ability of LM22A-4, a small-molecule BDNF loop-domain mimetic and TrkB partial agonist, to modulate synaptic excitability within respiratory cell groups in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS and to acutely reverse abnormalities in breathing at rest and during behavioral arousal in Mecp2 mutants. Patch-clamp recordings in Mecp2-null brainstem slices demonstrated that LM22A-4 decreases excitability at primary afferent synapses in the nTS by reducing the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents and the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. In vivo, acute treatment of Mecp2-null and -heterozygous mutants with LM22A-4 completely eliminated spontaneous apneas in resting animals, without sedation. Moreover, we demonstrate that respiratory dysregulation during behavioral arousal, a feature of human RTT, is also reversed in Mecp2 mutants by acute treatment with LM22A-4. Together, these data support the hypothesis that reduced BDNF signaling and respiratory dysfunction in RTT are linked, and establish the proof-of-concept that treatment with a small-molecule structural mimetic of a BDNF loop domain and a TrkB partial agonist can acutely reverse abnormal breathing at rest and in response to

  4. Definition of a Bidirectional Activity-Dependent Pathway Involving BDNF and Narp

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    Abigail Mariga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the cardinal features of neural development and adult plasticity is the contribution of activity-dependent signaling pathways. However, the interrelationships between different activity-dependent genes are not well understood. The immediate early gene neuronal-activity-regulated pentraxin (NPTX2 or Narp encodes a protein that has been associated with excitatory synaptogenesis, AMPA receptor aggregation, and the onset of critical periods. Here, we show that Narp is a direct transcriptional target of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, another highly regulated activity-dependent gene involved in synaptic plasticity. Unexpectedly, Narp is bidirectionally regulated by BDNF. Acute BDNF withdrawal results in downregulation of Narp, whereas transcription of Narp is greatly enhanced by BDNF. Furthermore, our results show that BDNF directly regulates Narp to mediate glutamatergic transmission and mossy fiber plasticity. Hence, Narp serves as a significant epistatic target of BDNF to regulate synaptic plasticity during periods of dynamic activity.

  5. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

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    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  6. Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Metallohelices with Potent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity.

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    Mitchell, Daniel E; Clarkson, Guy; Fox, David J; Vipond, Rebecca A; Scott, Peter; Gibson, Matthew I

    2017-07-26

    Antifreeze proteins are produced by extremophile species to control ice formation and growth, and they have potential applications in many fields. There are few examples of synthetic materials which can reproduce their potent ice recrystallization inhibition property. We report that self-assembled enantiomerically pure, amphipathic metallohelicies inhibited ice growth at just 20 μM. Structure-property relationships and calculations support the hypothesis that amphipathicity is the key motif for activity. This opens up a new field of metallo-organic antifreeze protein mimetics and provides insight into the origins of ice-growth inhibition.

  7. Improved Oxidase Mimetic Activity by Praseodymium Incorporation into Ceria Nanocubes.

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    Jiang, Lei; Fernandez-Garcia, Susana; Tinoco, Miguel; Yan, Zhaoxia; Xue, Qi; Blanco, Ginesa; Calvino, Jose J; Hungria, Ana B; Chen, Xiaowei

    2017-06-07

    Ceria nanocubes (NC) modified with increasing concentrations of praseodymium (5, 10, 15, and 20 mol %) have been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized Pr-modified ceria nanocubes exhibit an enhanced oxidase-like activity on the organic dye TMB within a wide range of concentrations and durations. The oxidase activity increases with increasing Pr amounts in Pr-modified ceria nanocubes within the investigated concentration range. Meanwhile, these Pr-modified ceria nanocubes also show higher reducibility than pure ceria nanocubes. The kinetics of their oxidase mimetic activity is fitted with the Michaelis-Menten equation. A mechanism has been proposed on how the Pr incorporation could affect the energy level of the bands in ceria and hence facilitate the TMB oxidation reaction. The presence of Pr 3+ species on the surface also contributes to the increasing activity of the Pr-modified ceria nanocubes present higher oxidase activity than pure ceria nanocubes.

  8. Positive feedback loop of autocrine BDNF from microglia causes prolonged microglia activation.

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    Zhang, Xin; Zeng, Lulu; Yu, Tingting; Xu, Yongming; Pu, Shaofeng; Du, Dongping; Jiang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, which represent the immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), have long been a subject of study in CNS disease research. Substantial evidence indicates that microglial activation functions as a strong neuro-inflammatory response in neuropathic pain, promoting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. In addition, activated microglia release brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which acts as a powerful cytokine. In this study, we performed a series of in vitro experiments to examine whether a positive autocrine feedback loop existed between microglia-derived BDNF and subsequent microglial activation as well as the mechanisms underlying this positive feedback loop. Because ATP is a classic inducer of microglial activation, firstly, we examined ATP-activated microglia in the present study. Secondly, we used TrkB/Fc, the BDNF sequester, to eliminate the effects of endogenous BDNF. ATP-stimulated microglia without BDNF was examined. Finally, we used exogenous BDNF to further determine whether BDNF could directly activate BV2 microglia. In all experiments, to quantify BV2 microglia activation, the protein levels of CD11b, a microglial activation marker, were measured by western blot. A Transwell migration assay was used to examine microglial migration. To assess the synthesis and release of proinflammatory cytokines, western blot was used to measure BDNF synthesis, and ELISA was used to quantify TNF-α release. In our present research, we have observed that ATP dramatically activates microglia, enhancing microglial migration, increasing the synthesis of BDNF and up-regulating the release of TNF-α. Microglial activation is inhibited following the sequestration of endogenous BDNF, resulting in impaired microglial migration and decreased TNF-α release. Furthermore, exogenous BDNF can also activate microglia to subsequently enhance migration and increase TNF-α release. Therefore, we suggest that microglial

  9. Use of Brevibacillus choshinensis for the production of biologically active brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

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    Angart, Phillip A; Carlson, Rebecca J; Thorwall, Sarah; Patrick Walton, S

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family critical for neuronal cell survival and differentiation, with therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. The production of recombinant, bioactive BDNF is not practical in most traditional microbial expression systems because of the inability of the host to correctly form the characteristic cystine-knot fold of BDNF. Here, we investigated Brevibacillus choshinensis as a suitable expression host for bioactive BDNF expression, evaluating the effects of medium type (2SY and TM), temperature (25 and 30 °C), and culture time (48-120 h). Maximal BDNF bioactivity (per unit mass) was observed in cultures grown in 2SY medium at extended times (96 h at 30 °C or >72 h at 25 °C), with resulting bioactivity comparable to that of a commercially available BDNF. For cultures grown in 2SY medium at 25 °C for 72 h, the condition that led to the greatest quantity of biologically active protein in the shortest culture time, we recovered 264 μg/L of BDNF. As with other microbial expression systems, BDNF aggregates did form in all culture conditions, indicating that while we were able to recover biologically active BDNF, further optimization of the expression system could yield still greater quantities of bioactive protein. This study provides confirmation that B. choshinensis is capable of producing biologically active BDNF and that further optimization of culture conditions could prove valuable in increasing BDNF yields.

  10. Determination of superoxide dismutase mimetic activity in common culinary herbs.

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    Chohan, Magali; Naughton, Declan P; Opara, Elizabeth I

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the removal of superoxide, a free radical associated with chronic inflammation, is catalysed by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Thus in addition to acting as an antioxidant, SOD may also be utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent. Some plant derived foods have been shown to have SOD mimetic (SODm) activity however it is not known if this activity is possessed by culinary herbs which have previously been shown to possess both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the study was to ascertain if the culinary herbs rosemary, sage and thyme possess SODm activity, and to investigate the influence of cooking and digestion on this activity. Transition metal ion content was also determined to establish if it could likely contribute to any SODm activity detected. All extracts of uncooked (U), cooked (C) and cooked and digested (C&D) herbs were shown to possess SODm activity, which was significantly correlated with previously determined antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of these herbs. SODm activity was significantly increased following (C) and (C&D) for rosemary and sage only. The impact of (C) and (C&D) on the SODm for thyme may have been influenced by its transition metal ion content. SODm activity may contribute to the herbs' antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities however the source and significance of this activity need to be established.

  11. BDNF Methylation and Maternal Brain Activity in a Violence-Related Sample.

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    Dominik A Moser

    Full Text Available It is known that increased circulating glucocorticoids in the wake of excessive, chronic, repetitive stress increases anxiety and impairs Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF signaling. Recent studies of BDNF gene methylation in relation to maternal care have linked high BDNF methylation levels in the blood of adults to lower quality of received maternal care measured via self-report. Yet the specific mechanisms by which these phenomena occur remain to be established. The present study examines the link between methylation of the BDNF gene promoter region and patterns of neural activity that are associated with maternal response to stressful versus non-stressful child stimuli within a sample that includes mothers with interpersonal violence-related PTSD (IPV-PTSD. 46 mothers underwent fMRI. The contrast of neural activity when watching children-including their own-was then correlated to BDNF methylation. Consistent with the existing literature, the present study found that maternal BDNF methylation was associated with higher levels of maternal anxiety and greater childhood exposure to domestic violence. fMRI results showed a positive correlation of BDNF methylation with maternal brain activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, regions generally credited with a regulatory function toward brain areas that are generating emotions. Furthermore we found a negative correlation of BDNF methylation with the activity of the right hippocampus. Since our stimuli focus on stressful parenting conditions, these data suggest that the correlation between vmPFC/ACC activity and BDNF methylation may be linked to mothers who are at a disadvantage with respect to emotion regulation when facing stressful parenting situations. Overall, this study provides evidence that epigenetic signatures of stress-related genes can be linked to functional brain regions regulating parenting stress, thus advancing our understanding of

  12. The Neuroprotective Role of Acupuncture and Activation of the BDNF Signaling Pathway

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    Lin, Dong; De La Pena, Ike; Lin, Lili; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Cao, Chuanhai

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have been conducted to examine the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture in many neurological disorders. Although the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture has been linked to changes in signaling pathways, accumulating evidence suggest the participation of endogenous biological mediators, such as the neurotrophin (NT) family of proteins, specifically, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Accordingly, acupuncture can inhibit neurodegeneration via expression and activation of BDNF. Moreover, recent studies have reported that acupuncture can increase ATP levels at local stimulated points. We have also demonstrated that acupuncture could activate monocytes and increase the expression of BDNF via the stimulation of ATP. The purpose of this article is to review the recent findings and ongoing studies on the neuroprotective roles of acupuncture and therapeutic implications of acupuncture-induced activation of BDNF and its signaling pathway. PMID:24566146

  13. Cardio-respiratory fitness, habitual physical activity and serum brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in men and women.

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    Currie, James; Ramsbottom, Roger; Ludlow, Helen; Nevill, Alan; Gilder, Michael

    2009-02-20

    Short episodes of high intensity exercise transiently increase serum levels of BDNF in humans, but serum levels of BDNF at rest appear to be lower in more physically active humans with greater levels of energy expenditure. The relationship between serum BDNF concentration, cardio-respiratory fitness (Astrand-Rhyming test estimated VO2 max) and volume of long-term, regular exercise and sporting activity (Baecke Habitual Physical Activity Index) was investigated in 44 men and women between the age range of 18-57 years. In this group an inverse relationship between resting serum BDNF concentration and measures of both estimated VO2 max (r=-0.352; Pcardio-respiratory fitness and habitual exercise are associated with lower resting levels of serum BDNF in healthy humans. This is the first study to demonstrate an inverse relationship between a physiological estimate of cardio-respiratory fitness and serum BDNF.

  14. PKC activation sensitizes basal-like breast cancer cell lines to Smac mimetics.

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    Cornmark, L; Holmgren, C; Masoumi, K; Larsson, C

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for novel strategies to initiate cancer cell death. One approach is the use of Smac mimetics, which antagonize inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Recent studies have shown that combinations of Smac mimetics such as LBW242 or LCL161 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increase cancer cell death. Here we show that the protein kinase C (PKC) activator TPA together with the Smac mimetic LBW242 induces cell death in two basal breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-468 and BT-549) that are resistant to Smac mimetic as single agent. Ten other LBW242-insensitive cancer cell lines were not influenced by the TPA+LBW242 combination. The TPA+LBW242 effect was suppressed by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, indicating dependence on PKC enzymatic activity. The PKC effect was mediated via increased synthesis and release of TNFα, which can induce death in the presence of Smac mimetics. The cell death, coinciding with caspase-3 cleavage, was suppressed by caspase inhibition and preceded by the association of RIP1 with caspase-8, as seen in complex II formation. Smac mimetics, but not TPA, induced the non-canonical NF-κB pathway in both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Blocking the canonical NF-κB pathway suppressed TPA induction of TNFα in MDA-MB-468 cells whereas isolated downregulation of either the canonical or non-canonical pathways did not abolish the Smac mimetic induction of the NF-κB driven genes TNFα and BIRC3 in MDA-MB-231 cells although the absolute levels were suppressed. A combined downregulation of the canonical and non-canonical pathways further suppressed TNFα levels and inhibited Smac mimetic-mediated cell death. Our data suggest that in certain basal breast cancer cell lines co-treatment of TPA with a Smac mimetic induces cell death highlighting the potential of using these pathways as molecular targets for basal-like breast cancers.

  15. Interaction between BDNF Polymorphism and Physical Activity on Inhibitory Performance in the Elderly without Cognitive Impairment

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    Anne Canivet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the elderly, physical activity (PA enhances cognitive performances, increases brain plasticity and improves brain health. The neurotrophic hypothesis is that the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is implicated in brain plasticity and cognition, is triggered by PA because motoneurons secrete BDNF into the bloodstream during exercise. Individual differences in cognitive performance may be explained by individual differences in genetic predisposition. A single nucleotide polymorphism on the BDNF gene, BDNFVal66Met, affects activity-dependent BDNF secretion. This study investigated the influence of the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism on the relationship between PA and controlled inhibition performance in older adults.Methods: A total of 114 healthy elderly volunteers (mean age = 71.53 years old were evaluated. Participants were genotyped for the BDNFVal66Met polymorphism. We evaluated inhibitory performance using choice reaction times (RT and error rates from a Simon-like task and estimated their PA using two self-reported questionnaires. We established four groups according to PA level (active vs. inactive and BDNFVal66Met genotype (Met carriers vs. Val-homozygous. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and ANCOVA, including age, gender and body mass index as covariates.Results: The BDNFVal66Met polymorphism interacted with PA on controlled inhibition performance. More specifically, inactive Val-homozygous participants exhibited a lower inhibition performance than active Val homozygotes and inactive Met carriers; the former had a higher error rate without differences in RT.Conclusion: Differences between individuals on inhibitory performance may be partially understood by the interaction between genetic influence in BDNF secretion and PA level. The results of this study clearly support the neurotrophic hypothesis that BDNF synthesis is an important mechanism underlying the influence of physical activity on brain

  16. Effect of cigarette smoke on monocyte procoagulant activity: Focus on platelet-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

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    Amadio, Patrizia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sandrini, Leonardo; Weksler, Babette B; Tremoli, Elena; Barbieri, Silvia S

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) activates platelets, promotes vascular dysfunction, and enhances Tissue Factor (TF) expression in blood monocytes favoring pro-thrombotic states. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the family of neurotrophins involved in survival, growth, and maturation of neurons, is released by activated platelets (APLTs) and plays a role in the cardiovascular system. The effect of CS on circulating levels of BDNF is controversial and the function of circulating BDNF in atherothrombosis is not fully understood. Here, we have shown that human platelets, treated with an aqueous extract of CS (CSE), released BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, incubation of human monocytes with BDNF or with the supernatant of platelets activated with CSE increased TF activity by a Tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)-dependent mechanism. Finally, comparing serum and plasma samples of 12 male never smokers (NS) and 29 male active smokers (AS) we observed a significant increase in microparticle-associated TF activity (MP-TF) as well as BDNF in AS, while in serum, BDNF behaved oppositely. Taken together these findings suggest that platelet-derived BDNF is involved in the regulation of TF activity and that CS plays a role in this pathway by favoring a pro-atherothrombotic state.

  17. Activity-Based Anorexia Alters the Expression of BDNF Transcripts in the Mesocorticolimbic Reward Circuit.

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    Ho, Emily V; Klenotich, Stephanie J; McMurray, Matthew S; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex eating disorder with severe dysregulation of appetitive behavior. The activity-based anorexia (ABA) paradigm is an animal model in which rodents exposed to both running wheels and scheduled feeding develop aspects of AN including paradoxical hypophagia, dramatic weight loss, and hyperactivity, while animals exposed to only one condition maintain normal body weight. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an activity-dependent modulator of neuronal plasticity, is reduced in the serum of AN patients, and is a known regulator of feeding and weight maintenance. We assessed the effects of scheduled feeding, running wheel access, or both on the expression of BDNF transcripts within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. We also assessed the expression of neuronal cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) to explore the specificity of effects on BDNF within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. Scheduled feeding increased the levels of both transcripts in the hippocampus (HPC), increased NCAM1 mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and decreased BDNF mRNA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In addition, wheel running increased BDNF mRNA expression in the VTA. No changes in either transcript were observed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, no changes in either transcript were induced by the combined scheduled feeding and wheel access condition. These data indicate that scheduled feeding or wheel running alter BDNF and NCAM1 expression levels in specific regions of the mesocorticolimbic pathway. These findings contribute to our current knowledge of the molecular alterations induced by ABA and may help elucidate possible mechanisms of AN pathology.

  18. Activity of Potent and Selective Host Defense Peptide Mimetics in Mouse Models of Oral Candidiasis

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    Ryan, Lisa K.; Freeman, Katie B.; Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G.; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24752272

  19. BDNF activates mTOR to regulate GluR1 expression required for memory formation.

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    Leandro Slipczuk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR kinase plays a key role in translational control of a subset of mRNAs through regulation of its initiation step. In neurons, mTOR is present at the synaptic region, where it modulates the activity-dependent expression of locally-translated proteins independently of mRNA synthesis. Indeed, mTOR is necessary for different forms of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM formation. However, little is known about the time course of mTOR activation and the extracellular signals governing this process or the identity of the proteins whose translation is regulated by this kinase, during mnemonic processing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that consolidation of inhibitory avoidance (IA LTM entails mTOR activation in the dorsal hippocampus at the moment of and 3 h after training and is associated with a rapid and rapamycin-sensitive increase in AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit expression, which was also blocked by intra-hippocampal delivery of GluR1 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO. In addition, we found that pre- or post-training administration of function-blocking anti-BDNF antibodies into dorsal CA1 hampered IA LTM retention, abolished the learning-induced biphasic activation of mTOR and its readout, p70S6K and blocked GluR1 expression, indicating that BDNF is an upstream factor controlling mTOR signaling during fear-memory consolidation. Interestingly, BDNF ASO hindered LTM retention only when given into dorsal CA1 1 h after but not 2 h before training, suggesting that BDNF controls the biphasic requirement of mTOR during LTM consolidation through different mechanisms: an early one involving BDNF already available at the moment of training, and a late one, happening around 3 h post-training that needs de novo synthesis of this neurotrophin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IN CONCLUSION, OUR FINDINGS DEMONSTRATE THAT: 1 mTOR-mediated mRNA translation is required for memory consolidation during

  20. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

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    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Influences Reading Ability and Patterns of Neural Activation in Children.

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    Kaja K Jasińska

    Full Text Available Understanding how genes impact the brain's functional activation for learning and cognition during development remains limited. We asked whether a common genetic variant in the BDNF gene (the Val66Met polymorphism modulates neural activation in the young brain during a critical period for the emergence and maturation of the neural circuitry for reading. In animal models, the bdnf variation has been shown to be associated with the structure and function of the developing brain and in humans it has been associated with multiple aspects of cognition, particularly memory, which are relevant for the development of skilled reading. Yet, little is known about the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on functional brain activation in development, either in animal models or in humans. Here, we examined whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (dbSNP rs6265 is associated with children's (age 6-10 neural activation patterns during a reading task (n = 81 using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, genotyping, and standardized behavioral assessments of cognitive and reading development. Children homozygous for the Val allele at the SNP rs6265 of the BDNF gene outperformed Met allele carriers on reading comprehension and phonological memory, tasks that have a strong memory component. Consistent with these behavioral findings, Met allele carriers showed greater activation in reading-related brain regions including the fusiform gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus as well as greater activation in the hippocampus during a word and pseudoword reading task. Increased engagement of memory and spoken language regions for Met allele carriers relative to Val/Val homozygotes during reading suggests that Met carriers have to exert greater effort required to retrieve phonological codes.

  2. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

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    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  3. Sex Differences in the Impact of BDNF Genotype on the Longitudinal Relationship between Physical Activity and Cognitive Performance.

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    Watts, Amber; Andrews, Shea J; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2018-02-02

    Physical activity may preserve cognitive function in older adults, but benefits vary by sex and genetic factors. We tested the longitudinal association between physical activity and cognitive performance to de termine whether a common genetic polymorphism for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF Val66Met) moderated this effect. In a 12-year longitudinal population-based sample of older adults (n = 2,218), we used growth curve modeling to investigate whether the benefits of physical activity on cognitive preservation differed by BDNF genotype and sex across multiple cognitive domains including processing speed, attention, working memory, and episodic verbal memory. The relationship between physical activity and cognitive performance was dependent on BDNF carrier status in males (Δχ2 [Δdf] = 12.94 [4], p = 0.01), but not in females (Δχ2 [Δdf] = 4.38 [4], p = 0.36). Cognition benefited from physical activity in male BDNF met noncarriers, but not met carriers, whereas cognition was not statistically significantly related to physical activity in females regardless of genotype. We observed longitudinal, but not cross-sectional, effects of physical activity on cognitive performance. Our study highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and consideration of sex differences in the relationships between physical activity, BDNF genotype, and cognitive decline. The findings contribute to understanding gene-lifestyle interactions in promoting cognitive health. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

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    Harish Babu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  5. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic potentiates tumor susceptibility toward natural killer cell-mediated killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Kerstin; Hombach, Andreas; Seeger, Jens Michael; Wagner-Stippich, Diana; Klubertz, Daniela; Krönke, Martin; Abken, Hinrich; Kashkar, Hamid

    2014-03-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer, and represents an important mechanism of how tumor cells resist immune cell destruction. Mitochondria are the central regulators of the apoptotic machinery by releasing pro-apoptotic factors including cytochrome c and second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC) upon mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Small molecules activating MOMP such as BH3 mimetics or antagonizers of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) such as SMAC mimetics have recently engendered new optimism for a more individualized and effective cancer therapy. Here we show that a SMAC mimetic potentiates cancer cell killing by natural killer (NK) cells through reactivation of tumor cell apoptosis. Specifically, the SMAC mimetic enhances the susceptibility of tumor cells toward NK cell-mediated effector mechanisms involving death receptors and cytolytic granules containing perforin and granzymes by relieving caspase activity. Our data highlight for the first time the specific use of SMAC mimetics for boosting immune cell-mediated immunotherapy, representing a novel and promising approach in the treatment of cancer.

  6. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance. PMID:28947927

  7. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

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    Cecilia Prata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  8. Potent Bivalent Smac Mimetics: Effect of the Linker on Binding to Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) and Anticancer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiying; Liu, Liu; Lu, Jianfeng; Bai, Longchuan; Li, Xiaoqin; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; McEachern, Donna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Qiu, Su; Yi, Han; Sun, Duxin; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-01-01

    We have synthesized and evaluated a series of non-peptidic, bivalent Smac mimetics as antagonists of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and new anticancer agents. All these bivalent Smac mimetics bind to full-length XIAP with low nanomolar affinities and function as ultra-potent antagonists of XIAP. While these Smac mimetics bind to cIAP1/2 with similar low nanomolar affinities, their potencies to induce degradation of cIAP1/2 proteins in cells differ by more than 100-fold. The most potent bivalent Smac mimetics inhibit cell growth with IC50 values from 1–3 nM in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and are 100-times more potent than the least potent compounds. Determination of intracellular concentrations for several representative compounds showed that the linkers in these bivalent Smac mimetics significantly affect their intracellular concentrations, hence the overall cellular activity. Compound 27 completely inhibits tumor growth in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts, while causing no signs of toxicity in the animals. PMID:21462933

  9. Mimetic Learning

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    Christoph Wulf

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic learning, learning by imitation, constitutes one of the most important forms of learning. Mimetic learning does not, however, just denote mere imitation or copying: Rather, it is a process by which the act of relating to other persons and worlds in a mimetic way leads to an en-hancement of one’s own world view, action, and behaviour. Mimetic learning is productive; it is related to the body, and it establishes a connection between the individual and the world as well as other persons; it creates practical knowledge, which is what makes it constitutive of social, artistic, and practical action. Mimetic learning is cultural learning, and as such it is crucial to teaching and education (Wulf, 2004; 2005.

  10. Histone deacetylase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in a pharmacological model of mania

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    Laura Stertz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of repeated D-amphetamine (AMPH exposure, a well-accepted animal model of acute mania in bipolar disorder (BD, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors on locomotor behavior and HDAC activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of rats. Moreover, we aimed to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and mRNA levels in these samples. Methods: We treated adult male Wistar rats with 2 mg/kg AMPH or saline intraperitoneally for 14 days. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received 47.5 mg/kg lithium (Li, 200 mg/kg sodium valproate (VPT, 2 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB, or saline. We evaluated locomotor activity in the open-field task and assessed HDAC activity in the PFC and PBMCs, and BDNF levels in the PFC and plasma. Results: AMPH significantly increased locomotor activity, which was reversed by all drugs. This hyperactivity was associated with increased HDAC activity in the PFC, which was partially reversed by Li, VPT, and SB. No differences were found in BDNF levels. Conclusion: Repeated AMPH administration increases HDAC activity in the PFC without altering BDNF levels. The partial reversal of HDAC increase by Li, VPT, and SB may account for their ability to reverse AMPH-induced hyperactivity.

  11. Activation and Inactivation of Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers by CD4-Mimetic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Zhao, Connie; Jahanbakhshsefidi, Fatemeh; Mertens, Max; Herschhorn, Alon; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into cells is mediated by the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env), a trimer of three gp120 exterior glycoproteins, and three gp41 transmembrane glycoproteins. The metastable Env is triggered to undergo entry-related conformational changes when gp120 binds sequentially to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5, on the target cell. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds (CD4mc) bind gp120 and act as competitive inhibitors of gp120-CD4 engagement. Some CD4mc have been shown to trigger Env prematurely, initially activating Env function, followed by rapid and irreversible inactivation. Here, we study CD4mc with a wide range of anti-HIV-1 potencies and demonstrate that all tested CD4mc are capable of activating as well as inactivating Env function. Biphasic dose-response curves indicated that the occupancy of the protomers in the Env trimer governs viral activation versus inactivation. One CD4mc bound per Env trimer activated HIV-1 infection. Envs with two CD4mc bound were activated for infection of CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells, but the infection of CD4-positive, CCR5-positive cells was inhibited. Virus was inactivated when all three Env protomers were occupied by the CD4mc, and gp120 shedding from the Env trimer was increased in the presence of some CD4mc. Env reactivity and the on rates of CD4mc binding to the Env trimer were found to be important determinants of the potency of activation and entry inhibition. Cross-sensitization of Env protomers that do not bind the CD4mc to neutralization by an anti-V3 antibody was not evident. These insights into the mechanism of antiviral activity of CD4mc should assist efforts to optimize their potency and utility. IMPORTANCE The trimeric envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mediate virus entry into host cells. Binding to the host cell receptors, CD4 and CCR5, triggers changes in the conformation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer important

  12. Structure-activity studies of heparan mimetic polyanions for anti-prion therapies.

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    Ouidja, Mohand-Ouidir; Petit, Emmanuel; Kerros, Marie-Emmanuelle; Ikeda, Yasunori; Morin, Christophe; Carpentier, Gilles; Barritault, Denis; Brugère-Picoux, Jeanne; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Adjou, Karim; Papy-Garcia, Dulce

    2007-11-09

    Polysulfated molecules, as the family of heparan mimetics (HMs) and pentosan polysulfate, are considered among the more promising drugs used in experimental models of prion diseases. Regardless of their therapeutic potential, structure-function studies on these polyanions are still missing. Here, we report the syntheses of a library of HMs of different molecular sizes, containing various sulfation and carboxylation levels, and substituted or not by different hydrophobic cores. The HMs capacities to inhibit the accumulation of PrPres in chronically infected cells (ScGT1-7) and their PrPc binding abilities were examined. Our results showed that an optimal size and sulfation degree are needed for optimum activity, that incorporation of hydrophobic moieties increases compounds efficacy and that the presence of carboxymethyl moieties decreases it. These structural features should be considered on the modelling of polyanionic compounds for optimum anti-prion activities and for advancing in the understanding the mechanisms involved in their biological actions.

  13. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-14

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL.

  14. Bis(maltolato)vanadium(III)-polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA cleavage, and insulin mimetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazrul; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Zeller, Matthias; Butcher, Raymond J; Dusane, Menakshi Bhat; Joshi, Bimba N

    2010-09-20

    Four vanadium(III) complexes of the general formula [V(maltol)(2)(N-N)]ClO(4), where N-N is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (1); 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (2); dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) (3), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) (4), have been synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-visible, NMR spectroscopies, and electrospray ionization mass spectra (ESI-MS). The complexes exhibit the typical (1)H NMR spectra for paramagnetic V(III) species. The structures of complexes 1, 2, and 3 were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. All complexes are monomeric and cationic containing V(III) species ligated to one neutral polypyridyl ligand and two monoanionic bidentate maltolate ligands with a distorted octahedral geometry. The complexes show an irreversible redox peak around +0.80 V versus Ag/AgCl corresponding to one-electron oxidation of V(III) to V(IV). The time-resolved UV-visible spectral changes for the complexes during the electrolysis in acetonitrile solution at +1.0 V are consistent with one-electron oxidation of the complexes to yield the stable V(IV) species. All complexes cleave plasmid pBR322 DNA without the addition of any external agents. In vitro insulin mimetic activity against insulin responsive RIN 5f cells indicates that complex 1 has similar activity to insulin while the others have moderate insulin mimetic activity.

  15. Smac mimetic triggers necroptosis in pancreatic carcinoma cells when caspase activation is blocked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannes, Sabine; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Fulda, Simone

    2016-09-28

    Evasion of apoptosis represents a key mechanism of treatment resistance of pancreatic cancer (PC) and contributes to the poor prognosis of this cancer type. Here, we report that induction of necroptosis is an alternative strategy to trigger programmed cell death in apoptosis-resistant PC cells. We show that the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic BV6 that antagonizes inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins induces necroptosis in PC cells in which apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk. Intriguingly, BV6 switches autocrine/paracrine production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α by PC cells into a death signal and also acts in concert with exogenously supplied TNFα to trigger necroptosis, when caspase activation is simultaneously blocked. BV6 stimulates TNFα production and formation of the receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1/RIP3-containing necrosome complex in PC cells. Knockdown of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) protects PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-mediated cell death, demonstrating that TNFα autocrine/paracrine signaling by PC cells contributes to BV6-induced necroptosis. Importantly, genetic silencing of receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) or mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) significantly rescues PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1, RIP3 or MLKL significantly reduces BV6- or BV6/TNFα-stimulated cell death. By demonstrating that Smac mimetics can bypass resistance to apoptosis by triggering necroptosis as an alternative form of programmed cell death, our findings have important implications for the design of new treatment concepts for PC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of intrathecal administration of glial activation inhibitors on dorsal horn BDNF overexpression and hind paw mechanical allodynia in spinal nerve ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Quanhong; Pu, Shaofeng; Jiang, Wei; Du, Dongping

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that activated glia in the spinal cord may play a vital role at different times during spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain; therefore, glial activation inhibitors have been used as effective painkillers. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also known to be a powerful pain modulator, but it remains unclear how it contributes to the glial activation inhibitor-based treatment. This study revealed the following results: (1) intrathecal administration of minocycline (a microglial activation inhibitor) could prevent mechanical allodynia during the initiation of SNL-induced neuropathic pain, and its action was associated with the elimination of BDNF overexpression in the dorsal horn; (2) the spinal injection of fluorocitrate (an astrocytic activation inhibitor) but not minocycline could reverse mechanical allodynia during the maintenance phase of SNL-induced pain, and its action was also related to a decrease in BDNF overexpression in the dorsal horn; and (3) treatment with TrkB/Fc (a BDNF-sequestering protein) had a similar effect during both the early development and maintenance periods. These results led to the following conclusions: (1) elevated BDNF expression in the dorsal horn was required to develop and maintain neuropathic pain; (2) minocycline could only prevent mechanical allodynia in the early stages, possibly by inhibiting BDNF release from microglia; and (3) fluorocitrate could reverse existing mechanical allodynia, and its action was associated with the inhibition of BDNF upregulation induced by astrocytic activation.

  17. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  18. ProBDNF/p75NTR/sortilin pathway is activated in peripheral blood of patients with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Xiong, Jing; Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Ruan, Ye; Liu, Dennis; Bao, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2018-03-09

    Alcohol dependence is a worldwide problem with a great social and economic burden in many countries. A number of studies have suggested that BDNF (mature BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) play important roles in the alcohol dependence. However, what roles of the mBDNF/proBDNF pathways play during the pathological process of alcohol dependence are not clearly understood. In our clinical study, peripheral blood was sampled from 30 male patients with alcohol dependence and 50 healthy males (as control). The protein levels of proBDNF, p75NTR, sortilin, mBDNF, TrkB and mRNA levels of BDNF, p75NTR, sortilin, and TrkB were detected in the peripheral blood in our study. We found that the protein levels of proBDNF and p75NTR were increased, but not the sortilin protein level; while the TrkB protein level was decreased in the alcohol dependence patients compared with healthy controls. Moreover, the mRNA levels of p75NTR and sortilin from the lymphocytes were slightly increased; while BDNF and TrkB were significantly decreased. The ELISA results of mBDNF and TrkB were declined in the alcohol dependence group. The levels of mBDNF and TrkB were negatively correlated with the average amount of daily ethanol consumption, and the levels of proBDNF, p75NTR and sortilin were positively correlated with the average amount of ethanol consumption per day. The ratio of proBDNF to mBDNF was altered in alcohol dependence patients. The balance between the proBDNF/p75NTR and mBDNF/TrkB signalling pathways appeared dysregulated in alcohol dependence. Our results suggested that both pathways may participate in the complex processes of alcohol dependence.

  19. Serum BDNF levels in relation to illness severity, suicide attempts, and central serotonin activity in patients with major depressive disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee; Um, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sollip

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are correlated with the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP). The question of whether there is a difference in BDNF levels between depressive patients according to their illness severity, history of suicide attempts, and central serotonin activity was also addressed. A sample of 51 patients who met the criteria for major depressive disorder following diagnosis using axis I of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - text revision comprised the study subjects. The patients were stratified into two subgroups based on their illness severity, history of suicide attempts, and their LDAEP values. The LDAEP was evaluated by measuring the auditory event-related potentials, and serum BDNF was measured using blood sampling before beginning medication with serotonergic agents. There was no difference in serum BDNF levels between the two patient subgroups. The subgroup with moderate-to-severe depression (n = 16) was reanalyzed after stratifying it into two subgroups according to LDAEP and BDNF values (dichotomized at the medians into low and high). The high-LDAEP subgroup had higher serum BDNF levels and total Barratt Impulsiveness Scale score than the low-LDAEP subgroup (p = 0.03 and 0.036, respectively). Serum BDNF levels were positively correlated with LDAEP and total Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) score (r = 0.56, p = 0.025, and r = 0.59, p = 0.016, respectively). The high-BDNF subgroup had a higher LDAEP and total BHS score than the low-BDNF subgroup (p = 0.046 and p = 0.011, respectively). This is the first study to demonstrate a relationship between the BDNF level and LDAEP in Asian depressive patients. Intriguingly, the high-BDNF subgroup (divided according to illness severity) exhibited a more severe psychopathology on some psychometric rating scales, a finding that

  20. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  1. Smac mimetic SM-164 potentiates APO2L/TRAIL- and doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuijun Zhang

    Full Text Available The members of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs family are key negative regulators of apoptosis. Overexpression of IAPs are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and can contribute to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of HCC. Small-molecule Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac mimetics have recently emerged as novel anticancer drugs through targeting IAPs. The specific aims of this study were to 1 examine the anticancer activity of Smac mimetics as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in HCC cells, and 2 investigate the mechanism of anticancer action of Smac mimetics.Four HCC cell lines, including SMMC-7721, BEL-7402, HepG2 and Hep3B, and 12 primary HCC cells were used in this study. Smac mimetic SM-164 was used to treat HCC cells. Cell viability, cell death induction and clonal formation assays were used to evaluate the anticancer activity. Western blotting analysis and a pancaspase inhibitor were used to investigate the mechanisms.Although SM-164 induced complete cIAP-1 degradation, it displayed weak inhibitory effects on the viability of HCC cells. Nevertheless, SM-164 considerably potentiated Apo2 ligand or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (APO2L/TRAIL- and Doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in HCC cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SM-164 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and also led to decreased AKT activation.Smac mimetics can enhance chemotherapeutic-mediated anticancer activity by enhancing apoptosis signaling and suppressing survival signaling in HCC cells. This study suggests Smac mimetics are potential therapeutic agents for HCC.

  2. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses. PMID:26241953

  3. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses.

  4. A novel Smac mimetic APG-1387 demonstrates potent antitumor activity in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Feng, Lin; Han, Hui-Qiong; Yuan, Jing; Qi, Xue-Kang; Lian, Yi-Fan; Kuang, Bo-Hua; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Deng, Cheng-Cheng; Zhang, Hao-Jiong; Yao, You-Yuan; Xu, Miao; He, Gui-Ping; Zhao, Bing-Chun; Gao, Ling; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Chen, Li-Zhen; Yang, Lu; Yang, Dajun; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2016-10-10

    Despite advances in the development of radiation against nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the management of advanced NPC remains a challenge. Smac mimetics are designed to neutralize inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, thus reactivating the apoptotic program in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of a novel bivalent Smac mimetic APG-1387 in NPC. In vitro, APG-1387 in combination with TNF-α potently decreased NPC cell viability by inducing apoptosis in majority of NPC cell lines. The in vitro antitumor effect was RIPK1-dependent, whereas it was independent on IAPs, USP11, or EBV. Of note, the inhibition of NF-κB or AKT pathway rendered resistant NPC cells responsive to the treatment of APG-1387/TNF-α. In vivo, APG-1387 displayed antitumor activity as a single agent at well-tolerated doses, even in an in vitro resistant cell line. In summary, our results demonstrate that APG-1387 exerts a potent antitumor effect on NPC. These findings support clinical evaluation of APG-1387 as a potential treatment for advanced NPC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Peroxide(s) of vanadium: a novel and potent insulin-mimetic agent which activates the insulin receptor kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, S; Fantus, I G; Deragon, G; Guyda, H J; Hersh, B; Posner, B I

    1987-08-31

    The actions of insulin, vanadate (V) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on IGF-II binding and insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity were studied in rat adipocytes. Incubating adipocytes with a combination of V plus H2O2 resulted in a potent synergistic effect on both the increase in IGF-II binding and the activation of the insulin receptor kinase. Catalase, which removes H2O2, abolished this synergism if added at the time of mixing of V plus H2O2 but not if added 10 min. later, suggesting that the formation of peroxide(s) of vanadate generated a potent insulin mimicker. The data support a critical role for the insulin receptor kinase in insulin action. The novel insulin-mimetic compound, a presumed peroxide of vanadate, could prove useful for investigating insulin action and may be valuable for treating insulin resistance.

  6. Effects of Mind-Body Training on Personality and Behavioral Activation and Inhibition System According to BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Lee, Ul Soon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2016-05-01

    It has been known that mind-body training (MBT) can affect personality and behavior system as well as emotional well-being, but different effects of MBT on them has not been reported according to BDNF genetic polymorphism. Healthy subjects consisted of 64 subjects and the MBT group who practiced meditation regularly consisted of 72 practitioners. Participants completed neuroticism-extraversion-openness (NEO) Five-Factor Inventory and Behavioral Activation System/Behavioral Inhibition System (BAS/BIS) scales. All subjects were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. In the same genotypes of the BDNF Val/Val+Val/Met group, MBT group showed the increased Extraversion (p=0.033) and the increased Openness to Experience (p=0.004) compared to the control group. Also, in the same Met/Met carriers, MBT group exhibited the increase of Extraversion (p=0.008), the reduction of Neuroticism (p=0.002), and the increase of Openness to Experience (p=0.008) compared to the control group. In the same genotypes of the BDNF Val/Val+Val/Met group, MBT group showed the decreased BAS-Reward Responsiveness (p=0.016) and the decrease of BIS (p=0.004) compared to the control group. In the BDNF Met/Met group, MBT group increased BAS-Fun Seeking (p=0.045) and decreased BIS (p=0.013) compared to the control group. MBT would differently contribute to NEO personality and BAS/BIS according to BDNF genetic polymorphism, compensating for different vulnerable traits based on each genotype.

  7. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P.; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor—NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  8. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX, NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats.

  9. Evidences for diabetes and insulin mimetic activity of medicinal plants: Present status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukumar, H M; Shiva Kumar, J; Chandrasekhar, B; Raghava, Sri; Umesha, S

    2017-08-13

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a considerable systemic metabolic disorder to exhibit various metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, mainly hyperglycemia. The global projected estimate of diabetes in 2030 will be about 439 million adults, out of which 300 million expected are of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present knowledge revealed responsible factors, occurrence and mechanism of these factors involved in the DM diseases. Hence, the aim of this review is to address and summarize the causes, plant resources, importance, present status and future programmes for diabetes control. The present review answers the contemporary present questions raised in the scientific field on DM. Two major problems are explained in detail about the autoimmune attack or dysfunction of β-cell and insulin resistance involved for Type 1 and Type 2 DM, respectively. Though there are various approaches to reduce the ill effects of diabetes and its secondary complications, many preferred herbal formulations due to lesser side effects and low cost. For this reason still it is getting increased attention in searching antidiabetic medicinal plants for hot research and to develop targeted medicine. Recurrence of islet autoimmunity lesson from pancreatic islet cell transplantation to cure T1D was outlined. With these highlights, the review summarizes the current knowledge on diabetes occurrence, factors (environmental and genetics), and types (I, II, gestation, and secondary DM), antidiabetic plants, sources for insulin mimetic plant principle compounds and their target mechanism with current and future trusted research areas for controlling of DM.

  10. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Age-related changes in cardiovascular system, autonomic functions, and levels of BDNF of healthy active males: role of yogic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rameswar; Singh, Som Nath; Chatterjee, Abhirup; Saha, Mantu

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with decline in cardiovascular, autonomic function, and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). Reports are scanty regarding whether yoga can improve age-related degenerative changes in healthy active men. This study is designed to appraise the role of yoga in improving age-related degenerative changes in cardiometabolic risk profile, autonomic function, stress, and BDNF. Healthy active males of three age groups (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) were randomly assigned to practice yoga daily 1 h for 3 months. Significantly higher values of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), load in heart (DoP), myocardial oxygen consumption (RPP), and total cholesterol (TC) were noted in senior age group. HR, BP, DoP, RPP, and TC decreased significantly following yogic practice. High frequency (HF), total power (TP), all time domain variables of heart rate variability (HRV), and skin conductance (SC) were significantly decreased with advancement of age. HF, TP, and time domain parameters of HRV and SC increased significantly following yogic practice. Higher levels of catecholamines and low frequency (LF) power of HRV was noted with advancement of age. Levels of catecholamines and LF significantly decreased following yogic practice. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level raised in senior age group. BDNF, serotonin, and dopamine were low in higher age group. Significant decrement of cortisol; ACTH; and increment in serotonin, dopamine, and BDNF was noted following yogic practice. This study revealed that yogic practices might help in the prevention of age-related degeneration by changing cardiometabolic risk factors, autonomic function, and BDNF in healthy male.

  12. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Selective activity against proliferating tumor endothelial cells by CVX-22, a thrombospondin-1 mimetic CovX-Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronella, Julia; Li, Lingna; Johnson, Kimberly; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Roxas, Giovanni; Levin, Nancy

    2009-06-01

    CVX-22 is a CovX-Body, produced by covalently attaching a thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) type 1 repeat peptide mimetic to a humanized IgG1 molecule. To dissect the antiangiogenic mechanism of CVX-22, the numbers and proliferative status of defined tumor endothelial cell (TEC) subsets from the B16 and C32 melanoma models were examined. CVX-22 treatment reduced the numbers of activated, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive TECs. Because the vast majority of mitotically active TECs reside in the VEGFR2 subset, a reduction in numbers of this compartment resulted in an 82% overall decrease in BrdU labeling of TEC. However, the rate of proliferation and VEGFR2 receptor density of this VEGFR2-positive subpopulation were unaffected. Instead, CVX-22 induced endothelial cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that CVX-22 acts by selective deletion of activated, VEGFR2-positive TEC. The overrepresentation of activated cells in sites of tumor angiogenesis may confer a unique specificity of CVX-22 for tumor vasculature.

  14. Higher derivative mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic gravity in the presence of classified higher derivative terms which can make the mimetic perturbations stable. We show that the quadratic higher derivative terms which are independent of curvature and the cubic higher derivative terms which come from curvature corrections are sufficient to remove instabilities in mimetic perturbations. The classified higher derivative terms have the same dimensions but they contribute differently in the background and perturbed equations. Therefore, we can control both the background and the perturbation equations allowing us to construct the higher derivative extension of mimetic dark matter and the mimetic nonsingular bouncing scenarios. The latter can be thought as a new higher derivative effective action for the loop quantum cosmology scenario in which the equations of motion coincide with those suggested by loop quantum cosmology. We investigate a possible connection between the mimetic cosmology and the Randall-Sundrum cosmology.

  15. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai; (CH-Boston); (DFCI)

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  16. Propofol alleviates electroconvulsive shock-induced memory impairment by modulating proBDNF/mBDNF ratio in depressive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Ren, Li; Qin, Peipei

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of propofol and electroconvulsive shock (ECS), the analogue of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in animals, on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) as well as the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF)/mature BDNF (mBDNF) ratio in depressive rats. ECT is an effective treatment for depression, but can cause cognitive deficit. Some studies have indicated that propofol can ameliorate cognitive decline induced by ECT, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. Recent evidence has found that mBDNF and its precursor proBDNF are related to depression and cognitive function; they elicit opposite effects on cellular functions. Chronic unpredicted mild stress is widely used to induce depressive behaviors in rodents. This study found that the depression resulted in an increased expression of PAI-1 and upregulation of the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, together with a decreased level of tPA, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment, and cognitive decline. The proBDNF/mBDNF ratio was further upregulated after the ECS treatment in depressive rats, resulting in the deterioration of cognitive function and hippocampal LTP. Propofol alone did not reverse the changes in depressive rats, but when co-administered with ECS, it improved the cognitive function, alleviated the impairment of LTP, downregulated the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, and increased the tPA expression. The results of this study suggest that propofol ameliorates cognitive decline induced by ECT, which was partly by modulating the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio and reversing the excessive changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, providing a new evidence for involving the proBDNF/mBDNF system in the progression and treatment of depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. BDNF, produced by a TPO-stimulated megakaryocytic cell line, regulates autocrine proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Shogo [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Nagasawa, Ayumi; Masuda, Yuya; Tsunematsu, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Hayasaka, Koji; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Chikara [Division of Laboratory and Transfusion Medicine, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ozaki, Yukio [Department of Clinical and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi (Japan); Moriyama, Takanori, E-mail: moriyama@hs.hokuda.ac.jp [Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It has been thought that BDNF is not produced in the megakaryocytic lineage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEG-01 produces BDNF upon TPO stimulation and regulates its proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF accelerates proliferation of MEG-01 in an autocrine manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF may be an autocrine MEG-CSF, which regulates megakaryopoiesis. -- Abstract: While human platelets release endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) upon activation, a previous report on MEG-01, a megakaryocytic cell line, found no trace of BDNF production, and the pathophysiological function of platelet BDNF has remained elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that MEG-01 produces BDNF in the presence of TPO and that this serves to potentiate cell proliferation. Our in vitro findings suggest that BDNF regulates MEG-01 proliferation in an autocrine manner, and we suggest that BDNF may be a physiological autocrine regulator of megakaryocyte progenitors.

  18. Syntheses of vanadyl and zinc(II) complexes of 1-hydroxy-4,5,6-substituted 2(1H)-pyrimidinones and their insulin-mimetic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Mika; Wakasugi, Kei; Saito, Ryota; Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu; Katoh, Akira

    2006-02-01

    Control of the glucose level in the blood plasma has been achieved in vitro and in vivo by administration of vanadium and zinc in form of inorganic salts. It has been shown that elements are poorly absorbed in their inorganic forms and required high doses which have been associated with undesirable side effects. Many researchers, therefore, have focused on metal complexes that were prepared from VOSO(4) or ZnSO(4) and low-molecular-weight bidentate ligands. Seven kinds of 1-hydroxy-4,6-disubstituted and 1-hydroxy-4,5,6-trisubstituted-2(1H)-pyrimidinones were synthesized by reaction of N-benzyloxyurea and beta-diketones and subsequent removal of the protecting group. Six kinds of 1-hydroxy-4-(substituted)amino-2(1H)-pyrimidinones were synthesized by the substitution reaction of 1-benzyloxy-4-(1',2',4'-triazol-1'-yl)-2(1H)-pyrimidinone with various alkyl amines or amino acids. Treatment with VOSO(4) and ZnSO(4) or Zn(OAc)(2) afforded vanadyl(IV) and zinc(II) complexes which were characterized by means of (1)H NMR, IR, EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopies, and combustion analysis. The in vitro insulin-mimetic activity of these complexes was evaluated from 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) on free fatty acid (FFA) release from isolated rat adipocytes treated with epinephrine. Vanadyl complexes of 4,6-disubstituted-2(1H)-pyrimidinones showed higher insulin-mimetic activities than those of 4,5,6-trisubstituted ones. On the other hand, Zn(II) complexes showed lower insulin-mimetic activities than VOSO(4) and ZnSO(4) as positive controls. It was found that the balance of the hydrophilicity and/or hydrophobicity is important for higher insulin-mimetic activity. The in vivo insulin-mimetic activity was evaluated with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were lowered from hyperglycemic to normal levels after the treatment with bis(1,2-dihydro-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-1-pyrimidinolato)oxovanadium(IV) by daily intraperitoneal injections. The improvement in

  19. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of phosphonic arginine mimetics as inhibitors of the M1 and M17 aminopeptidases from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan Sivaraman, Komagal; Paiardini, Alessandro; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Ruggeri, Chiara; Oellig, Christine A; Dalton, John P; Scammells, Peter J; Drag, Marcin; McGowan, Sheena

    2013-06-27

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum employs two metallo-aminopeptidases, PfA-M1 and PfA-M17, which are essential for parasite survival. Compounds that inhibit the activity of either enzyme represent leads for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Here we report the synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a small library of phosphonic acid arginine mimetics that probe the S1 pocket of both enzymes and map the necessary interactions that would be important for a dual inhibitor.

  20. The radiosensitizing activity of the SMAC-mimetic, Debio 1143, is TNFα-mediated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzinger, Oscar; Viertl, David; Tsoutsou, Pelagia; Kadi, Linda; Rigotti, Stefania; Zanna, Claudio; Wiedemann, Norbert; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Bourhis, Jean

    2015-09-01

    Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC)-mimetics are a new class of targeted drugs that specifically induce apoptotic cancer cell death and block pro-survival signaling by antagonizing selected members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family. The present study was designed to investigate the radiosensitizing effect and optimal sequence of administration of the novel SMAC-mimetic Debio 1143 in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis, alteration of DNA damage repair (DDR), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling were examined. In vitro, Debio 1143 displayed anti-proliferative activity and enhanced intrinsic radiation sensitivity in 5/6 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in a synergistic manner. In vivo, Debio 1143 dose-dependently radio-sensitized FaDu and SQ20B xenografts, resulting in complete tumor regression in 8/10 FaDu-xenografted mice at the high dose level. At the molecular level, Debio 1143 combined with radiotherapy (RT) induced enhancement of caspase-3 activity, increase in Annexin V-positive cells and karyopyknosis, and increase in TNF-α mRNA levels. Finally, in a neutralization experiment using a TNF-α-blocking antibody and a caspase inhibitor, it was shown that the radiosensitizing effect of Debio 1143 is mediated by caspases and TNF-α. These results demonstrate that the novel SMAC-mimetic Debio 1143 is a radiosensitizing agent that is worthy of further investigation in clinical trials in combination with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [The effect of central administration of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and GDNF on the functional activity and expression of the serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in mice genetically predisposed to depressive-like behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybko, A S; Il'chibaeva, T V; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Naumenko, V S

    2014-01-01

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) system plays an important role in the control of normal and pathological behavior. 5-HT2A receptors are widely implicated in the regulation both normal functions and psychopathologies, especially schizophrenia and depression. Here, we investigated implication of 5-HT2A receptor in mechanisms of neurotrophic factors BDNF and GDNF action. We found that the acute intracerebroventricular injection of BDNF produced considerable increase in 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in ASC mice. Moreover, BDNF injection led to the increasing of 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus and its decrease in the frontal cortex without any effects in the midbrain. On the contrary, GDNF injection failed to alter 5-HT2A receptor functional activity, but increased the 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the frontal cortex without any effects in the hippocampus and midbrain. Thus, an effect of the central administration of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and GDNF on the 5-HT2A receptor functional activity and gene expression was shown. The results indicate the implication of 5-HT2A receptor in the mechanisms of BDNF and GDNF action.

  2. Contribution of the spinal cord BDNF to the development of neuropathic pain by activation of the NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in rats with spinal nerve ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shan-Jing; Liao, Fei-Fei; Dang, Wen-Hao; Ding, Xu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Cai, Jie; Han, Ji-Sheng; Wan, You; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The NMDA receptor and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are involved in central sensitization and synaptic plasticity in the spinal cord. To determine whether the spinal cord BDNF contributes to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain by activation of the dorsal horn NR2B-containing NMDA (NMDA-2B) receptors, this study was designed to investigate if alterations in BDNF and its TrkB receptor in the spinal dorsal horn would parallel the timeline of the development of neuropathic pain in lumbar 5 (L5) spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that the BDNF concentration significantly increased during 24 h post-surgery, and the maximal enhancement lasted for 48 h. It declined as time progressed and returned to the level of pre-operation at 28 days after SNL. In parallel with the alteration of BDNF concentration in the spinal dorsal horn, the 50% paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) of the ipsilateral hind paw in SNL rats also showed a significant decrease during 24-48 h after SNL as compared with those in sham-operated rats. The correlation analysis revealed that the BDNF concentration had a negative correlation with 50% PWT in early stage (0-48 h) (r=-0.974, p=0.001), but not late stage (3-28 days) (r=0.3395, p=0.6605), after SNL. Similarly, the immunohistochemical staining revealed that a significant up-regulation of BDNF expression in the spinal dorsal horn appeared as early as 12 h post-operation in SNL rats, peaked at 24-48 h, declined at 3 days and disappeared at 14 days after SNL. In contrast, an increase in NMDA-2B receptors expression in the spinal dorsal horn was delayed to 48 h after SNL. The increase reached peak at 3 days, lasted for 14 days, and returned to the control level of pre-operation at 28 days after SNL. The maximal enhancement of BDNF expression occurred in early stage (24-48 h) after nerve injury, while the peak of NMDA-2B receptors expression appeared in late stage (3-14 days) post

  3. BDNF mediated activity dependent maturation of visual Wulst following prenatal repetitive auditory stimulation at a critical developmental period in domestic chicks (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Saborni; Sharma, Hanuman Prasad; Nag, Tapas C; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Mathur, Rashmi; Jain, Suman

    2014-10-01

    The developing visual circuitry attains its mature adult pattern through the process of activity-dependent refinement in which photic stimulation plays the major role. However, auditory stimulation can also facilitate the developing visual Wulst synaptic plasticity and postnatal perceptual behavior, though the underlying mechanism is unclear. We exposed the fertilized eggs of white Leghorn chickens during incubation to either species-specific calls or no sound for varying time periods depending on the functional development of the auditory and/or visual systems. The visual evoked potential (VEP) from the Wulst was recorded at embryonic days (E) 19, 20 and posthatch days (PH) 1-3, to assess functional maturation. A significant attenuation in latencies and higher amplitudes at PH1-3 in the stimulated groups that received exposure during visual system maturation, suggest beneficial effect of auditory inputs only during critical periods. Concomitant with this, there was a significant increase in the expression of BDNF and levels of neurotransmitters GABA, glutamate, norepinephrine and serotonin from E18 only in both hemispheres of the visual Wulst. A significant inter-hemispheric difference in expression was also found in all groups. These results suggest the role of BDNF in activity driven structural and functional maturation of the visual system following prenatal repetitive auditory stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  5. Relationship Between Brain-Derived Neurotrofic Factor (Bdnf) and Sleep on Depression: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Bárbara C.; Monteiro, Suzana; Candida, Maristela; Adler, Nathalia; Paes, Flavia; Rocha, Nuno; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Machado, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The Brain-Derived Neurotrofic Factor (BDNF) is one of the most important neurotrophins in the brain and it is suggested influences the activity of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic pathways. In the last few years, it has been hypothesized that BDNF level is related with depression and sleep. Several studies show that depressive subjects present low levels of BDNF in the brain. Poor sleep quality is also related with alterations in the BDNF concentration. Some authors argue that...

  6. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  7. Ativador do Plasminogênio Tecidual (tPA/ Fator Neurotrófico Derivado do Cérebro (BDNF e a Consolidação da Memória/ Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA/ Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and the Consolidation of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Souza de Faria

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available O Fator Neurotrófico Derivado do Cérebro (BDNF participa de processos de plasticidade sináptica subjacentes à aprendizagem e memória. Esta proteína possui diversas isoformas, sendo a isoforma BDNF-maduro envolvida nas mudanças neuronais da memória. Além disso, foi demonstrado que a consolidação da memória aversiva depende do Ativador do Plasminogênio Tecidual (tPA, enzima que estabelece a formação do BDND-maduro na fenda sináptica garantindo os processos neuroplásticos da aprendizagem. Para esta revisão de literatura, foram selecionados 37 trabalhos, dentre eles 36 artigos científicos e 1 livro. A consolidação da memória requer a ativação gênica para síntese de novas proteínas, sendo a tPA e o BDNF algumas das principais moléculas neuronais expressas no hipocampo, amigdala, córtex frontal em diferentes momentos após o início da aprendizagem, ativando uma série de eventos moleculares que levam ao aumento da expressão de outras proteínas, garantindo assim a regulação fina da plasticidade neuronal necessária para a memória. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF participates in synaptic plasticity processes underlying learning and memory. This protein has several isoforms, mature-BDNF one isoform involved in neuronal memory changes. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the consolidation of aversive memory depends on the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, an enzyme that establishes the formation of the mature BDND-synaptic cleft, guaranteeing neuroplastic learning processes. For this literature review, we selected 37 works, including 36 scientific articles and one book. The consolidation of memory for gene activation requires new protein synthesis, tPA and BDNF and some of the major neuronal molecules expressed in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex at different times after the start of learning, activating a series of molecular events leading the increased expression of other proteins, thereby

  8. Real-time examination of aminoglycoside activity towards bacterial mimetic membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Voo, Zhi Xiang; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone; Martin, Lisandra L

    2015-02-01

    The rapid increase in multi-drug resistant bacteria has resulted in previously discontinued treatments being revisited. Aminoglycosides are effective "old" antibacterial agents that fall within this category. Despite extensive usage and understanding of their intracellular targets, there is limited mechanistic knowledge regarding how aminoglycosides penetrate bacterial membranes. Thus, the activity of two well-known aminoglycosides, kanamycin A and neomycin B, towards a bacterial mimetic membrane (DMPC:DMPG (4:1)) was examined using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The macroscopic effect of increasing the aminoglycoside concentration showed that kanamycin A exerts a threshold response, switching from binding to the membrane to disruption of the surface. Neomycin B, however, disrupted the membrane at all concentrations examined. At concentrations above the threshold value observed for kanamycin A, both aminoglycosides revealed similar mechanistic details. That is, they both inserted into the bacterial mimetic lipid bilayer, prior to disruption via loss of materials, presumably aminoglycoside-membrane composites. Depth profile analysis of this membrane interaction was achieved using the overtones of the quartz crystal sensor. The measured data is consistent with a two-stage process in which insertion of the aminoglycoside precedes the 'detergent-like' removal of membranes from the sensor. The results of this study contribute to the insight required for aminoglycosides to be reconsidered as active antimicrobial agents/co-agents by providing details of activity at the bacterial membrane. Kanamycin and neomycin still offer potential as antimicrobial therapeutics for the future and the QCM-D method illustrates great promise for screening new antibacterial or antiviral drug candidates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship Between Brain-Derived Neurotrofic Factor (Bdnf) and Sleep on Depression: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Bárbara C.; Monteiro, Suzana; Candida, Maristela; Adler, Nathalia; Paes, Flavia; Rocha, Nuno; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Machado, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The Brain-Derived Neurotrofic Factor (BDNF) is one of the most important neurotrophins in the brain and it is suggested influences the activity of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic pathways. In the last few years, it has been hypothesized that BDNF level is related with depression and sleep. Several studies show that depressive subjects present low levels of BDNF in the brain. Poor sleep quality is also related with alterations in the BDNF concentration. Some authors argue that most of the cases show that impaired sleep quality increases the stress and, consequently, the vulnerability to depressive disorders, suggesting that there is a relationship between sleep, depression and BDNF levels. PMID:29299044

  10. Helix mimetics: Recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J

    2015-10-01

    The development of protein-protein interaction (PPIs) inhibitors represents a challenging goal in chemical biology and drug discovery. PPIs are problematic targets because they involve large surfaces with less well defined features and recognition motifs that are less amenable to conventional experimental and computational ligand discovery methodologies. α-Helix mediated PPIs represent a sub group with a clearly defined interface and thus may be more amenable to the development of generic ligand discovery methods. Indeed, this is borne out in numerous studies using peptides covalently constrained into a helical conformation resulting in improvement of myriad biophysical and cellular properties. It is however desirable to have small molecule alternatives: a helix mimetic (proteomimetic) is a generic small molecule scaffold that projects functional groups in a similar spatial orientation so as to mimic the presentation of key amino acid side chains from the helix that mediates the PPI. The first true example of a helix mimetic was described over a decade ago however this approach has not yet been elaborated to the extent that it receives similar levels of attention to constrained peptides. This review explores recent significant developments in the area of small molecule α-helix mimetics and provides a critical overview of success stories, potential limitations of the approach, and areas for future development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BDNF: An Oncogene or Tumor Suppressor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Daniel P; Patel, Parth

    2017-08-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of growth factors that are vital to the proper development of the central nervous system. Their effects on cells are governed by the expression and activation of the tyrosine kinase receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. TrkB has been immensely implicated in mediating neuronal migration, development and differentiation. It has also been shown to protect several neuronal cell types from an array of cytotoxic stressors after activation by its conjugate ligand brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Over the past two decades, it has been shown that TrkB and BDNF are up-regulated in many types of cancers, conferring aggressive phenotypes underpinned by their resistance to several standard chemotherapeutic agents. This resistance to chemotherapy is modulated by the downstream targets of the TrkB receptor which include the well-characterized PI3K /Akt growth pathway, a hallmark of uncontrolled cancer cell growth and proliferation. Pre-clinical efforts to develop inhibitors of this receptor are promising, and such inhibitors also seem to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapies. However, new evidence suggests that BDNF overexpression in the hypothalamus has immunoaugmenting properties, eliciting an increased anti-tumor immune response and reducing the activity of several proteins that would normally confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. In the current work, we provide a global analysis of the physiological consequences of TrkB receptor activation in vitro and discuss the dynamic consequences of TrkB activation in vivo. Finally, we propose a clinically-feasible option for increasing BDNF expression in the hypothalamus to more readily utilize the oncolytic effects of BDNF. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Distinct roles of prelimbic and infralimbic proBDNF in extinction of conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaoliang; An, Lei

    2018-03-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been investigated for its positive role in regulation of fear acquisition and memory. The precursor of BDNF, proBDNF, has been identified as different protein from its mature form. The prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) sub-regions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are functionally distinct in fear behavior. However, the role of PL and IL proBDNF in fear memory is unclear. Here, through the infusion of cleavage-resistant proBDNF and its antibody, we identified the dissociable roles of PL and IL proBDNF in fear expression and extinction memory as well as explored proBDNF's potential mechanism of action. The results suggest that the infusion of proBDNF in the IL facilitates induction of fear extinction, while infusion in the PL depresses fear expression. Blocking proBDNF by using its antibody disrupted the acquisition of fear extinction in the IL, but not the PL. Furthermore, proBDNF-induced extinction was sufficient for extinguishing new and older memories, and required NR2B, but not NR2A, -containing NMDA receptors. We also observed extinction-related proBDNF expression increased in the PL and IL during successful fear expression and extinction, respectively. Importantly, enhanced proBDNF was required for maintaining an extinguished behavior. The extinction effects of proBDNF did not involve degrading the original fear memory. Therefore, proBDNF in the IL and PL differentially contribute to the inhibitory control of fear extinction behavior. Our findings provide a strong link between proBDNF activity and deficits in fear extinction, a hallmark of several psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wood mimetic hydrogel beads for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Saerom; Kim, Sung Hee; Won, Keehoon; Choi, Joon Weon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-22

    Wood component-based composite hydrogels have potential applications in biomedical fields owing to their low cost, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. The controllable properties of wood mimetic composites containing three major wood components are useful for enzyme immobilization. Here, lipase from Candida rugosa was entrapped in wood mimetic beads containing cellulose, xylan, and lignin by dissolving wood components with lipase in [Emim][Ac], followed by reconstitution. Lipase entrapped in cellulose/xylan/lignin beads in a 5:3:2 ratio showed the highest activity; this ratio is very similar to that in natural wood. The lipase entrapped in various wood mimetic beads showed increased thermal and pH stability. The half-life times of lipase entrapped in cellulose/alkali lignin hydrogel were 31- and 82-times higher than those of free lipase during incubation under denaturing conditions of high temperature and low pH, respectively. Owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and controllable properties, wood mimetic hydrogel beads can be used to immobilize various enzymes for applications in the biomedical, bioelectronic, and biocatalytic fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pastoral conflict in Kenya: Transforming mimetic violence to mimetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transcending the relationship from mimetic violence to mimetic peace and reconciliation. Ultimately, by empowering local pastoral communities in the. * Ryan Triche is an African regional specialist focusing on governance, conflict mediation, human rights, and the responsibility to protect. He is currently undertaking graduate.

  15. The BDNF val-66-met Polymorphism Affects Neuronal Morphology and Synaptic Transmission in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from Rett Syndrome Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf has been implicated in several neurological disorders including Rett syndrome (RTT, an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. The human BDNF gene has a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP—a methionine (met substitution for valine (val at codon 66—that affects BDNF’s trafficking and activity-dependent release and results in cognitive dysfunction. Humans that are carriers of the met-BDNF allele have subclinical memory deficits and reduced hippocampal volume and activation. It is still unclear whether this BDNF SNP affects the clinical outcome of RTT individuals. To evaluate whether this BDNF SNP contributes to RTT pathophysiology, we examined the consequences of expression of either val-BDNF or met-BDNF on dendrite and dendritic spine morphology, and synaptic function in cultured hippocampal neurons from wildtype (WT and Mecp2 knockout (KO mice. Our findings revealed that met-BDNF does not increase dendritic growth and branching, dendritic spine density and individual spine volume, and the number of excitatory synapses in WT neurons, as val-BDNF does. Furthermore, met-BDNF reduces dendritic complexity, dendritic spine volume and quantal excitatory synaptic transmission in Mecp2 KO neurons. These results suggest that the val-BDNF variant contributes to RTT pathophysiology, and that BDNF-based therapies should take into consideration the BDNF genotype of the RTT individuals.

  16. BDNF-induced local protein synthesis and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Graciano; Comprido, Diogo; Duarte, Carlos B

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important regulator of synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus and in other brain regions, playing a role in the formation of certain forms of memory. The effects of BDNF in LTP are mediated by TrkB (tropomyosin-related kinase B) receptors, which are known to be coupled to the activation of the Ras/ERK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathways. The role of BDNF in LTP is best studied in the hippocampus, where the neurotrophin acts at pre- and post-synaptic levels. Recent studies have shown that BDNF regulates the transport of mRNAs along dendrites and their translation at the synapse, by modulating the initiation and elongation phases of protein synthesis, and by acting on specific miRNAs. Furthermore, the effect of BDNF on transcription regulation may further contribute to long-term changes in the synaptic proteome. In this review we discuss the recent progress in understanding the mechanisms contributing to the short- and long-term regulation of the synaptic proteome by BDNF, and the role in synaptic plasticity, which is likely to influence learning and memory formation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. BDNF in Lower Brain Parts Modifies Auditory Fiber Activity to Gain Fidelity but Increases the Risk for Generation of Central Noise After Injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chumak, Tetyana; Rüttiger, L.; Lee, S.Ch.; Campanelli, D.; Zuccotti, A.; Singer, W.; Popelář, Jiří; Gutsche, K.; Geisler, H.S.; Schraven, S.P.; Jaumann, M.; Panford-Walsh, R.; Hu, J.; Schimmang, T.; Zimmermann, U.; Syka, Josef; Knipper, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 8 (2016), s. 5607-5627 ISSN 0893-7648 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : BDNF * central hyperactivity * high-spontaneous rate Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 6.190, year: 2016

  18. Anti-tumor activity of a novel HS-mimetic-vascular endothelial growth factor binding small molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Sugahara

    Full Text Available The angiogenic process is controlled by variety of factors of which the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway plays a major role. A series of heparan sulfate mimetic small molecules targeting VEGF/VEGFR pathway has been synthesized. Among them, compound 8 (2-butyl-5-chloro-3-(4-nitro-benzyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde was identified as a significant binding molecule for the heparin-binding domain of VEGF, determined by high-throughput-surface plasmon resonance assay. The data predicted strong binding of compound 8 with VEGF which may prevent the binding of VEGF to its receptor. We compared the structure of compound 8 with heparan sulfate (HS, which have in common the functional ionic groups such as sulfate, nitro and carbaldehyde that can be located in similar positions of the disaccharide structure of HS. Molecular docking studies predicted that compound 8 binds at the heparin binding domain of VEGF through strong hydrogen bonding with Lys-30 and Gln-20 amino acid residues, and consistent with the prediction, compound 8 inhibited binding of VEGF to immobilized heparin. In vitro studies showed that compound 8 inhibits the VEGF-induced proliferation migration and tube formation of mouse vascular endothelial cells, and finally the invasion of a murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8G7 which secrets high levels of VEGF. In vivo, these effects produce significant decrease of tumor burden in an experimental model of liver metastasis. Collectively, these data indicate that compound 8 may prevent tumor growth through a direct effect on tumor cell proliferation and by inhibition of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis mediated by VEGF. In conclusion, compound 8 may normalize the tumor vasculature and microenvironment in tumors probably by inhibiting the binding of VEGF to its receptor.

  19. Activity-dependent alterations in the sensitivity to BDNF-TrkB signaling may promote excessive dendritic arborization and spinogenesis in fragile X syndrome in order to compensate for compromised postsynaptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woo; Cho, Kyoung Joo

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of inherited human mental retardation, results from the loss of function of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). To date, most researchers have thought that FXS neural pathologies are primarily caused by extreme dendritic branching and spine formation. With this rationale, several researchers attempted to prune dendritic branches and reduce the number of spines in FXS animal models. We propose that increased dendritic arborization and spinogenesis in FXS are developed rather as secondary compensatory responses to counteract the compromised postsynaptic activity during uncontrollable metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD). When postsynaptic and electrical activities become dampened in FXS, dendritic trees can increase their sensitivity to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by using the molecular sensor called eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and taking advantage of the tight coupling of mGluR and BDNF-TrkB signaling pathways. Then, this activity-dependent elevation of the BDNF signaling can strategically alter dendritic morphologies to foster branching and develop spine structures in order to improve the postsynaptic response in FXS. Our model suggests a new therapeutic rationale for FXS: correcting the postsynaptic and electrical activity first, and then repairing structural abnormalities of dendrites. Then, it may be possible to successfully fix the dendritic morphologies without affecting the survival of neurons. Our theory may also be generalized to explain aberrant dendritic structures observed in other neurobehavioral diseases, such as tuberous sclerosis, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, and channelopathies, which accompany high postsynaptic and electrical activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Promises and Challenges of Smac Mimetics as Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-11-15

    Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins block programmed cell death and are expressed at high levels in various human cancers, thus making them attractive targets for cancer drug development. Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetics are small-molecule inhibitors that mimic Smac, an endogenous antagonist of IAP proteins. Preclinical studies have shown that Smac mimetics can directly trigger cancer cell death or, even more importantly, sensitize tumor cells for various cytotoxic therapies, including conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or novel agents. Currently, several Smac mimetics are under evaluation in early clinical trials as monotherapy or in rational combinations (i.e., GDC-0917/CUDC-427, LCL161, AT-406/Debio1143, HGS1029, and TL32711/birinapant). This review discusses the promise as well as some challenges at the translational interface of exploiting Smac mimetics as cancer therapeutics. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Smac mimetics as IAP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-03-01

    As the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in human cancers, they represent promising targets for therapeutic intervention. Small-molecule inhibitors of IAP proteins mimicking the endogenous IAP antagonist Smac, called Smac mimetics, neutralize IAP proteins and thereby promote the induction of cell death. Smac mimetics have been shown in preclinical models of human cancer to directly trigger cancer cell death or to sensitize for cancer cell death induced by a variety of cytotoxic stimuli. Smac mimetics are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in phase I/II trials, demonstrating that therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins has reached the clinical stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Polacchini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5′UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3′UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3′UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  3. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  4. IAP Proteins Antagonist: An Introduction and Chemistry of Smac Mimetics under Clinical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rafat; Singh, Shalini; Haq, Wahajul

    2018-03-12

    Smac mimetics (also known as IAP antagonist) are a new class of targeted drugs having a goal to suppress the IAPs, reestablishing the apoptotic pathways and inducing cancer cell death. Therefore, development of Smac mimetics was consideredan attractive strategy for the development of new anticancer drugs. Lots of review has been come in yesteryears which mainly discussed about biology of IAPs and their role in cancer development. But none of these reviews focused on the chemical synthesis of Smac mimetics. Literature study was done by using standard bibliographic search engines like scifinder, pubmed etc. The characteristic features of screened articles were described in the review. The review gives an introduction of IAP proteins and Smac mimetics. Readers will gain an overview of the development of Smac mimetics with representative examples of both monovalent and bivalent Smac mimetics as anticancer agents and an understanding of their structure activity relationships. Chemical synthesis of biologically important Smac mimetics was discussed briefly in this review. Small molecules that mimic Smac are continuously progressing towards clinical development. Smac mimetics are generally well tolerated and have demonstrated rapid suppression of their target (the IAPs), activation of apoptosis and anti-tumor activity. Continuous research has been done to generate even more insight into the function of IAP proteins to significantly enhance the therapeutical potential of Smac mimetics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Central BDNF Administration in Mice of Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy (ASC) Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Maria; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2012-08-31

    Although numerous data evidence the implication of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression, the potential for BDNF to correct genetically defined depressive-like states is poorly studied. This study was aimed to reveal antidepressant-like effects of BDNF (300 ng, 2×, i.c.v.) on behavior and mRNA expression of genes associated with depression-like state in the brain in mice of antidepressant sensitive catalepsy (ASC) strain characterized by high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy and depressive-like features. Behavioral tests were held on the 7th-16th days after the first (4th-13th after the second) BDNF injection. Results showed that BDNF normalized impaired sexual motivation in the ASC males, and this BDNF effect differed, with advantageous effects, from that of widely used antidepressants. The anticataleptic effect of two BDNF injections was enhanced compared with a single administration. A tendency to decrease the immobility duration in tail-suspension test was observed in BDNF-treated ASC mice. The effects on catalepsy and sexual motivation were specific since BDNF did not alter locomotor and exploratory activity or social interest in the ASC mice. Along with behavioral antidepressant-like effects on the ASC mice, BDNF increased hippocampal mRNA levels of Bdnf and Creb1 (cAMP response element-binding protein gene). BDNF also augmented mRNA levels of Arc gene encoding Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated) protein involved in BDNF-induced processes of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that: [1] BDNF is effective in the treatment of some genetically defined behavioral disturbances; [2] BDNF influences sexually-motivated behavior; [3] Arc mRNA levels may serve as a molecular marker of BDNF physiological activity associated with its long-lasting behavioral effects; [4] ASC mouse strain can be used as a suitable model to study mechanisms of BDNF effects on

  6. Blood BDNF concentrations reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Williamson, Rebecca; Santini, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in synaptic plasticity, neuronal differentiation and survival of neurons. Observations of decreased serum BDNF levels in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders have highlighted the potential of BDNF as a biomarker, but so far there have been ...... positive correlation between frontal cortex and hippocampal BDNF levels in mice (r2=0.81, p=0.0139). Our data support the view that measures of blood and plasma BDNF levels reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels....

  7. Working memory deficits, increased anxiety-like traits, and seizure susceptibility in BDNF overexpressing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Francesco; Silverman, Jill L.; Aney, Jordan; Tian, Qingjun; Barkan, Charlotte L.; Chadman, Kathryn K.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    BDNF regulates components of cognitive processes and has been implicated in psychiatric disorders. Here we report that genetic overexpression of the BDNF mature isoform (BDNF-tg) in female mice impaired working memory functions while sparing components of fear conditioning. BDNF-tg mice also displayed reduced breeding efficiency, higher anxiety-like scores, high self-grooming, impaired prepulse inhibition, and higher susceptibility to seizures when placed in a new empty cage, as compared with wild-type (WT) littermate controls. Control measures of general health, locomotor activity, motor coordination, depression-related behaviors, and sociability did not differ between genotypes. The present findings, indicating detrimental effects of life-long increased BDNF in mice, may inform human studies evaluating the role of BDNF functional genetic variations on cognitive abilities and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. PMID:21791566

  8. Enriched environment prevents hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration: role of BDNF/PI3K/GSK3β pathway coupled with CREB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Jain

    Full Text Available Adverse environmental conditions such as hypobaric hypoxia (HH cause memory impairment by affecting cellular machinery leading to neurodegeneration. Providing enriched environment (EE is found to be beneficial for curing several neurodegenerative disorders. The protective role of EE in preventing HH induced neuronal death has been reported previously but the involved mechanism is still not clearly understood. The present study is an attempt to verify the impact of EE on spatial memory during HH and also to explore the possible role of neurotrophin in EE mediated neuroprotection. Signaling mechanism involved in neuroprotection was also explored. Male Sprague Dawley rats were simulated to HH condition in an Animal Decompression Chamber at an altitude of 25000 feet in standard and enriched cages for 7 days. Spatial memory was assessed through Morris Water Maze. Role of different neurotrophins was explored by gene silencing and inhibitors for their respective receptors. Further, using different blockers signaling pathway was also explored. Finding of the present study suggested that EE prevents HH mediated memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Also brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a major role in EE mediated neuroprotection and it effectively prevented neurodegeneration by activating PI3K/AKT pathway resulting in GSK3β inactivation which further inhibits apoptosis. Moreover GSK3β phosphorylation and hence its inactivation upregulates CREB phosphorylation which may also accounts for activation of survival machinery in cells and provides neuroprotection. From these observations it can be postulated that EE has a therapeutic potential in amelioration of HH induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Hence it may be used as a non invasive and non pharmacological intervention against various neurological disorders.

  9. Enriched environment prevents hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration: role of BDNF/PI3K/GSK3β pathway coupled with CREB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2013-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions such as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) cause memory impairment by affecting cellular machinery leading to neurodegeneration. Providing enriched environment (EE) is found to be beneficial for curing several neurodegenerative disorders. The protective role of EE in preventing HH induced neuronal death has been reported previously but the involved mechanism is still not clearly understood. The present study is an attempt to verify the impact of EE on spatial memory during HH and also to explore the possible role of neurotrophin in EE mediated neuroprotection. Signaling mechanism involved in neuroprotection was also explored. Male Sprague Dawley rats were simulated to HH condition in an Animal Decompression Chamber at an altitude of 25000 feet in standard and enriched cages for 7 days. Spatial memory was assessed through Morris Water Maze. Role of different neurotrophins was explored by gene silencing and inhibitors for their respective receptors. Further, using different blockers signaling pathway was also explored. Finding of the present study suggested that EE prevents HH mediated memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Also brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a major role in EE mediated neuroprotection and it effectively prevented neurodegeneration by activating PI3K/AKT pathway resulting in GSK3β inactivation which further inhibits apoptosis. Moreover GSK3β phosphorylation and hence its inactivation upregulates CREB phosphorylation which may also accounts for activation of survival machinery in cells and provides neuroprotection. From these observations it can be postulated that EE has a therapeutic potential in amelioration of HH induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Hence it may be used as a non invasive and non pharmacological intervention against various neurological disorders.

  10. Proapoptotic Activity of a Monomeric Smac Mimetic on Human Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lattuada, D.; Casnici, C.; Crotta, K.; Seneci, P.F.; Corradini, C.; Truzzi, M.; Ingegnoli, F.; Marelli, O.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) block cell death in response to diverse stimuli. The mitochondrial protein, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac), negatively regulates IAP inhibition of caspase activity. We investigated the proapoptotic activity of a synthetic Smac (Smac 066) on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) derived from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We found that Smac 066 induced significant apoptosis in all RA-FLS samples. Furthermor...

  11. Caloric Restriction Mimetic 2-Deoxyglucose Alleviated Inflammatory Lung Injury via Suppressing Nuclear Pyruvate Kinase M2–Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an energy-intensive process, and caloric restriction (CR could provide anti-inflammatory benefits. CR mimetics (CRM, such as the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG, mimic the beneficial effects of CR without inducing CR-related physiologic disturbance. This study investigated the potential anti-inflammatory benefits of 2-DG and the underlying mechanisms in mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced lethal endotoxemia. The results indicated that pretreatment with 2-DG suppressed LPS-induced elevation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6. It also suppressed the upregulation of myeloperoxidase, attenuated Evans blue leakage, alleviated histological abnormalities in the lung, and improved the survival of LPS-challenged mice. Treatment with 2-DG had no obvious effects on the total level of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, but it significantly suppressed LPS-induced elevation of PKM2 in the nuclei. Prevention of PKM2 nuclear accumulation by ML265 mimicked the anti-inflammatory benefits of 2-DG. In addition, treatment with 2-DG or ML265 suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3. Inhibition of STAT3 by stattic suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory injury. Interestingly, posttreatment with 2-DG at the early stage post-LPS challenge also improved the survival of the experimental animals. This study found that treatment with 2-DG, a representative CRM, provided anti-inflammatory benefits in lethal inflammation. The underlying mechanisms included suppressed nuclear PKM2-STAT3 pathway. These data suggest that 2-DG might have potential value in the early intervention of lethal inflammation.

  12. Caloric Restriction Mimetic 2-Deoxyglucose Alleviated Inflammatory Lung Injury via Suppressing Nuclear Pyruvate Kinase M2-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai; Yang, Yongqiang; Lin, Ling; Ai, Qing; Dai, Jie; Fan, Kerui; Ge, Pu; Jiang, Rong; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation is an energy-intensive process, and caloric restriction (CR) could provide anti-inflammatory benefits. CR mimetics (CRM), such as the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), mimic the beneficial effects of CR without inducing CR-related physiologic disturbance. This study investigated the potential anti-inflammatory benefits of 2-DG and the underlying mechanisms in mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethal endotoxemia. The results indicated that pretreatment with 2-DG suppressed LPS-induced elevation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6. It also suppressed the upregulation of myeloperoxidase, attenuated Evans blue leakage, alleviated histological abnormalities in the lung, and improved the survival of LPS-challenged mice. Treatment with 2-DG had no obvious effects on the total level of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), but it significantly suppressed LPS-induced elevation of PKM2 in the nuclei. Prevention of PKM2 nuclear accumulation by ML265 mimicked the anti-inflammatory benefits of 2-DG. In addition, treatment with 2-DG or ML265 suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Inhibition of STAT3 by stattic suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory injury. Interestingly, posttreatment with 2-DG at the early stage post-LPS challenge also improved the survival of the experimental animals. This study found that treatment with 2-DG, a representative CRM, provided anti-inflammatory benefits in lethal inflammation. The underlying mechanisms included suppressed nuclear PKM2-STAT3 pathway. These data suggest that 2-DG might have potential value in the early intervention of lethal inflammation.

  13. The roles of BDNF, pCREB and Wnt3a in the latent period preceding activation of progenitor cell mitosis in the adult dentate gyrus by fluoxetine.

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    Scarlett B Pinnock

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new neurons continues into adult life in the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus, as in many other species. Neurogenesis itself turns out to be highly labile, and is regulated by a number of factors. One of these is the serotoninergic system: treatment with drugs (such as the SSRI fluoxetine markedly stimulates mitosis in the progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus. But this process has one remarkable feature: it takes at least 14 days of continuous treatment to be effective. This is despite the fact that the pharmacological action of fluoxetine occurs within an hour or so of first administration. This paper explores the role of BDNF in this process, using the effect of a Trk antagonist (K252a on the labelling of progenitor cells with the mitosis marker Ki67 and the associated expression of pCREB and Wnt3a. These experiments show that (i Fluoxetine increased Ki67 counts, as well as pCREB and Wnt3a expression in the dentate gyrus. The action of fluoxetine on the progenitor cells and on pCREB (but not Wnt3a depends upon Trk receptor activation, since it was prevented by icv infusion of K252a. (ii These receptors are required for both the first 7 days of fluoxetine action, during which no apparent change in progenitor mitosis occurs, as well as the second 7 days. Increased pCREB was always associated with progenitor cell mitosis, but Wnt3a expression may be necessary but not sufficient for increased progenitor cell proliferation. These results shed new light on the action of fluoxetine on neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, and have both clinical and experimental interest.

  14. THE SYNTHESIS OF RGDF MIMETIC DERIVATIVES BASED ON 4-(ISOINDOLINE-5-YLAMINO-4-OXOBUTYRIC ACID WITH THE ORAL ANTIAGGREGATIVE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Krysko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl ethers of N-[4-(isoindoline-5-ylamino-4-oxobutyryl]-D,L-β-substituted-β-alanines were synthesized. Estimation of antiaggregatory activity of the compounds obtained has showed that the compounds possess an oral activity ex vivoin mice  with the use of human rich platelet plasma.

  15. Proapoptotic activity of a monomeric smac mimetic on human fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuada, D; Casnici, C; Crotta, K; Seneci, P F; Corradini, C; Truzzi, M; Ingegnoli, F; Marelli, O

    2015-02-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) block cell death in response to diverse stimuli. The mitochondrial protein, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac), negatively regulates IAP inhibition of caspase activity. We investigated the proapoptotic activity of a synthetic Smac (Smac 066) on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) derived from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We found that Smac 066 induced significant apoptosis in all RA-FLS samples. Furthermore, IAPs, which are upregulated in RA-FLS, were downregulated by Smac 066. This suggested that IAPs upregulation was responsible for RA-FLS sensitivity to Smac 066. Next, we analysed caspase activation and found that Smac 066 was associated with caspase 8 and caspase 3 activities. We then investigated the mechanism underlying Smac 066 downregulation of IAPs in RA-FLS with an apoptotic pathway array. Interestingly, Smac 066 significantly upregulated IGFBP-5, a protein involved in differentiation, apoptosis, and osteoblastic activation. Smac 066 may represent a new therapeutic approach to RA treatment.

  16. Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid normalizes hippocampal omega-3 and 6 polyunsaturated fatty acid profile, attenuates glial activation and regulates BDNF function in a rodent model of neuroinflammation induced by central interleukin-1β administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yilong; Xu, Min; Kalueff, Allan V; Song, Cai

    2017-05-18

    Interleukin (IL)-1β can activate glial cells to trigger neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Lower omega (n)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and lower n-3/n-6 PUFA ratios occur in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that an n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can improve memory and attenuate neurodegeneration-like changes in animal models of AD. However, whether and how EPA modulates glial cell activity and functions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that EPA may attenuate neuroinflammation by inhibiting microglial activation and microglia-produced proinflammatory cytokines, and by enhancing the expression of astrocytes-produced neurotrophins and their receptors. Male Long-Evans rats were fed either palm oil supplemented diet or EPA supplemented diet for 42 days. On day 36 of diet feeding, rats received an intracerebroventricular injection of IL-1β or saline for 7 days. The glial activation, the expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP), calcium-dependent phospholipase (cPL) A2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, and PUFA profile in the hippocampus were analyzed. IL-1β elevated biomarkers of microglial CD11b and astrocyte GFAP expression, increased the expression of APP, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but reduced BDNF and its receptor (TrKB). IL-1β also lowered n-3 EPA and docosapentaenoic acid concentrations but increased n-6 PUFAs and cPLA2 activity in the hippocampus. EPA supplement normalized the n-3 and n-6 PUFA profiles and cPLA2 levels, inhibited glial activation, reduced APP and TNF-α expression, as well as up-regulated BDNF and TrKB. Supplementation with EPA appear to have potential effects on improving glial over-activation, n3/n6 imbalance and BDNF down-regulation, which contribute to anti-inflammatory and may provide beneficial effects on inflammation-associated disease such as AD.

  17. BDNF ACTIVATION OF ERK IS AUTONOMOUS FROM THE DOMINANT EXTRASYNAPTIC NMDA RECEPTOR ERK SHUT-OFF PATHWAY

    OpenAIRE

    MULHOLLAND, P. J.; LUONG, N. T.; WOODWARD, J. J.; CHANDLER, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    NMDA receptors bidirectionally modulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through the coupling of synaptic NMDA receptors to an ERK activation pathway that is opposed by a dominant ERK shut-off pathway thought to be coupled to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present study, synaptic NMDA receptor activation of ERK in cortical cultures was partially inhibited by the highly selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 (Ro) and the less selective NR2A antagonist NVP-AAM077 (NVP). When Ro an...

  18. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  19. Nicotinic Acid-Mediated Activation of Both Membrane and Nuclear Receptors towards Therapeutic Glucocorticoid Mimetics for Treating Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Todd Penberthy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute attacks of multiple sclerosis (MS are most commonly treated with glucocorticoids, which can provide life-saving albeit only temporary symptomatic relief. The mechanism of action (MOA is now known to involve induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and interleukin-10 (IL-10, where IL-10 requires subsequent heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1 induction. Ectopic expression studies reveal that even small changes in expression of IDO, HMOX-1, or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2 can prevent demyelination in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE animal models of MS. An alternative to glucocorticoids is needed for a long-term treatment of MS. A distinctly short list of endogenous activators of both membrane G-protein-coupled receptors and nuclear peroxisome proliferating antigen receptors (PPARs demonstrably ameliorate EAE pathogenesis by MOAs resembling that of glucocorticoids. These dual activators and potential MS therapeutics include endocannabinoids and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2. Nicotinamide profoundly ameliorates and prevents autoimmune-mediated demyelination in EAE via maintaining levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, without activating PPAR nor any G-protein-coupled receptor. By comparison, nicotinic acid provides even greater levels of NAD than nicotinamide in many tissues, while additionally activating the PPAR-dependent pathway already shown to provide relief in animal models of MS after activation of GPR109a/HM74a. Thus nicotinic acid is uniquely suited for providing therapeutic relief in MS. However nicotinic acid is unexamined in MS research. Nicotinic acid penetrates the blood brain barrier, cures pellagric dementia, has been used for over 50 years clinically without toxicity, and raises HDL concentrations to a greater degree than any pharmaceutical, thus providing unparalleled benefits against lipodystrophy. Summary analysis reveals that the expected therapeutic benefits of high-dose nicotinic

  20. Blood BDNF concentrations reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Williamson, Rebecca; Santini, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    no studies directly comparing blood BDNF levels to brain BDNF levels in different species. We examined blood, serum, plasma and brain-tissue BDNF levels in three different mammalian species: rat, pig, and mouse, using an ELISA method. As a control, we included an analysis of blood and brain tissue from...... conditional BDNF knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Whereas BDNF could readily be measured in rat blood, plasma and brain tissue, it was undetectable in mouse blood. In pigs, whole-blood levels of BDNF could not be measured with a commercially available ELISA kit, but pig plasma BDNF levels (mean...... positive correlation between frontal cortex and hippocampal BDNF levels in mice (r2=0.81, p=0.0139). Our data support the view that measures of blood and plasma BDNF levels reflect brain-tissue BDNF levels....

  1. BDNF in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Maija L; Castrén, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a monogenic disorder that is caused by the absence of FMR1 protein (FMRP). FXS serves as an excellent model disorder for studies investigating disturbed molecular mechanisms and synapse function underlying cognitive impairment, autism, and behavioral disturbance. Abnormalities in dendritic spines and synaptic transmission in the brain of FXS individuals and mouse models for FXS indicate perturbations in the development, maintenance, and plasticity of neuronal network connectivity. However, numerous alterations are found during the early development in FXS, including abnormal differentiation of neural progenitors and impaired migration of newly born neurons. Several aspects of FMRP function are modulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Here, we review the evidence of the role for BDNF in the developing and adult FXS brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. BSA-boronic acid conjugate as lectin mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Pinnamaneni, Poornima; Nie, Huan; Li, Yu; Sun, Xue-Long

    2014-01-10

    We report bovine serum albumin (BSA)-boronic acid (BA) conjugates as lectin mimetics and their glyco-capturing capacity. The BSA-BA conjugates were synthesized by amidation of carboxylic acid groups in BSA with aminophenyl boronic acid in the presence of EDC, and were characterized by Alizarin Red S (ARS) assay and SDS-PAGE gel. The BSA-BA conjugates were immobilized onto maleimide-functionalized silica beads and their sugar capturing capacity and specificity were confirmed by ARS displacement assay. Further, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis of the glyco-capturing activity of the BSA-BA conjugates was conducted by immobilizing BSA-BA onto SPR gold chip. Overall, we demonstrated a BSA-BA-based lectin mimetics for glyco-capturing applications. These lectin mimetics are expected to provide an important tool for glycomics and biosensor research and applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Botanicals as Modulators of Neuroplasticity: Focus on BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Sangiovanni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in different central nervous system (CNS diseases suggests that this neurotrophin may represent an interesting and reliable therapeutic target. Accordingly, the search for new compounds, also from natural sources, able to modulate BDNF has been increasingly explored. The present review considers the literature on the effects of botanicals on BDNF. Botanicals considered were Bacopa monnieri (L. Pennell, Coffea arabica L., Crocus sativus L., Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim., Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze (green tea, Ginkgo biloba L., Hypericum perforatum L., Olea europaea L. (olive oil, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Rhodiola rosea L., Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, Vitis vinifera L., Withania somnifera (L. Dunal, and Perilla frutescens (L. Britton. The effect of the active principles responsible for the efficacy of the extracts is reviewed and discussed as well. The high number of articles published (more than one hundred manuscripts for 14 botanicals supports the growing interest in the use of natural products as BDNF modulators. The studies reported strengthen the hypothesis that botanicals may be considered useful modulators of BDNF in CNS diseases, without high side effects. Further clinical studies are mandatory to confirm botanicals as preventive agents or as useful adjuvant to the pharmacological treatment.

  4. Systemic delivery of recombinant brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Giampà

    Full Text Available Loss of huntingtin-mediated BDNF gene transcription has been shown to occur in HD and thus contribute to the degeneration of the striatum. Several studies have indicated that an increase in BDNF levels is associated with neuroprotection and amelioration of neurological signs in animal models of HD. In a recent study, an increase in BDNF mRNA and protein levels was recorded in mice administered recombinant BDNF peripherally. Chronic, indwelling osmotic mini-pumps containing either recombinant BDNF or saline were surgically placed in R6/2 or wild-type mice from 4 weeks of age until euthanasia. Neurological evaluation (paw clasping, rotarod performance, locomotor activity in an open field was performed. After transcardial perfusion, histological and immunohistochemical studies were performed. We found that BDNF- treated R6/2 mice survived longer and displayed less severe signs of neurological dysfunction than the vehicle treated ones. Primary outcome measures such as brain volume, striatal atrophy, size and morphology of striatal neurons, neuronal intranuclear inclusions and microglial reaction confirmed a neuroprotective effect of the compound. BDNF was effective in increasing significantly the levels of activated CREB and of BDNF the striatal spiny neurons. Moreover, systemically administered BDNF increased the synthesis of BDNF as demonstrated by RT-PCR, and this might account for the beneficial effects observed in this model.

  5. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and protein levels in Amniotic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calabrese Francesca

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin which plays survival- and growth-promoting activity in neuronal cells and it is involved in cellular plasticity mechanisms as it controls activity dependent synaptic transmission. A functional polymorphism (Val66Met in the pro-region of BDNF, which affects the intracellular trafficking of proBDNF has been associated with memory and cognitive deficits as well as to an increased susceptibility for several psychiatric disorders especially those with a neurodevelopmental origin. To date, no study has evaluated the influence of the Val66Met polymorphism on BDNF levels in a peripheral system that may reflect fetal neurodevelopment. Therefore we investigated in amniotic fluids (AF obtained from 139 healthy women during 15-17 week of pregnancy, BDNF protein levels in correlation with the Val66Met polymorphism. Results Interestingly we found a significant BDNF protein levels reduction in 55 Met carriers (Val/Met and Met/Met (p = 0.002 as compared to 84 non carriers (Val/Val, and no effect of fetus gender, maternal age or gestation week on BDNF levels has been observed. Conclusion These results, although explorative, indicate that during fetal life the Val66Met genotype might influences BDNF protein levels in AF supporting the involvement of this polymorphism in behavioral and functional brain individual differences in the adulthood.

  6. Cosmological dynamics of mimetic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Khyllep, Wompherdeiki; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tamanini, Nicola; Vagnozzi, Sunny

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the dynamical behavior of mimetic gravity with a general potential for the mimetic scalar field. Performing a phase-space and stability analysis, we show that the scenario at hand can successfully describe the thermal history of the universe, namely the successive sequence of radiation, matter, and dark-energy eras. Additionally, at late times the universe can either approach a de Sitter solution, or a scaling accelerated attractor where the dark-matter and dark-energy density parameters are of the same order, thus offering an alleviation of the cosmic coincidence problem. Applying our general analysis to various specific potential choices, including the power-law and the exponential ones, we show that mimetic gravity can be brought into good agreement with the observed behavior of the universe. Moreover, with an inverse square potential we find that mimetic gravity offers an appealing unified cosmological scenario where both dark energy and dark matter are characterized by a single scalar field, and where the cosmic coincidence problem is alleviated.

  7. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  8. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  9. Cardioprotection by Conditioning Mimetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Elpidio; Migale, Monica; Postacchini, Demetrio; Balestrini, Fabrizio; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2016-01-01

    At present, ischemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. An important insight into both IHD pathophysiology and cardioprotection was achieved in 1986 when Murry et al. described for the first time the ischemic preconditioning (IP). IP can be defined as an innate phenomenon by which brief episodes of ischemia confer protection to a tissue from a subsequent more protracted ischemic insult. Suggested mechanisms explaining IP comprise the action of circulating substances (e.g. adenosine, bradykinin, nitric oxide). These mediators are released after a prolonged ischemic stress, causing activation of molecular pathways that induce favorable posttranslational changes of proteins and adaptive modifications in genetic expression. Briefly review evidences from clinical studies on drugs that exert their effects by mimicking IP, discussing their therapeutic properties and the potential clinical employment in order to obtain cardioprotection. Literature regarding IP mimicking pharmacological agents was searched in Medline and Google Scholar. Authors reviewed relevant researches in English language including both clinical studies and reviews of clinical studies published from 1986 to 2016. Several pharmacological agents reproducing IP protective actions have been evaluated in many clinical trials. Examined molecules include adenosine, nicorandil and atrial natriuretic peptide. Interestingly IP mimicking effects of drugs have been also analyzed perioperatively in the context of ischaemia-reperfusion heart injury. Moreover evidences suggest that also some anaesthetic drugs (especially volatile agents) are able to provide myocardial protection by inducing IP. Drugs capable of mimicking IP exhibit a high therapeutic potential because of their properties of eliciting an effective cardioprotective signaling. Future studies should clarify the optimal doses and timing of administration of IP mimetic agents in order to favor the advent of

  10. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. The IAP Protein Family, SMAC Mimetics and Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, Alex; Miura, Koh

    2016-01-01

    Since the acquired resistance of cells to apoptosis is one of the major hallmarks of cancer, the endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis can be regarded as promising targets in the design of anticancer therapeutics. In addition to their antiapoptotic activity, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are able to regulate numerous other cell functions, including proliferation, differentiation, and migration, as well as proinflammatory and immune responses. Study of the IAP family as target molecules in targeted therapies has recently focused on SMAC mimetics as synthetic IAP antagonists that have been under development as promising therapeutics. To overview the background of IAP proteins and to focus on the development of SMAC mimetics, the present review first looks at the mechanisms of IAP proteins' antiapoptotic activities and those for controlling those activities; then the SMAC mimetics, including birinapant, LCL161, and DEBIO1143/AT-406, and their clinical trials are introduced. To further clarify the processes to exert the efficacies of SMAC mimetics, it is necessary to determine therapeutic biomarkers that predict and assess them, which may include caspases and factors in the TNFα pathway.

  12. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  13. AP-1 Transcription Factors Mediate BDNF-Positive Feedback Loop in Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvikene, Jürgen; Pruunsild, Priit; Orav, Ester; Esvald, Eli-Eelika; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2016-01-27

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, regulates both survival and differentiation of several neuronal populations in the nervous system during development, as well as synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. BDNF exerts its biological functions through its receptor TrkB. Although the regulation of BDNF transcription by neuronal activity has been widely studied, little is known about TrkB signaling-dependent expression of BDNF. Using rat primary cortical neuron cultures, we show that the BDNF gene is a subject to an extensive autoregulatory loop, where TrkB signaling upregulates the expression of all major BDNF transcripts, mainly through activating MAPK pathways. Investigating the mechanisms behind this autoregulation, we found that AP-1 transcription factors, comprising Jun and Fos family members, participate in the induction of BDNF exon I, III, and VI transcripts. AP-1 transcription factors directly upregulate the expression of exon I transcripts by binding two novel AP-1 cis-elements in promoter I. Moreover, our results show that the effect of AP-1 proteins on the activity of rat BDNF promoters III and VI is indirect, because AP-1 proteins were not detected to bind the respective promoter regions by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Collectively, we describe an extensive positive feedback system in BDNF regulation, adding a new layer to the elaborate control of BDNF gene expression. Here, we show for the first time that in rat primary cortical neurons the expression of all major BDNF transcripts (exon I, II, III, IV, VI, and IXa transcripts) is upregulated in response to TrkB signaling, and that AP-1 transcription factors participate in the induction of exon I, III, and VI transcripts. Moreover, we have described two novel functional AP-1 cis-elements in BDNF promoter I, responsible for the activation of the promoter in response to TrkB signaling. Our results indicate the existence of a positive feedback loop for

  14. Exercise, fasting, and mimetics: toward beneficial combinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Richard T; Zillikens, M Carola; Friesema, Edith C H; delli Paoli, Giuseppe; Bloch, Wilhelm; Uitterlinden, André G; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated disorders that involve a multiplicity of tissues. Both fasting and physical exercise are known to counteract dyslipidemia/hyperglycemia. Skeletal muscle plays a key role in the control of blood glucose levels, and the metabolic changes and related signaling pathways in skeletal muscle induced by fasting overlap with those induced by exercise. The reduction of fat disposal has been shown to extend to the liver and to white and brown adipose tissue and to involve an increase in their metabolic activities. In recent years signal transduction pathways related to exercise and fasting/food withdrawal in muscle have been intensively studied, both in animals and in humans. Combining fasting/food withdrawal with exercise in animals as well as in humans causes changes unlike those seen during fasting/food withdrawal or exercise alone, which favor repair of muscle over autophagy. In addition, compounds that mimic exercise have been studied in combination with exercise or fasting/food withdrawal. This review addresses our current knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie the individual and combined effects of fasting/food withdrawal, endurance or resistance exercise, and their mimetics, in muscle vs other organs in rodents and humans, and highlights which combinations may improve metabolic disorders.-Jaspers, R. T., Zillikens, M. C., Friesema, E. C. H., delli Paoli, G., Bloch, W., Uitterlinden, A. G., Goglia, F., Lanni, A., de Lange, P. Exercise, fasting, and mimetics: toward beneficial combinations. © FASEB.

  15. Delphinidin inhibits BDNF-induced migration and invasion in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Won-Chul; Kim, Hyunhee; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Seung-Ho; Song, Ji-Hye; Lee, Ki Heon; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; So, Kyeong A; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Ko, Hyeonseok

    2017-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the TrkB ligand, is associated with aggressive malignant behavior, including migration and invasion, in tumor cells and a poor prognosis in patients with various types of cancer. Delphinidin is a diphenylpropane-based polyphenolic ring structure-harboring compound, which exhibits a wide range of pharmacological activities, anti-tumor, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-mutagenic activity. However, the possible role of delphinidin in the cancer migration and invasion is unclear. We investigated the suppressive effect of delphinidin on the cancer migration and invasion. Thus, we found that BDNF enhanced cancer migration and invasion in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell. To exam the inhibitory role of delphinidin in SKOV3 ovarian cancer migration and invasion, we investigated the use of delphinidin as inhibitors of BDNF-induced motility and invasiveness in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Here, we found that delphinidin prominently inhibited the BDNF-induced increase in cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, delphinidin remarkably inhibited BDNF-stimulated expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Also, delphinidin antagonized the phosphorylation of Akt and nuclear translocation of NF-κB permitted by the BDNF in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, our findings provide new evidence that delphinidin suppressed the BDNF-induced ovarian cancer migration and invasion through decreasing of Akt activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurochemical properties of BDNF-containing neurons projecting to rostral ventromedial medulla in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Bin eYin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG modulates nociception via a descending pathway that relays in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM and terminates in the spinal cord. Previous behavioral pharmacology and electrophysiological evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in descending pain modulation, likely through the PAG-RVM pathway. However, there still lacks detailed information on the distribution of BDNF, activation of BDNF-containing neurons projecting to RVM in the condition of pain, and neurochemical properties of these neurons within the PAG. Through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and immunofluorescent staining, the homogenous distributions of BDNF mRNA and protein were observed in the four subregions of PAG. Both neurons and astrocytes expressed BDNF, but not microglias. By combining retrograde tracing methods and formalin pain model, there were more BDNF-containing neurons projecting to RVM being activated in the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG than other subregions of PAG. The neurochemical properties of BDNF-containing projection neurons in the vlPAG were investigated. BDNF-containing projection neurons expressed auto receptor Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB in addition to serotonin (5-HT, neurotensin (NT, substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, and parvalbumin (PV but not tyrosine decarboxylase (TH. It is speculated that BDNF released from projection neurons in the vlPAG might participate in the descending pain modulation through enhancing the presynaptic release of other neuroactive substances (NSs in the RVM.

  17. BDNF Val66Met homozygosity does not influence plasma BDNF levels in healthy human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luykx, J.J.; Boks, M.P.M.; Breetvelt, E.J.; Aukes, M.F.; Strengman, E.; da Pozzo, E.; Dell'osso, L.; Marazziti, D.; van Leeuwen, A.; Vreeker, A.; Abramovic, L.; Martini, C.; Numans, M.E.; Kahn, R. S.; Ophoff, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    A putative pathway by which the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) leads to aberrant phenotypes is its influence on plasma BDNF. Research into the impact of rs6265 on plasma BDNF has given rise to conflicting results. Moreover, most such studies have compared Met-carriers with Val-homozygous

  18. Association Between Smoking, Nicotine Dependence, and BDNF Val(66)Met Polymorphism with BDNF Concentrations in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamal, Mumtaz; Van der Does, Willem; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Molendijk, Marc L.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Introduction: Nicotine use is associated with the upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum. An association between smoking and the BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism has also been found. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of serum BDNF in never-smokers, former smokers,

  19. Impact of the erythropoietin-derived peptide mimetic Epotris on the histopathological consequences of status epilepticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zellinger, Christina; Seeger, Natalie; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The design of peptide mimetics offers interesting opportunities to selectively include beneficial and exclude undesirable effects of a parent molecule. Epotris represents a novel erythropoietin mimetic, which lacks an erythropoietic activity. The present study evaluates the potential of this pept......The design of peptide mimetics offers interesting opportunities to selectively include beneficial and exclude undesirable effects of a parent molecule. Epotris represents a novel erythropoietin mimetic, which lacks an erythropoietic activity. The present study evaluates the potential...... exert limited in vivo effects on the cellular consequences of prolonged seizure activity. When considering further testing it should be taken in mind that Epotris administration only attenuated selected cellular consequences of status epilepticus and did not completely prevent cellular alterations....

  20. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E

    2015-02-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here, we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the "addiction phase" examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF's potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. More Insight into BDNF against Neurodegeneration: Anti-Apoptosis, Anti-Oxidation, and Suppression of Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Der Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its well-established neurotrophic action, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF also possesses other neuroprotective effects including anti-apoptosis, anti-oxidation, and suppression of autophagy. We have shown before that BDNF triggers multiple mechanisms to confer neuronal resistance against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in primary rat cortical cultures. The beneficial effects of BDNF involve the induction of anti-oxidative thioredoxin with the resultant expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 as well as erythropoietin (EPO-dependent stimulation of sonic hedgehog (SHH. We further revealed that BDNF may bring the expression of sulfiredoxin, an ATP-dependent antioxidant enzyme, to offset mitochondrial inhibition in cortical neurons. Recently, we provided insights into another novel anti-oxidative mechanism of BDNF, which involves the augmentation of sestrin2 expression to endow neuronal resistance against oxidative stress induced by 3-NP; BDNF induction of sestrin2 entails the activation of a pathway involving nitric oxide (NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB. Apart from anti-apoptosis and anti-oxidation, we demonstrated in our most recent study that BDNF may activate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR with resultant activation of transcription factor c-Jun, thereby stimulating the expression of p62/sequestosome-1 to suppress heightened autophagy as a result of 3-NP exposure. Together, our results provide in-depth insight into multi-faceted protective mechanisms of BDNF against mitochondrial dysfunction commonly associated with the pathogenesis of many chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Delineation of the protective signaling pathways elicited by BDNF would endow a rationale to develop novel therapeutic regimens to halt or prevent the progression of neurodegeneration.

  2. BDNF/TrkB Signaling as a Potential Novel Target in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Anticancer Activity of Selective TrkB Inhibition in Medulloblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Amanda; Jaeger, Mariane; Buendia, Marienela; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Gregianin, Lauro José; Brunetto, Algemir Lunardi; Brunetto, André T; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Deregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling has been associated with increased proliferative capabilities, invasiveness, and chemoresistance in several types of cancer. However, the relevance of this pathway in MB remains unknown. Here, we show that the selective TrkB inhibitor N-[2-[[(hexahydro-2-oxo-1H-azepin-3-yl)amino]carbonyl]phenyl]-benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (ANA-12) markedly reduced the viability and survival of human cell lines representative of different MB molecular subgroups. These findings provide the first evidence supporting further investigation of TrkB inhibition as a potential novel strategy for MB treatment.

  3. Hypothalamic Gene Transfer of BDNF Inhibits Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis in Middle Age Obese Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xianglan; McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Slater, Andrew; Huang, Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the hypothalamus-adipocyte axis is associated with an antiobesity and anticancer phenotype in animal models of melanoma and colon cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator in the hypothalamus leading to preferential sympathoneural activation of adipose tissue and the ensuing resistance to obesity and cancer. Here, we generated middle age obese mice by high fat diet feeding for a year and investigated the effects of hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF on a...

  4. Birinapant (TL32711), a bivalent SMAC mimetic, targets TRAF2-associated cIAPs, abrogates TNF-induced NF-κB activation, and is active in patient-derived xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetatos, Christopher A; Mitsuuchi, Yasuhiro; Burns, Jennifer M; Neiman, Eric M; Condon, Stephen M; Yu, Guangyao; Seipel, Martin E; Kapoor, Gurpreet S; Laporte, Matthew G; Rippin, Susan R; Deng, Yijun; Hendi, Mukta S; Tirunahari, Pavan K; Lee, Yu-Hua; Haimowitz, Thomas; Alexander, Matthew D; Graham, Martin A; Weng, David; Shi, Yigong; McKinlay, Mark A; Chunduru, Srinivas K

    2014-04-01

    The acquisition of apoptosis resistance is a fundamental event in cancer development. Among the mechanisms used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis is the dysregulation of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. The activity of the IAPs is regulated by endogenous IAP antagonists such as SMAC (also termed DIABLO). Antagonism of IAP proteins by SMAC occurs via binding of the N-terminal tetrapeptide (AVPI) of SMAC to selected BIR domains of the IAPs. Small molecule compounds that mimic the AVPI motif of SMAC have been designed to overcome IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance of cancer cells. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of birinapant (TL32711), a bivalent SMAC-mimetic compound currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Birinapant bound to the BIR3 domains of cIAP1, cIAP2, XIAP, and the BIR domain of ML-IAP in vitro and induced the autoubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in intact cells, which resulted in formation of a RIPK1:caspase-8 complex, caspase-8 activation, and induction of tumor cell death. Birinapant preferentially targeted the TRAF2-associated cIAP1 and cIAP2 with subsequent inhibition of TNF-induced NF-κB activation. The activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic cancer drugs was potentiated by birinapant both in a TNF-dependent or TNF-independent manner. Tumor growth in multiple primary patient-derived xenotransplant models was inhibited by birinapant at well-tolerated doses. These results support the therapeutic combination of birinapant with multiple chemotherapies, in particular, those therapies that can induce TNF secretion.

  5. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and gray matter volume in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, S; Aggio, V; Hoogenboezem, T A; Ambrée, O; de Wit, H; Wijkhuijs, A J M; Locatelli, C; Colombo, C; Arolt, V; Drexhage, H A; Benedetti, F

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric condition characterized by grey matter (GM) volumes reduction. Neurotrophic factors have been suggested to play a role in the neuroprogressive changes during the illness course. In particular peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in BD. The aim of our study was to investigate if serum levels of BDNF are associated with GM volumes in BD patients and healthy controls (HC). We studied 36 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD type I and 17 HC. Analysis of variance was performed to investigate the effect of diagnosis on GM volumes in the whole brain. Threshold for significance was Pbrain areas, encompassing the caudate head, superior temporal gyrus, insula, fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex. The interaction analysis between BDNF levels and diagnosis showed a significant effect in the middle frontal gyrus. HC reported higher BDNF levels associated with higher GM volumes, whereas no association between BDNF and GM volumes was observed in BD. Our study seems to suggest that although the production of BDNF is increased in BD possibly to prevent and repair neural damage, its effects could be hampered by underlying neuroinflammatory processes interfering with the neurodevelopmental role of BDNF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Relevance of Post-Stroke Circulating BDNF Levels as a Prognostic Biomarker of Stroke Outcome. Impact of rt-PA Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Marion; Quirié, Aurore; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant form of tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only curative treatment for ischemic stroke. Recently, t-PA has been linked to the metabolism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neurotrophin involved in post-stroke neuroplasticity. Thus, the objective of our study was to investigate the impact of rt-PA treatment on post-stroke circulating BDNF levels in humans and in animals. Serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were measured at hospital admission and at up to 90 days in stroke patients receiving (n = 24) or not (n = 14) rt-PA perfusion. We investigated the relationships between serum BDNF with concurrent t-PA/plasmin activity, neurological outcomes and cardiovascular scores at admission. In parallel, serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity were assessed before and after (1, 4 and 24h) the induction of ischemic stroke in rats. Our study revealed higher serum BDNF levels and better neurological outcome in rt-PA-treated than non-treated patients. However, serum BDNF levels did not predict stroke outcome when the whole cohort of stroke patients was analyzed. By contrast, serum BDNF levels when measured at admission and at day 90 correlated with cardiovascular scores, and those at day 1 correlated with serum t-PA/plasmin activity in the whole cohort of patients whereas no association could be found in the rt-PA-treated group. In rats devoid of cardiovascular risk, no difference in post-stroke serum BDNF levels was detected between rt-PA- and vehicle-treated animals and no correlation was found between serum BDNF levels and t-PA/plasmin activity. Overall, the data suggest that serum BDNF levels may not be useful as a prognostic biomarker of stroke outcome and that endothelial dysfunction could be a confounding factor when serum BDNF levels after stroke are used to reflect of brain BDNF levels.

  7. Smac mimetics and oncolytic viruses synergize in driving anticancer T-cell responses through complementary mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Dastidar, Himika; Zhang, Chunfen; Zemp, Franz J; Lau, Keith; Ernst, Matthias; Rakic, Andrea; Sikdar, Saif; Rajwani, Jahanara; Naumenko, Victor; Balce, Dale R; Ewanchuk, Ben W; Taylor, Pankaj; Yates, Robin M; Jenne, Craig; Gafuik, Chris; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2017-08-24

    Second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds and oncolytic viruses were developed to kill cancer cells directly. However, Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies also modulate host immune responses in ways we hypothesized would complement one another in promoting anticancer T-cell immunity. We show that Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies synergize in driving CD8 + T-cell responses toward tumors through distinct activities. Smac-mimetic compound treatment with LCL161 reinvigorates exhausted CD8 + T cells within immunosuppressed tumors by targeting tumor-associated macrophages for M1-like polarization. Oncolytic virus treatment with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV ΔM51 ) promotes CD8 + T-cell accumulation within tumors and CD8 + T-cell activation within the tumor-draining lymph node. When combined, LCL161 and VSV ΔM51 therapy engenders CD8 + T-cell-mediated tumor control in several aggressive mouse models of cancer. Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies are both in clinical development and their combination therapy represents a promising approach for promoting anticancer T-cell immunity.Oncolytic viruses (OV) and second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds (SMC) synergistically kill cancer cells directly. Here, the authors show that SMC and OV therapies combination also synergize in vivo by promoting anticancer immunity through an increase in CD8 + T-cell response.

  8. How sound symbolism is processed in the brain: a study on Japanese mimetic words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kanero

    Full Text Available Sound symbolism is the systematic and non-arbitrary link between word and meaning. Although a number of behavioral studies demonstrate that both children and adults are universally sensitive to sound symbolism in mimetic words, the neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been extensively investigated. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how Japanese mimetic words are processed in the brain. In Experiment 1, we compared processing for motion mimetic words with that for non-sound symbolic motion verbs and adverbs. Mimetic words uniquely activated the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS. In Experiment 2, we further examined the generalizability of the findings from Experiment 1 by testing another domain: shape mimetics. Our results show that the right posterior STS was active when subjects processed both motion and shape mimetic words, thus suggesting that this area may be the primary structure for processing sound symbolism. Increased activity in the right posterior STS may also reflect how sound symbolic words function as both linguistic and non-linguistic iconic symbols.

  9. Neuroprotective action of N-acetyl serotonin in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the activation of both TrkB/CREB/BDNF pathway and Akt/Nrf2/Antioxidant enzyme in neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Myung Yoo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available N-acetyl serotonin (NAS as a melatonin precursor has neuroprotective actions. Nonetheless, it is not clarified how NAS protects neuronal cells against oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that N-palmitoyl serotonins possessed properties of antioxidants and neuroprotection. Based on those, we hypothesized that NAS, a N-acyl serotonin, may have similar actions in oxidative stress-induced neuronal cells, and examined the effects of NAS based on in vitro and in vivo tests. NAS dose-dependently inhibited oxidative stress-induced cell death in HT-22 cells. Moreover, NAS suppressed glutamate-induced apoptosis by suppressing expression of AIF, Bax, calpain, cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3, whereas it enhanced expression of Bcl-2. Additionally, NAS improved phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB as well as expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, whereas the inclusion of each inhibitor of JNK, p38 or Akt neutralized the neuroprotective effect of NAS, but not that of ERK. Meanwhile, NAS dose-dependently reduced the level of reactive oxygen species, and enhanced the level of glutathione in glutamate-treated HT-22 cells. Moreover, NAS significantly increased expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(PH quinine oxidoreductase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit as well as nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor-2. Separately, NAS at 30 mg/kg suppressed scopolamine-induced memory impairment and cell death in CA1 and CA3 regions in mice. In conclusion, NAS shows actions of antioxidant and anti-apoptosis by activating TrkB/CREB/BDNF pathway and expression of antioxidant enzymes in oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, such effects of NAS may provide the information for the application of NAS against neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and serum concentrations of BDNF with smoking in Thai males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyaprom, K; Tungtrongchitr, R; Thawnashom, K; Pimainog, Y

    2013-10-24

    Many studies have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the reward system of addiction, and that nicotine may induce alterations in BDNF gene expression and its protein level within the mesocorticolimbic system. We investigated the BDNF levels and biochemical-hematological parameters of smoker and non-smoker groups, and examined the association of the Val66Met BDNF gene polymorphism with BDNF serum levels and cigarette smoking. The study sample comprised 311 Thai volunteers (200 smokers; 111 non-smokers). The levels of serum BDNF and biochemical-hematological parameters were determined. The Val66Met BDNF polymorphism was genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. The smoker group had significantly higher serum BDNF levels than the non-smoker group (8.3 vs 6.5 ng/mL, P smoked, and thiocyanate level (P smoking status of the Thai males in this study. Cigarette smoking may be one factor that determines the serum BDNF level, but the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism probably does not influence susceptibility to smoking among Thai males.

  11. Antidepressant-like activity of red wine phenolic extracts in repeated corticosterone-induced depression mice via BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of red wine phenolic extracts in mouse model exposed to exogenous corticosterone. The results showed that 3-week corticosterone injections caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase immobility time in the forced swim test. Red wine phenolic extracts treatment significantly reduced serum corticosterone levels. Moreover, it was found that red wine phenolic extract increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein (BNDF and Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB phosphorylation and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB phosphorylation levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. However, K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, completely abolished those antidepressant-like effects. These results suggested that the red wine phenolic extracts produce an antidepressant-like effect in corticosterone-treated mice, at least in part, which is possibly mediated by modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, BDNF, TrkB and CREB phosphorylation levels in the brain region of mice.

  12. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F Galati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF regulates both action potential (AP generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  13. BDNF and its receptors in human myasthenic thymus: implications for cell fate in thymic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzi, Angela; Ayata, C Korcan; Cavalcante, Paola; Falcone, Chiara; Candiago, Elisabetta; Motta, Teresio; Bernasconi, Pia; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Mantegazza, Renato; Meinl, Edgar; Farina, Cinthia

    2008-07-15

    Here we show that in myasthenic thymus several cell types, including thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and immune cells, were the source and the target of the neurotrophic factor brain-derived growth factor (BDNF). Interestingly, many actively proliferating medullary thymocytes expressed the receptor TrkB in vivo in involuted thymus, while this population was lost in hyperplastic or neoplastic thymuses. Furthermore, in hyperplastic thymuses the robust coordinated expression of BDNF in the germinal centers together with the receptor p75NTR on all proliferating B cells strongly suggests that this factor regulates germinal center reaction. Finally, all TEC dying of apoptosis expressed BDNF receptors, indicating that this neurotrophin is involved in TEC turnover. In thymomas both BDNF production and receptor expression in TEC were strongly hindered. This may represent an attempt of tumour escape from cell death.

  14. Effect of tempol on redox homeostasis and stress tolerance in mimetically aged Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Ugur; Yanar, Karolin; Terzioglu, Duygu; Erkol, Tugçe; Ece, Evrim; Aydin, Seval; Uslu, Ezel; Çakatay, Ufuk

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to test our hypothesis that scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) with tempol, a membrane permeable antioxidant, affects the type and magnitude of oxidative damage and stress tolerance through mimetic aging process in Drosophila. Drosophila colonies were randomly divided into three groups: (1) no D-galactose, no tempol; (2) D-galactose without tempol; (3) D-galactose, but with tempol. Mimetic aging was induced by d-galactose administration. The tempol-administered flies received tempol at the concentration of 0.2% in addition to d-galactose. Thiobarbituric acid reacting substance (TBARS) concentrations, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), sialic acid (SA) were determined. Additionally, stress tolerances were tested. Mimetically aged group without tempol led to a significant decrease in tolerance to heat, cold, and starvation (P tempol was used for these parameters. The Cu,Zn-SOD activity and SA concentrations were lower in both mimetically aged and tempol-administered Drosophila groups compared to control (P tempol-administered groups. Mimetically aged group without tempol led to a significant increase in tissue TBARS and AOPPs concentrations (P tempol could prevent these alterations. Scavenging ROS using tempol also restores redox homeostasis in mimetically aged group. Tempol partly restores age-related oxidative injury and increases stress tolerance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Beneficial effect of fluoxetine treatment aganist psychological stress is mediated by increasing BDNF expression in selected brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongying; Jing, Ping; Liu, Zhidong; Li, Zhiruo; Ma, Hongxia; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhang, Wei; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2017-09-19

    SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine is widely used to treat psychological stress related disorders, however the underlying working mechanisms is not fully understood, as SSRIs can rapidly increase the extracellular serotonin levels but it normally takes weeks to reveal their therapeutic effect in the stress-related psychological disorders. Our previous study demonstrated that purely psychological stress without any physic stimuli induces a biphasic change in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which immediately decrease and then gradually increase after the stress; and that the latter BDNF increase in response to the psychological stress involves the activation of serotonin system. To investigate the role of BDNF in the fluoxetine treatment for stress-related psychological disorders, we examined the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF in the brain of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which were pretreated with fluoxetine at 10 mg/kg or vehicle solution for 14 days, over 24 hour after an acute psychological stress exposure. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of BDNF at different time points in various brain regions after the psychological stress. We found that fluoxetine treatment completely blocked the BDNF decrease induced by the psychological stress, and also enhanced the gradual increase in the expression of BDNF in most of the brain regions except VTA after the psychological stress. The results suggest that the enhancement in BDNF levels induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment mediates the therapeutic effect against psychological stress.

  16. Hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF inhibits breast cancer progression and metastasis in middle age obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglan; McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Slater, Andrew; Huang, Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the hypothalamus-adipocyte axis is associated with an antiobesity and anticancer phenotype in animal models of melanoma and colon cancer. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator in the hypothalamus leading to preferential sympathoneural activation of adipose tissue and the ensuing resistance to obesity and cancer. Here, we generated middle age obese mice by high fat diet feeding for a year and investigated the effects of hypothalamic gene transfer of BDNF on a hormone receptor-positive mammary tumor model. The recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated overexpression of BDNF led to marked weight loss and decrease of adiposity without change of food intake. BDNF gene therapy improved glucose tolerance, alleviated steatosis, reduced leptin level, inhibited mouse breast cancer EO771 growth, and prevented the metastasis. The reduced tumor growth in BDNF-treated mice was associated with reduced angiogenesis, decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and reduced adipocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation. Moreover, BDNF gene therapy reduced inflammation markers in the hypothalamus, the mammary gland, the subcutaneous fat, and the mammary tumor. Our results suggest that manipulating a single gene in the brain may influence multiple mechanisms implicated in obesity-cancer association and provide a target for the prevention and treatment of both obesity and cancer.

  17. Probing for missing links in the binary and ternary V(V)-citrate-(H2O2) systems: synthetic efforts and in vitro insulin mimetic activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, C; Venetis, J; Kaliva, M; Raptopoulou, C P; Terzis, A; Drouza, C; Meier, B; Voyiatzis, G; Potamitis, C; Salifoglou, A

    2009-04-01

    In a pH-specific fashion, V(2)O(5) and citric acid in the absence and presence of H(2)O(2) reacted and afforded, in the presence of NaOH and (CH(6)N(3))(2)CO(3), two new dinuclear V(V) binary non-peroxo (CH(6)N(3))(6)[V(2)O(4)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(2)].2H(2)O (1) and ternary peroxo (CH(6)N(3))(4)[V(2)O(2)(Omicron(2))(2)(C(6)H(5)O(7))(2)].6Eta(2)Omicron (2) species, respectively. Complexes 1 and 2 were further characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, FT-IR, NMR (solution and solid state Cross Polarization-Magic Angle Spinning (CP-MAS)) and Raman spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are members of the family of dinuclear V(V)-citrate species bearing citrate with a distinct coordination mode and degree of deprotonation, with 2 being the missing link in the family of pH-structural variants of the ternary V(V)-peroxo-citrate system. Given that 1 and 2 possess distinct structural features, relevant binary V(III), V(IV) and V(V), and ternary V(V) species bearing O- and N-containing ligands were tested in in vitro cell cultures to assess their cellular toxicity and insulin mimetic capacity. The results project a clear profile for all species tested, earmarking the importance of vanadium oxidation state and its ligand environment in influencing further binary and ternary interactions of vanadium arising with variable mass cellular targets, ultimately leading to a specific (non)toxic phenotype and glucose uptake ability.

  18. Molecular pathways: targeting death receptors and smac mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins are overexpressed in multiple human malignancies, an event that is associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance. Therefore, IAP proteins represent relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) is a mitochondrial protein that is released into the cytosol upon the induction of programmed cell death and promotes apoptosis by neutralizing IAP proteins. On the basis of this property, a variety of small-molecule inhibitors have been developed that mimic the binding domain of the native Smac protein to IAP proteins. Evaluation of these Smac mimetics in preclinical studies revealed that they particularly synergize together with agents that trigger the death receptor pathway of apoptosis. Such combinations might therefore be of special interest for being included in the ongoing evaluation of Smac mimetics in early clinical trials. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Salicylamide and salicylglycine oxidovanadium complexes with insulin-mimetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jessica; Shteinman, Albert A; Degerman, Eva; Enyedy, Eva A; Kiss, Tamás; Behrens, Ulrich; Rehder, Dieter; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2011-12-01

    Reaction of N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(2-picolyl) glycine (H(2)papy) with VOSO(4) in water gives the oxidovanadium(V) oxido-bridged dimer [{(papy)(VO)}(2) μ-O)] (1). Similarly, reaction of N-(2-hydroxybenzyl) glycine (H(2)glysal) with VOSO(4) gives [(glysal)VO(H(2)O)] (2) and reaction of salicylamide (Hsalam) with VOSO(4) in methanol gives [(salam)(2)VO] (3). The crystal structure of the oxido-bridged complex 1 is reported. The insulin-mimetic activity of all three complexes was evaluated with respect to their ability to phosphorylate protein kinase B (PKB). The speciations of complexes 1 and 2 were studied over the pH range 2-10. Complex 1 shows greater stability over the whole pH range but only 2 and 3 exhibit an insulin-mimetic effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteolytic Cleavage of ProBDNF into Mature BDNF in the Basolateral Amygdala Is Necessary for Defeat-Induced Social Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulka, Brooke N.; Ford, Ellen C.; Lee, Melissa A.; Donnell, Nathaniel J.; Goode, Travis D.; Prosser, Rebecca; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for memory processes. The present study tested whether proteolytic cleavage of proBDNF into mature BDNF (mBDNF) within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) regulates the consolidation of defeat-related memories. We found that acute social defeat increases the expression of mBDNF, but not proBDNF, in…

  1. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on HPA Axis Activity and Expression of BDNF and Trkb in the Hippocampus of Pregnant Rats: Possible Contribution in Depression during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader maghsoudi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus are targets for adverse effects of stress paradigms in addition, BDNF and its receptor play key role in the pathology of brain diseases like depression. In the present study, we evaluated the possible role of hippocampal BDNF in depression during pregnancy, Methods: To achieve the purpose, repeated restrain stress (1 or 3 hours daily for 7 days during the last week of pregnancy was used and alteration in the gene expression of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB evaluated by semi-quantitative PCR. Results: The results showed that in stress group the level of ACTH and Corticosterone is increased showing that our model was efficient in inducing psychological stress we also found that BDNF and TrkB expression are decreased in 3 hours stress group but not in 1 hour stress compared to control group. Discussion: Our results imply that decrease in BDNF and its receptor could contribute in some adverse effects of stress during pregnancy such as elevation of depressive like behavior.

  2. LRIG1 modulates cancer cell sensitivity to Smac mimetics by regulating TNFα expression and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Longchuan; McEachern, Donna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Sun, Haiying; Wang, Shaomeng

    2012-03-01

    Smac mimetics block inhibitor of apoptosis proteins to trigger TNFα-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. However, only a small subset of cancer cells seem to be sensitive to Smac mimetics and even sensitive cells can develop resistance. Herein, we elucidated mechanisms underlying the intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer cells to Smac mimetics. In vitro and in vivo investigations revealed that the expression of the cell surface protein LRIG1, a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), is downregulated in resistant derivatives of breast cancer cells sensitive to Smac mimetics. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of LRIG1 markedly attenuated the growth inhibitory activity of the Smac mimetic SM-164 in drug-sensitive breast and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, LRIG1 downregulation attenuated TNFα gene expression induced by Smac mimetics and increased the activity of multiple RTKs, including c-Met and Ron. The multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors Crizotinib and GSK1363089 greatly enhanced the anticancer activity of SM-164 in all resistant cell derivatives, with the combination of SM-164 and GSK1363089 also completely inhibiting the outgrowth of resistant tumors in vivo. Together, our findings show that both upregulation of RTK signaling and attenuated TNFα expression caused by LRIG1 downregulation confers resistance to Smac mimetics, with implications for a rational combination strategy.

  3. HuD-mediated distinct BDNF regulatory pathways promote regeneration after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-03-15

    Up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) synthesis is an important mechanism of peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. This study examines the role of BDNF in the spared nerve injury (SNI) mice model. Protein expression and cellular localization were investigated in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord by western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments respectively. BDNF protein was markedly increased 3 and 7days post-injury in the spinal cord and DRG. Following nerve injury sensory neurons produce molecules to promote regeneration, such as growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and cytoskeletal proteins. Our results show that the expression of GAP-43 was increased in the DRG and spinal cord while, an increased of p-NFH content was detected in the spinal cord, with no modification in the DRG. Both events were counteracted by the administration of an anti-BDNF antibody. In DRG of SNI mice we also detected an increase of HuD expression, a RNA-binding protein known to stabilize BDNF and GAP-43 mRNA. Silencing of HuD prevented the nerve injury-induced BDNF and GAP-43 enhanced expression in the DRG. HuD-mediated BDNF synthesis in the primary sensory neurons, is followed by an anterograde transport of the neurotrophin to the central terminals of the primary afferents in the spinal dorsal horn, to modulate GAP-43 and NFH activation. Our data suggest that BDNF, GAP-43 and p-NFH proteins increase are linked events required for the enhanced regeneration after nerve injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. BDNF val66met Polymorphism Affects Aging of Multiple Types of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kristen M.; Reese, Elizabeth D.; Horn, Marci M.; Sizemore, April N.; Unni, Asha K.; Meerbrey, Michael E.; Kalich, Allan G.; Rodrigue, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The BDNF val66met polymorphism (rs6265) influences activity-dependent secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the synapse, which is crucial for learning and memory. Individuals homozygous or heterozygous for the met allele have lower BDNF secretion than val homozygotes and may be at risk for reduced declarative memory performance, but it remains unclear which types of declarative memory may be affected and how aging of memory across the lifespan is impacted by the BDNF val66met polymorphism. This cross-sectional study investigated the effects of BDNF polymorphism on multiple indices of memory (item, associative, prospective, subjective complaints) in a lifespan sample of 116 healthy adults aged 20-93 years. Advancing age showed a negative effect on item, associative and prospective memory, but not on subjective memory complaints. For item and prospective memory, there were significant age x BDNF group interactions, indicating the adverse effect of age on memory performance across the lifespan was much stronger in the BDNF met carriers than for the val homozygotes. BDNF met carriers also endorsed significantly greater subjective memory complaints, regardless of age, and showed a trend (p memory performance compared to val homozygotes. These results suggest that genetic predisposition to the availability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, by way of the BDNF val66met polymorphism, exerts an influence on multiple indices of episodic memory – in some cases in all individuals regardless of age (subjective memory and perhaps associative memory), in others as an exacerbation of age-related differences in memory across the lifespan (item and prospective memory). PMID:25264352

  5. Unimodular mimetic F(R) inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the unimodular-mimetic F(R) gravity theory, to resolve cosmological constant problem and dark matter problem in a unified geometric manner. We demonstrate that such a theory naturally admits accelerating universe evolution. Furthermore, we construct unimodular-mimetic F(R) inflationary cosmological scenarios compatible with the Planck and BICEP2/Keck-Array observational data. We also address the graceful exit issue, which is guaranteed by the existence of unstable de Sitter vacua.

  6. Sulforaphane epigenetically enhances neuronal BDNF expression and TrkB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisung; Lee, Siyoung; Choi, Bo-Ryoung; Yang, Hee; Hwang, Youjin; Park, Jung Han Yoon; LaFerla, Frank M; Han, Jung-Soo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jiyoung

    2017-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that supports the survival of existing neurons and encourages the growth and differentiation of new neurons and synapses. We investigated the effect of sulforaphane, a hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin present in Brassica vegetables, on neuronal BDNF expression and its synaptic signaling pathways. Mouse primary cortical neurons and a triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3 × Tg-AD) were used to study the effect of sulforaphane. Sulforaphane enhanced neuronal BDNF expression and increased levels of neuronal and synaptic molecules such as MAP2, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 in primary cortical neurons and 3 × Tg-AD mice. Sulforaphane elevated levels of synaptic TrkB signaling pathway components, including CREB, CaMKII, ERK, and Akt in both primary cortical neurons and 3 × Tg-AD mice. Sulforaphane increased global acetylation of histone 3 (H3) and H4, inhibited HDAC activity, and decreased the level of HDAC2 in primary cortical neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that sulforaphane increased acetylated H3 and H4 at BDNF promoters, suggesting that sulforaphane regulates BDNF expression via HDAC inhibition. These findings suggest that sulforaphane has the potential to prevent neuronal disorders such as Alzheimer's disease by epigenetically enhancing neuronal BDNF expression and its TrkB signaling pathways. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effects of soft-diet feeding on BDNF expression in hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsu; Hirayama, Akihiko; Hosoe, Nobuo; Furube, Masaru; Hirano, Shusuke

    2008-11-01

    Our previous study showed that mice fed a soft diet after weaning had reduced synaptic connections in the hippocampal formation and impaired spatial learning ability after 3 months of age. We hypothesized that soft-diet feeding during development reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein in the hippocampus, resulting in lower synaptic densities in this region. Male pups of C57BL/6 mice were fed either a solid (hard-diet group) or powdered diet (soft-diet group), starting at weaning. Expression of BDNF protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was evaluated quantitatively with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 1, 3 and 6 months of age. Reduction in BDNF protein levels due to soft diet was detected markedly in the hippocampus of 3- and 6-month-old mice. On the other hand, a soft diet showed no significant effect on BDNF content in the cerebral cortex throughout the ages investigated. Immunohistochemistry of hippocampal formation in 3-month-old mice revealed that intensities of BDNF immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer and CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers appeared diminished in mice fed the soft diet compared with mice fed the hard diet. These results indicate that insufficient mastication activity during development reduces BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus and influences synaptic plasticity in this region.

  8. A selective histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor improves BDNF trafficking in hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout mice:implications for Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. One of the most prominent gene targets of MeCP2 is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, a potent modulator of activity-dependent synaptic development, function and plasticity. Dysfunctional BDNF signaling has been demonstrated in several pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT disease progression. To evaluate whether the dynamics of BDNF trafficking is affected by Mecp2 deletion, we analyzed movements of BDNF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in cultured hippocampal neurons by time-lapse fluorescence imaging. We found that both anterograde and retrograde vesicular trafficking of BDNF-YFP are significantly impaired in Mecp2 knockout hippocampal neurons. Selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 show neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases and stimulate microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking of BDNF-containing dense core vesicles. Here, we show that the selective HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin-A increased the velocity of BDNF-YFP vesicles in Mecp2 knockout neurons in both directions by increasing αtubulin acetylation. Tubastatin-A also restored activity-dependent BDNF release from Mecp2 knockout neurons to levels comparable to those shown by wildtype neurons. These findings demonstrate that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor is a potential pharmacological strategy to reverse cellular and synaptic impairments in RTT resulting from impaired BDNF signaling.

  9. BDNF Val66Met homozygosity does not influence plasma BDNF levels in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luykx, Jurjen J; Boks, Marco P M; Breetvelt, Elemi J; Aukes, Maartje F; Strengman, Eric; da Pozzo, Eleonora; Dell'osso, Liliana; Marazziti, Donatella; van Leeuwen, Annelies; Vreeker, Annabel; Abramovic, Lucija; Martini, Claudia; Numans, Mattijs E; Kahn, René S; Ophoff, Roel A

    2013-06-03

    A putative pathway by which the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) leads to aberrant phenotypes is its influence on plasma BDNF. Research into the impact of rs6265 on plasma BDNF has given rise to conflicting results. Moreover, most such studies have compared Met-carriers with Val-homozygous subjects. We therefore genotyped subjects from a population-based cohort (the Utrecht Health Project, N=2743) and assessed whether plasma BDNF differs between rs6265 homozygous groups. We maximized the number of Met-homozygous subjects in whom we measured plasma BDNF, resulting in plasma BDNF being available for 19 Met-homozygous and 42 matched Val-homozygous subjects. Mean concentrations (S.D.) were 1963.1 (750.1) and 2133.2 pg/ml (1164.3) for the Val/Val and Met/Met groups, respectively. Using ANOVA, no differences in plasma BDNF between the two groups were detected. In conclusion, these results add to a growing body of evidence indicating that allelic variation at rs6265 does not have medium to large effects on plasma BDNF concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of acute voluntary loaded wheel running on BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minchul; Soya, Hideaki

    2017-12-31

    Voluntary loaded wheel running involves the use of a load during a voluntary running activity. A muscle-strength or power-type activity performed at a relatively high intensity and a short duration may cause fewer apparent metabolic adaptations but may still elicit muscle fiber hypertrophy. This study aimed to determine the effects of acute voluntary wheel running with an additional load on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the rat hippocampus. Ten-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a (1) sedentary (Control) group; (2) voluntary exercise with no load (No-load) group; or (3) voluntary exercise with an additional load (Load) group for 1-week (acute period). The expression of BDNF genes was quantified by real-time PCR. The average distance levels were not significantly different in the No-load and Load groups. However, the average work levels significantly increased in the Load group. The relative soleus weights were greater in the No-load group. Furthermore, loaded wheel running up-regulated the BDNF mRNA level compared with that in the Control group. The BDNF mRNA levels showed a positive correlation with workload levels (r=0.75), suggesting that the availability of multiple workload levels contributes to the BDNF-related benefits of loaded wheel running noted in this study. This novel approach yielded the first set of findings showing that acute voluntary loaded wheel running, which causes muscular adaptation, enhanced BDNF expression, suggesting a possible role of high-intensity short-term exercise in hippocampal BDNF activity.

  11. From Dalek half balls to Daft Punk helmets: Mimetic fandom and the crafting of replicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Hills

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic fandom is a surprisingly understudied mode of (culturally masculinized fan activity in which fans research and craft replica props. Mimetic fandom can be considered as (inauthentic and (immaterial, combining noncommercial status with grassroots marketing or brand reinforcement as well as fusing an emphasis on material artifacts with Web 2.0 collective intelligence. Simply analyzing mimetic fandom as part of fannish material culture fails to adequately assess the nonmaterial aspects of this collaborative creativity. Two fan cultures are taken as case studies: Dalek building groups and Daft Punk helmet constructors. These diverse cases indicate that mimetic fandom has a presence and significance that moves across media fandoms and is not restricted to the science fiction, fantasy, and horror followings with which it is most often associated. Mimetic fandom may be theorized as an oscillatory activity that confuses binaries and constructions of (academic/fan authenticity. This fan practice desires and pursues a kind of ontological bridging or unity—from text to reality—that is either absent or less dominant in many other fan activities such as cosplay, screen-used prop collecting, and geographical pilgrimage. Fan studies may benefit from reassessing the place of mimesis, especially in order to theorize fan practices that are less clearly transformative in character.

  12. Reactive oxygen species contribute toward Smac mimetic/temozolomide-induced cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfrid, Mathieu; Marschall, Viola; Fulda, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Inhibitor of Apoptosis proteins such as Smac mimetics have been reported to provide a promising tool to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to cytotoxic therapies including chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of action have not yet been fully unraveled. In the present study, we therefore investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of Smac mimetic/temozolomide (TMZ)-induced cell death in GBM cells. Here, we show that the Smac mimetic BV6 and TMZ act in concert to stimulate the production of both cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS. This accumulation of ROS contributes toward the activation of the proapoptotic factor BAX upon BV6/TMZ cotreatment as several ROS scavengers (i.e. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, MnTBAP, or α-tocopherol) protect GBM cells against BV6/TMZ-mediated BAX activation. In addition, ROS scavengers significantly rescue GBM cells from BV6/TMZ-triggered cell death, indicating that ROS generation is required for the induction of cell death. By showing that ROS play an important role in the regulation of Smac mimetic/TMZ-induced cell death, our work sheds light on the crucial role of the oxidative system in the cooperative antitumor activity of Smac mimetic/TMZ combination therapy against GBM cells.

  13. [Incretin mimetic drugs: therapeutic positioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Simarro, F

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic and complex disease, due to the differences among affected individuals, which affect choice of treatment. The number of drug families has increased in the last few years, and these families have widely differing mechanisms of action, which contributes greatly to the individualization of treatment according to the patient's characteristics and comorbidities. The present article discusses incretin mimetic drugs. Their development has been based on knowledge of the effects of natural incretin hormones: GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1), GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) and dipeptidyl peptidase enzyme 4 (DPP4), which rapidly degrade them in the systemic circulation. This group is composed of 2 different types of molecules: GLP-1 analogs and DPP4 enzyme inhibitors. The benefits of these molecules include a reduction in plasma glucose without the risk of hypoglycemias or weight gain. There are a series of questions that require new studies to establish a possible association between the use of these drugs and notification of cases of pancreatitis, as well as their relationship with pancreatic and thyroid cancer. Also awaited is the publication of several studies that will provide information on the relationship between these drugs and cardiovascular risk in people with diabetes. All these questions will probably be progressively elucidated with greater experience in the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  14. BDNF-Induced Potentiation of Spontaneous Twitching in Innervated Myocytes Requires Calcium Release From Intracellular Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLEIMAN, ROBIN J.; TIAN, NING; KRIZAJ, DAVID; HWANG, THOMAS N.; COPENHAGEN, DAVID R.; REICHARDT, LOUIS F.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can potentiate synaptic release at newly developed frog neuromuscular junctions. Although this potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+ and reflects changes in acetylcholine release, little is known about the intracellular transduction or calcium signaling pathways. We have developed a video assay for neurotrophin-induced potentiation of myocyte twitching as a measure of potentiation of synaptic activity. We use this assay to show that BDNF-induced synaptic potentiation is not blocked by cadmium, indicating that Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is not required. TrkB autophosphorylation is not blocked in Ca2+-free conditions, indicating that TrkB activity is not Ca2+ dependent. Additionally, an inhibitor of phospholipase C interferes with BDNF-induced potentiation. These results suggest that activation of the TrkB receptor activates phospholipase C to initiate intracellular Ca2+ release from stores which subsequently potentiates transmitter release. PMID:10899220

  15. Deltamethrin Increases Neurite Outgrowth in Cortical Neurons through Endogenous BDNF/TrkB Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Daisuke; Fukuchi, Mamoru; Katakai, Momoko; Shinoda, Yo; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Furuichi, Teiichi; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Tabuchi, Akiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2017-10-28

    Deltamethrin (DM), a type II pyrethroid, robustly increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) expression and has a neurotrophic effect in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. In this study, we investigated the effect of DM on neurite morphology in cultured rat cortical neurons. DM significantly increased neurite outgrowth, but this increase was abolished when the BDNF scavenger tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)-Fc was added 10 min before the DM treatment. In contrast, the addition of TrkB-Fc 1 h after the treatment did not affect DM-induced neurite outgrowth. Our previous research has indicated that type II, but not type I, pyrethroids have the ability to induce Bdnf mRNA expression, but neither permethrin nor cypermethrin, which are type I and type II pyrethroids, respectively, affected neurite outgrowth in the current study. These results suggest that this effect is not due to increased Bdnf expression, and the effect is unique to DM. We previously demonstrated that calcineurin plays a role in the DM-mediated induction of Bdnf expression. However, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 did not significantly affect DM-induced neurite outgrowth. DM-induced neurite outgrowth was abolished by U0126 and rapamycin, indicating the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Taken together, these findings suggest that DM activates endogenous BDNF/TrkB-mediated MAPK and mTOR pathways, thereby increasing neurite outgrowth.Key words: BDNF, Deltamethrin, MAPK, mTOR, Neurite outgrowth.

  16. [Insulin-mimetic property of vanadium compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    Vanadium is a transition metal which creates a number of inorganic and organic derivatives with various organic substances. Some of these compounds have pharmaceutical significance, e.g. vanadyl cation, vanadate and bis(maltolato) oxovanadium(IV). Vanadium compounds are competence inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). They have anti-tumor properties, capable of inhibiting cell proliferation at the concentrations of several micromoles. They also display insulin-mimetic and hypoglycemic properties. As they can increase the activity of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor, they stimulate glycogen synthesis, increase the number of GLUT-4 transporters in the cell membrane and impair gluconeogenesis. In addition to their effects on sugar metabolism, vanadium compounds increase the synthesis of fatty acids, reducing the concentration of glucose in the blood. Thanks to their mitotic properties, low concentrations of vanadium compounds are also able to induce β cell regeneration. Clinical tests have shown that vanadium compounds may be used as antidiabetic drugs with low toxicity. However, the range of therapeutic concentrations is very narrow; at concentrations as low a several micromoles vanadium compounds inhibit cell proliferation and cause apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation.

  17. A possible link between BDNF and mTOR in control of food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food intake is intricately regulated by glucose, amino acids, hormones, neuropeptides, and trophic factors through a neural circuit in the hypothalamus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, the most prominent neurotrophic factor in the brain, regulates differentiation, maturation, and synaptic plasticity throughout life. Among its many roles, BDNF exerts an anorexigenic function in the brain. However, the intracellular signaling induced by BDNF to control food intake is not fully understood. One candidate for the molecule involved in transducing the anorexigenic activity of BDNF is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. mTOR senses extracellular amino acids, glucose, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, and regulates anabolic reactions response to these signals. Activated mTOR increases protein and lipid synthesis and inhibits protein degradation. In the hypothalamus, mTOR activation is thought to reduce food intake. Here we summarize recent findings regarding BDNF- and mTOR-mediated feeding control, and propose a link between these molecules in eating behavior.

  18. The functional BDNF Val66Met polymorphism affects functions of pre-attentive visual sensory memory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Christian; Schneider, Daniel; Epplen, Jörg T; Arning, Larissa

    2011-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is involved in nerve growth and survival. Especially, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the BDNF gene, Val66Met, has gained a lot of attention, because of its effect on activity-dependent BDNF secretion and its link to impaired memory processes. We hypothesize that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism may have modulatory effects on the visual sensory (iconic) memory performance. Two hundred and eleven healthy German students (106 female and 105 male) were included in the data analysis. Since BDNF is also discussed to be involved in the pathogenesis of depression, we additionally tested for possible interactions with depressive mood. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism significantly influenced iconic-memory performance, with the combined Val/Met-Met/Met genotype group revealing less time stability of information stored in iconic memory than the Val/Val group. Furthermore, this stability was positively correlated with depressive mood exclusively in the Val/Val genotype group. Thus, these results show that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has an effect on pre-attentive visual sensory memory processes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel SMAC-mimetics synergistically stimulate melanoma cell death in combination with TRAIL and Bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecis, D; Drago, C; Manzoni, L; Seneci, P; Scolastico, C; Mastrangelo, E; Bolognesi, M; Anichini, A; Kashkar, H; Walczak, H; Delia, D

    2010-06-08

    XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is an anti-apoptotic protein exerting its activity by binding and suppressing caspases. As XIAP is overexpressed in several tumours, in which it apparently contributes to chemoresistance, and because its activity in vivo is antagonised by second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC)/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with low pI, small molecules mimicking SMAC (so called SMAC-mimetics) can potentially overcome tumour resistance by promoting apoptosis. Three homodimeric compounds were synthesised tethering a monomeric SMAC-mimetic with different linkers and their affinity binding for the baculoviral inhibitor repeats domains of XIAP measured by fluorescent polarisation assay. The apoptotic activity of these molecules, alone or in combination with tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and/or Bortezomib, was tested in melanoma cell lines by MTT viability assays and western blot analysis of activated caspases. We show that in melanoma cell lines, which are typically resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, XIAP knock-down sensitises cells to TRAIL treatment in vitro, also favouring the accumulation of cleaved caspase-8. We also describe a new series of 4-substituted azabicyclo[5.3.0]alkane monomeric and dimeric SMAC-mimetics that target various members of the IAP family and powerfully synergise at submicromolar concentrations with TRAIL in inducing cell death. Finally, we show that the simultaneous administration of newly developed SMAC-mimetics with Bortezomib potently triggers apoptosis in a melanoma cell line resistant to the combined effect of SMAC-mimetics and TRAIL. Hence, the newly developed SMAC-mimetics effectively synergise with TRAIL and Bortezomib in inducing cell death. These findings warrant further preclinical studies in vivo to verify the anticancer effectiveness of the combination of these agents.

  20. BDNF Responses in Healthy Older Persons to 35 Minutes of Physical Exercise, Cognitive Training, and Mindfulness: Associations with Working Memory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Krister; Ledreux, Aurélie; Daffner, Kirk; Terjestam, Yvonne; Bergman, Patrick; Carlsson, Roger; Kivipelto, Miia; Winblad, Bengt; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Mohammed, Abdul Kadir H

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a central role in brain plasticity by mediating changes in cortical thickness and synaptic density in response to physical activity and environmental enrichment. Previous studies suggest that physical exercise can augment BDNF levels, both in serum and the brain, but no other study has examined how different types of activities compare with physical exercise in their ability to affect BDNF levels. By using a balanced cross over experimental design, we exposed nineteen healthy older adults to 35-minute sessions of physical exercise, cognitive training, and mindfulness practice, and compared the resulting changes in mature BDNF levels between the three activities. We show that a single bout of physical exercise has significantly larger impact on serum BDNF levels than either cognitive training or mindfulness practice in the same persons. This is the first study on immediate BDNF effects of physical activity in older healthy humans and also the first study to demonstrate an association between serum BDNF responsivity to acute physical exercise and working memory function. We conclude that the BDNF increase we found after physical exercise more probably has a peripheral than a central origin, but that the association between post-intervention BDNF levels and cognitive function could have implications for BDNF responsivity in serum as a potential marker of cognitive health.

  1. Tackling Glaucoma from within the Brain: An Unfortunate Interplay of BDNF and TrkB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Dekeyster

    Full Text Available According to the neurotrophin deprivation hypothesis, diminished retrograde delivery of neurotrophic support during an early stage of glaucoma pathogenesis is one of the main triggers that induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration. Therefore, interfering with neurotrophic signaling seems an attractive strategy to achieve neuroprotection. Indeed, exogenous neurotrophin administration to the eye has been shown to reduce loss of RGCs in animal models of glaucoma; however, the neuroprotective effect was mostly insufficient for sustained RGC survival. We hypothesized that treatment at the level of neurotrophin-releasing brain areas might be beneficial, as signaling pathways activated by target-derived neurotrophins are suggested to differ from pathways that are initiated at the soma membrane. In our study, first, the spatiotemporal course of RGC degeneration was characterized in mice subjected to optic nerve crush (ONC or laser induced ocular hypertension (OHT. Subsequently, the well-known neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF was chosen as the lead molecule, and the levels of BDNF and its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB, were examined in the mouse retina and superior colliculus (SC upon ONC and OHT. Both models differentially influenced BDNF and TrkB levels. Next, we aimed for RGC protection through viral vector-mediated upregulation of collicular BDNF, thought to boost the retrograde neurotrophin delivery. Although the previously reported temporary neuroprotective effect of intravitreally delivered recombinant BDNF was confirmed, viral vector-induced BDNF overexpression in the SC did not result in protection of the RGCs in the glaucoma models used. These findings most likely relate to decreased neurotrophin responsiveness upon vector-mediated BDNF overexpression. Our results highlight important insights concerning the complexity of neurotrophic factor treatments that should surely be considered in

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances GABA transport by modulating the trafficking of GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) from the plasma membrane of rat cortical astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, Sandra H; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    /MAPK pathway and requires active adenosine A(2A) receptors. Transport through GAT-3 is not affected by BDNF. To elucidate if BDNF affects trafficking of GAT-1 in astrocytes, we generated and infected astrocytes with a functional mutant of the rat GAT-1 (rGAT-1) in which the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope...

  3. Mimetic desire and scapegoat mechanism in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Pisk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most fundamental question about sport is what is sport, what is its origin and its essence? Because sport is connected with the human being (there is no sport without human beings different anthropological visions of human being result in different understandings of sport. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to present and explain an anthropological vision of the human being and society as was developed by René Girard. In his view mimetic desire and the scapegoat mechanism have a central role in any culture, religion or other secular institutions. The explanatory power of his theory is presented when it is applied to the world of sport. METHODS: Our methodology is philosophical, involving conceptual analysis and the application of the outcomes to sport. RESULTS: In the paper we show that mimetic desire can be recognized as one of the important origins of recreational and competitive sports. When people recognize what other people are able to do or accomplish in sport this invokes the mimetic desire as a result of which motivation for sport and competiveness can arise. But mimetic rivalry leads to an unstable situation. Therefore a second element is needed: Scapegoating in sport is presented as a mean to preserve the good reputation of sport, to keep peace in sport as well as in society as a whole. Finally, the attempt to overcome mimetic desire and scapegoating in sport is presented and the question if this is worth trying at all is opened. CONCLUSIONS: The theories of mimetic desire and scapegoat mechanism have great explanatory power when they are applied to the field of sport. They could reveal us some hidden motives and forces which drive athletes and sport as a whole. Moreover, they exceed the world of sport and reveal the influence of sport on the whole of society.

  4. Regulated Release of BDNF by Cortical Oligodendrocytes is Mediated Through Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and the PLC Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate, receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3 receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxyethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  5. BDNF control of adult SVZ neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Kevin G; Akins, Michael R; Lee, Francis S

    2012-09-01

    The sensory processing of odorants is a dynamic process that requires plasticity at multiple levels. In the olfactory bulb (OB), inhibitory interneurons undergo lifelong replacement through a process known as adult neurogenesis. These newly born cells are incorporated in a learning-dependent fashion, a process which has led some to suggest this as a primary mechanism through which the OB retains a high degree of plasticity throughout life. A continued focus of researchers in this field has been to understand the molecular mechanisms controlling adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis and the innate functional role of these cells. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been identified as a strong candidate molecule regulating adult OB neurogenesis. We review what is known regarding the functional role of newly born cells, highlight the role of BDNF in this process, and describe preliminary findings from our lab implicating BDNF in the process of selecting of newly born cells for survival. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  7. BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Interacts with Sleep Consolidation to Predict Ability to Create New Declarative Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; De Beaumont, Louis; Gagnon, Katia; Baril, Andrée-Ann; Mongrain, Valérie; Blais, Hélène; Montplaisir, Jacques; Gagnon, Jean-François; Pelleieux, Sandra; Poirier, Judes; Carrier, Julie

    2016-08-10

    BDNF polymorphism was more salient for hippocampus-dependent tasks than for other cognitive tasks. Our results support the hypothesis that reduced activity-dependent secretion of BDNF impairs the benefits of sleep on synaptic plasticity and next-day memory. Our work advances the field by revealing new evidence of a clear genetic heterogeneity in how sleep consolidation contributes to the ability to learn. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/368391-09$15.00/0.

  8. NGF and BDNF: from nerves to adipose tissue, from neurokines to metabokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaldakov, George N; Tonchev, Anton B; Aloe, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Neurotrophins, particularly, NGF and BDNF are now well recognized to mediate a dizzying number of trophobiological effects, ranging from the Rita Levi-Montalcini's neurotrophic through immunotrophic to metabotrophic effects.These are implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neuropsychiatric and cardiometabolic diseases, such as dementia, depression, type 2 diabetes and obesity that may express a common phenotype and coexistence. Recently, adipobiology (adiposcience) as become a focus of numerous studies showing that the adipose tissue is the body's largest endocrine organ producing multiple signaling proteins, including NGF and BDNF, all these dubbed adipokines. On the basis of our and other authors' evidence that low NGF and/or BDNF levels are found in cardiometabolic diseases (atherosclerosis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome), a hypothesis of a critical role of neuro-metabotrophic deficit in the pathogenesis of these diseases has been raised. Since NGF and BDNF also exerts various synaptotrophic effects involved in cognitive enhancement, this hypothesis might also be related to neuropsychiatric diseases such as dementia, depression, schizophrenia, autism, Rett syndrome, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. Finally, NGF- and BDNF-based therapeutic approach, including ampakines, antidepressants, selective deacetylase inhibitors, statins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, and "brain food" and calorie restriction, is outlined.

  9. Interaction of BDNF rs6265 variants and energy and protein intake in the risk for glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W; Park, Sunmin

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to examine the association of BDNF variants with type 2 diabetes and the interactions of different BDNF genotypes with dietary habits and food and nutrient intakes in middle-aged adults. The study population included 8840 adults ages 40 to 65 y from the Ansan and Asung areas in the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study, a cross-sectional study of Korean adults, conducted from 2001 to 2002. Adjusted odd ratios for the prevalence of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes according to BDNF genotypes were calculated after adjusting for age, sex, residence area, body mass index, physical activity, and smoking and stress status. Nutrient intake was calculated from usual food intake determined by semiquantitative food frequencies using the nutrient assessment software. BDNF rs6265 Val/Met and Met/Met variants were negatively associated with the risk for type 2 diabetes after adjusting for covariates. Serum glucose levels after glucose loading and hemoglobin A1c, but not serum insulin levels, also were negatively associated with BDNF Val/Met and Met/Met. In subgroup analysis, sex and stress levels had an interaction with BDNF Val/Met in the risk for type 2 diabetes. Glucose-intolerant and diabetic, but not nondiabetic, patients with BDNF Met/Met had nominally, but significantly higher intakes of energy than those with BDNF Val/Val. BDNF rs6265 had consistent gene-diet interactions with energy and protein intake. With low-energy, low-protein, and high-carbohydrate intake, BDNF Val/Met lowered the risk for type 2 diabetes after adjusting for confounding factors. BDNF Val/Met did not compensate for developing type 2 diabetes with high-energy intake. Additionally, indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion showed the same gene-energy interaction as type 2 diabetes. BDNF Val/Met and Met/Met variants (rs6265) decreases the risk for

  10. Novel Superoxide Dismutase Mimetics for Protection against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraquat-induced nephrotoxicity involves severe renal damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically by increasing superoxide (O2○-) generation in the kidney. While proven to be of benefit in animal models of organ injury involving O2○-, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and superoxide dismutase mimetics ...

  11. Obesity itself does not influence BDNF serum levels in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, E; Sobieska, M; Łojko, D; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K; Suwalska, A

    2014-01-01

    In European countries more than 50% of the population are overweight, 30% with obesity. In Poland overweight was present in 41% of men and 28.7% of women (obesity 15.7% and 19.9%). It was examined whether obesity affects serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which may lead to the consequences of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and finally the metabolic syndrome. We aimed to examine whether obesity affects the serum levels of BDNF and IL-6. The study involved 144 people aged 45 to 86 years, 80 subjects with diagnosed obesity and 64 with normal body weight, ≤ 65 years old (n = 45) and > 65 years old (n = 99). All patients underwent tests of glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides levels, using routine laboratory methods. A test of the concentration of IL-6 and BDNF was carried out. The declared level of physical activity (gymnastics, cycling or walking) was considered. It was shown that in women ≤ 65 years old, obesity was associated with higher levels of interleukin-6. When the test group, divided into the above categories, was analyzed for the diagnosis of hypertension, heart failure or diabetes mellitus, no statistically significant differences in the investigated parameters were detected. The concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor did not differ in the investigated subjects, regardless of sex, age, obesity, or the declared physical activity. The concentration of interleukin-6 in younger people, including those with normal body weight, correlated with total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and it was significantly higher in obese women compared to those with normal body weight.

  12. Melatonin Promotes Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression and Anti-Apoptotic Effects in Neonatal Hemolytic Hyperbilirubinemia via a Phospholipase (PLC)-Mediated Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Peng, Mei; Wei, Hong

    2017-12-16

    BACKGROUND Melatonin therapy shows positive effects on neuroprotective factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and neuronal apoptosis in neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia. We hypothesized that melatonin promotes BDNF expression and anti-apoptotic effects in neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia through a phospholipase (PLC)-mediated mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS A phenylhydrazine hydrochloride (PHZ)-induced neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia model was constructed in neonatal rats. Four experimental groups - a control group (n=30), a PHZ group (n=30), a PHZ + melatonin group (n=30), and a PHZ + melatonin+U73122 (a PLC inhibitor) group (n=30) - were constructed. Trunk blood was assayed for serum hemoglobin, hematocrit, total and direct bilirubin, BDNF, S100B, and tau protein levels. Brain tissue levels of neuronal apoptosis, BDNF expression, PLC activity, IP3 content, phospho- and total Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMKIV) expression, and phospho- and total cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) expression were also assayed. RESULTS PHZ-induced hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia was validated by significantly decreased serum hemoglobin and hematocrit as well as significantly increased total and direct serum bilirubin (p<0.05). Neonatal bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity was validated by significantly decreased serum BDNF, brain BDNF, and serum S100B, along with significantly increased serum tau protein (p<0.05). PHZ-induced hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia significantly decreased serum BDNF, brain BDNF, and PLC/IP3/Ca2+ pathway activation while increasing neuronal apoptosis levels (p<0.05), all of which were partially rescued by melatonin therapy (p<0.05). Pre-treatment with the PLC inhibitor U73122 largely abolished the positive effects of melatonin on PLC/IP3/Ca2+ pathway activation, downstream BDNF levels, and neuronal apoptosis (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Promotion of BDNF expression and anti-apoptotic effects in neonatal

  13. Hierarchical CNFs/MnCo2O4.5 nanofibers as a highly active oxidase mimetic and its application in biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mu; Lu, Xiaofeng; Nie, Guangdi; Chi, Maoqiang; Wang, Ce

    2017-12-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid on the nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes due to their tunable catalytic activity, high stability and low cost compared to the natural enzymes. Different from the peroxidase mimics which have been studied for several decades, nanomaterials with oxidase-like property are burgeoning in the recent years. In this paper, hierarchical carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/MnCo2O4.5 nanofibers as efficient oxidase mimics are reported. The products are synthesized by an electrospinning technique and an electrochemcial deposition process in which the CNFs are used as the working electrode where MnCo2O4.5 nanosheets deposit on. The resulting binary metal oxide-based nanocomposites exhibit a good oxidase-like activity toward the oxidations of 3,3‧,5,5‧tetramethylbenzi-dine (TMB), 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium (ABTS) salt and o-phenylenediamine (OPD) without exogenous addition of H2O2. The system of CNFs/MnCo2O4.5-TMB can be used as a candidate to detect sulfite and ascorbic acid via a colorimetric method with a high sensitivity. This work provides the efficient utilization and potential applications of binary metal oxide-based nanocomposites with oxidase activities in biosensors and other biotechnologies.

  14. Modular protein switches derived from antibody mimetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholes, N; Date, A; Beaujean, P; Hauk, P; Kanwar, M; Ostermeier, M

    2016-02-01

    Protein switches have potential applications as biosensors and selective protein therapeutics. Protein switches built by fusion of proteins with the prerequisite input and output functions are currently developed using an ad hoc process. A modular switch platform in which existing switches could be readily adapted to respond to any ligand would be advantageous. We investigated the feasibility of a modular protein switch platform based on fusions of the enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase (BLA) with two different antibody mimetic proteins: designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) and monobodies. We created libraries of random insertions of the gene encoding BLA into genes encoding a DARPin or a monobody designed to bind maltose-binding protein (MBP). From these libraries, we used a genetic selection system for β-lactamase activity to identify genes that conferred MBP-dependent ampicillin resistance to Escherichia coli. Some of these selected genes encoded switch proteins whose enzymatic activity increased up to 14-fold in the presence of MBP. We next introduced mutations into the antibody mimetic domain of these switches that were known to cause binding to different ligands. To different degrees, introduction of the mutations resulted in switches with the desired specificity, illustrating the potential modularity of these platforms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Chronic intermittent fasting improves the survival following large myocardial ischemia by activation of BDNF/VEGF/PI3K signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katare, Rajesh G; Kakinuma, Yoshihiko; Arikawa, Mikihiko; Yamasaki, Fumiyasu; Sato, Takayuki

    2009-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the major cause of death in the developed countries. Calorie restriction is known to improve the recovery in these patients; however, the exact mechanism behind this protective effect is unknown. Here we demonstrate the activation of cell survival PI3kinase/Akt and VEGF pathway as the mechanism behind the protection induced by intermittent fasting in a rat model of established chronic myocardial ischemia (MI). Chronic MI was induced in rats by occlusion of the left coronary artery. Two weeks later, the rats were randomly assigned to a normal feeding group (MI-NF) and an alternate-day feeding group (MI-IF). After 6 weeks of observation, we evaluated the effect of intermittent fasting on cellular and ventricular remodeling and long-term survival after CHF. Compared with the normally fed group, intermittent fasting markedly improved the survival of rats with CHF (88.5% versus 23% survival, Pfasted hearts. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed increased capillary density (Pfasting also upregulated the expression of other anti-apoptotic factors such as Akt and Bcl-2 and reduced the TUNEL positive apoptotic nuclei in the border zone. Chronic intermittent fasting markedly improves the long-term survival after CHF by activation through its pro-angiogenic, anti-apoptotic and anti-remodeling effects.

  16. Postnatal BDNF Expression Profiles in Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus of a Rat Schizophrenia Model Induced by MK-801 Administration

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    Chunmei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors represents one of experimental animal models for schizophrenia. This study is to investigate the long-term brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression profiles in different regions and correlation with “schizophrenia-like” behaviors in the adolescence and adult of this rat model. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 was administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats on postnatal days (PND 5 through 14. Open-field test was performed on PND 42, and PND 77 to examine the validity of the current model. BDNF protein levels in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC were analyzed on PND 15, PND 42, and PND 77. Results showed that neonatal challenge with MK-801 persistently elevated locomotor activity as well as BDNF expression; the alterations in BDNF expression varied at different developing stages and among brain regions. However, these findings provide neurochemical evidence that the blockade of NMDA receptors during brain development results in long-lasting alterations in BDNF expression and might contribute to neurobehavioral pathology of the present animal model for schizophrenia. Further study in the mechanisms and roles of the BDNF may lead to better understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  17. Oestrogene mimetic isoflavones’ pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

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    Anca Dragomirescu,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genisteine is the most abundant and the most studied estrogen-mimetic izoflavone. It's chemical formula is 4',5,7 – trihidroxyisoflavone. It has also estrogen-modulated properties by its binding ability to the beta type estrogen receptor. Genisteine presents the following farmacodinamic effects: antiaterogen effect, prevention of estrogen-dependent cancers, especially breast cancer, prevention of skin aging body, osteoprogen effect, prevention of osteoporosis at the menopauses women. Despite all these real benefits, there are also many adverse effects, registered both in humans and animals. Thus, the sheep feeding with some Fabaceae species, containing estrogen-mimetic isoflavones were stopped their reproductive function(isoflavones acted as an oral contraceptive. In humans, phytoestroges influence is still under evaluation, being suspected effects such as cerebral involution - via abusive apoptosis - or disturbance in hormonal status, in male children. All these are added to already known allergies, caused by soy proteins.

  18. Smac-mimetic-induced epithelial cell death reduces the growth of renal cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lucy X; Zhou, Xia; Sweeney, William E; Wallace, Darren P; Avner, Ellis D; Grantham, Jared J; Li, Xiaogang

    2013-12-01

    Past efforts to pharmacologically disrupt the development and growth of renal cystic lesions focused primarily on normalizing the activity of a specific signaling molecule, but the effects of stimulating apoptosis in the proliferating epithelial cells have not been well studied. Although benign, ADPKD renal cysts created by the sustained proliferation of epithelial cells resemble tumors, and malignant cell death can be achieved by cotreatment with TNF-α and a mimetic of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac). Notably, TNF-α accumulates to high levels in ADPKD cyst fluid. Here, we report that an Smac-mimetic selectively induces TNF-α-dependent cystic renal epithelial cell death, leading to the removal of cystic epithelial cells from renal tissues and delaying cyst formation. In vitro, a Smac-mimetic (GT13072) induced the degradation of cIAP1 that is required but not sufficient for cell death. Cotreatment with TNF-α augmented the formation and activation of the RIPK1-dependent death complex and the degradation and cleavage of FLIP, an inhibitor of caspase-8, in renal cystic epithelial cells. This approach produced death specifically in Pkd1 mutant epithelial cells, with no effect on normal renal epithelial cells. Moreover, treatment with the Smac-mimetic slowed cyst and kidney enlargement and preserved renal function in two genetic strains of mice with Pkd1 mutations. Thus, our mechanistic data characterize an apoptotic pathway, activated by the selective synergy of an Smac-mimetic and TNF-α in renal cyst fluid, that attenuates cyst development, providing an innovative translational platform for the rational development of novel therapeutics for ADPKD.

  19. The vagus nerve modulates BDNF expression and neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Ogbonnaya, Ebere S; Felice, Daniela; Levone, Brunno R; C Conroy, Lorraine; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Bravo, Javier A; Forsythe, Paul; Bienenstock, John; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2018-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that certain gut microbiota have antidepressant-like behavioural effects and that the microbiota can regulate neurogenesis and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. The precise mechanisms underlying these effects are not yet clear. However, the vagus nerve is one of the primary bidirectional routes of communication between the gut and the brain and thus may represent a candidate mechanism. Yet, relatively little is known about the direct influence of vagus nerve activity on hippocampal function and plasticity. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether constitutive vagus nerve activity contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis and BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus. To this end, we examined the impact of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy in adult mice on these parameters. We found that vagotomy decreased BDNF mRNA in all areas of the hippocampus. Vagotomy also reduced the proliferation and survival of newly born cells and decreased the number of immature neurons, particularly those with a more complex dendritic morphology. Taken together, these findings suggest that vagal nerve activity influences neurogenesis and BDNF mRNA expression in the adult hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

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    Anna Ijjas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space–times always decreases while in contracting space–times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this letter, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples. Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein–Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. We also show that mimetic cosmology can be understood as a singular limit of known, well-behaved theories involving higher-derivative kinetic terms and discuss ways of removing the instability.

  1. Designing a small molecule erythropoietin mimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a protein made by the kidneys in response to low red blood cell count that is secreted into the bloodstream and binds to a receptor on hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow inducing them to become new red blood cells. EPO made with recombinant DNA technology was brought to market in the 1980s to treat anemia caused by kidney disease and cancer chemotherapy. Because EPO infusion was able to replace blood transfusions in many cases, it rapidly became a multibillion dollar per year drug and as the first biologic created with recombinant technology it launched the biotech industry. For many years intense research was focused on creating a small molecule orally available EPO mimetic. The Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) group seemed to definitively establish that only large peptides with a minimum of 60 residues could replace EPO, as anything less was not a full agonist. An intense study of the published work led me to hypothesize that the size of the mimetic is not the real issue, but the symmetry making and breaking of the EPO receptor induced by the ligand is the key to activating the stem cells. This analysis meant that residues in the binding site of the receptor deemed absolutely essential for ligand binding and activation from mutagenesis experiments, were probably not really that important. My fundamental hypotheses were: (a) the symmetric state of the homodimeric receptor is the most stable state and thus must be the off-state, (b) a highly localized binding site exists at a pivot point where the two halves of the receptor meet, (c) small molecules can be created that have high potency for this site that will be competitive with EPO and thus can displace the protein-protein interaction, (d) small symmetric molecules will stabilize the symmetric off-state of the receptor, and (e) a key asymmetry in the small molecule will stabilize a mirror image asymmetry in the receptor resulting in the stabilization of the on-state and proliferation of

  2. Direct couplings of mimetic dark matter and their cosmological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liuyuan; Mou, Yicen; Zheng, Yunlong; Li, Mingzhe

    2018-01-01

    The original mimetic model was proposed to take the role of dark matter. In this paper we consider possible direct interactions of mimetic dark matter with other matter in the universe, especially standard model particles such as baryons and photons. By imposing shift symmetry, the mimetic dark matter field can only have derivative couplings. We discuss the possibilities of generating baryon number asymmetry and cosmic birefringence in the universe based on the derivative couplings of mimetic dark matter to baryons and photons. Supported by NSFC (11422543, 11653002)

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K. S.; Nielsen, A. R.; Krogh-Madsen, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis  Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and depression. These disorders are associated with type 2 diabetes, and animal models suggest that BDNF plays a role in insulin resistance. We therefore...... explored whether BDNF plays a role in human glucose metabolism. Subjects and methods  We included (Study 1) 233 humans divided into four groups depending on presence or absence of type 2 diabetes and presence or absence of obesity; and (Study 2) seven healthy volunteers who underwent both a hyperglycaemic...... and a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Results  Plasma levels of BDNF in Study 1 were decreased in humans with type 2 diabetes independently of obesity. Plasma BDNF was inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, but not with insulin. No association was found between the BDNF G196A (Val66Met) polymorphism...

  4. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts BDNF level.

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    Maria Giese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep plays a pivotal role in normal biological functions. Sleep loss results in higher stress vulnerability and is often found in mental disorders. There is evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF could be a central player in this relationship. Recently, we could demonstrate that subjects suffering from current symptoms of insomnia exhibited significantly decreased serum BDNF levels compared with sleep-healthy controls. In accordance with the paradigm indicating a link between sleep and BDNF, we aimed to investigate if the stress system influences the association between sleep and BDNF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants with current symptoms of insomnia plus a former diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS and/or Periodic Limb Movement (PLM and sleep healthy controls were included in the study. They completed questionnaires on sleep (ISI, Insomnia Severity Index and stress (PSS, Perceived Stress Scale and provided a blood sample for determination of serum BDNF. We found a significant interaction between stress and insomnia with an impact on serum BDNF levels. Moreover, insomnia severity groups and score on the PSS each revealed a significant main effect on serum BDNF levels. Insomnia severity was associated with increased stress experience affecting serum BDNF levels. Of note, the association between stress and BDNF was only observed in subjects without insomnia. Using a mediation model, sleep was revealed as a mediator of the association between stress experience and serum BDNF levels. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show that the interplay between stress and sleep impacts BDNF levels, suggesting an important role of this relationship in the pathogenesis of stress-associated mental disorders. Hence, we suggest sleep as a key mediator at the connection between stress and BDNF. Whether sleep is maintained or disturbed might explain why some individuals are able to handle a certain stress load while

  5. Prenatal auditory stimulation alters the levels of CREB mRNA, p-CREB and BDNF expression in chick hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2009-10-01

    Prenatal auditory stimulation influences the development of the chick auditory pathway and the hippocampus showing an increase in various morphological parameters as well as expression of calcium-binding proteins. Calcium regulates the activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding (CREB) protein. CREB is known to play a role in development, undergo phosphorylation with neural activity as well as regulate transcription of BDNF. BDNF is important for the survival of neurons and regulates synaptic strength. Hence in the present study, we have evaluated the levels of CREB mRNA and protein along with p-CREB protein as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the chick hippocampus at embryonic days (E) 12, E16, E20 and post-hatch day (PH) 1 following activation by prenatal auditory stimulation. Fertilized eggs were exposed to species-specific sound or sitar music (frequency range: 100-6300Hz) at 65dB levels for 15min/h over 24h from E10 till hatching. The control chick hippocampus showed higher CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein in the early embryonic stages, which later decline whereas BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels increase until PH1. The CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein were significantly increased at E12, E16 and PH1 in the auditory stimulated groups as compared to control group. A significant increase in the level of BDNF mRNA was observed from E12 and the protein expression from E16 onwards in both auditory stimulated groups. Therefore, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB during development following prenatal sound stimulation may be responsible for cell survival. Increased levels of p-CREB again at PH1 may trigger synthesis of proteins necessary for synaptic plasticity. Further, the increased levels of BDNF may also help in regulating synaptic plasticity.

  6. New diketone based vanadium complexes as insulin mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheela, A; Roopan, S Mohana; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2008-10-01

    Since 1985, when Heyliger et al. first reported the in vivo insulin mimetic activity of oral vanadate, extensive studies exploring vanadium chemistry, including the synthesis of novel complexes and their biological effects both in vitro and in vivo have been pursued. Such complexes have emerged as possible potential agents for diabetes therapy. Among the several existing compounds, diketone based vanadium complexes have been chosen for the current study. Two new complexes namely bisdimethylmalonatooxovanadium(IV) and bisdiethylmalonatooxovanadium(IV) have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible, FTIR and mass spectral studies. The antidiabetic activity of the complexes was proved by animal study. The results show that the above complexes have comparable antidiabetic potential with respect to the standard drug as well as with bisacetylacetonatooxovanadium(IV) which has been studied earlier by Reul et al.

  7. Atorvastatin Protects from Aβ1-40-Induced Cell Damage and Depressive-Like Behavior via ProBDNF Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludka, Fabiana K; Cunha, Maurício P; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Constantino, Leandra C; Massari, Caio M; Martins, Wagner C; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-10-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) amyloid-beta (Aβ) 1-40 infusion to mice has been demonstrated to cause neurotoxicty and depressive-like behavior and it can be used to evaluate antidepressant and neuroprotective effect of drugs. Atorvastatin is a widely used statin that has demonstrated antidepressant-like effect in predictable animal behavioral models and neuroprotective effect against Aβ 1-40 infusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of in vivo atorvastatin treatment against Aβ 1-40 -induced changes in mood-related behaviors and biochemical parameters in ex vivo hippocampal slices from mice. Atorvastatin treatment (10 mg/kg, p.o., once a day for seven consecutive days) abolished depressive-like and anhedonic-like behaviors induced by Aβ 1-40 (400 pmol/site, icv) infusion. Aβ 1-40 -induced hippocampal cell damage was reversed by atorvastatin treatment. Aβ 1-40 infusion decreased glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices, and atorvastatin did not altered it. Glutamine synthetase activity was not altered by any treatment. Atorvastatin also increased hippocampal mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF)/precursor BDNF (proBDNF) ratio, suggesting an increase of proBDNF to mBDNF cleavage. Accordingly, increased tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and p11 genic expression were observed in hippocampus of atorvastatin-treated mice. Atorvastatin displays antidepressant-like and neuroprotective effects against Aβ 1-40 -induced toxicity, and these effects may involve tPA- and p11-mediated cleavage of proBDNF to mBDNF.

  8. The Brain-Uterus Connection: Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Its Receptor (Ntrk2) Are Conserved in the Mammalian Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Jocelyn M.; Wu, Liang; Leyland, Nicholas A.; Wang, Hongmei; Foster, Warren G.

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophins are neuropeptides that are potent regulators of neurite growth and survival. Although mainly studied in the brain and nervous system, recent reports have shown that neurotrophins are expressed in multiple target tissues and cell types throughout the body. Additionally, dysregulation of neurotrophins has been linked to several disease conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, psychiatric disorders, and cancer. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that elicits its actions through the neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase type 2 (Ntrk2). Together BDNF and Ntrk2 are capable of activating the adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation pathways. These pathways are prominently involved in reproductive physiology, yet a cross-species examination of BDNF and Ntrk2 expression in the mammalian uterus is lacking. Herein we demonstrated the conserved nature of BDNF and Ntrk2 across several mammalian species by mRNA and protein sequence alignment, isolated BDNF and Ntrk2 transcripts in the uterus by Real-Time PCR, localized both proteins to the glandular and luminal epithelium, vascular smooth muscle, and myometrium of the uterus, determined that the major isoforms expressed in the human endometrium were pro-BDNF, and truncated Ntrk2, and finally demonstrated antibody specificity. Our findings suggest that BDNF and Ntrk2 are transcribed, translated, and conserved across mammalian species including human, mouse, rat, pig, horse, and the bat. PMID:24714156

  9. The brain-uterus connection: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor (Ntrk2) are conserved in the mammalian uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Jocelyn M; Wu, Liang; Leyland, Nicholas A; Wang, Hongmei; Foster, Warren G

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophins are neuropeptides that are potent regulators of neurite growth and survival. Although mainly studied in the brain and nervous system, recent reports have shown that neurotrophins are expressed in multiple target tissues and cell types throughout the body. Additionally, dysregulation of neurotrophins has been linked to several disease conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, psychiatric disorders, and cancer. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that elicits its actions through the neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase type 2 (Ntrk2). Together BDNF and Ntrk2 are capable of activating the adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation pathways. These pathways are prominently involved in reproductive physiology, yet a cross-species examination of BDNF and Ntrk2 expression in the mammalian uterus is lacking. Herein we demonstrated the conserved nature of BDNF and Ntrk2 across several mammalian species by mRNA and protein sequence alignment, isolated BDNF and Ntrk2 transcripts in the uterus by Real-Time PCR, localized both proteins to the glandular and luminal epithelium, vascular smooth muscle, and myometrium of the uterus, determined that the major isoforms expressed in the human endometrium were pro-BDNF, and truncated Ntrk2, and finally demonstrated antibody specificity. Our findings suggest that BDNF and Ntrk2 are transcribed, translated, and conserved across mammalian species including human, mouse, rat, pig, horse, and the bat.

  10. Social variables exert selective pressures in the evolution and form of primate mimetic musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Anne M; Li, Ly; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    Mammals use their faces in social interactions more so than any other vertebrates. Primates are an extreme among most mammals in their complex, direct, lifelong social interactions and their frequent use of facial displays is a means of proximate visual communication with conspecifics. The available repertoire of facial displays is primarily controlled by mimetic musculature, the muscles that move the face. The form of these muscles is, in turn, limited by and influenced by phylogenetic inertia but here we use examples, both morphological and physiological, to illustrate the influence that social variables may exert on the evolution and form of mimetic musculature among primates. Ecomorphology is concerned with the adaptive responses of morphology to various ecological variables such as diet, foliage density, predation pressures, and time of day activity. We present evidence that social variables also exert selective pressures on morphology, specifically using mimetic muscles among primates as an example. Social variables include group size, dominance 'style', and mating systems. We present two case studies to illustrate the potential influence of social behavior on adaptive morphology of mimetic musculature in primates: (1) gross morphology of the mimetic muscles around the external ear in closely related species of macaque (Macaca mulatta and Macaca nigra) characterized by varying dominance styles and (2) comparative physiology of the orbicularis oris muscle among select ape species. This muscle is used in both facial displays/expressions and in vocalizations/human speech. We present qualitative observations of myosin fiber-type distribution in this muscle of siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), and human to demonstrate the potential influence of visual and auditory communication on muscle physiology. In sum, ecomorphologists should be aware of social selective pressures as well as ecological ones, and that observed morphology might

  11. Effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and met allele load on declarative memory related neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodds, Chris M; Henson, Richard N; Suckling, John

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism modulates episodic memory performance via effects on hippocampal neural circuitry. However, fMRI studies have yielded inconsistent results in this respect. Moreover, very few studies have examined the effect of met allele load on activation...... of memory circuitry. In the present study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the effects of the BDNF polymorphism on brain responses during episodic memory encoding and retrieval, including an investigation of the effect of met allele load on memory related activation in the medial temporal lobe....... In contrast to previous studies, we found no evidence for an effect of BDNF genotype or met load during episodic memory encoding. Met allele carriers showed increased activation during successful retrieval in right hippocampus but this was contrast-specific and unaffected by met allele load. These results...

  12. ROLE OF BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF COGNTIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

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    Irina Vladimirovna Gatskikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the heavy progressive vascular complications of type 2 diabetes is a central nervous system, manifesting cognitive dysfunction due to metabolic changes. Goal. Defining the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods. The study involved 83 patients with type 2 diabetes at the age of 40 - 70 years. Complex examination included clinical and laboratory examination, neuropsychological testing. To screen for cognitive impairment used the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MOS test. To identify early markers of cognitive impairment was determined the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Results. The study found a negative correlation between the level of BDNF and the HbA1c (r = - 0,494, p = 0.01, fasting glucose (r = - 0,499, p = 0.01, and a positive relationship between the level of BDNF and cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion. In patients with type 2 diabetes revealed cognitive dysfunction in the form of reduced memory, attention, optical-dimensional activity that correlated with chronic hyperglycemia. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the complex diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. With an increase in HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes reduces the level of BDNF in the blood plasma, and a decline in cognitive function. Recommended use of BDNF as an additional marker of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Inhibition of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium (Kir 4.1 Channels Facilitates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF Expression in Astrocytes

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    Masato Kinboshi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir 4.1 channels in astrocytes regulate neuronal excitability by mediating spatial potassium buffering. Although dysfunction of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels is implicated in the development of epileptic seizures, the functional mechanisms of Kir4.1 channels in modulating epileptogenesis remain unknown. We herein evaluated the effects of Kir4.1 inhibition (blockade and knockdown on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key modulator of epileptogenesis, in the primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. For blockade of Kir4.1 channels, we tested several antidepressant agents which reportedly bound to and blocked Kir4.1 channels in a subunit-specific manner. Treatment of astrocytes with fluoxetine enhanced BDNF mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner and increased the BDNF protein level. Other antidepressants (e.g., sertraline and imipramine also increased the expression of BDNF mRNA with relative potencies similar to those for inhibition of Kir4.1 channels. In addition, suppression of Kir4.1 expression by the transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting Kir4.1 significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF. The BDNF induction by Kir4.1 siRNA transfection was suppressed by the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126, but not by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125. The present results demonstrated that inhibition of Kir4.1 channels facilitates BDNF expression in astrocytes primarily by activating the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, which may be linked to the development of epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Black hole solutions in mimetic Born-Infeld gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2018-01-01

    The vacuum, static, and spherically symmetric solutions in the mimetic Born-Infeld gravity are studied. The mimetic Born-Infeld gravity is a reformulation of the Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) model under the mimetic approach. Due to the mimetic field, the theory contains non-trivial vacuum solutions different from those in Einstein gravity. We find that with the existence of the mimetic field, the spacelike singularity inside a Schwarzschild black hole could be altered to a lightlike singularity, even though the curvature invariants still diverge at the singularity. Furthermore, in this case, the maximal proper time for a timelike radially-infalling observer to reach the singularity is found to be infinite.

  15. Moth eye mimetic cytocompatible bactericidal nanotopography: A convergent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viela, Felipe; Navarro-Baena, Iván; Hernández, Jaime J; Osorio, Manuel R; Rodriguez, Isabel

    2018-01-19

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria has prompted the need for radically different approaches to combat bacterial infections. Among these, bioinspired surface topographies have emerged as an effective sustainable strategy to deter bacterial infection. This study demonstrates the bactericidal activity and cytocompatibility of the moth eye mimetic topography produced by thermal polymer nanoimprinting. The moth eye topography was found to have bactericidal capabilities against Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Electron microscopy imaging revealed the bactericidal effect caused by mechanical rupture of the bacteria wall inflicted by the topography on the adhered cells. The cytocompatibility of the surfaces was evidenced by assessing the proliferation and morphology of keratinocytes cultured on the nanotopography. The technology meets important needs in medical implant technology for materials that not only have good biocompatibility but also antibacterial properties for reducing the risk of infections and related health complications. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. BDNF VAL66MET Polymorphism Elevates the Risk of Bladder Cancer via MiRNA-146b in Micro-Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Emerging studies on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF have shown that might be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer. We explore the role of BDNF in the tumorigenesis of bladder cancer and the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods: 368 patients with diagnosed bladder cancer and 352 healthy controls were enrolled to evaluate the association of BDNF and the miR-146b. Bioinformatics algorithm analysis and luciferase assay were performed to identify the target genes of miR-146b. Real-time PCR and western-blot were carried out to validate the relationship between miR-146b and CRK. MTT assay and FACS were used to evaluated the proliferation and apoptosis of cancer cells. MVs were isolated and transfect into the culture cells to confirm the above observation. Results: The clinical study shows that BDNF Met/Met was significantly associated with the risk of bladder cancer. In addition, comparing with Val/Val and Val/Met, Met/Met has lower miR-146b level. Luciferase assay shows that BDNF Val/Val is apparently enhanced miR-146b promoter-luciferase, but not BDNF Met/Met. Based on luciferase assay, CRK is a direct target gene of miR-146b. MiR-146b mimics significantly inhibited the expression of CRK and activation of AKT level. The expression of CRK and the activation of AKT (p-AKT were significantly inhibited by MV-BDNF Val/Val-miR-146b or MV-BDNF Val/Met-miR-146b, but not MV-BDNF Met/Met-miR-146b. MV-BDNF Val/Val-miR-146b or Val/Met-miR-146b obviously inhibited cell proliferation, which eliminated by CRK. Meanwhile, with MV-BDNF Met/Met-miR-146b or Met/Met-miR-146b+CRK did not affect the proliferation. MV-BDNF Val/Val-miR-146b or Val/Met-miR-146b enhanced cell apoptosis, which could be eliminated by CRK. Meanwhile, MV-BDNF Met/Met-miR-146b or Met/Met-miR-146b+CRK did not promote apoptosis. Conclusion: BDNF VAL66MET polymorphism is associated with miR-146b and its target gene CRK. MiR-146b and CRK mediated BDNF VAL66

  17. Endurance training enhances BDNF release from the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice; Wissenberg, Mads

    2010-01-01

    The circulating level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is reduced in patients with major depression and type-2 diabetes. Because acute exercise increases BDNF production in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, we hypothesized that endurance training would enhance the release of BDNF from...... the human brain as detected from arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples. In a randomized controlled study, 12 healthy sedentary males carried out 3 mo of endurance training (n = 7) or served as controls (n = 5). Before and after the intervention, blood samples were obtained at rest and during...... exercise. At baseline, the training group (58 + or - 106 ng x 100 g(-1) x min(-1), means + or - SD) and the control group (12 + or - 17 ng x 100 g(-1) x min(-1)) had a similar release of BDNF from the brain at rest. Three months of endurance training enhanced the resting release of BDNF to 206 + or - 108...

  18. Conjunctivally Applied BDNF Protects Photoreceptors from Light-Induced Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Elisa; Origlia, Nicola; Falsini, Benedetto; Barloscio, Davide; Fabiani, Carlotta; Sansò, Marco; Ottino, Sara; Giovannini, Luca; Domenici, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    To test whether the topical eye treatment with BDNF prevents the effects of continuous light exposure (LE) in the albino rat retina. Two groups of albino rats were used. The first group of rats received an intraocular injection of BDNF (2 μL, 1 μg/μL) before LE, while the second group was treated with one single drop of BDNF (10 μL, 12 μg/μL) dissolved in different types of solutions (physiological solution, the polysaccharide fraction of Tamarind gum, TSP, and sodium carboxy methyl cellulose), at the level of conjunctival fornix before LE. The level of BDNF in the retina and optic nerve was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We recorded the flash electroretinogram (fERG) in dark adapted rats 1 week after LE. At the end of the recording session, the retinas were removed and labeled so that the number of photoreceptors nuclear rows and thickness of the outer nuclear layer was analyzed. Intravitreal injection of BDNF before LE prevented fERG impairment. Different ophthalmic preparations were used for topical eye application; the TSP resulted the most suitable vehicle to increase BDNF level in the retina and optic nerve. Topical eye application with BDNF/TSP before LE partially preserved both fERG response and photoreceptors. Topical eye treatment with BDNF represents a suitable, noninvasive tool to increase the retinal content of BDNF up to a level capable of exerting neuroprotection toward photoreceptors injured by prolonged LE. A collyrium containing BDNF may serve as an effective, clinically translational treatment against retinal degeneration.

  19. Could BDNF be involved in compensatory mechanisms to maintain cognitive performance despite acute sleep deprivation? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Vedovelli, Kelem; de Souza, Carlos Eduardo Bruhn; Spitza, Letícia Martins; Gonçalves, Lucas; Paludo, Nathália; Molina, Rachel Dias; da Rosa, Eduarda Dias; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Bromberg, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest that acute sleep deprivation can lead to adaptations, such as compensatory recruitment of cerebral structures, to maintain cognitive performance despite sleep loss. However, the understanding of the neurochemical alterations related to these adaptations remains incomplete. Investigate BDNF levels, cognitive performance and their relations in healthy subjects after acute sleep deprivation. Nineteen sleep deprived (22.11±3.21years) and twenty control (25.10±4.42years) subjects completed depression, anxiety and sleep quality questionnaires. Sleep deprived group spent a full night awake performing different playful activities to keep themselves from sleeping. Attention, response inhibition capacity and working memory (prefrontal cortex-dependent) were assessed with Stroop and Digit Span tests. Declarative memory (hippocampus-dependent) was assessed with Logical Memory test. Serum BDNF was measured by sandwich ELISA. Data were analyzed with independent samples T-test, ANOVA, ANCOVA and curve estimation regressions. psleep deprived group showed higher BDNF levels and normal performance on attention, response inhibition capacity and working memory. However, declarative memory was impaired. A sigmoidal relation between BDNF and Stroop Test scores was found. Increased BDNF could be related, at least in part, to the maintenance of normal prefrontal cognitive functions after sleep deprivation. This potential relation should be further investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Exercise Training on Resting Concentrations of Peripheral Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dinoff

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which physical activity supports healthy brain function remain to be elucidated. One hypothesis suggests that increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mediates some cognitive and mood benefits. This meta-analysis sought to determine the effect of exercise training on resting concentrations of BDNF in peripheral blood.MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, Rehabilitation & Sports Medicine Source, and CINAHL databases were searched for original, peer-reviewed reports of peripheral blood BDNF concentrations before and after exercise interventions ≥ 2 weeks. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs were generated from random effects models. Risk of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger's test. Potential sources of heterogeneity were explored in subgroup analyses.In 29 studies that met inclusion criteria, resting concentrations of peripheral blood BDNF were higher after intervention (SMD = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17-0.60, p < 0.001. Subgroup analyses suggested a significant effect in aerobic (SMD = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.33-0.99, p < 0.001 but not resistance training (SMD = 0.07, 95% CI: -0.15-0.30, p = 0.52 interventions. No significant difference in effect was observed between males and females, nor in serum vs plasma.Aerobic but not resistance training interventions increased resting BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood.

  1. Smac Mimetic Bypasses Apoptosis Resistance in FADD- or Caspase-8-Deficient Cells by Priming for Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Necroptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Laukens

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Searching for new strategies to bypass apoptosis resistance, we investigated the potential of the Smac mimetic BV6 in Jurkat leukemia cells deficient in key molecules of the death receptor pathway. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that Smac mimetic primes apoptosis-resistant, FADD- or caspase-8-deficient leukemia cells for TNFα-induced necroptosis in a synergistic manner. In contrast to TNFα, Smac mimetic significantly enhances CD95-induced apoptosis in wild-type but not in FADD-deficient cells. Interestingly, Smac mimetic- and TNFα-mediated cell death occurs without characteristic features of apoptosis (i.e., caspase activation, DNA fragmentation in FADD-deficient cells. By comparison, Smac mimetic and TNFα trigger activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and DNA fragmentation in wild-type cells. Consistently, the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk fails to block Smac mimetic- and TNFα-triggered cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient cells, while it confers protection in wild-type cells. By comparison, necrostatin-1, an RIP1 kinase inhibitor, abolishes Smac mimetic- and TNFα-induced cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient. Thus, Smac mimetic enhances TNFα-induced cell death in leukemia cells via two distinct pathways in a context-dependent manner: it primes apoptosis-resistant cells lacking FADD or caspase-8 to TNFα-induced, RIP1-dependent and caspase-independent necroptosis, whereas it sensitizes apoptosis-proficient cells to TNFα-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic exploitation of necroptosis as an alternative cell death program to overcome apoptosis resistance.

  2. Smac Mimetic Bypasses Apoptosis Resistance in FADD- or Caspase-8-Deficient Cells by Priming for Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Necroptosis12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukens, Bram; Jennewein, Claudia; Schenk, Barbara; Vanlangenakker, Nele; Schier, Alexander; Cristofanon, Silvia; Zobel, Kerry; Deshayes, Kurt; Vucic, Domagoj; Jeremias, Irmela; Bertrand, Mathieu JM; Vandenabeele, Peter; Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Searching for new strategies to bypass apoptosis resistance, we investigated the potential of the Smac mimetic BV6 in Jurkat leukemia cells deficient in key molecules of the death receptor pathway. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that Smac mimetic primes apoptosis-resistant, FADD- or caspase-8-deficient leukemia cells for TNFα-induced necroptosis in a synergistic manner. In contrast to TNFα, Smac mimetic significantly enhances CD95-induced apoptosis in wild-type but not in FADD-deficient cells. Interestingly, Smac mimetic- and TNFα-mediated cell death occurs without characteristic features of apoptosis (i.e., caspase activation, DNA fragmentation) in FADD-deficient cells. By comparison, Smac mimetic and TNFα trigger activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and DNA fragmentation in wild-type cells. Consistently, the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk fails to block Smac mimetic- and TNFα-triggered cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient cells, while it confers protection in wild-type cells. By comparison, necrostatin-1, an RIP1 kinase inhibitor, abolishes Smac mimetic- and TNFα-induced cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient. Thus, Smac mimetic enhances TNFα-induced cell death in leukemia cells via two distinct pathways in a context-dependent manner: it primes apoptosis-resistant cells lacking FADD or caspase-8 to TNFα-induced, RIP1-dependent and caspase-independent necroptosis, whereas it sensitizes apoptosis-proficient cells to TNFα-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic exploitation of necroptosis as an alternative cell death program to overcome apoptosis resistance. PMID:22028622

  3. Smac mimetic bypasses apoptosis resistance in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient cells by priming for tumor necrosis factor α-induced necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukens, Bram; Jennewein, Claudia; Schenk, Barbara; Vanlangenakker, Nele; Schier, Alexander; Cristofanon, Silvia; Zobel, Kerry; Deshayes, Kurt; Vucic, Domagoj; Jeremias, Irmela; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Vandenabeele, Peter; Fulda, Simone

    2011-10-01

    Searching for new strategies to bypass apoptosis resistance, we investigated the potential of the Smac mimetic BV6 in Jurkat leukemia cells deficient in key molecules of the death receptor pathway. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that Smac mimetic primes apoptosis-resistant, FADD- or caspase-8-deficient leukemia cells for TNFα-induced necroptosis in a synergistic manner. In contrast to TNFα, Smac mimetic significantly enhances CD95-induced apoptosis in wild-type but not in FADD-deficient cells. Interestingly, Smac mimetic- and TNFα-mediated cell death occurs without characteristic features of apoptosis (i.e., caspase activation, DNA fragmentation) in FADD-deficient cells. By comparison, Smac mimetic and TNFα trigger activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 and DNA fragmentation in wild-type cells. Consistently, the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk fails to block Smac mimetic- and TNFα-triggered cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient cells, while it confers protection in wild-type cells. By comparison, necrostatin-1, an RIP1 kinase inhibitor, abolishes Smac mimetic- and TNFα-induced cell death in FADD- or caspase-8-deficient. Thus, Smac mimetic enhances TNFα-induced cell death in leukemia cells via two distinct pathways in a context-dependent manner: it primes apoptosis-resistant cells lacking FADD or caspase-8 to TNFα-induced, RIP1-dependent and caspase-independent necroptosis, whereas it sensitizes apoptosis-proficient cells to TNFα-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic exploitation of necroptosis as an alternative cell death program to overcome apoptosis resistance.

  4. Synthetic N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine Based Fully Branched Tetrasaccharide, a Mimetic of the Endogenous Ligand for CD69, Activates CD69+ Killer Lymphocytes upon Dimerization via a Hydrophilic Flexible Linker

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovalová, Anna; Ledvina, Miroslav; Šaman, David; Zyka, Daniel; Kubíčková, M.; Žídek, L.; Sklenář, V.; Pompach, P.; Kavan, D.; Bílý, J.; Vaněk, O.; Kubínková, Z.; Libigerová, M.; Ivanová, L.; Antolíková, M.; Mrázek, H.; Rozbeský, D.; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Křen, Vladimír; Bezouška, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2010), s. 4050-4065 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA ČR GA303/09/0477; GA ČR GD305/09/H008; GA ČR GP203/09/P024; GA AV ČR KAN200520703; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : CD69 * mimetic * tetrasaccharide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.207, year: 2010

  5. Working Memory Deficits, Increased Anxiety-Like Traits, and Seizure Susceptibility in BDNF Overexpressing Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Francesco; Silverman, Jill L.; Aney, Jordan; Tian, Qingjun; Barkan, Charlotte L.; Chadman, Kathryn K.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    BDNF regulates components of cognitive processes and has been implicated in psychiatric disorders. Here we report that genetic overexpression of the BDNF mature isoform (BDNF-tg) in female mice impaired working memory functions while sparing components of fear conditioning. BDNF-tg mice also displayed reduced breeding efficiency, higher…

  6. Antitumor Efficacy of a Thrombospondin 1 Mimetic CovX-Body

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lingna; Leedom, Tom A; Do, Janet; Huang, Hanhua; Lai, JingYu; Johnson, Kim; Osothprarop, Trina F; Rizzo, John D; Doppalapudi, Venkata R; Bradshaw, Curt W; Lappe, Rodney W; Woodnutt, Gary; Levin, Nancy J; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    CVX-045 is produced by covalently attaching a thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) mimetic comprising a peptidic sequence and a linker to the Fab binding site of a proprietary scaffold antibody. CVX-045 possesses the potency of the TSP-1-derived peptide, along with the advantageous pharmacokinetics of an antibody. Antitumor activity of CVX-045 was evaluated in human xenograft models alone and in combination with standard chemotherapies and targeted molecules. In A549 and A431 xenograft models, CVX-045 de...

  7. Muscle Contraction Regulates BDNF/TrkB Signaling to Modulate Synaptic Function through Presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hurtado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF acts via tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB to regulate synapse maintenance and function in the neuromuscular system. The potentiation of acetylcholine (ACh release by BDNF requires TrkB phosphorylation and Protein Kinase C (PKC activation. BDNF is secreted in an activity-dependent manner but it is not known if pre- and/or postsynaptic activities enhance BDNF expression in vivo at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Here, we investigated whether nerve and muscle cell activities regulate presynaptic conventional PKC (cPKCα and βI via BDNF/TrkB signaling to modulate synaptic strength at the NMJ. To differentiate the effects of presynaptic activity from that of muscle contraction, we stimulated the phrenic nerve of rat diaphragms (1 Hz, 30 min with or without contraction (abolished by μ-conotoxin GIIIB. Then, we performed ELISA, Western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological techniques. We found that nerve-induced muscle contraction: (1 increases the levels of mature BDNF protein without affecting pro-BDNF protein or BDNF mRNA levels; (2 downregulates TrkB.T1 without affecting TrkB.FL or p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 levels; (3 increases presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI protein level through TrkB signaling; and (4 enhances phosphorylation of cPKCα and cPKCβI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cPKCβI, which is exclusively located in the motor nerve terminals, increases activity-induced acetylcholine release. Together, these results show that nerve-induced muscle contraction is a key regulator of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, retrogradely activating presynaptic cPKC isoforms (in particular cPKCβI to modulate synaptic function. These results indicate that a decrease in neuromuscular activity, as occurs in several neuromuscular disorders, could affect the BDNF/TrkB/PKC pathway that links pre- and postsynaptic activity to maintain neuromuscular function.

  8. Synergistic Effects of a Smac Mimetic with Doxorubicin Against Human Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Etsuko; Kawamoto, Teruya; Ueha, Takeshi; Hara, Hitomi; Fukase, Naomasa; Minoda, Masaya; Morishita, Masayuki; Takemori, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Shuichi; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Akisue, Toshihiro

    2017-11-01

    Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) is a proapoptogenic mitochondrial protein that antagonizes inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), resulting in induction of apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the effects of a Smac mimetic in combination with doxorubicin against osteosarcoma. In vitro effects of the combination of a Smac mimetic AT-406 and doxorubicin on cell proliferation and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cell lines were examined using cell proliferation assays, flow cytometry, and immunoblot analyses. For in vivo experiments, human osteosarcoma xenografts were treated with combination of the two substances, and tumor volume and apoptotic activity in treated tumors were assessed. In vitro studies revealed that combination of the two substances significantly inhibited osteosarcoma proliferation with decreased cIAP1 expression and induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells. Combination of the two substances significantly suppressed osteosarcoma growth in vivo. Moreover, decreased cIAP1 expression and increased apoptotic activity were observed in tumors treated by their combination of the substances. The Smac mimetic AT-406 showed an apoptotic effect and a synergistic antitumor effect with doxorubicin on osteosarcoma. The combination of AT-406 and doxorubicin may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma treatment. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Insulin mimetic effects of macrocyclic binuclear oxovanadium complexes on streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, B; Kandaswamy, M; Narayanan, V; Subramanian, S

    2003-11-01

    The vanadium complexes so far tested for their insulin mimetic effects are either mono- or binuclear and contain only acyclic ligands. The leaching or hydrolysis of vanadyl ions from these complexes is much easier, and hence they elicit side effects. In the present study, a new binuclear macrocyclic oxovanadium complex was synthesized, and its efficacy was studied on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats over a period of 30 days. The insulin mimetic effect of the complex was tested on the blood sugar level in the STZ-diabetic rats and on the activities of the carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes present in the liver. Administration of vanadium complex to STZ-induced diabetic rats decreased blood glucose levels from hyperglycaemic to normoglycaemic when compared to diabetic rats. The activity of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes such as hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and glycogen content were increased to near normal in vanadium complex-administered diabetic rats. The biochemical studies such as assay of blood urea and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases revealed that the complex is not toxic to the system. The nontoxic nature of this complex may be due to the presence of the vanadyl ions in an intact macrocyclic form. Further, the vanadyl ions present in the macrocyclic binuclear oxovanadium complex are very close to each other, and this may enhance the insulin mimetic activity by synergic effect.

  10. Increased BDNF levels in long-term bipolar disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Guimarães Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bipolar disorder (BD is a prevalent, chronic and progressive illness. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in the pathophysiology of BD. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate BDNF plasma levels in BD patients with long term illness in comparison with controls. METHODS: 87 BD type I patients and 58 controls matched by age, gender and education level were enrolled in this study. All subjects were assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the patients by the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The plasma levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: On average, patients had suffered from BD for 23.4 years. In comparison with controls, BD patients with mania presented a 1.90-fold increase in BDNF plasma levels (p = .001, while BD patients in remission presented a 1.64-fold increase in BDNF plasma levels (p = .03. BDNF plasma levels were not influenced by age, length of illness or current medications. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that long-term BD patients exhibit increased circulating levels of BDNF.

  11. BDNF downregulates 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in hippocampal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, V; Santini, M A; Marcussen, Anders Bue

    2009-01-01

    Both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT(2A)) have been related to depression pathology. Specific 5-HT(2A) receptor changes seen in BDNF conditional mutant mice suggest that BDNF regulates the 5-HT(2A) receptor level. Here we show a direct effect of BDNF...... on 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in primary hippocampal neuronal and mature hippocampal organotypic cultures exposed to different BDNF concentrations for either 1, 3, 5 or 7 days. In vivo effects of BDNF on hippocampal 5-HT(2A) receptor levels were further corroborated in (BDNF +/-) mice...... with reduced BDNF levels. In primary neuronal cultures, 7 days exposure to 25 and 50ng/mL BDNF resulted in downregulation of 5-HT(2A), but not of 5-HT(1A), receptor protein levels. The BDNF-associated downregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptor levels was also observed in mature hippocampal organotypic cultures...

  12. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S; Taube, Ran; Engel, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential.

  13. Long-term Administration of Salicylate-induced Changes in BDNF Expression and CREB Phosphorylation in the Auditory Cortex of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bin; Wu, Cong; Shi, Runjie; Han, Kun; Sheng, Haibin; Li, Bei; Mei, Ling; Wang, Xueling; Huang, Zhiwu; Wu, Hao

    2018-03-01

    We investigated whether salicylate induces tinnitus through alteration of the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proBDNF, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB), cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the auditory cortex (AC). Salicylate medication is frequently used for long-term treatment in clinical settings, but it may cause reversible tinnitus. Salicylate-induced tinnitus is associated with changes related to central auditory neuroplasticity. Our previous studies revealed enhanced neural activity and ultrastructural synaptic changes in the central auditory system after long-term salicylate administration. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Salicylate-induced tinnitus-like behavior in rats was confirmed using gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition testing, followed by comparison of the expression levels of BDNF, proBDNF, TrkB, CREB, and p-CREB. Synaptic ultrastructure was observed under a transmission electron microscope. BDNF and p-CREB were upregulated along with ultrastructural changes at the synapses in the AC of rats treated chronically with salicylate (p  0.05). Long-term administration of salicylate increased BDNF expression and CREB activation, upregulated synaptic efficacy, and changed synaptic ultrastructure in the AC. There may be a relationship between these factors and the mechanism of tinnitus.

  14. Smac Mimetics to Therapeutically Target IAP Proteins in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, S

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are overexpressed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, they are considered as promising targets for the design of therapeutic strategies. Smac mimetics mimic the endogenous mitochondrial protein Smac that antagonizes IAP proteins upon its release into the cytosol. Multiple preclinical studies have documented the ability of Smac mimetics to either directly induce cell death of cancer cells or to prime them to agents that trigger cell death. At present, several Smac mimetics are being evaluated in early clinical trials. The current review provides an overview on the potential of Smac mimetics as cancer therapeutics to target IAP proteins for cancer therapy. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of BDNF in multiple myeloma blocks osteoclastogenesis via down-regulated stroma-derived RANKL expression both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Li-Sha; Sun, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Shun-Chang; Chu, Zhang-Bo; Qin, You; Wang, Ya-Dan; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Han; Guo, Tao; Chen, Lei; Yang, Di; Hu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was recently identified as a factor produced by multiple myeloma (MM) cells, which may contribute to bone resorption and disease progression in MM, though the molecular mechanism of this process is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to test the effect of BDNF on bone disease and growth of MM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Co- and triple-culture systems were implemented. The in vitro results demonstrate that BDNF augmented receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) expression in human bone marrow stromal cells, thus contributing to osteoclast formation. To further clarify the effect of BDNF on myeloma bone disease in vivo, ARH-77 cells were stably transfected with an antisense construct to BDNF (AS-ARH) or empty vector (EV-ARH) to test their capacity to induce MM bone disease in SCID-rab mice. Mice treated with AS-ARH cells were preserved, exhibited no radiologically identifiable lytic lesions and, unlike the controls treated with EV-ARH cells, lived longer and showed reduced tumor burden. Consistently, bones harboring AS-ARH cells showed marked reductions of RANKL expression and osteoclast density compared to the controls harboring EV-ARH cells. These results provide further support for the potential osteoclastogenic effects of BDNF, which may mediate stromal-MM cell interactions to upregulate RANKL secretion, in myeloma bone diseases.

  16. BDNF prevents NMDA-induced toxicity in models of Huntington's disease: the effects are genotype specific and adenosine A2A receptor is involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Alberto; Pepponi, Rita; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ferrante, Antonella; Chiodi, Valentina; Popoli, Patrizia

    2013-04-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is also highly involved in HD and whose effects are modulated by adenosine A2 ARs, influences the activity and expression of striatal NMDA receptors. In electrophysiology experiments, we investigated the role of BDNF toward NMDA-induced effects in HD models, and the possible involvement of A2ARs. In corticostriatal slices from wild-type mice and age-matched symptomatic R6/2 mice (a model of HD), NMDA application (75 μM) induced a transient or a permanent (i.e., toxic) reduction of field potential amplitude, respectively. BDNF (10 ng/mL) potentiated NMDA effects in wild-type, while it protected from NMDA toxicity in R6/2 mice. Both effects of BDNF were prevented by A2 AR blockade. The protective effect of BDNF against NMDA-induced toxicity was reproduced in a cellular model of HD. These findings may have very important implications for the neuroprotective potential of BDNF and A2 AR ligands in HD. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  18. Aging Triggers a Repressive Chromatin State at Bdnf Promoters in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Palomer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive capacities decline with age, an event accompanied by the altered transcription of synaptic plasticity genes. Here, we show that the transcriptional induction of Bdnf by a mnemonic stimulus is impaired in aged hippocampal neurons. Mechanistically, this defect is due to reduced NMDA receptor (NMDAR-mediated activation of CaMKII. Decreased NMDAR signaling prevents changes associated with activation at specific Bdnf promoters, including displacement of histone deacetylase 4, recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase CBP, increased H3K27 acetylation, and reduced H3K27 trimethylation. The decrease in NMDA-CaMKII signaling arises from constitutive reduction of synaptic cholesterol that occurs with normal aging. Increasing the levels of neuronal cholesterol in aged neurons in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo restored NMDA-induced Bdnf expression and chromatin remodeling. Furthermore, pharmacological prevention of age-associated cholesterol reduction rescued signaling and cognitive deficits of aged mice. Thus, reducing hippocampal cholesterol loss may represent a therapeutic approach to reverse cognitive decline during aging.

  19. Smac mimetics and type II interferon synergistically induce necroptosis in various cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekay, Michael John; Roesler, Stefanie; Frank, Tanja; Knuth, Anne-Kathrin; Eckhardt, Ines; Fulda, Simone

    2017-12-01

    Since cancer cells often evade apoptosis, induction of necroptosis as another mode of programmed cell death is considered a promising therapeutic alternative. Here, we identify a novel synergistic interaction of Smac mimetics that antagonize x-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP), cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis (cIAP) 1 and 2 with interferon (IFN)γ to induce necroptosis in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells in which caspase activation is blocked. This synergism is confirmed by calculation of combination indices (CIs) and found in both solid and hematological cancer cell lines as well as for different Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, Birinapant), pointing to a broader relevance. Importantly, individual genetic knockdown of key components of necroptosis signaling, i.e. receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 1, RIP3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like pseudokinase (MLKL), significantly protects from BV6/IFNγ-induced cell death. Similarly, pharmacological inhibitors of RIP1 (necrostatin-1(Nec-1)), RIP3 (GSK'872) or MLKL (necrosulfonamide (NSA)) significantly reduce BV6/IFNγ-stimulated cell death. Of note, IFN-regulatory factor (IRF)1 is required for BV6/IFNγ-mediated necroptosis, as IRF1 silencing provides protection from cell death. By comparison, antibodies blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or CD95 ligand fail to inhibit BV6/IFNγ-induced cell death, pointing to a mechanism independently of death receptor ligands. This is the first report showing that Smac mimetics synergize with IFNγ to trigger necroptosis in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells with important implications for Smac mimetic-based strategies for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Apolipoprotein Mimetic Peptides: A New Approach for the Treatment of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan eYao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available New treatments are needed for severe asthmatics to improve disease control and avoid severe toxicities associated with oral corticosteroids. We have used a murine model of house dust mite (HDM-induced asthma to identify steroid-unresponsive genes that might represent targets for new therapeutic approaches for severe asthma. This strategy identified apolipoprotein E as a steroid-unresponsive gene with increased mRNA expression in the lungs of HDM-challenged mice. Furthermore, apolipoprotein E functioned as an endogenous negative regulator of airway hyperreactivity and goblet cell hyperplasia in experimental HDM-induced asthma. The ability of apolipoprotein E, which is expressed by lung macrophages, to attenuate AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia is mediated by low density lipoprotein (LDL receptors expressed by airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, administration of an apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide, corresponding to amino acids 130 to 149 of the LDL receptor-binding domain of the holo-apoE protein, significantly reduced AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia in HDM-challenged apoE-/- mice. These findings identified the apolipoprotein E - LDL receptor pathway as a new druggable target for asthma that can be activated by administration of apoE mimetic peptides. Similarly, apolipoprotein A-I may have therapeutic potential in asthma based upon its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-fibrotic properties. Furthermore, administration of apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides has attenuated airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperreactivity in murine models of experimental asthma. Thus, site-directed delivery of inhaled apolipoprotein E or apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides may represent novel treatment approaches that can be developed for asthma, including severe disease.

  1. Synergistic interaction of Smac mimetic and IFNα to trigger apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bake, Vanessa; Roesler, Stefanie; Eckhardt, Ines; Belz, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2014-12-28

    Therapeutic targeting of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins by small-molecule inhibitors such as Smac mimetic is considered as a promising anticancer strategy to elicit apoptosis. Recent advances have renewed the interest in exploiting the antileukemic activity of interferon (IFN)α for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we identify a novel synergistic interaction of the Smac mimetic BV6 and IFNα to trigger cell death in AML cells. Calculation of combination index (CI) confirms the synergism of BV6 and IFNα. In contrast to AML cells, no synergistic toxicity of BV6 and IFNα at equimolar concentrations is found against normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. BV6 and IFNα act in concert to stimulate expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and its secretion into the supernatant, thereby initiating an autocrine/paracrine TNFα/TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) loop that drives cell death by BV6 and IFNα. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of TNFα by the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel or genetic silencing of TNFR1 significantly reduces BV6/IFNα-induced cell death. In addition, BV6/IFNα-induced cell death depends on interferon regulatory factor (IRF)1, since RNA interference-imposed knockdown of IRF1 significantly rescues cell death. In conclusion, the identification of a novel synergistic antileukemic combination of Smac mimetic and IFNα has important implications for the development of innovative treatment strategies in AML. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vincristine resistance in relapsed neuroblastoma can be efficiently overcome by Smac mimetic LCL161 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommann, Kristin; Appl, Birgit; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Reinshagen, Konrad; Eschenburg, Georg

    2018-01-31

    In spite of good initial therapy response neuroblastomas often spread to distant organs or relapse after periods of remission. Dysregulation of apoptosis, a hallmark of cancer, is often effected by elevated levels of antiapoptotic signals leading to resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are crucial cellular apoptosis regulators. Targeting IAPs with Smac mimetics has been demonstrated as a promising strategy for treatment of neuroblastoma and other tumors. In paired neuroblastoma cell lines, obtained from the same patient at time of diagnosis (CHLA-15) and postchemotherapy during progressive disease (CHLA-20), expression of crucial IAPs was determined. Furthermore, effects of vincristine on viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction and caspase-3/7 activation were determined. Cellular IAP-1 (cIAP-1) and X-linked IAP (XIAP) expression was increased in cell line CHLA-20. Moreover, biological effects of vincristine were significantly lower in these cells. Treatment of cells with Smac mimetic LCL161 increased the effects of vincristine in CHLA-15 cells and more importantly was able to overcome vincristine resistance in CHLA-20 cells. These findings demonstrate the potential of Smac mimetics for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of relapsed/resistant neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Combining basal insulin analogs with glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Riccardo

    2011-09-01

    Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin regimens are associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain, which can contribute to a greater burden on patients. The combination of basal insulin with a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic is a potentially attractive solution to this problem for some patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mimetics target postprandial glucose and should complement the activity of basal insulins; they are also associated with a relatively low risk of associated hypoglycemia and moderate, but significant, weight loss. Although the combination has not been approved by regulatory authorities, preliminary evidence from mostly small-scale studies suggests that basal insulins in combination with GLP-1 mimetics do provide improvements in A1c and postprandial glucose with concomitant weight loss and no marked increase in the risk of hypoglycemia. These results are promising, but further studies are required, including comparisons with basal-bolus therapy, before the complex value of this association can be fully appreciated.

  4. BDNF genotype modulates resting functional connectivity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriah E Thomason

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A specific polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene is associated with alterations in brain anatomy and memory; its relevance to the functional connectivity of brain networks, however, is unclear. Given that altered hippocampal function and structure has been found in adults who carry the methionine (met allele of the BDNF gene and the molecular studies elucidating the role of BDNF in neurogenesis and synapse formation, we examined in the association between BDNF gene variants and neural resting connectivity in children and adolescents. We observed a reduction in hippocampal and parahippocampal to cortical connectivity in met-allele carriers within each of three resting networks: the default-mode, executive, and paralimbic networks. In contrast, we observed increased connectivity to amygdala, insula and striatal regions in met-carriers, within the paralimbic network. Because the BDNF met-allele has been linked to increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, this latter finding of greater connectivity in circuits important for emotion processing may indicate a new neural mechanism through which these gene-related psychiatric differences are manifest. Here we show that the BDNF gene, known to regulate synaptic plasticity and connectivity in the brain, affects functional connectivity at the neural systems level. Additionally, we provide the first demonstration that the spatial topography of multiple high-level resting state networks in healthy children and adolescents is similar to that observed in adults.

  5. BDNF mechanisms in late LTP formation: A synthesis and breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Debabrata; Bramham, Clive R

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the molecular mechanisms governing long-term synaptic plasticity is a key to understanding how the brain stores information in neural circuits and adapts to a changing environment. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has emerged as a regulator of stable, late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the adult brain. However, the mechanisms by which BDNF triggers L-LTP are controversial. Here, we distill and discuss the latest advances along three main lines: 1) TrkB receptor-coupled translational control underlying dendritic protein synthesis and L-LTP, 2) Mechanisms for BDNF-induced rescue of L-LTP when protein synthesis is blocked, and 3) BDNF-TrkB regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics in dendritic spines. Finally, we explore the inter-relationships between BDNF-regulated mechanisms, how these mechanisms contribute to different forms of L-LTP in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, and outline outstanding issues for future research. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of BDNF Genotype and Exercise on BDNF Serum Levels and VO2 Max after Acute Exercise and Post Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-29

    across age and gender groups [12,13,14,15,16]. Exercise-based cognitive augmentation is thought to be mediated by BDNF [17,18]. BDNF is a...memory and decision- making) (termed FAC henceforth) to traditional AFPT (LC). The FAC training incorporated motions from real world actions (e.g...effectively discriminated since the results are consistent above the prior probabilities in a random guess. 17 Distribution A: Approved for public

  7. Suppression of choriocarcinoma invasion and metastasis following blockade of BDNF/TrkB signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Kawamura, Nanami; Okamoto, Naoki; Manabe, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts through its cognate receptor tyrosine kinase-B (TrkB) to regulate diverse physiological functions in reproductive and other tissues. In normal and malignant trophoblastic cells, the BDNF/TrkB signaling promotes cell growth. Due to the highly malignant nature of choriocarcinoma, we investigated possible involvement of this system in choriocarcinoma cell invasion and metastasis. We demonstrated that treatment of cultured choriocarcinoma cells, known to express both BDNF and TrkB, with a soluble TrkB ectodomain or a Trk receptor inhibitor K252a suppressed cell invasion accompanied with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, a cell invasion marker. In vivo studies using a tumor xenograft model in athymic nude mice further showed inhibition of cell invasion from tumors to surrounding tissues following the suppression of endogenous TrkB signaling. For an in vivo model of choriocarcinoma metastasis, we performed intravenous injections of JAR cells expressing firefly luciferase into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Treatment with K252a inhibited metastasis of tumors to distant organs. In vivo K252a treatment also suppressed metastatic tumor growth as reflected by decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis and caspases-3/7 activities, together with reduced tissue levels of a tumor marker, human chorionic gonadotropin-β. In vivo suppression of TrkB signaling also led to decreased expression of angiogenic markers in metastatic tumor, including cluster of differentiation 31 and vascular endothelial growth factor A. Our findings suggested essential autocrine/paracrine roles of the BDNF/TrkB signaling system in choriocarcinoma invasion and metastasis. Inhibition of this signaling could serve as the basis to develop a novel therapy for patients with choriocarcinoma

  8. The Effects of Acute Physical Exercise on Memory, Peripheral BDNF, and Cortisol in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hötting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In animals, physical activity has been shown to induce functional and structural changes especially in the hippocampus and to improve memory, probably by upregulating the release of neurotrophic factors. In humans, results on the effect of acute exercise on memory are inconsistent so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a single bout of physical exercise on memory consolidation and the underlying neuroendocrinological mechanisms in young adults. Participants encoded a list of German-Polish vocabulary before exercising for 30 minutes with either high intensity or low intensity or before a relaxing phase. Retention of the vocabulary was assessed 20 minutes after the intervention as well as 24 hours later. Serum BDNF and salivary cortisol were measured at baseline, after learning, and after the intervention. The high-intensity exercise group showed an increase in BDNF and cortisol after exercising compared to baseline. Exercise after learning did not enhance the absolute number of recalled words. Participants of the high-intensity exercise group, however, forgot less vocabulary than the relaxing group 24 hours after learning. There was no robust relationship between memory scores and the increase in BDNF and cortisol, respectively, suggesting that further parameters have to be taken into account to explain the effects of exercise on memory in humans.

  9. The Effects of Acute Physical Exercise on Memory, Peripheral BDNF, and Cortisol in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötting, Kirsten; Schickert, Nadine; Kaiser, Jochen; Röder, Brigitte; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren

    2016-01-01

    In animals, physical activity has been shown to induce functional and structural changes especially in the hippocampus and to improve memory, probably by upregulating the release of neurotrophic factors. In humans, results on the effect of acute exercise on memory are inconsistent so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a single bout of physical exercise on memory consolidation and the underlying neuroendocrinological mechanisms in young adults. Participants encoded a list of German-Polish vocabulary before exercising for 30 minutes with either high intensity or low intensity or before a relaxing phase. Retention of the vocabulary was assessed 20 minutes after the intervention as well as 24 hours later. Serum BDNF and salivary cortisol were measured at baseline, after learning, and after the intervention. The high-intensity exercise group showed an increase in BDNF and cortisol after exercising compared to baseline. Exercise after learning did not enhance the absolute number of recalled words. Participants of the high-intensity exercise group, however, forgot less vocabulary than the relaxing group 24 hours after learning. There was no robust relationship between memory scores and the increase in BDNF and cortisol, respectively, suggesting that further parameters have to be taken into account to explain the effects of exercise on memory in humans.

  10. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction in hypoc......Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction...... in hypocretin neurons in hypothalamus in post-mortem tissue. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are important for activity-dependent neuronal function and synaptic modulation and it is considered that these mechanisms are important in sleep regulation. We hypothesised...... that serum levels of these factors are altered in patients with narcolepsy compared to healthy controls without sleep disturbances. Polysomnography data was obtained and serum BDNF and NGF levels measured using ELISA, while hypocretin was measured using RIA. Serum BDNF levels were significantly higher...

  11. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Yu

    Full Text Available MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10 ml/kg body weight for 6 days and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h. Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling.

  12. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenjuan; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Yueming; Li, Guanjun; Wang, Lihua; Li, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10 ml/kg body weight for 6 days) and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h). Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling.

  13. Oral insulin-mimetic compounds that act independently of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vicente, Silvia; Yraola, Francesc; Marti, Luc; González-Muñoz, Elena; García-Barrado, María José; Cantó, Carles; Abella, Anna; Bour, Sandy; Artuch, Rafael; Sierra, Cristina; Brandi, Nuria; Carpéné, Christian; Moratinos, Julio; Camps, Marta; Palacín, Manuel; Testar, Xavier; Gumà, Anna; Albericio, Fernando; Royo, Miriam; Mian, Alec; Zorzano, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    The hallmarks of insulin action are the stimulation and suppression of anabolic and catabolic responses, respectively. These responses are orchestrated by the insulin pathway and are initiated by the binding of insulin to the insulin receptor, which leads to activation of the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine kinase. Severe defects in the insulin pathway, such as in types A and B and advanced type 1 and 2 diabetes lead to severe insulin resistance, resulting in a partial or complete absence of response to exogenous insulin and other known classes of antidiabetes therapies. We have characterized a novel class of arylalkylamine vanadium salts that exert potent insulin-mimetic effects downstream of the insulin receptor in adipocytes. These compounds trigger insulin signaling, which is characterized by rapid activation of insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3 independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. Administration of these compounds to animal models of diabetes lowered glycemia and normalized the plasma lipid profile. Arylalkylamine vanadium compounds also showed antidiabetic effects in severely diabetic rats with undetectable circulating insulin. These results demonstrate the feasibility of insulin-like regulation in the complete absence of insulin and downstream of the insulin receptor. This represents a novel therapeutic approach for diabetic patients with severe insulin resistance.

  14. Differential Expression of Sox11 and Bdnf mRNA Isoforms in the Injured and Regenerating Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L. Struebing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In both the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS, axonal injury induces changes in neuronal gene expression. In the PNS, a relatively well-characterized alteration in transcriptional activation is known to promote axonal regeneration. This transcriptional cascade includes the neurotrophin Bdnf and the transcription factor Sox11. Although both molecules act to facilitate successful axon regeneration in the PNS, this process does not occur in the CNS. The present study examines the differential expression of Sox11 and Bdnf mRNA isoforms in the PNS and CNS using three experimental paradigms at different time points: (i the acutely injured CNS (retina after optic nerve crush and PNS (dorsal root ganglion after sciatic nerve crush, (ii a CNS regeneration model (retina after optic nerve crush and induced regeneration; and (iii the retina during a chronic form of central neurodegeneration (the DBA/2J glaucoma model. We find an initial increase of Sox11 in both PNS and CNS after injury; however, the expression of Bdnf isoforms is higher in the PNS relative to the CNS. Sustained upregulation of Sox11 is seen in the injured retina following regeneration treatment, while the expression of two Bdnf mRNA isoforms is suppressed. Furthermore, two isoforms of Sox11 with different 3′UTR lengths are present in the retina, and the long isoform is specifically upregulated in later stages of glaucoma. These results provide insight into the molecular cascades active during axonal injury and regeneration in mammalian neurons.

  15. Energy restriction and potential energy restriction mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolai, Sibylle; Pallauf, Kathrin; Huebbe, Patricia; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Energy restriction (ER; also known as caloric restriction) is the only nutritional intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase lifespan in model organisms and may delay ageing in humans. In the present review we discuss current scientific literature on ER and its molecular, metabolic and hormonal effects. Moreover, criteria for the classification of substances that might induce positive ER-like changes without having to reduce energy intake are summarised. Additionally, the putative ER mimetics (ERM) 2-deoxy-d-glucose, metformin, rapamycin, resveratrol, spermidine and lipoic acid and their suggested molecular targets are discussed. While there are reports on these ERM candidates that describe lifespan extension in model organisms, data on longevity-inducing effects in higher organisms such as mice remain controversial or are missing. Furthermore, some of these candidates produce detrimental side effects such as immunosuppression or lactic acidosis, or have not been tested for safety in long-term studies. Up to now, there are no known ERM that could be recommended without limitations for use in humans.

  16. Depression, 5HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms, and plasma BDNF levels in hemodialysis patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang LJ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liang-Jen Wang,1,* Chih-Ken Chen,2,3,* Heng-Jung Hsu,3,4 I-Wen Wu,3,4 Chiao-Yin Sun,3,4 Chin-Chan Lee3,41Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan; 3Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan *LJW and CKC are joint first authors and contributed equally to this manuscriptObjective: Depression is the most prevalent comorbid psychiatric disease among hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease. This cross-sectional study investigated whether depression in hemodialysis patients is associated with the polymorphism of the 5' flanking transcriptional region (5-HTTLPR of the serotonin transporter gene, the valine (Val-to-methionine (Met substitution at codon 66 (Val66Met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, or plasma BDNF levels.Methods: A total of 188 participants (mean age: 58.5±14.0 years; 89 men and 99 women receiving hemodialysis at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were recruited. The diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD was confirmed using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The genotypes of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met were conducted using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The plasma BDNF levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.Results: Forty-five (23.9% patients fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV-TR criteria for a MDD. There were no significant effects of the 5-HTTLPR or BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism on MDD among the hemodialysis patients. The plasma BDNF levels correlated significantly with age (P=0.003 and sex (P=0.047 but not with depression, the genotypes of 5

  17. Promotion of hair growth by newly synthesized ceramide mimetic compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu-Mahn; Bak, Soon-Sun; Shin, Kyung-Oh; Kim, Minhee; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Sekyoo; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-09-09

    Based on the crucial roles of ceramides in skin barrier function, use of ceramides or their structural mimetic compounds, pseudoceramides, as cosmetic ingredients are getting more popular. While currently used pseudoceramides are intended to substitute the structural roles of ceramides in stratum corneum, development of bioactive pseudoceramides has been repeatedly reported. In this study, based on the potential involvement of sphingolipids in hair cycle regulation, we investigated the effects of newly synthesized pseudoceramide, bis-oleamido isopropyl alcohol (BOI), on hair growth using cultured human hair follicles and animal models. BOI treatment promoted hair growth in cultured human hair follicles ex vivo and induced earlier conversion of telogen into anagen. Although we did not find a significant enhancement of growth factor expression and follicular cell proliferation, BOI treatment resulted in an increased sphinganine and sphingosine contents as well as increased ceramides contents in cultured dermal papilla (DP) cells. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that biologically active pseudoceramide promotes hair growth by stimulating do novo synthesis of sphingolipids in DP cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enriched Environment Attenuates Surgery-Induced Impairment of Learning, Memory, and Neurogenesis Possibly by Preserving BDNF Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dan; Li, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Hua, Lei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a significant clinical syndrome. Neurogenesis contributes to cognition. It is known that enriched environment (EE) enhances neurogenesis. We determined whether EE attenuated surgery-induced cognitive impairment and whether growth factors and neurogenesis played a role in the EE effect. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were subjected to carotid artery exposure. Their learning and memory were assessed by Barnes maze, and fear conditioning started 2 weeks after the surgery. Growth factor expression and cell genesis were determined at various times after the surgery. Surgery increased the time for the mice to identify the target hole in the Barnes maze and reduced context-related freezing behavior. Surgery also reduced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. These effects were attenuated by EE. EE also attenuated surgery-induced reduction of phosphorylated/activated tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), components of BDNF signaling pathway. ANA-12, a selective TrkB antagonist, blocked the effects of EE on cognition, phosphorylation of TrkB and ERK, and neurogenesis. These results provide initial evidence that surgery reduces BDNF expression and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that EE reduces surgery-induced impairment of learning, memory, and neurogenesis by preserving BDNF expression.

  19. Curcumin Improves Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42) Induced Spatial Memory Deficits through BDNF-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Fang, Yu; Xu, Yuming; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang; Wu, Tianwen; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Limin; Zhang, Ruifang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, the most active component of turmeric, has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. Previous studies have suggested that curcumin reduces the levels of amyloid and oxidized proteins and prevents memory deficits and thus is beneficial to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin's effect on cognitive functions are not well-understood. In the present study, we examined the working memory and spatial reference memory in rats that received a ventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42), representing a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats treated with Aβ1-42 exhibited obvious cognitive deficits in behavioral tasks. Chronic (seven consecutive days, once per day) but not acute (once a day) curcumin treatments (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) improved the cognitive functions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the beneficial effect of curcumin is accompanied by increased BDNF levels and elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the cognition enhancement effect of curcumin could be mimicked by the overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus and blocked by either bilateral hippocampal injections with lentiviruses that express BDNF shRNA or a microinjection of ERK inhibitor. These findings suggest that chronic curcumin ameliorates AD-related cognitive deficits and that upregulated BDNF-ERK signaling in the hippocampus may underlie the cognitive improvement produced by curcumin.

  20. Serum BDNF correlates with connectivity in the (pre)motor hub in the aging human brain--a resting-state fMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Arelin, Katrin; Möller, Harald E; Sacher, Julia; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Villringer, Arno; Schroeter, Matthias L

    2016-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been discussed to be involved in plasticity processes in the human brain, in particular during aging. Recently, aging and its (neurodegenerative) diseases have increasingly been conceptualized as disconnection syndromes. Here, connectivity changes in neural networks (the connectome) are suggested to be the most relevant and characteristic features for such processes or diseases. To further elucidate the impact of aging on neural networks, we investigated the interaction between plasticity processes, brain connectivity, and healthy aging by measuring levels of serum BDNF and resting-state fMRI data in 25 young (mean age 24.8 ± 2.7 (SD) years) and 23 old healthy participants (mean age, 68.6 ± 4.1 years). To identify neural hubs most essentially related to serum BDNF, we applied graph theory approaches, namely the new data-driven and parameter-free approach eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping. The analysis revealed a positive correlation between serum BDNF and EC in the premotor and motor cortex in older participants in contrast to young volunteers, where we did not detect any association. This positive relationship between serum BDNF and EC appears to be specific for older adults. Our results might indicate that the amount of physical activity and learning capacities, leading to higher BDNF levels, increases brain connectivity in (pre)motor areas in healthy aging in agreement with rodent animal studies. Pilot results have to be replicated in a larger sample including behavioral data to disentangle the cause for the relationship between BDNF levels and connectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressant drugs transactivate TrkB neurotrophin receptors in the adult rodent brain independently of BDNF and monoamine transporter blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. METHODOLOGY: In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a chemical-genetic TrkB(F616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf⁻/⁻ knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01, indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the

  2. Copper Complexes of Nicotinic-Aromatic Carboxylic Acids as Superoxide Dismutase Mimetics

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    Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acid (also known as vitamin B3 is a dietary element essential for physiological and antihyperlipidemic functions. This study reports the synthesis of novel mixed ligand complexes of copper with nicotinic and other select carboxylic acids (phthalic, salicylic and anthranilic acids. The tested copper complexes exhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic activity and antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, with a minimum inhibition concentration of 256 μg/mL. Copper complex of nicotinic-phthalic acids (CuNA/Ph was the most potent with a SOD mimetic activity of IC50 34.42 μM. The SOD activities were observed to correlate well with the theoretical parameters as calculated using density functional theory (DFT at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory. Interestingly, the SOD activity of the copper complex CuNA/Ph was positively correlated with the electron affinity (EA value. The two quantum chemical parameters, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO, were shown to be appropriate for understanding the mechanism of the metal complexes as their calculated energies show good correlation with the SOD activity. Moreover, copper complex with the highest SOD activity were shown to possess the lowest HOMO energy. These findings demonstrate a great potential for the development of value-added metallovitamin-based therapeutics.

  3. Characterization of Potent SMAC Mimetics that Sensitize Cancer Cells to TNF Family-Induced Apoptosis.

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    Kate Welsh

    Full Text Available Members of the Inhibitor of APoptosis (IAP protein family suppress apoptosis within tumor cells, particularly in the context of immune cell-mediated killing by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily cytokines. Most IAPs are opposed endogenously by the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (SMAC, which binds to selected baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR domains of IAPs to displace interacting proteins. The development of SMAC mimetics as novel anticancer drugs has gained impetus, with several agents now in human clinical trials. To further understand the cellular mechanisms of SMAC mimetics, we focused on IAP family members cIAP1 and cIAP2, which are recruited to TNF receptor complexes where they support cell survival through NF-κB activation while suppressing apoptosis by preventing caspase activation. We established fluorescence polarization (FP assays for the BIR2 and BIR3 domains of human cIAP1 and cIAP2 using fluorochrome-conjugated SMAC peptides as ligands. A library of SMAC mimetics was profiled using the FP assays to provide a unique structure activity relationship (SAR analysis compared to previous assessments of binding to XIAP. Potent compounds displayed mean inhibitory binding constants (Ki of 9 to 27 nM against the BIR3 domains of cIAP1 and cIAP2, respectively. Selected compounds were then characterized using cytotoxicity assays in which a cytokine-resistant human tumor cell line was sensitized to either TNF or lymphotoxin-α (LT-α. Cytotoxicity correlated closely with cIAP1 and cIAP2 BIR3 binding activity with the most potent compounds able to reduce cell viability by 50%. Further testing demonstrated that active compounds also inhibit RIP1 binding to BIR3 of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in vitro and reduce steady-state cIAP1 protein levels in cells. Altogether, these data inform the SAR for our SMAC mimetics with respect to cIAP1 and cIAP2, suggesting that these IAP family members play an important role in tumor cell resistance to

  4. Characterization of Potent SMAC Mimetics that Sensitize Cancer Cells to TNF Family-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Kate; Milutinovic, Snezana; Ardecky, Robert J; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos; Ganji, Santhi Reddy; Teriete, Peter; Finlay, Darren; Riedl, Stefan; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Pinilla, Clemencia; Houghten, Richard; Vuori, Kristiina; Reed, John C; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Inhibitor of APoptosis (IAP) protein family suppress apoptosis within tumor cells, particularly in the context of immune cell-mediated killing by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily cytokines. Most IAPs are opposed endogenously by the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (SMAC), which binds to selected baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR) domains of IAPs to displace interacting proteins. The development of SMAC mimetics as novel anticancer drugs has gained impetus, with several agents now in human clinical trials. To further understand the cellular mechanisms of SMAC mimetics, we focused on IAP family members cIAP1 and cIAP2, which are recruited to TNF receptor complexes where they support cell survival through NF-κB activation while suppressing apoptosis by preventing caspase activation. We established fluorescence polarization (FP) assays for the BIR2 and BIR3 domains of human cIAP1 and cIAP2 using fluorochrome-conjugated SMAC peptides as ligands. A library of SMAC mimetics was profiled using the FP assays to provide a unique structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis compared to previous assessments of binding to XIAP. Potent compounds displayed mean inhibitory binding constants (Ki) of 9 to 27 nM against the BIR3 domains of cIAP1 and cIAP2, respectively. Selected compounds were then characterized using cytotoxicity assays in which a cytokine-resistant human tumor cell line was sensitized to either TNF or lymphotoxin-α (LT-α). Cytotoxicity correlated closely with cIAP1 and cIAP2 BIR3 binding activity with the most potent compounds able to reduce cell viability by 50%. Further testing demonstrated that active compounds also inhibit RIP1 binding to BIR3 of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in vitro and reduce steady-state cIAP1 protein levels in cells. Altogether, these data inform the SAR for our SMAC mimetics with respect to cIAP1 and cIAP2, suggesting that these IAP family members play an important role in tumor cell resistance to cytotoxicity

  5. Abnormalities in the zinc-metalloprotease-BDNF axis may contribute to megalencephaly and cortical hyperconnectivity in young autism spectrum disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jae-Young; Lim, Joon Seo; Byun, Hyae-Ran; Yoo, Min-Heui

    2014-09-03

    Whereas aberrant brain connectivity is likely the core pathology of autism-spectrum disorder (ASD), studies do not agree as to whether hypo- or hyper-connectivity is the main underlying problem. Recent functional imaging studies have shown that, in most young ASD patients, cerebral cortical regions appear hyperconnected, and cortical thickness/brain size is increased. Collectively, these findings indicate that developing ASD brains may exist in an altered neurotrophic milieu. Consistently, some ASD patients, as well as some animal models of ASD, show increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, how BDNF is upregulated in ASD is unknown. To address this question, we propose the novel hypothesis that a putative zinc-metalloprotease-BDNF (ZMB) axis in the forebrain plays a pivotal role in the development of hyperconnectivity and megalencephaly in ASD. We have previously demonstrated that extracellular zinc at micromolar concentrations can rapidly increase BDNF levels and phosphorylate the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB via the activation of metalloproteases. The role of metalloproteases in ASD is still uncertain, but in fragile X syndrome, a monogenic disease with an autistic phenotype, the levels of MMP are increased. Early exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and other MMP activators such as organic mercurials also have been implicated in ASD pathogenesis. The resultant increases in BDNF levels at synapses, especially those involved in the zinc-containing, associative glutamatergic system may produce abnormal brain circuit development. Various genetic mutations that lead to ASD are also known to affect BDNF signaling: some down-regulate, and others up-regulate it. We hypothesize that, although both up- and down-regulation of BDNF may induce autism symptoms, only BDNF up-regulation is associated with the hyperconnectivity and large brain size observed in most young idiopathic ASD patients. To test this hypothesis, we propose to examine the

  6. Combinatorial solid-phase synthesis of hapalosin mimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jacob A.; Jensen, Knud J.; Nielsen, John

    2000-01-01

    The solid-phase synthesis of a small library of mimetics of the cyclic depsipeptide hapalosin is described. 3-Amino-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid was anchored through the anilino moiety to a backbone amide linker (BAL) handle support. Using chemoselective reactions and without the need for protec......The solid-phase synthesis of a small library of mimetics of the cyclic depsipeptide hapalosin is described. 3-Amino-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid was anchored through the anilino moiety to a backbone amide linker (BAL) handle support. Using chemoselective reactions and without the need...

  7. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Garraway

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions.

  8. Striatal dopamine transporter binding correlates with serum BDNF levels in patients with striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Khalid, Usman; Klein, Anders B

    2012-01-01

    BDNF levels in patients with parkinsonism. Twenty-one patients with abnormal in vivo striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding as evidenced with [(123)I]PE2I SPECT brain scanning were included. Samples for serum BDNF levels were collected at the time of the SPECT scanning, and BDNF was measured...

  9. Spinal Plasticity and Behavior: BDNF-Induced Neuromodulation in Uninjured and Injured Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Sandra M; Huie, J Russell

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophic factor family of signaling molecules. Since its discovery over three decades ago, BDNF has been identified as an important regulator of neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and cellular and synaptic plasticity and has been shown to function in the formation and maintenance of certain forms of memory. Neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory in the hippocampus shares distinct characteristics with spinal cord nociceptive plasticity. Research examining the role BDNF plays in spinal nociception and pain overwhelmingly suggests that BDNF promotes pronociceptive effects. BDNF induces synaptic facilitation and engages central sensitization-like mechanisms. Also, peripheral injury-induced neuropathic pain is often accompanied with increased spinal expression of BDNF. Research has extended to examine how spinal cord injury (SCI) influences BDNF plasticity and the effects BDNF has on sensory and motor functions after SCI. Functional recovery and adaptive plasticity after SCI are typically associated with upregulation of BDNF. Although neuropathic pain is a common consequence of SCI, the relation between BDNF and pain after SCI remains elusive. This article reviews recent literature and discusses the diverse actions of BDNF. We also highlight similarities and differences in BDNF-induced nociceptive plasticity in naïve and SCI conditions.

  10. A novel BDNF gene promoter directs expression to skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Gerhard

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-specific expression of the gene that encodes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is required for the normal development of peripheral sensory neurons and efficient synaptic transmission in the mature central and peripheral nervous system. The control of BDNF gene expression involves multiple tissue and cell-specific promoters that are differentially regulated. The molecular mechanisms that are responsible for tissue and cell-specific expression of these promoters are still incompletely understood. Results The cloning and analysis of three additional zebrafish (Danio rerio BDNF gene exons and two associated promoters, is reported. Among them are two exons that generate a novel tripartite mature transcript. The exons were located on the transcription unit, whose overall organization was determined by cloning, Southern blot hybridization and sequence analysis, and compared with the pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and mammalian BDNF loci, revealing a conserved but more compact organization. Structural and functional analysis of the exons, their adjacent promoters and 5' flanks, showed that they are expressed cell-specifically. The promoter associated with the 5' exon of the tripartite transcript is GC-rich, TATA-less and the 5' flank adjacent to it contains multiple Sp1, Mef2, and AP1 elements. A fusion gene containing the promoter and 1.5 KB of 5' flank is directed exclusively to skeletal muscle of transiently transfected embryos. The second promoter, whose associated 5' exon contains a 25-nucleotide segment of identity with a mammalian BDNF gene exon, was transiently expressed in yolk of the early embryo. RT-PCR analysis of total RNA from whole juvenile fish and adult female skeletal muscle revealed tissue-specific expression of the 5' exons but the novel exon could not be detected even after two rounds of nested PCR. Conclusion The zebrafish BDNF gene is as complex as the mammalian gene yet much more compact. Its exons are

  11. Differential role of RIP1 in Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplinski, Sebastian; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Torkov, Alica; Seggewiß, Dominik; Hugle, Manuela; Fulda, Simone

    2015-12-08

    We explored the potential of Smac mimetics, which antagonize Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, for chemosensitization of neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we report that Smac mimetics, e.g. BV6, prime NB cells for chemotherapeutics including the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin (DOX) and vinca alkaloids such as Vincristine (VCR), Vinblastine (VBL) and Vinorelbine (VNR). Additionally, BV6 acts in concert with DOX or VCR to suppress long-term clonogenic growth. While BV6 causes rapid downregulation of cellular IAP (cIAP)1 protein and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation, DOX/BV6- or VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis occurs independently of NF-κB or TNFα signaling, since overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor or the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α-blocking antibody Enbrel fail to block cell death. Mechanistic studies reveal that Receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 is required for DOX/BV6-, but not for VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis, since transient or stable knockdown of RIP1 or the pharmacological RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 significantly reduce apoptosis. By comparison, VCR/BV6-mediated apoptosis critically depends on the mitochondrial pathway. VCR/BV6 cotreatment causes phosphorylation of BCL-2 during mitotic arrest, enhanced activation of BAX and BAK and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, overexpression of BCL-2 profoundly suppresses VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis. Thus, BV6 sensitizes NB cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via distinct initial signaling mechanisms depending on the chemotherapeutic drug. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights into Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of NB.

  12. Incretin mimetics: a novel therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine B Hansen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Katrine B Hansen1, Tina Vilsbøll2, Filip K Knop21Department of Clinical Physiology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Diabetes Research Division, Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease associated with low quality of life and early death. The goal in diabetes treatment is to prevent these outcomes by tight glycemic control and minimizing vascular risk factors. So far, even intensified combination regimen with the traditional antidiabetes agents have failed to obtain these goals. Incretin mimetics are a new class of antidiabetes drugs which involve modulation of the incretin system. They bind to and activate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptors on pancreatic beta-cells following which insulin secretion and synthesis are initiated. Since the compounds have no insulinotropic activity at lower glucose concentrations the risk of hypoglycemia – a well-known shortcoming of existing antidiabetes treatments – is low. Additionally, incretin mimetics have been shown to be associated with beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors such as weight loss, decrease in blood pressure and changes in lipid profile. Current clinical data on the two available incretin mimetics, exenatide and liraglutide, are evaluated in this review, focusing on pharmacology, efficacy, safety and tolerability. The review is built on a systematic PubMed and Medline search for publications with the key words GLP-1 receptor agonist, exenatide, liraglutide and type 2 diabetes mellitus up to January 2009.Keywords: glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, type 2 diabetes

  13. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  14. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

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    Syed Faraz Kazim

    Full Text Available Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6, which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  15. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Melissa H.; Orio, Laura; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1 h/day) or extended access (6 h/day) paradigm for 17 days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct allostatic changes in

  16. Effects of phenytoin and lamotrigine treatment on serum BDNF levels in offsprings of epileptic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Handan; Doğan, Zümrüt; Kamışlı, Özden

    2016-04-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is to promote and modulate neuronal responses across neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Therefore, abnormal BDNF signaling may be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Low BDNF levels have been reported in brains and serums of patients with psychotic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of antiepileptic drugs on BDNF in developing rats. Pregnant rats were treated with phenytoin (PHT), lamotrigine (LTG) and folic acid for long-term, all through their gestational periods. Experimental epilepsy (EE) model was applied in pregnant rats. Epileptic seizures were determined with electroencephalography. After birth, serum BDNF levels were measured in 136 newborn rats on postnatal day (PND) 21 and postnatal day 38. In postnatal day 21, serum BDNF levels of experimental epilepsy group were significantly lower compared with PHT group. This decrease is statistically significant. Serum BDNF levels increased in the group LTG. This increase compared with LTG+EE group was statistically significant. In the folic acid (FA) group, levels of serum BDNF decreased statistically significantly compared to the PHT group. On postnatal day 38, no significant differences were found among the groups for serum BDNF levels. We concluded that, the passed seizures during pregnancy adversely affect fetal brain development, lowering of serum BDNF levels. PHT use during pregnancy prevents seizure-induced injury by increasing the levels of BDNF. About the increase level of BDNF, LTG is much less effective than PHT, the positive effect of folic acid on serum BDNF levels was not observed. LTG increase in BDNF is much less effective than PHT, folic acid did not show a positive effect on serum BDNF levels. Epilepsy affects fetal brain development during gestation in pregnant rats, therefore anti-epileptic therapy should be continued during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding....

  18. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism: relation to familiar risk of affective disorder, BDNF levels and salivary cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Bennike, Bente

    2009-01-01

    with a familiar risk of affective disorder and whether these genotypes affect whole blood BDNF level and salivary cortisol. METHOD: In a high-risk study, healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with and without a co-twin (high- and low-risk twins, respectively) history of affective disorder were identified...... familiar risk of affective disorder and the met allele was associated with a higher whole blood BDNF (p=0.02) and a higher evening cortisol level (p=0.01), but not with awakening cortisol. CONCLUSION: Individuals at high risk of affective disorders and who are carriers of the met allele of the Val66Met...

  19. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

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    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  20. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  1. Cholesterol depletion blocks redistribution of lipid raft components and insulin-mimetic signaling by glimepiride and phosphoinositolglycans in rat adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gunter; Hanekop, Nils; Wied, Susanne; Frick, Wendelin

    2002-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane (GPI) proteins, such as Gce1, the dually acylated nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs), such as pp59(Lyn), and the membrane protein, caveolin, together with cholesterol are typical components of detergent/carbonate-insoluble glycolipid-enriched raft domains (DIGs) in the plasma membrane of most eucaryotes. Previous studies demonstrated the dissociation from caveolin and concomitant redistribution from DIGs of Gce1 and pp59(Lyn) in rat adipocytes in response to four different insulin-mimetic stimuli, glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans, caveolin-binding domain peptide, and trypsin/NaCl-treatment. We now characterized the structural basis for this dynamic of DIG components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Carbonate extracts from purified plasma membranes of basal and stimulated adipocytes were analyzed by high-resolution sucrose gradient centrifugation. RESULTS: This process revealed the existence of two distinct species of detergent/carbonate-insoluble complexes floating at higher buoyant density and harboring lower amounts of cholesterol, caveolin, GPI proteins, and NRTKs (lcDIGs) compared to typical DIGs of high cholesterol content (hcDIGs). The four insulin-mimetic stimuli decreased by 40-70% and increased by 2.5- to 5-fold the amounts of GPI proteins and NRTKs at hcDIGs and lcDIGs, respectively. Cholesterol depletion of adipocytes per se by incubation with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase also caused translocation of GPI proteins and NRTKs from hcDIGs to lcDIGs and their release from caveolin in reversible fashion without concomitant induction of insulin-mimetic signaling. Cholesterol depletion, however, reduced by 50-60% the stimulus-induced translocation as well as dissociation from hcDIGs-associated caveolin of GPI proteins and NRTKs, activation of NRTKs as well as insulin-mimetic signaling and metabolic action. In contrast, insulin-mimetic signaling induced by vanadium compounds was not

  2. Cholesterol depletion blocks redistribution of lipid raft components and insulin-mimetic signaling by glimepiride and phosphoinositolglycans in rat adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gunter; Hanekop, Nils; Wied, Susanne; Frick, Wendelin

    2002-03-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma membrane (GPI) proteins, such as Gce1, the dually acylated nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs), such as pp59(Lyn), and the membrane protein, caveolin, together with cholesterol are typical components of detergent/carbonate-insoluble glycolipid-enriched raft domains (DIGs) in the plasma membrane of most eucaryotes. Previous studies demonstrated the dissociation from caveolin and concomitant redistribution from DIGs of Gce1 and pp59(Lyn) in rat adipocytes in response to four different insulin-mimetic stimuli, glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans, caveolin-binding domain peptide, and trypsin/NaCl-treatment. We now characterized the structural basis for this dynamic of DIG components. Carbonate extracts from purified plasma membranes of basal and stimulated adipocytes were analyzed by high-resolution sucrose gradient centrifugation. This process revealed the existence of two distinct species of detergent/carbonate-insoluble complexes floating at higher buoyant density and harboring lower amounts of cholesterol, caveolin, GPI proteins, and NRTKs (lcDIGs) compared to typical DIGs of high cholesterol content (hcDIGs). The four insulin-mimetic stimuli decreased by 40-70% and increased by 2.5- to 5-fold the amounts of GPI proteins and NRTKs at hcDIGs and lcDIGs, respectively. Cholesterol depletion of adipocytes per se by incubation with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase also caused translocation of GPI proteins and NRTKs from hcDIGs to lcDIGs and their release from caveolin in reversible fashion without concomitant induction of insulin-mimetic signaling. Cholesterol depletion, however, reduced by 50-60% the stimulus-induced translocation as well as dissociation from hcDIGs-associated caveolin of GPI proteins and NRTKs, activation of NRTKs as well as insulin-mimetic signaling and metabolic action. In contrast, insulin-mimetic signaling induced by vanadium compounds was not significantly diminished by cholesterol

  3. The Targeted SMAC Mimetic SW IV-134 is a strong enhancer of standard chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Yassar M; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Sankpal, Narendra V; Binder, Pratibha S; Liu, Jingxia; Goedegebuure, S Peter; Mach, Robert H; Spitzer, Dirk; Hawkins, William G

    2017-01-17

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal malignancy that frequently acquires resistance to conventional chemotherapies often associated with overexpression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). We have recently described a novel means to deliver second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC) mimetics selectively to cancer cells employing the sigma-2 ligand/receptor interaction. The intrinsic death pathway agonist SMAC offers an excellent opportunity to counteract the anti-apoptotic activity of IAPs. SMAC mimetics have been used to sensitize several cancer types to chemotherapeutic agents but cancer-selective delivery and appropriate cellular localization have not yet been considered. In our current study, we tested the ability of the sigma-2/SMAC drug conjugate SW IV-134 to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Using the targeted SMAC mimetic SW IV-134, inhibition of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (XIAP) was induced pharmacologically and its impact on cell viability was studied alone and in combination with gemcitabine. Pathway analyses were performed by assessing caspase activation, PARP cleavage and membrane blebbing (Annexin-V), key components of apoptotic cell death. Single-agent treatment regimens were compared with combination therapy in a preclinical mouse model of pancreatic cancer. The sensitizing effect of XIAP interference toward gemcitabine was confirmed via pharmacological intervention using our recently designed, targeted SMAC mimetic SW IV-134 across a wide range of commonly used pancreatic cancer cell lines at concentrations where the individual drugs showed only minimal activity. On a mechanistic level, we identified involvement of key components of the apoptosis machinery during cell death execution. Furthermore, combination therapy proved superior in decreasing the tumor burden and extending the lives of the animals in a preclinical mouse model of pancreatic cancer. We believe that the strong sensitizing capacity of

  4. Ligand selectivity of a synthetic CXCR4 mimetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Andrea; Brox, Regine; Damm, Dominik; Tschammer, Nuška; Schmidt, Barbara; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-07-15

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 belongs to the family of seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is activated by its natural ligand SDF-1α. In addition, CXCR4, along with CCR5, serve as coreceptors during HIV-1 entry into its target cell. Recently, we introduced a CXCR4 mimetic peptide, termed CX4-M1, which presents the three extracellular loops (ECLs) of the receptor. CX4-M1 was shown to selectively bind to gp120 of X4-tropic, that is, CXCR4 using, HIV-1, as well as to peptides that present the V3-loops of these gp120 proteins. Furthermore, CX4-M1 selectively inhibits infection of cells with X4-tropic HIV-1. We have now adapted the sequence of the ECLs presented by CX4-M1 to the recently published crystal structure of CXCR4. The binding behavior, as well as the effect on HIV-1 infection, of the resulting peptide (CX4-Mc) was very similar to CX4-M1, validating retrospectively the original design of CX4-M1. A peptide presenting the ECLs of CCR5 (CR5-M), on the other hand, did neither bind to gp120 from X4-tropic HIV-1, nor did it inhibit infection of cells with X4-tropic HIV-1. Furthermore, we could show that CX4-M1, as well as CX4-Mc, but not CR5-M, are selectively recognized by anti-CXCR4 antibodies, bind to SDF-1α, and also inhibit SDF-1α signaling, extending the scope of selective functional CXCR4 mimicry through CX4-M1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Haynes, Barton; Sodroski, Joseph

    2016-05-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in which a virus

  6. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E.; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Haynes, Barton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. IMPORTANCE Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in

  7. Cooperative TRAIL production mediates IFNα/Smac mimetic-induced cell death in TNFα-resistant solid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Stefanie; Eckhardt, Ines; Wolf, Sebastian; Fulda, Simone

    2016-01-26

    Smac mimetics antagonize IAP proteins, which are highly expressed in several cancers. Recent reports indicate that Smac mimetics trigger a broad cytokine response and synergize with immune modulators to induce cell death. Here, we identify a differential requirement of TRAIL or TNFα as mediators of IFNα/Smac mimetic-induced cell death depending on the cellular context. Subtoxic concentrations of Smac mimetics cooperate with IFNα to induce cell death in various solid tumor cell lines in a highly synergistic manner as determined by combination index. Mechanistic studies show that IFNα/BV6 cotreatment promotes the formation of a caspase-8-activating complex together with the adaptor protein FADD and RIP1. Assembly of this RIP1/FADD/caspase-8 complex represents a critical event, since RIP1 silencing inhibits IFNα/BV6-induced cell death. Strikingly, pharmacological inhibition of paracrine/autocrine TNFα signaling by the TNFα scavenger Enbrel rescues HT-29 colon carcinoma cells, but not A172 glioblastoma cells from IFNα/BV6-induced cell death. By comparison, A172 cells are significantly protected against IFNα/BV6 treatment by blockage of TRAIL signaling through genetic silencing of TRAIL or its cognate receptor TRAIL receptor 2 (DR5). Despite this differential requirement of TNFα and TRAIL signaling, mRNA and protein expression is increased by IFNα/BV6 cotreatment in both cell lines. Interestingly, A172 cells turn out to be resistant to exogenously added recombinant TNFα even in the presence of BV6, whereas they display a high sensitivity towards TRAIL/BV6. In contrast, BV6 efficiently sensitizes HT-29 cells to TNFα while TRAIL only had limited efficacy. This demonstrates that a differential sensitivity towards TRAIL or TNFα determines the dependency on either death receptor ligand for IFNα/Smac mimetic-induced cell death. Thus, by concomitant stimulation of both death receptor systems IFNα/Smac mimetic combination treatment is an effective strategy to

  8. The influence of BDNF on human umbilical cord blood stem/progenitor cells: implications for stem cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Edyta; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Rogińska, Dorota; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Ustianowski, Przemysław; Cecerska, Elżbieta; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) have demonstrated the potential to improve neurologic function in different experimental models. SPCs can survive after transplantation in the neural microenvironment and indu ce neuroprotection, endogenous neurogenesis by secreting a broad repertoire of trophic and immunomodulatory cytokines. In this study, the influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pre-treatment was comprehensively evaluated in a UCB-derived lineage-negative (Lin-) SPC population. UCB-derived Lin- cells were evaluated with respect to the expression of (i) neuronal markers using immunofluorescence staining and (ii) specific (TrkB) receptors for BDNF using flow cytometry. Next, after BDNF pre-treatment, Lin- cells were extensively assessed with respect to apoptosis using Western blotting and proliferation via BrdU incorporation. Furthermore, NT-3 expression levels in Lin- cells using RQ PCR and antioxidative enzyme activities were assessed. We demonstrated neuronal markers as well as TrkB expression in Lin- cells and the activation of the TrkB receptor by BDNF. BDNF pre-treatment diminished apoptosis in Lin- cells and influenced the proliferation of these cells. We observed significant changes in antioxidants as well as in the increased expression of NT-3 in Lin- cells following BDNF exposure. Complex global miRNA and mRNA profiling analyses using microarray technology and GSEA revealed the differential regulation of genes involved in the proliferation, gene expression, biosynthetic processes, translation, and protein targeting. Our results support the hypothesis that pre-treatment of stem/progenitor cells could be beneficial and may be used as an auxiliary strategy for improving the properties of SPCs.

  9. 4-Connected azabicyclo[5.3.0]decane Smac mimetics-Zn2+ chelators as dual action antitumoral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Leonardo; Samela, Alessandro; Barbini, Stefano; Cairati, Silvia; Penconi, Marta; Arosio, Daniela; Lecis, Daniele; Seneci, Pierfausto

    2017-06-01

    Putative dual action compounds (DACs 3a-d) based on azabicyclo[5.3.0]decane (ABD) Smac mimetic scaffolds linked to Zn 2+ -chelating 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA) through their 4 position are reported and characterized. Their synthesis, their target affinity (cIAP1 BIR3, Zn 2+ ) in cell-free assays, their pro-apoptotic effects, and their cytotoxicity in tumor cells with varying sensitivity to Smac mimetics are described. A limited influence of Zn 2+ chelation on in vitro activity of DPA-substituted DACs 3a-d was sometimes perceivable, but did not lead to strong cellular synergistic effects. In particular, the linker connecting DPA with the ABD scaffold seems to influence cellular Zn 2+ -chelation, with longer lipophilic linkers/DAC 3c being the optimal choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis, molecular docking and biological evaluation as HDAC inhibitors of cyclopeptide mimetics by a tandem three-component reaction and intramolecular [3+2] cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirali, Tracey; Faccio, Valeria; Mossetti, Riccardo; Grolla, Ambra A; Di Micco, Simone; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Genazzani, Armando A; Tron, Gian Cesare

    2010-02-01

    Novel macrocyclic peptide mimetics have been synthesized by exploiting a three-component reaction and an azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition. The prepared compounds were screened as HDAC inhibitors allowing us to identify a new compound with promising biological activity. In order to rationalize the biological results, computational studies have also been performed.

  11. A synthetic NCAM-derived mimetic peptide, FGL, exerts anti-inflammatory properties via IGF-1 and interferon-gamma modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downer, Eric J; Cowley, Thelma R; Cox, Fionnuala

    2009-01-01

    Microglial cell activity increases in the rat hippocampus during normal brain aging. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-derived mimetic peptide, FG loop (FGL), acts as an anti-inflammatory agent in the hippocampus of the aged rat, promoting CD200 ligand expression while attenuating glial cell...

  12. Visual Experience Facilitates BDNF-Dependent Adaptive Recruitment of New Neurons in the Postembryonic Optic Tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zachary J; Tropepe, Vincent

    2018-02-21

    Postembryonic brain development is sensitive to environmental input and sensory experience, but the mechanisms underlying healthy adaptive brain growth are poorly understood. Here, we tested the importance of visual experience on larval zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) postembryonic development of the optic tectum (OT), a midbrain structure involved in visually guided behavior. We first characterized postembryonic neurogenic growth in OT, in which new neurons are generated along the caudal tectal surface and contribute appositionally to anatomical growth. Restricting visual experience during development by rearing larvae in dim light impaired OT anatomical and neurogenic growth, specifically by reducing the survival of new neurons in the medial periventricular gray zone. Neuronal survival in the OT was reduced only when visual experience was restricted for the first 5 d following new neuron generation, suggesting that tectal neurons exhibit an early sensitive period in which visual experience protects these cells from subsequent neuronal loss. The effect of dim rearing on neuronal survival was mimicked by treatment with an NMDA receptor antagonist early, but not later, in a new neuron's life. Both dim rearing and antagonist treatment reduced BDNF production in the OT, and supplementing larvae with exogenous BDNF during dim rearing prevented neuronal loss, suggesting that visual experience protects new tectal neurons through neural activity-dependent BDNF expression. Collectively, we present evidence for a sensitive period of neurogenic adaptive growth in the larval zebrafish OT that relies on visual experience-dependent mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Early brain development is shaped by environmental factors via sensory input; however, this form of experience-dependent neuroplasticity is traditionally studied as structural and functional changes within preexisting neurons. Here, we found that restricting visual experience affects development of the larval zebrafish

  13. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Beverley J; Hu, Rebecca G; Phillips, Anthony R J; Becker, David L

    2015-10-15

    Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM) significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM). Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. BH3 Mimetics Reactivate Autophagic Cell Death in Anoxia-Resistant Malignant Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hetschko

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigated the specific roles of Bcl-2 family members in anoxia tolerance of malignant glioma. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death in 17 glioma cell lines revealed drastic differences in their sensitivity to oxygen withdrawal (<0.1% O2. Cell death correlated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged light chain 3 to autophagosomes but occurred in the absence of caspase activation or phosphatidylserine exposure. In both sensitive and tolerant glioma cell lines, anoxia caused a significant up-regulation of BH3-only genes previously implicated in mediating anoxic cell death in other cell types (BNIP3, NIX, PUMA, and Noxa. In contrast, we detected a strong correlation between anoxia resistance and high expression levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 that function to neutralize the proapoptotic activity of BH3-only proteins. Importantly, inhibition of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL with the small-molecule BH3 mimetics HA14-1 and BH3I-2′ and by RNA interference reactivated anoxia-induced autophagic cell death in previously resistant glioma cells. Our data suggest that endogenous BH3-only protein induction may not be able to compensate for the high expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in anoxia-resistant astrocytomas. They also support the conjecture that BH3 mimetics may represent an exciting new approach for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  15. SOD mimetics: A Novel Class of Androgen Receptor Inhibitors that Suppresses Castration-Resistant Growth of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rusha; Sharifi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer (PCa) is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men. The androgen receptor (AR) is vital for PCa progression, even in the face of castrate levels of serum testosterone following androgen ablation therapy, a mainstay therapy for advanced PCa. Downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), a major intracellular antioxidant enzyme, occurs progressively during PCa progression to advanced states, and is known to promote AR activity in PCa. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of SOD mimetics on AR expression and function in AR-dependent LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, and LAPC-4AD PCa cells. Treatment with Tempol, a SOD mimetic, not only lowered cellular superoxide levels, but also concomitantly attenuated AR transcriptional activity and AR target gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in the presence and absence of dihydrotestosterone, the major endogenous AR agonist. Tempol's inhibition of AR was mediated, in large part, by its ability to decrease AR protein via increased degradation, in the absence of any inhibitory effects on other nuclear receptors. Tempol's inhibitory effects on AR were also reproducible with other SOD mimetics, MnTBAP and MnTMPyP. Importantly, Tempol's effects on AR function were accompanied by significant in vitro and in vivo reduction in castration-resistant PCa survival and growth. Collectively, this study has demonstrated for the first time that SOD mimetics, by virtue of their ability to suppress AR function, may be beneficial in treating the currently incurable castration-resistant PCa in which SOD2 expression is highly suppressed. PMID:22172488

  16. Amygdala electrical stimulation inducing spatial memory recovery produces an increase of hippocampal bdnf and arc gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercerón-Martínez, D; Almaguer-Melian, W; Alberti-Amador, E; Estupiñán, B; Fernández, I; Bergado, J A

    2016-06-01

    Amygdala seems to promote the consolidation of plastic modification in different brain areas and these long-term brain changes require a rapid de novo RNA and protein synthesis. We have previously shown that basolateral amygdala electrical stimulation produces a partial recovery of spatial memory in fimbria-fornix lesioned animals and it is also able to increase the BDNF protein content in the hippocampus. The emerging question is whether these increased BDNF protein content arises from previously synthesized RNA or from de novo RNA expression. Now we address the question if amygdala electrical stimulation 15min after daily water maze training produces a rapid de novo RNA synthesis in the hippocampus, a critical brain area for spatial memory recovery in fimbria-fornix lesioned animals. In addition, we also study RNA arc expression, a gene which is essential for memory and neural plasticity processes. To this purpose, we study amygdala stimulation effects on the expression of plasticity related-early-genes bdnf and arc in the hippocampus of fimbria-fornix lesioned animals trained in a water-maze for 4days. We also checked on the expression of both genes in non-lesioned, untrained animals (acute condition) at 0.5, 1, 2 and 24h after basolateral amygdala electrical stimulation. Our data from trained animals confirm that daily amygdala electrical stimulation 15min after water maze training produces a partial memory recovery and that is coupled to an increase of bdnf and arc genes expression in the hippocampus. Additionally, the acute study shows that a single session of amygdala stimulation induces a transient increase of both genes (peaking at 30min). These results confirm the memory improving effect of amygdala stimulation in fimbria-fornix-lesioned animals and sustain the assumption that the memory improving effect is mediated by newly synthetized BDNF acting on a memory relevant structure like the hippocampus. The increased amount of BDNF within the hippocampus

  17. Regulated viral BDNF delivery in combination with Schwann cells promotes axonal regeneration through capillary alginate hydrogels after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengwen; Sandner, Beatrice; Schackel, Thomas; Nicholson, LaShae; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Puttagunta, Radhika; Müller, Rainer; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2017-09-15

    Grafting of cell-seeded alginate capillary hydrogels into a spinal cord lesion site provides an axonal bridge while physically directing regenerating axonal growth in a linear pattern. However, without an additional growth stimulus, bridging axons fail to extend into the distal host spinal cord. Here we examined whether a combinatory strategy would support regeneration of descending axons across a cervical (C5) lateral hemisection lesion in the rat spinal cord. Following spinal cord transections, Schwann cell (SC)-seeded alginate hydrogels were grafted to the lesion site and AAV5 expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter was injected caudally. In addition, we examined whether SC injection into the caudal spinal parenchyma would further enhance regeneration of descending axons to re-enter the host spinal cord. Our data show that both serotonergic and descending axons traced by biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) extend throughout the scaffolds. The number of regenerating axons is significantly increased when caudal BDNF expression is activated and transient BDNF delivery is able to sustain axons after gene expression is switched off. Descending axons are confined to the caudal graft/host interface even with continuous BDNF expression for 8weeks. Only with a caudal injection of SCs, a pathway facilitating axonal regeneration through the host/graft interface is generated allowing axons to successfully re-enter the caudal spinal cord. Recovery from spinal cord injury is poor due to the limited regeneration observed in the adult mammalian central nervous system. Biomaterials, cell transplantation and growth factors that can guide axons across a lesion site, provide a cellular substrate, stimulate axon growth and have shown some promise in increasing the growth distance of regenerating axons. In the present study, we combined an alginate biomaterial with linear channels with transplantation of Schwann cells within

  18. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism affects encoding of object locations during active navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, J.B.T.; Tyborowska, A.B.; Hoogman, M.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Janzen, G.

    2017-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was shown to be involved in spatial memory and spatial strategy preference. A naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphism of the BDNF gene (Val66Met) affects activity-dependent secretion of BDNF. The current event-related fMRI study on preselected

  19. Running throughout middle-age improves memory function, hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF levels in female C57Bl/6J mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlatt, M.W.; Potter, M.C.; Lucassen, P.J.; van Praag, H.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related memory loss is considered to commence at middle-age and coincides with reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neurotrophin levels. Consistent physical activity at midlife may preserve brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, new cell genesis and learning. In the present

  20. Piperine-like alkamides from Piper nigrum induce BDNF promoter and promote neurite outgrowth in Neuro-2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Sook; Noda, Sachie; Takahashi, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yuji; Inoue, Hideshi

    2018-01-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) contains a variety of alkamides. Among them, piperine has been reported to have antidepressant-like effects in chronically stressed mice, but little is known about the biological activity of other alkamides. In this study, we investigated the effects of alkamides from white pepper (P. nigrum) on neuronal cells. Twelve alkamides were isolated from white pepper MeOH extracts, and their chemical structures were identified by NMR and MS analyses. The compounds were subjected to assays using the luciferase-reporter gene under the control of the BDNF promoter or cAMP response element in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells. In both assays, marked reporter-inducing activity was observed for piperine (1), piperettine (2) and piperylin (7), all of which have in common an (E)-5-(buta-1,3-dien-1-yl)benzo[d] [1, 3] dioxole moiety. Piperettine (2) and piperylin (7) tended to increase endogenous BDNF protein levels. Furthermore, piperylin (7) promoted retinoic acid-induced neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that piperylin (7), or analogues thereof, may have a beneficial effect on disorders associated with dysregulation of BDNF expression, such as depression.

  1. SMAC mimetic BV6 induces cell death in monocytes and maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Müller-Sienerth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compounds mimicking the inhibitory effect of SMAC/DIABLO on X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP have been developed with the aim to achieve sensitization for apoptosis of tumor cells resistant due to deregulated XIAP expression. It turned out that SMAC mimetics also have complex effects on the NFκB system and TNF signaling. In view of the overwhelming importance of the NFκB transcription factors in the immune system, we analyzed here the effects of the SMAC mimetic BV6 on immune cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BV6 induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death in monocytes while T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages were largely protected against BV6-induced cell death. In immature dendritic cells BV6 treatment resulted in moderate activation of the classical NFκB pathway, but it also diminished the stronger NFκB-inducing effect of TNF and CD40L. Despite its inhibitory effect on TNF- and CD40L signaling, BV6 was able to trigger maturation of immature DCs as indicated by upregulation of CD83, CD86 and IL12. SIGNIFICANCE: The demonstrated effects of SMAC mimetics on immune cells may complicate the development of tumor therapeutic concepts based on these compounds but also arise the possibility to exploit them for the development of immune stimulatory therapies.

  2. Pharmacology of smac mimetics; chemotype differentiation based on physical association with caspase regulators and cellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Randy L; Borzilleri, Robert M; Chaudhry, Charu; Fargnoli, Joseph; Shen, Henry; Fairchild, Craig; Barnhart, Bryan; Ortega, Marie; McDonagh, Thomas E; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Vite, Gregory D; Hunt, John T; Gottardis, Marco; Naglich, Joseph G

    2015-11-01

    Cellular levels of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins are elevated in multiple human cancers and their activities often play a part in promoting cancer cell survival by blocking apoptotic pathways, controlling signal transduction pathways and contributing to resistance. These proteins function through interactions of their BIR (baculoviral IAP repeat) protein domains with pathway components and these interactions are endogenously antagonized by Smac/Diablo (second mitochondrial activator of caspases/direct IAP binding protein with low isoelectric point). This report describes development of synthetic smac mimetics (SM) and compares their binding, antiproliferative and anti-tumor activities. All dimeric antagonists inhibit in vitro smac tetrapeptide binding to recombinant IAP proteins, rescue IAP-bound caspase-3 activity and show anti-proliferative activity against human A875 melanoma cells. One heterodimeric SM, SM3, binds tightly to IAP proteins in vitro and slowly dissociates (greater than two hours) from these protein complexes compared to the other antagonists. In addition, in vitro SM anti-proliferation potency is influenced by ABCB1 transporter (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B; MDR1, P-gp) activities and one antagonist, SM5, does not appear to be an ABCB1 efflux pump substrate. All dimeric smac mimetics inhibit the growth of human melanoma A875 tumors implanted in athymic mice at well-tolerated doses. One antagonist, SM4, shows broad spectrum in vivo anti-tumor activity and modulates known pharmacodynamic markers of IAP antagonism. These data taken together demonstrate the range of diverse dimeric IAP antagonist activities and supports their potential as anticancer agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A mucosa-mimetic material for the mucoadhesion testing of thermogelling semi-solids

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Jéssica Bassi; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V.; Bruschi, Marcos L.; Cook, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Mucosa-mimetic materials are synthetic substrates which aim to replace animal tissue in mucoadhesion experiments. One potential mucosa-mimetic material is a hydrogel comprised of N-acryloyl-d-glucosamine and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, which has been investigated as a surrogate for animal mucosae in the mucoadhesion testing of tablets and solution formulations. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of this mucosa-mimetic material in the testing of thermogelling semi-solid formulations, ...

  4. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene expression is differentially modulated in the rat spinal dorsal horn and hippocampus during inflammatory pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarson Kenneth E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Persistent pain produces complex alterations in sensory pathways of the central nervous system (CNS through activation of various nociceptive mechanisms. However, the effects of pain on higher brain centers, particularly the influence of the stressful component of pain on the limbic system, are poorly understood. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, known neuromediators of hyperalgesia and spinal central sensitization, have also been implicated in the plasticity and neurodegeneration occurring in the hippocampal formation during exposures to various stressors. Results of this study showed that injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA into the hind paw increased NK-1 receptor and BDNF mRNA levels in the ipsilateral dorsal horn, supporting an important role for these nociceptive mediators in the amplification of ascending pain signaling. An opposite effect was observed in the hippocampus, where CFA down-regulated NK-1 receptor and BDNF gene expression, phenomena previously observed in immobilization models of stress and depression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in the spinal cord, CFA also increased levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB, while in the hippocampus the activation of this transcription factor was significantly reduced, further suggesting that tissue specific transcription of either NK-1 or BDNF genes may be partially regulated by common intracellular transduction mechanisms mediated through activation of CREB. These findings suggest that persistent nociception induces differential regional regulation of NK-1 receptor and BDNF gene expression and CREB activation in the CNS, potentially reflecting varied roles of these neuromodulators in the spinal cord during persistent sensory activation vs. modulation of the higher brain structures such as the hippocampus.

  5. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

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    Shuzhen Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclothiazide (CTZ has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  6. Whole blood BDNF levels in healthy twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Vinberg, Maj; Aznar, Susana

    2008-01-01

    and protected against affective disorder. Whole blood assessed for BDNF concentrations and correlated to risk status, neuroticism, and number of stressful life events. RESULTS: Between the groups, we found no significant difference in whole blood BDNF levels. Women at high-risk for depression who had......BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with decreased blood BDNF concentrations; but it is unclear if low blood BDNF levels are a state or a trait marker of depression. METHODS: We investigated blood BDNF concentrations in a twin population including both subjects highly predisposed...... experienced three or more recent stressful events (n=26) had decreased whole blood BDNF levels compared to high-risk women with two or less recent stressful events (n=35), 21.6+/-7.0 vs. 18.5+/-4.1 ng/ml, respectively, (p

  7. The Gut-Brain Axis, BDNF, NMDA and CNS Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Raeesah; Stone, Trevor W

    2016-11-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) microbiota and the 'gut-brain axis' are proving to be increasingly relevant to early brain development and the emergence of psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on the influence of the GI tract on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its relationship with receptors for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR), as these are believed to be involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. NMDAR may be associated with the development of schizophrenia and a range of other psychopathologies including neurodegenerative disorders, depression and dementias. An analysis of the routes and mechanisms by which the GI microbiota contribute to the pathophysiology of BDNF-induced NMDAR dysfunction could yield new insights relevant to developing novel therapeutics for schizophrenia and related disorders. In the absence of GI microbes, central BDNF levels are reduced and this inhibits the maintenance of NMDAR production. A reduction of NMDAR input onto GABA inhibitory interneurons causes disinhibition of glutamatergic output which disrupts the central signal-to-noise ratio and leads to aberrant synaptic behaviour and cognitive deficits. Gut microbiota can modulate BDNF function in the CNS, via changes in neurotransmitter function by affecting modulatory mechanisms such as the kynurenine pathway, or by changes in the availability and actions of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the brain. Interrupting these cycles by inducing changes in the gut microbiota using probiotics, prebiotics or antimicrobial drugs has been found promising as a preventative or therapeutic measure to counteract behavioural deficits and these may be useful to supplement the actions of drugs in the treatment of CNS disorders.

  8. The Effects of Resistance Exercise on Cocaine Self-Administration, Muscle Hypertrophy, and BDNF Expression in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C.; Abel, Jean M.; Lacy, Ryan T.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Witte, Maryam A.; Lynch, Wendy J.; Smith, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise is associated with positive outcomes in drug abusing populations and reduces drug self-administration in laboratory animals. To date, most research has focused on aerobic exercise, and other types of exercise have not been examined. This study examined the effects of resistance exercise (strength training) on cocaine self-administration and BDNF expression, a marker of neuronal activation regulated by aerobic exercise. Methods Female rats were assigned to either exercising or sedentary conditions. Exercising rats climbed a ladder wearing a weighted vest and trained six days/week. Training consisted of a three-set “pyramid” in which the number of repetitions and resistance varied across three sets: eight climbs carrying 70% body weight (BW), six climbs carrying 85% BW, and four climbs carrying 100% BW. Rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and cocaine self-administration was examined. Behavioral economic measures of demand intensity and demand elasticity were derived from the behavioral data. BDNF mRNA expression was measured via qRT-PCR in the nucleus accumbens following behavioral testing. Results Exercising rats self-administered significantly less cocaine than sedentary rats. A behavioral economic analysis revealed that exercise increased demand elasticity for cocaine, reducing consumption at higher unit prices. Exercising rats had lower BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens core than sedentary rats. Conclusions These data indicate that resistance exercise decreases cocaine self-administration and reduces BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens after a history of cocaine exposure. Collectively, these findings suggest that strength training reduces the positive reinforcing effects of cocaine and may decrease cocaine use in human populations. PMID:27137405

  9. BDNF Val66Met Genotype Interacts With a History of Simulated Stress Exposure to Regulate Sensorimotor Gating and Startle Reactivity.

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    Notaras, Michael J; Hill, Rachel A; Gogos, Joseph A; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2017-05-01

    Reduced expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, which results in deficient activity-dependent secretion of BDNF, is associated with clinical features of schizophrenia. We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on Prepulse Inhibition (PPI), a translational model of sensorimotor gating which is disrupted in schizophrenia. We utilized humanized BDNFVal66Met (hBDNFVal66Met) mice which have been modified to carry the Val66Met polymorphism, as well as express humanized BDNF in vivo. We also studied the long-term effect of chronic corticosterone (CORT) exposure in these animals as a model of history of stress. PPI was assessed at 30ms and 100ms interstimulus intervals (ISI). Analysis of PPI at the commonly used 100ms ISI identified that, irrespective of CORT treatment, the hBDNFVal/Met genotype was associated with significantly reduced PPI. In contrast, PPI was not different between hBDNFMet/Met and hBDNFVal/Val genotype mice. At the 30ms ISI, CORT treatment selectively disrupted sensorimotor gating of hBDNFVal/Met heterozygote mice but not hBDNFVal/Val or hBDNFMet/Met mice. Analysis of startle reactivity revealed that chronic CORT reduced startle reactivity of hBDNFVal/Val male mice by 51%. However, this was independent of the effect of CORT on PPI. In summary, we provide evidence of a distinct BDNFVal66Met heterozygote-specific phenotype using the sensorimotor gating endophenotype of schizophrenia. These data have important implications for clinical studies where, if possible, the BDNFVal/Met heterozygote genotype should be distinguished from the BDNFMet/Met genotype. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide causes deficits in spatial learning in the watermaze but not in BDNF expression in the rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K N; Commins, S; O'Mara, S M

    2001-09-28

    We investigated the effects of a single injection and a daily injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on spatial learning and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the rat dentate gyrus. LPS is derived from the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria and is a potent endotoxin that causes the release of cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor. LPS is thought to activate both the neuroimmune and neuroendocrine systems; it also blocks long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Here, we examined the effects of LPS on a form of hippocampal-dependent learning-spatial learning in the water maze. Rats were injected with LPS intraperitoneally (100 microg/kg) and trained in the water maze. The first group of rats were injected on day 1 of training, 4 h prior to learning the water maze task. Groups 2 and 3 were injected daily, again 4 h prior to the water-maze task; group 2 with LPS and group 3 with saline. A number of behavioural variables were recorded by a computerised tracking system for each trial. The behavioural results showed a single injection of LPS (group 1) impaired escape latency in both the acquisition and retention phases of the study, whereas a daily injection of LPS did not significantly impair acquisition or retention. BDNF expression was analysed in the dentate gyrus of all animals. No significant differences in BDNF expression were found between the three groups.

  11. BDNF Variants May Modulate Long-Term Visual Memory Performance in a Healthy Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesli Avgan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is involved in numerous cognitive functions including learning and memory. BDNF plays an important role in synaptic plasticity in humans and rats with BDNF shown to be essential for the formation of long-term memories. We previously identified a significant association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265 and long-term visual memory (p-value = 0.003 in a small cohort (n = 181 comprised of healthy individuals who had been phenotyped for various aspects of memory function. In this study, we have extended the cohort to 597 individuals and examined multiple genetic variants across both the BDNF and BDNF-AS genes for association with visual memory performance as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale—Fourth Edition subtests Visual Reproduction I and II (VR I and II. VR I assesses immediate visual memory, whereas VR II assesses long-term visual memory. Genetic association analyses were performed for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip arrays with the immediate and long-term visual memory phenotypes. While none of the BDNF and BDNF-AS variants were shown to be significant for immediate visual memory, we found 10 variants (including the Val66Met polymorphism (p-value = 0.006 that were nominally associated, and three variants (two variants in BDNF and one variant in the BDNF-AS locus that were significantly associated with long-term visual memory. Our data therefore suggests a potential role for BDNF, and its anti-sense transcript BDNF-AS, in long-term visual memory performance.

  12. On the quest for a biomechanism of transsexualism: is there a role for BDNF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Biedermann, Sarah V; Stalla, Günter K; Auer, Matthias K

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies hypothesized a neurobiological mechanism for gender identity disorder (GID). Recently a possible role for serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was suggested on the basis of reduced serum BDNF levels in male-to-female individuals. Here we review the question whether there is indeed a role of BDNF in the development of transsexualism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. BDNF Variants May Modulate Long-Term Visual Memory Performance in a Healthy Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgan, Nesli; Sutherland, Heidi G; Spriggens, Lauren K; Yu, Chieh; Ibrahim, Omar; Bellis, Claire; Haupt, Larisa M; Shum, David H K; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-03-17

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in numerous cognitive functions including learning and memory. BDNF plays an important role in synaptic plasticity in humans and rats with BDNF shown to be essential for the formation of long-term memories. We previously identified a significant association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) and long-term visual memory ( p -value = 0.003) in a small cohort ( n = 181) comprised of healthy individuals who had been phenotyped for various aspects of memory function. In this study, we have extended the cohort to 597 individuals and examined multiple genetic variants across both the BDNF and BDNF-AS genes for association with visual memory performance as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition subtests Visual Reproduction I and II (VR I and II). VR I assesses immediate visual memory, whereas VR II assesses long-term visual memory. Genetic association analyses were performed for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress BeadChip arrays with the immediate and long-term visual memory phenotypes. While none of the BDNF and BDNF-AS variants were shown to be significant for immediate visual memory, we found 10 variants (including the Val66Met polymorphism ( p -value = 0.006)) that were nominally associated, and three variants (two variants in BDNF and one variant in the BDNF-AS locus) that were significantly associated with long-term visual memory. Our data therefore suggests a potential role for BDNF , and its anti-sense transcript BDNF-AS , in long-term visual memory performance.

  14. Modulation of c-Fos and BDNF Protein Expression in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Mice following the Treatment with Novel Antiepileptic Compound HHL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Mahmood Malhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and c-Fos are shown to promote epileptogenesis and are taken as a marker of neuronal activity. The present study investigated the expression of BDNF and c-Fos in mice brain with pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ- induced generalized seizure and evaluated the effect of novel tryptamine derivative HHL-6 on the expression of these two markers. The subconvulsive dose of PTZ (50 mg/kg was administered on alternate days in the experimental groups until the seizure scores 4-5 developed in the PTZ-control group. At the end of each experiment, animals were sacrificed, brain samples were collected and cryosectioned, and immunohistochemical analysis of BDNF and c-Fos protein was performed. Data obtained from two sections per mouse (n=12 animals/group is presented as means ± S.E.M. The test compound HHL-6 demonstrated a potent anticonvulsant activity in the PTZ-induced seizure in mice. Significant reduction in the BDNF (P<0.003 and c-Fos (P<0.01 protein expression was observed in the HHL-6 treated group. Based on these results we suggest that one of the possible mechanisms of HHL-6 to inhibit epileptogenesis might be due to its controlling effect on the cellular and molecular expression of the factors that contribute to the development of epileptogenic plasticity in the CNS.

  15. Smac mimetic enables the anticancer action of BCG-stimulated neutrophils through TNF-α but not through TRAIL and FasL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh G., Goodwin; Chunduru, Srinivas; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2012-01-01

    BCG, the current gold standard immunotherapy for bladder cancer, exerts its activity via recruitment of neutrophils to the tumor microenvironment. Many patients do not respond to BCG therapy, indicating the need to understand the mechanism of action of BCG-stimulated neutrophils and to identify ways to overcome resistance to BCG therapy. Using isolated human neutrophils stimulated with BCG, we found that TNF-α is the key mediator secreted by BCG-stimulated neutrophils. RT4v6 human bladder cancer cells, which express TNFR1, CD95/Fas, CD95 ligand/FasL, DR4, and DR5, were resistant to BCG-stimulated neutrophil conditioned medium but effectively killed by the combination of conditioned medium and Smac mimetic. rhTNF-α and rhFasL, but not rhTRAIL, in combination with Smac mimetic, generated signature molecular events similar to those produced by BCG-stimulated neutrophils in combination with Smac mimetic. However, experiments using neutralizing antibodies to these death ligands showed that TNF-α secreted from BCG-stimulated neutrophils was the key mediator of anticancer action. These findings explain the mechanism of action of BCG and identified Smac mimetics as potential combination therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. PMID:22517918

  16. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, T W; Duck, K A; Michalopoulos, G C; Chen, M J; Liu, Z-J; Connor, J R; Lanier, L M; Sola-Visner, M C; Georgieff, M K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Potential neurodevelopmental side effects of thrombopoietin mimetics need to be considered. The effects of eltrombopag (ELT) on neuronal iron status and dendrite development were assessed. ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier and causes iron deficiency in developing neurons. ELT blunts dendrite maturation, indicating a need for more safety studies before neonatal use. Background Thrombocytopenia is common in sick neonates. Thrombopoietin mimetics (e.g. eltrombopag [ELT]) might provide an alternative therapy for selected neonates with severe and prolonged thrombocytopenia, and for infants and young children with different varieties of thrombocytopenia. However, ELT chelates intracellular iron, which may adversely affect developing organs with high metabolic requirements. Iron deficiency (ID) is particularly deleterious during brain development, impairing neuronal myelination, dopamine signaling and dendritic maturation and ultimately impairing long-term neurological function (e.g. hippocampal-dependent learning and memory). Objective To determine whether ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), causes neuronal ID and impairs hippocampal neuron dendrite maturation. Methods ELT transport across the BBB was assessed using primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Embryonic mouse primary hippocampal neuron cultures were treated with ELT or deferoxamine (DFO, an iron chelator) from 7 days in vitro (DIV) through 14 DIV and assessed for gene expression and neuronal dendrite complexity. Results ELT crossed the BBB in a time-dependent manner. 2 and 6 μm ELT increased Tfr1 and Slc11a2 (iron-responsive genes involved in neuronal iron uptake) mRNA levels, indicating neuronal ID. 6 μm ELT, but not 2 μm ELT, decreased BdnfVI, Camk2a and Vamp1 mRNA levels, suggesting impaired neuronal development and synaptic function. Dendrite branch number and length were reduced in 6 μm ELT-treated neurons, resulting in blunted dendritic arbor complexity that

  17. Expression and methylation of BDNF in the human brain in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Sern-Yih; McLeay, Robert; Wockner, Leesa F; Lawford, Bruce R; Young, Ross McD; Morris, Charles P; Voisey, Joanne

    2017-08-01

    To examine the combined effect of the BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism and BDNF DNA methylation on transcriptional regulation of the BDNF gene. DNA methylation profiles were generated for CpG sites proximal to Val66Met, within BDNF promoter I and exon V for prefrontal cortex samples from 25 schizophrenia and 25 control subjects. Val66Met genotypes and BDNF mRNA expression data were generated by transcriptome sequencing. Expression, methylation and genotype data were correlated and examined for association with schizophrenia. There was 43% more of the BDNF V-VIII-IX transcript in schizophrenia samples. BDNF mRNA expression and DNA methylation of seven CpG sites were not associated with schizophrenia after accounting for age and PMI effects. BDNF mRNA expression and DNA methylation were not altered by Val66Met after accounting for age and PMI effects. DNA methylation of one CpG site had a marginally significant positive correlation with mRNA expression in schizophrenia subjects. Schizophrenia risk was not associated with differential BDNF mRNA expression and DNA methylation. A larger age-matched cohort with comprehensive clinical history is required to accurately identify the effects of genotype, mRNA expression and DNA methylation on schizophrenia risk.

  18. Increased blood BDNF in healthy individuals with a family history of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Søndergaard, Mia H Greisen; Koefoed, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    The brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play an important role in the course of depression. We aimed to study the associations between peripheral whole blood BDNF levels in healthy individuals with and without a family history of depression. BDNF levels were significantly increased...... in healthy individuals with (n = 76), compared with healthy individuals without (n = 39) a family history of depression and persisted after adjustment for age and gender differences. Higher BDNF levels were associated with increasing age and seasonality. A family history of depression may contribute...

  19. Smac mimetic induces cell death in a large proportion of primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, which correlates with defined molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Botzenhardt, Ursula; Schlenk, Richard F; Zobel, Kerry; Deshayes, Kurt; Vucic, Domagoj; Döhner, Hartmut; Döhner, Konstanze; Fulda, Simone; Bullinger, Lars

    2016-08-02

    Apoptosis is deregulated in most, if not all, cancers, including hematological malignancies. Smac mimetics that antagonize Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins have so far largely been investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines; however, little is yet known on the therapeutic potential of Smac mimetics in primary AML samples. In this study, we therefore investigated the antileukemic activity of the Smac mimetic BV6 in diagnostic samples of 67 adult AML patients and correlated the response to clinical, cytogenetic and molecular markers and gene expression profiles. Treatment with cytarabine (ara-C) was used as a standard chemotherapeutic agent. Interestingly, about half (51%) of primary AML samples are sensitive to BV6 and 21% intermediate responsive, while 28% are resistant. Notably, 69% of ara-C-resistant samples show a good to fair response to BV6. Furthermore, combination treatment with ara-C and BV6 exerts additive effects in most samples. Whole-genome gene expression profiling identifies cell death, TNFR1 and NF-κB signaling among the top pathways that are activated by BV6 in BV6-sensitive, but not in BV6-resistant cases. Furthermore, sensitivity of primary AML blasts to BV6 correlates with significantly elevated expression levels of TNF and lower levels of XIAP in diagnostic samples, as well as with NPM1 mutation. In a large set of primary AML samples, these data provide novel insights into factors regulating Smac mimetic response in AML and have important implications for the development of Smac mimetic-based therapies and related diagnostics in AML.

  20. Negative affectivity moderated by BDNF and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, C S; Paternina, A C; Gomez, Y; Lattig, M C

    2012-02-01

    Gene×environment (G×E) interactions are known to predict susceptibility to disorders such as depression and anxiety. Adverse experiences in childhood and number of stressful life events (SLEs) have been widely studied as environmental risk factors; however, SLE response has not yet been studied. Here we present a first attempt at the analysis of the interaction between the response to personal and academic stressful events during different life stages and the gene polymorphisms 5-HTTLPR, 5-HTTVNTR (STin2), HTR1A C(-1019)G, and BDNF Val66Met in the prediction of negative affectivity (NA). Standardized questionnaires (ST-DEP and STAI) were used to measure negative affectivity derived from depression and anxiety in a sample of 303 undergraduate students. Response to stressful events during childhood, high school and college years was evaluated together with a self-report personal history form. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to perform association and G×E analysis. Negative affectivity is strongly associated with childhood maltreatment and stress response. Gene associations were observed between 5-HTTVNTR allele 12 and the S_12 haplotype with NA derived from high scores in both depression and anxiety. The BDNF gene variant was not associated with NA derived from depression or anxiety alone, but it was associated with the comorbid presentation. A significant G×E interaction was observed between the BDNF Val66Met and stress response during childhood and college years although the risk for negative affectivity conferred by stress response during childhood was only significant among the Met allele carriers, while stress response during college years was a significant risk factor regardless of the BDNF Val66Met genotype. A significant G×E interaction was also found between the HTR1A C(-1019)G variant and childhood maltreatment. The study has two main limitations, sample size is low and retrospective recognition of SLEs is a concern. Altogether, our

  1. Maternal Exercise during Pregnancy Increases BDNF Levels and Cell Numbers in the Hippocampal Formation but Not in the Cerebral Cortex of Adult Rat Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence has shown that physical exercise during pregnancy may alter brain development and improve cognitive function of offspring. However, the mechanisms through which maternal exercise might promote such effects are not well understood. The present study examined levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and absolute cell numbers in the hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex of rat pups born from mothers exercised during pregnancy. Additionally, we evaluated the cognitive abilities of adult offspring in different behavioral paradigms (exploratory activity and habituation in open field tests, spatial memory in a water maze test, and aversive memory in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Results showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy increased BDNF levels and absolute numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the hippocampal formation of offspring. No differences in BDNF levels or cell numbers were detected in the cerebral cortex. It was also observed that offspring from exercised mothers exhibited better cognitive performance in nonassociative (habituation and associative (spatial learning mnemonic tasks than did offspring from sedentary mothers. Our findings indicate that maternal exercise during pregnancy enhances offspring cognitive function (habituation behavior and spatial learning and increases BDNF levels and cell numbers in the hippocampal formation of offspring.

  2. BDNF Reduces Toxic Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Signaling via Synaptic NMDA Receptors and Nuclear-Calcium-Induced Transcription of inhba/Activin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The health of neurons is critically dependent on the relative signaling intensities of survival-promoting synaptic and death-inducing extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. Here, we show that BDNF is a regulator of this balance and promotes neuroprotection by reducing toxic NMDA receptor signaling. BDNF acts by initiating synaptic NMDA-receptor/nuclear-calcium-driven adaptogenomics, leading to increased expression of inhibin β-A (inhba. Inhibin β-A (its homodimer is known as activin A in turn reduces neurotoxic extrasynaptic NMDA-receptor-mediated calcium influx, thereby shielding neurons against mitochondrial dysfunction, a major cause of excitotoxicity. Thus, BDNF induces acquired neuroprotection by enhancing synaptic activity and lowering extrasynaptic NMDA receptor death signaling through a nuclear calcium-inhibin β-A pathway. This process, which confers protection against ischemic brain damage in a mouse stroke model, may be compromised in Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, or aging-related neurodegenerative conditions that are associated with reduced BDNF levels and/or enhanced extrasynaptic NMDA receptor signaling.

  3. Growth factors and hormones pro-peptides: the unexpected adventures of the BDNF prodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Unsain, Nicolás; Anastasia, Agustin

    2017-05-01

    Most growth factors and hormones are synthesized as pre-pro-proteins which are processed to the biologically active mature protein. The pre- and prodomains are cleaved from the precursor protein in the secretory pathway or, in some cases, extracellularly. The canonical functions of these prodomains are to assist in folding and stabilization of the mature domain, to direct intra and extracellular localization, to facilitate storage, and to regulate bioavailability of their mature counterpart. Recently, exciting evidence has revealed that prodomains of certain growth factors, after cleaved from the precursor pro-protein, can act as independent active signaling molecules. In this review, we discuss the various classical functions of prodomains, and the biological consequences of these pro-peptides acting as ligands. We will focus our attention on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor prodomain (pBDNF), which has been recently described as a novel secreted ligand influencing neuronal morphology and physiology. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, M H; Orio, L; Mandyam, C D

    2015-02-12

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1h/day) or extended access (6h/day) paradigm for 17days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct

  5. Alterations of serum levels of BDNF-related miRNAs in patients with depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jie Li

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious and potentially life-threatening mental disorder with unknown etiology. Emerging evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microRNAs (miRNAs play critical roles in the etiology of depression. Here this study was aimed to identify and characterize the roles of BDNF and its putative regulatory miRNAs in depression. First, we identified that miR-182 may be a putative miRNA that regulates BDNF levels by bioinformatic studies, and characterized the effects of miR-182 on the BDNF levels using cell-based studies, side by side with miR-132 (a known miRNA that regulates BDNF expression. We showed that treatment of miR-132 and miR-182 respectively decreased the BDNF protein levels in a human neuronal cell model, supporting the regulatory roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF expression. Furthermore, we explored the roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF levels in depression using human subjects by assessing their serum levels. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with depression showed lower serum BDNF levels (via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and higher serum miR-132 and miR-182 levels (via the real-time PCR. Finally, the Pearson's (or Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to study whether there was a relationship among the Self-Rating Depression Scale score, the serum BDNF levels, and serum BDNF-related miRNA levels. Our results revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between the SDS scores and the serum BDNF levels, and a positive correlation between the SDS scores and miR-132 levels. In addition, we found a reverse relationship between the serum BDNF levels and the miR-132/miR-182 levels in depression. Collectively, we provided evidence supporting that miR-182 is a putative BDNF-regulatory miRNA, and suggested that the serum BDNF and its related miRNAs may be utilized as important biomarkers in the diagnosis or as therapeutic targets of depression.

  6. Reproductive isolation related to mimetic divergence in the poison frog Ranitomeya imitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twomey, Evan; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    study the Peruvian poison frog Ranitomeya imitator, a species that has undergone a mimetic radiation into four distinct morphs. Using a combination of colour–pattern analysis, landscape genetics and mate-choice experiments, we show that a mimetic shift in R. imitator is associated with a narrow...

  7. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain-barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W.; Duck, Kari A.; Michalopoulos, George C.; Chen, Michael J.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Connor, James R.; Lanier, Lorene M.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is common in sick neonates. Thrombopoietin mimetics (e.g., eltrombopag (ELT)) might provide an alternative therapy for selected neonates with severe and prolonged thrombocytopenia, and for infants and young children with different varieties of thrombocytopenia. However, ELT chelates intracellular iron, which may adversely affect developing organs with high metabolic requirements. Iron deficiency (ID) is particularly deleterious during brain development, impairing neuronal myelination, dopamine signaling, and dendritic maturation and ultimately impairing long-term neurological function (e.g. hippocampal-dependent learning and memory). Objective Determine whether ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), causes neuronal ID and impairs hippocampal neuron dendrite maturation. Methods ELT transport across the BBB was assessed using primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Embryonic mouse primary hippocampal neuron cultures were treated with ELT or deferoxamine (DFO, an iron chelator) from 7 days in vitro (DIV) through 14DIV and assessed for gene expression and neuronal dendrite complexity. Results ELT crossed the BBB in a time-dependent manner. 2 and 6 μM ELT increased Tfr1 and Slc11a2 (iron-responsive genes involved in neuronal iron uptake) mRNA levels, indicating neuronal ID. 6 μM ELT, but not 2 μM ELT, decreased BdnfVI, Camk2a, and Vamp1 mRNA levels, suggesting impaired neuronal development and synaptic function. Dendrite branch number and length was reduced in 6 μM ELT-treated neurons, resulting in blunted dendritic arbor complexity that was similar to DFO-treated neurons. Conclusions ELT treatment during development may impair neuronal structure due to neuronal ID. Pre-clinical in vivo studies are warranted to assess ELT safety during periods of rapid brain development. PMID:28005311

  8. Late time cosmological dynamics with a nonminimal extension of the mimetic matter scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhan, N.; Nozari, K.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate an extension of mimetic gravity in which mimetic matter is nonminimally coupled to the Ricci scalar. We derive the background field equations and show that, as the minimal case, the nonminimal mimetic matter can behave as dark matter or dark energy. By adopting some well-known potentials, we study the dynamics of the scale factor and the equation of state parameter in detail. As the effective mimetic dark energy, this model explains the late time cosmic acceleration and its equation of state parameter crosses the phantom divide. We extend our analysis to the dynamical system approach and the phase space trajectories of the model. We obtain an attractor line which corresponds to the late time cosmic acceleration. By comparing this nonminimal mimetic matter scenario with observational data for the LCDM, we show that the confidence levels of this model overlap with those of Planck 2015 TT, TE, EE + Low P + Lensing + BAO data in the LCDM model.

  9. Effects of hippotherapy on brain function, BDNF level, and physical fitness in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namju; Park, Sok; Kim, Jongkyu

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hippotherapy on brain function and levels of blood-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in children with attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The hippotherapy group (HRG) included twenty children with ADHD and the control group (CG) included 19 children. All participants' physical fitness, fMRI brain scans, and blood BDNF levels were measured at baseline and after 32 weeks of participating in hippotherapy. After 32 weeks of participating in hippotherapy, the body fat of the HRG was significantly decreased (-1.12 ± 4.20%) and the body fat of the CG was increased (2.38 ± 6.35%) (p=0.049). There was no significant difference of physical fitness in both groups (p>0.05). Although there was a higher decrease in the activated insular area in the HRG (-1.59 ± 0.99) than in the CG (-1.14 ± 1.41), there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05) Also, there was a higher increase in the activated cerebellum area in the HRG (1.97 ± 1.45) than in the CG (1.92 ± 1.81). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). BDNF levels showed an increased tendency in the HRG (166.29 ± 277.52pg) compared to the CG (21.13 ± 686.33pg); otherwise, there was not any significant difference in these blood levels between the two groups (p>0.05). It can be assumed that big individual differences in the level of ADHD in the study participants might not cause any significant results, although there might be positive changes in the brain function of children with ADHD. Therefore, this study suggests that hippotherapy training would need to be modified and developed to increase the efficacy of hippotherapy in children with ADHD.

  10. Mimetic Finite Differences for Flow in Fractures from Microseismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hinai, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for porous media flow in the presence of complex fracture networks. The approach uses the Mimetic Finite Difference method (MFD) and takes advantage of MFD\\'s ability to solve over a general set of polyhedral cells. This flexibility is used to mesh fracture intersections in two and three-dimensional settings without creating small cells at the intersection point. We also demonstrate how to use general polyhedra for embedding fracture boundaries in the reservoir domain. The target application is representing fracture networks inferred from microseismic analysis.

  11. RSL3 and Erastin differentially regulate redox signaling to promote Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dächert, Jasmin; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-09-27

    Redox mechanisms play an important role in the control of various signaling pathways. Here, we report that Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic-induced cell death is regulated by redox signaling. We show that RSL3, a glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPX) 4 inhibitor, or Erastin, an inhibitor of the cystine/glutamate antiporter, cooperate with the Smac mimetic BV6 to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Addition of the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) fails to rescue ROS-induced cell death, demonstrating that RSL3/BV6- or Erastin/BV6-induced cell death occurs in a caspase-independent manner. Interestingly, the iron chelator Deferoxamine (DFO) significantly inhibits RSL3/BV6-induced cell death, whereas it is unable to rescue cell death by Erastin/BV6, showing that RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-mediated cell death depends on iron. ROS production is required for both RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, since the ROS scavenger α-tocopherol (α-Toc) rescues RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. By comparison, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation by GPX4 overexpression or ferrostatin (Fer)-1 significantly decreases RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, despite inhibition of lipid peroxidation upon exposure to RSL3/BV6 or Erastin/BV6. Of note, inhibition of lipid peroxidation by Fer-1 protects from RSL3/BV6-, but not from Erastin/BV6-stimulated ROS production, indicating that other forms of ROS besides lipophilic ROS occur during Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. Taken together, RSL3/BV6 and Erastin/BV6 differentially regulate redox signaling and cell death in ALL cells. While RSL3/BV6 cotreatment induces ferroptotic cell death, Erastin/BV6 stimulates oxidative cell death independently of iron. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic targeting of redox signaling to

  12. BDNF serum levels are not related to cognitive functioning in older depressed patients and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, A.; Thesing, C.; Bouckaert, F.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Comijs, H.C.; Stek, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent in older persons and both are associated with low serum brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Mutual pathways of depression and cognitive decline in older persons may explain the overlap in symptoms and low serum BDNF. We

  13. BDNF serum levels are not related to cognitive functioning in older depressed patients and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, A.; Thesing, C.S.; Bouckaert, F.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Comijs, H.C.; Stek, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent in older persons and both are associated with low serum brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Mutual pathways of depression and cognitive decline in older persons may explain the overlap in symptoms and low serum BDNF. We

  14. BDNF val66met genotype and schizotypal personality traits interact to influence probabilistic association learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilleter, Ashley Jayne; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Moustafa, Ahmed Abdelhalim; Gendy, Rasha; Chan, Mico; Arifin, Nur; Mitchell, Philip Bowden; Weickert, Thomas Wesley

    2014-11-01

    The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism rs6265 influences learning and may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Healthy people with high schizotypal personality traits display cognitive deficits that are similar to but not as severe as those observed in schizophrenia and they can be studied without confounds of antipsychotics or chronic illness. How genetic variation in BDNF may impact learning in individuals falling along the schizophrenia spectrum is unknown. We predicted that schizotypal personality traits would influence learning and that schizotypal personality-based differences in learning would vary depending on the BDNF val66met genotype. Eighty-nine healthy adults completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) and a probabilistic association learning test. Blood samples were genotyped for the BDNF val66met polymorphism. An ANOVA was performed with BDNF genotype (val homozygotes and met-carriers) and SPQ score (high/low) as grouping variables and probabilistic association learning as the dependent variable. Participants with low SPQ scores (fewer schizotypal personality traits) showed significantly better learning than those with high SPQ scores. BDNF met-carriers displaying few schizotypal personality traits performed best, whereas BDNF met-carriers displaying high schizotypal personality traits performed worst. Thus, the BDNF val66met polymorphism appears to influence probabilistic association learning differently depending on the extent of schizotypal personality traits displayed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of combined BDNF and GDNF treatment on cultured dopaminergic midbrain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten; Spenger, C

    1998-01-01

    -derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), or a combination of both. Dopamine content of the culture medium, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons, and culture volumes were moderately increased in the BDNF- and GDNF-treated cultures but significantly...

  16. Investigating the role of hippocampal BDNF in anxiety vulnerability using classical eyeblink conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie L Janke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, behavioral inhibition temperament (BI and small hippocampal volume have been linked to anxiety disorders. Individuals with BI show facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response (CCER as compared to non-BI individuals, and a similar pattern is seen in an animal model of BI, the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat. The present study examined the role of hippocampal BDNF in the facilitated delay CCER of WKY rats. Consistent with earlier work, acquisition was facilitated in WKY rats compared to the SD rats. Facilitated acquisition was associated with increased BDNF, TrkB, and Arc mRNA in the dentate gyrus of SD rats, but learning-induced increases in BDNF and Arc mRNA were significantly smaller in WKY rats. To determine if reduced hippocampal BDNF in WKY rats was a contributing factor for their facilitated CCER, BDNF or saline infusions were given bilaterally into the dentate gyrus region one hour prior to training. BDNF infusion did not alter the acquisition of SD rats, but significantly dampened the acquisition of CCER in the WKY rats, such that acquisition was similar to SD rats. Together, these results suggest that inherent differences in the BDNF system play a critical role in the facilitated associative learning exhibited by WKY rats, and potentially individuals with BI. Facilitated associative learning may represent a vulnerability factor in the development of anxiety disorders.

  17. BDNF serum levels are not related to cognitive functioning in older depressed patients and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, Annemiek; Thesing, Carisha S.; Bouckaert, Filip; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Comijs, Hannie C.; Stek, M. L.

    Background: Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent in older persons and both are associated with low serum brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Mutual pathways of depression and cognitive decline in older persons may explain the overlap in symptoms and low serum BDNF. We

  18. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lynn Leckie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82. Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = .036. The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations.

  19. Localization of BDNF mRNA with the Huntington's disease protein in rat brain

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    Chao Moses V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have implicated reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. Mutant huntingtin (Htt protein was previously reported to decrease BDNF gene transcription and axonal transport of BDNF. We recently showed that wild-type Htt is associated with the Argonaute 2 microRNA-processing enzyme involved in gene silencing. In dendrites, Htt co-localizes with components of neuronal granules and mRNAs, indicating that it might play a role in post-transcriptional processing/transport of dendritic mRNAs. Results We conducted imaging experiments in cultured cortical neurons to demonstrate the co-localization of endogenous Htt and BDNF mRNA in fixed cells, and co-trafficking of BDNF 3'UTR mRNA with endogenous and fluorescently tagged Htt in live neurons. We used an enhanced technique that combines FISH and immunofluorescent staining to co-localize BDNF mRNA with Htt, Ago2, CPEB and dynein in thick vibratome sections of the rat cortex. Conclusions In cultured neurons and sections of the rat cortex, we found BDNF mRNA associated with Htt and components of neuronal RNA granules, which are centers for regulating RNA transport and local translation. Htt may play a role in post-transcriptional transport/targeting of mRNA for BDNF, thus contributing to neurotrophic support and neuron survival.

  20. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisna J LeVaillant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-term AAV-mediated secretion of BDNF or CNTF affected endogenous retinal gene expression. One year after the intravitreal injection of AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP, bi-cistronic AAV-BDNF-GFP or AAV-CNTF-GFP, mRNA was extracted and analyzed using custom 96 well polymerase chain reaction arrays. Of 93 test genes, 56% showed significantly altered expression in AAV-BDNF-GFP and/or AAV-CNTF-GFP retinas compared with AAV-GFP controls. Of these genes, 73% showed differential expression in AAV-BDNF versus AAV-CNTF injected eyes. To focus on retinal ganglion cell changes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was undertaken on mRNA (16 genes obtained from fixed retinal sections in which the ganglion cell layer was enriched. The sign and extent of fold changes in ganglion cell layer gene expression differed markedly from whole retinal samples. Sustained and global alteration in endogenous mRNA expression after gene therapy should be factored into any interpretation of experimental/clinical outcomes, particularly when introducing factors into the central nervous system that require secretion to evoke functionality.

  1. Deletion of the BDNF truncated receptor TrkB.T1 delays disease onset in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Sudhirkumar U Yanpallewar

    Full Text Available Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF exerts strong pro-survival effects on developing and injured motoneurons. However, in clinical trials, BDNF has failed to benefit patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. To date, the cause of this failure remains unclear. Motoneurons express the TrkB kinase receptor but also high levels of the truncated TrkB.T1 receptor isoform. Thus, we investigated whether the presence of this receptor may affect the response of diseased motoneurons to endogenous BDNF. We deleted TrkB.T1 in the hSOD1(G93A ALS mouse model and evaluated the impact of this mutation on motoneuron death, muscle weakness and disease progression. We found that TrkB.T1 deletion significantly slowed the onset of motor neuron degeneration. Moreover, it delayed the development of muscle weakness by 33 days. Although the life span of the animals was not affected we observed an overall improvement in the neurological score at the late stage of the disease. To investigate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at bypassing the TrkB.T1 limit to BDNF signaling we treated SOD1 mutant mice with the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS21680, which can activate motoneuron TrkB receptor signaling independent of neurotrophins. We found that CGS21680 treatment slowed the onset of motor neuron degeneration and muscle weakness similarly to TrkB.T1 removal. Together, our data provide evidence that endogenous TrkB.T1 limits motoneuron responsiveness to BDNF in vivo and suggest that new strategies such as Trk receptor transactivation may be used for therapeutic intervention in ALS or other neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Daily visual stimulation in the critical period enhances multiple aspects of vision through BDNF-mediated pathways in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, Amanda M; Yang, Victoria; Aung, Moe H; Fu, Jieming; Adekunle, Adewumi N; Prall, Brian C; Sidhu, Curran S; Park, Han Na; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Iuvone, P Michael; Pardue, Machelle T

    2018-01-01

    Visual experience during the critical period modulates visual development such that deprivation causes visual impairments while stimulation induces enhancements. This study aimed to determine whether visual stimulation in the form of daily optomotor response (OMR) testing during the mouse critical period (1) improves aspects of visual function, (2) involves retinal mechanisms and (3) is mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dopamine (DA) signaling pathways. We tested spatial frequency thresholds in C57BL/6J mice daily from postnatal days 16 to 23 (P16 to P23) using OMR testing. Daily OMR-treated mice were compared to littermate controls that were placed in the OMR chamber without moving gratings. Contrast sensitivity thresholds, electroretinograms (ERGs), visual evoked potentials, and pattern ERGs were acquired at P21. To determine the role of BDNF signaling, a TrkB receptor antagonist (ANA-12) was systemically injected 2 hours prior to OMR testing in another cohort of mice. BDNF immunohistochemistry was performed on retina and brain sections. Retinal DA levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Daily OMR testing enhanced spatial frequency thresholds and contrast sensitivity compared to controls. OMR-treated mice also had improved rod-driven ERG oscillatory potential response times, greater BDNF immunoreactivity in the retinal ganglion cell layer, and increased retinal DA content compared to controls. VEPs and pattern ERGs were unchanged. Systemic delivery of ANA-12 attenuated OMR-induced visual enhancements. Daily OMR testing during the critical period leads to general visual function improvements accompanied by increased DA and BDNF in the retina, with this process being requisitely mediated by TrkB activation. These results suggest that novel combination therapies involving visual stimulation and using both behavioral and molecular approaches may benefit degenerative retinal diseases or amblyopia.

  3. Possible Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halepoto, D. M.; Bashir, S.; AL-Ayadhi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family of survival-promoting molecules, plays a vital role in the growth, development, maintenance, and function of several neuronal systems. The purpose of this review is to document the support for the involvement of this molecule in the maintenance of normal cognitive, emotional functioning, and to outline recent developments in the content of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current and future treatment development can be guided by developing understanding of this molecules actions in the brain and the ways the expression of BDNF can be planned. Over the years, research findings suggested a critical role played by BDNF in the development of autism including increased serum concentrations of BDNF in children with autism and identification of different forms of BDNF in families of autistic individuals. (author)

  4. No association between polymorphisms in the BDNF gene and age at onset in Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus Peter H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an attractive candidate for modifying age at onset (AO in Huntington disease (HD. In particular, the functional Val66Met polymorphism appeared to exert a significant effect. Here we evaluate BDNF variability with respect to AO of HD using markers that represent the entire locus. Methods Five selected tagging polymorphisms were genotyped across a 65 kb region comprising the BDNF gene in a well established cohort of 250 unrelated German HD patients. Results Addition of BDNF genotype variations or one of the marker haplotypes to the effect of CAG repeat lengths did not affect the variance of the AO. Conclusion We were unable to verify a recently reported association between the functional Val66Met polymorphism in the BDNF gene and AO in HD. From our findings, we conclude that neither sequence variations in nor near the gene contribute significantly to the variance of AO.

  5. Reduced serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in transsexual Brazilian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanari, Anna Martha Vaitses; Costa, Angelo Brandelli; Aguiar, Bianca; Tusset, Cíntia; Andreazza, Tahiana; Schneider, Maiko; da Rosa, Eduarda Dias; Soll, Bianca Machado Borba; Schwarz, Karine; da Silva, Dhiordan Cardoso; Borba, André Oliveira; Mueller, Andressa; Massuda, Raffael; Lobato, Maria Inês Rodrigues

    2016-09-06

    Serum BDNF levels are significantly decreased in transsexual Brazilian women when compared to cis-sexual men. Since transsexual men are also exposed to chronic social stress and have a high prevalence of associated psychopathologies, it is plausible to inquire if BDNF serum levels are altered in transsexual men as well. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate differences in BDNF serum level of transsexual men when compared to cis-sexual men and women. Our sample comprises 27 transsexual men, 31 cis-sexual women and 30 cis-sexual men recruited between 2011 and 2015. We observed that BDNF serum concentration is decreased in transsexual men comparing to cis-sexual men and women. Cross-sex hormone treatment, chronic social stress or long-term gender dysphoria (GD) could explain the variation found in BDNF serum levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. BDNF Overexpression Exhibited Bilateral Effect on Neural Behavior in SCT Mice Associated with AKT Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Rong; Dai, Ping; Wang, Shu-Fen; Song, Shu-Hua; Wang, Hang-Ping; Zhao, Ya; Wang, Ting-Hua; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI), a severe health problem in worldwide, was commonly associated with functional disability and reduced quality of life. As the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was substantial event in injured spinal cord, we hypothesized whether BDNF-overexpression could be in favor of the recovery of both sensory function and hindlimb function after SCI. By using BDNF-overexpression transgene mice [CMV-BDNF 26 (CB26) mice] we assessed the role of BDNF on the recovery of neurological behavior in spinal cord transection (SCT) model. BMS score and tail-flick test was performed to evaluate locomotor function and sensory function, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was employed to detect the location and the expression of BDNF, NeuN, 5-HT, GAP-43, GFAP as well as CGRP, and the level of p-AKT and AKT were examined through western blot analysis. BDNF overexpressing resulted in significant locomotor functional recovery from 21 to 28 days after SCT, compared with wild type (WT)+SCT group. Meanwhile, the NeuN, 5-HT and GAP-43 positive cells were markedly increased in ventral horn in BDNF overexpression animals, compared with WT mice with SCT. Moreover, the crucial molecular signal, p-AKT/AKT has been largely up-regulated, which is consistent with the improvement of locomotor function. However, in this study, thermal hyperpathia encountered in sham (CB26) group and WT+SCT mice and further aggravated in CB26 mice after SCT. Also, following SCT, the significant augment of positive-GFAP astrocytes and CGRP fibers were found in WT+SCT mice, and further increase was seen in BDNF over-expression transgene mice. BDNF-overexpression may not only facilitate the recovery of locomotor function via AKT pathway, but also contributed simultaneously to thermal hyperalgesia after SCT.

  7. Early raise of BDNF in hippocampus suggests induction of posttranscriptional mechanisms by antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlati Sergio

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurotrophin BDNF has been implicated in the regulation of neuroplasticity, gene expression, and synaptic function in the adult brain, as well as in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Antidepressant treatments have been shown to increase the expression of BDNF mRNA, although the changes measured were found to be different depending on various factors. A few studies only have measured levels of BDNF protein after antidepressant treatments, and poor correlation was found between mRNA and protein changes. We studied the time course of expression of BDNF mRNA and protein during drug treatments, in order to elucidate the temporal profile of regulation of this effector and whether mRNA and protein levels correlate. Rat groups were treated for 1, 2 or 3 weeks with fluoxetine or reboxetine; in additional groups drug treatment was followed by a washout week (3+1. Total BDNF mRNA was measured by Real Time PCR, pro- and mature BDNF proteins were measured by Western blot. Results We found that mature BDNF protein is induced more rapidly than mRNA, by both drugs in hippocampus (weeks 1–2 and by reboxetine in prefrontal/frontal cortex (week 1. The temporal profile of BDNF protein expression was largely inconsistent with that of mRNA, which followed the protein induction and reached a peak at week 3. Conclusion These results suggest that BDNF protein is rapidly elevated by antidepressant treatments by posttranscriptional mechanisms, and that induction of BDNF mRNA is a slower process.

  8. Complete spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects nociceptive sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Jen; Lee, Kuan H; Grau, James W

    2017-02-01

    Noxious stimulation can induce a lasting increase in neural excitability within the spinal cord (central sensitization) that can promote pain and disrupt adaptive function (maladaptive plasticity). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate the development of plasticity and has been shown to impact the development of spinally-mediated central sensitization. The latter effect has been linked to an alteration in GABA-dependent inhibition. Prior studies have shown that, in spinally transected rats, exposure to regular (fixed spaced) stimulation can counter the development of maladaptive plasticity and have linked this effect to an up-regulation of BDNF. Here it is shown that application of the irritant capsaicin to one hind paw induces enhanced mechanical reactivity (EMR) after spinal cord injury (SCI) and that the induction of this effect is blocked by pretreatment with fixed spaced shock. This protective effect was eliminated if rats were pretreated with the BDNF sequestering antibody TrkB-IgG. Intrathecal (i.t.) application of BDNF prevented, but did not reverse, capsaicin-induced EMR. BDNF also attenuated cellular indices (ERK and pERK expression) of central sensitization after SCI. In uninjured rats, i.t. BDNF enhanced, rather than attenuated, capsaicin-induced EMR and ERK/pERK expression. These opposing effects were related to a transformation in GABA function. In uninjured rats, BDNF reduced membrane-bound KCC2 and the inhibitory effect of the GABA A agonist muscimol. After SCI, BDNF increased KCC2 expression, which would help restore GABAergic inhibition. The results suggest that SCI transforms how BDNF affects GABA function and imply that the clinical usefulness of BDNF will depend upon the extent of fiber sparing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Small-molecule SMAC mimetics as new cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Longchuan; Smith, David C; Wang, Shaomeng

    2014-10-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cellular process and faulty regulation of apoptosis is a hallmark of human cancers. Targeting key apoptosis regulators with the goal to restore apoptosis in tumor cells has been pursued as a new cancer therapeutic strategy. XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2, members of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, are critical regulators of cell death and survival and are attractive targets for new cancer therapy. The SMAC/DIABLO protein is an endogenous antagonist of XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2. In the last decade, intense research efforts have resulted in the design and development of several small-molecule SMAC mimetics now in clinical trials for cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the roles of XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 in regulation of cell death and survival, and the design and development of small-molecule SMAC mimetics as novel cancer treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of canola and corn oil mimetic on Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinsete Juliana A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Western diet is high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil contains a healthier omega 3 to omega 6 ratio than corn oil. Jurkat T leukemia cells were treated with free fatty acids mixtures in ratios mimicking that found in commercially available canola oil (7% α-linolenic, 30% linoleic, 54% oleic or corn oil (59% linoleic, 24% oleic to determine the cell survival or cell death and changes in expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors following oil treatment. Methods Fatty acid uptake was assessed by gas chromatography. Cell survival and cell death were evaluated by cell cycle analyses, propidium-iodide staining, trypan blue exclusion and phosphatidylserine externalization. mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors were assessed by RT-PCR. Results There was a significant difference in the lipid profiles of the cells after treatment. Differential action of the oils on inflammatory molecules, following treatment at non-cytotoxic levels, indicated that canola oil mimetic was anti-inflammatory whereas corn oil mimetic was pro-inflammatory. Significance These results indicate that use of canola oil in the diet instead of corn oil might be beneficial for diseases promoted by inflammation.

  11. The mimetic repertoire of the spotted bowerbird Ptilonorhynchus maculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Laura A.; Healy, Susan D.

    2011-06-01

    Although vocal mimicry in songbirds is well documented, little is known about the function of such mimicry. One possibility is that the mimic produces the vocalisations of predatory or aggressive species to deter potential predators or competitors. Alternatively, these sounds may be learned in error as a result of their acoustic properties such as structural simplicity. We determined the mimetic repertoires of a population of male spotted bowerbirds Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, a species that mimics predatory and aggressive species. Although male mimetic repertoires contained an overabundance of vocalisations produced by species that were generally aggressive, there was also a marked prevalence of mimicry of sounds that are associated with alarm such as predator calls, alarm calls and mobbing calls, irrespective of whether the species being mimicked was aggressive or not. We propose that it may be the alarming context in which these sounds are first heard that may lead both to their acquisition and to their later reproduction. We suggest that enhanced learning capability during acute stress may explain vocal mimicry in many species that mimic sounds associated with alarm.

  12. Insulin-mimetic activity of stevioside on diabetic rats: biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biochemical, molecular and histopathological studies have been done to evaluate the therapeutic effect of stevioside on minimizing levels of glucose and its ... For mRNA expression, stevioside up-regulated the expressions of PK and IRS-1 genes, which are down-regulated in diabetic rats, and was very effective in the ...

  13. Human mimetic forearm mechanism towards bionic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minsang; Kim, Hogyun; Choi, Youngjin

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents a mechanical forearm mechanism to extend the pronation and supination (P/S) movement of the trans-radial amputee when he/she is able to conduct the P/S motion partially with his/her remaining forearm. The P/S motions of the existing prostheses and robotic arms developed till now are completely different from those of the human. When we are to develop the robotic prostheses for the amputees, two important issues should be considered such as cosmetic issue to look like normal arm and motion harmony issue between robotic prosthesis and the amputated living arm. Most prostheses do not realize the human-like P/S motion, but the simple rotational motion at the wrist by using the electric motor. In this paper, the well-known spatial four-bar mechanism is adopted in order to mimic human P/S motion as if the person does, because it is one of the best candidates to describe actual human forearm movement. To obtain the design parameters of the mechanism, first, 3D data of the amputated arm as well as the opposite side non-amputated arm are captured by using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and 3D scanner. The design parameters such as link lengths, joint locations, and volumetric shape are determined from the measured data. Second, mathematical analysis is performed to simulate one degree-of-freedom P/S motion realized from the spatial four-bar mechanism, and the simulation results are suggested to confirm whether or not it acts like the relative movement between human ulnar and radius bones. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism is verified through two ADL (activities of daily living) tests.

  14. Smac mimetic induces an early wave of gene expression via NF-κB and AP-1 and a second wave via TNFR1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nadine; Haydn, Tinka; Schneider, Ines; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Fulda, Simone

    2018-05-01

    Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases) mimetics are considered as promising cancer therapeutics, but little is yet known about how they alter gene expression. In this study, we used an unbiased genome-wide expression array to investigate gene regulation induced by the Smac mimetic BV6 in breast cancer cell lines. Here, we discover that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α/TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) auto-/paracrine signaling regulates Smac mimetic-stimulated changes in gene expression in a time-dependent manner. TNFR1-independent and -dependent genes account for two subsequent waves of BV6-induced gene expression. While the first wave mostly comprises TNFR1-independent genes and involves nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 transcription factors, the second wave largely depends on TNFR1 signaling. Interestingly, disrupting auto-/paracrine TNFα/TNFR1 signaling by knockdown of TNFR1 strongly attenuates the BV6-induced second wave of gene expression and upregulation of many pathways, including NF-κB, apoptosis and immune signaling, while activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling occurs also in TNFR1 knockdown cells. Thus, BV6 alters gene expression in a time- as well as TNFR1-dependent manner. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mimetic Gravity: A Review of Recent Developments and Applications to Cosmology and Astrophysics

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    Lorenzo Sebastiani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic gravity is a Weyl-symmetric extension of General Relativity, related to the latter by a singular disformal transformation, wherein the appearance of a dust-like perfect fluid can mimic cold dark matter at a cosmological level. Within this framework, it is possible to provide a unified geometrical explanation for dark matter, the late-time acceleration, and inflation, making it a very attractive theory. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of mimetic gravity, as well as extensions of the minimal formulation of the model. We devote particular focus to the reconstruction technique, which allows the realization of any desired expansionary history of the universe by an accurate choice of potential or other functions defined within the theory (as in the case of mimetic f(R gravity. We briefly discuss cosmological perturbation theory within mimetic gravity. As a case study within which we apply the concepts previously discussed, we study a mimetic Hořava-like theory, of which we explore solutions and cosmological perturbations in detail. Finally, we conclude the review by discussing static spherically symmetric solutions within mimetic gravity and apply our findings to the problem of galactic rotation curves. Our review provides an introduction to mimetic gravity, as well as a concise but self-contained summary of recent findings, progress, open questions, and outlooks on future research directions.

  16. The SMAC mimetic birinapant attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by inhibiting the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 degradation in Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxiang; Liao, Rui; He, Kun; Zhu, Xiwen; Li, Peizhi; Gong, Jianping

    2017-05-01

    It was demonstrated that second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC) mimetic inhibites tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) degradation and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. However, the effect of Smac mimetic in vivo is not clear. The present study was to investigate the role of Smac mimetic in LPS-induced liver injury in mice and its possible mechanism. An animal model of LPS-induced liver injury was established by intraperitoneally injecting mice with 10mg/kg LPS pretreatment with or without Smac mimetic birinapant (30mg/kg body weight). Birinapant significantly improved the survival rate of endotoxemic mice (P<0.05) and attenuated LPS-induced liver pathologic damage and inflammatory response. IL-1 and TNF-α levels in the serum were markedly decreased in birinapant pretreatment mice compared with control mice (P<0.05).The cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1) expression in liver resident macrophage (Kupffer cells, KCs) was significantly decreased in the Birinapant group compared to the Vehicle group (P<0.05). At the same time, total TRAF3 protein abundance in KCs rapidly declined after LPS stimulation in the Vehicle group. However, it remained constant in the Birinapant group. Moreover, K48-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF3 in KCs was markedly impressed in the birinapant group compared with the control group. At last, the JNK and p38 MAPK activation in KCs was significantly inhibited by birinapant pretreatment (P<0.05). These results suggested that birinapant attenuated liver injury and improved survival rates in endotoxemic mice by inhibited the expression of cIAP1, degradation of TRAF3 and aviation of MAPK signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metformin + Sodium-glucose Co-transporter-2 Inhibitor: Salutogenic Lifestyle Mimetics in a Tablet?

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    Sanjay Kalra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salutogenesis is an accepted approach for chronic disease management. Calorie restriction and exercise are two evidence based salutogenic interventions in diabetes treatment. Calorie restriction mimetics and exercise mimetics may be used as pharmacological tools to help manage diabetes in a sulutogenic manner. This article discusses the biochemical basis and pharmacology of metformin and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. It describes how a combination of these drugs can be used as a calories restriction and exercise mimetic, to help improve diabetes control.

  18. BDNF promotes target innervation of Xenopus mandibular trigeminal axons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Dorey, Karel; Ishibashi, Shoko; Amaya, Enrique

    2007-05-31

    Trigeminal nerves consist of ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular branches that project to distinct regions of the facial epidermis. In Xenopus embryos, the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve extends toward and innervates the cement gland in the anterior facial epithelium. The cement gland has previously been proposed to provide a short-range chemoattractive signal to promote target innervation by mandibular trigeminal axons. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF is known to stimulate axon outgrowth and branching. The goal of this study is to determine whether BDNF functions as the proposed target recognition signal in the Xenopus cement gland. We found that the cement gland is enriched in BDNF mRNA transcripts compared to the other neurotrophins NT3 and NT4 during mandibular trigeminal nerve innervation. BDNF knockdown in Xenopus embryos or specifically in cement glands resulted in the failure of mandibular trigeminal axons to arborise or grow into the cement gland. BDNF expressed ectodermal grafts, when positioned in place of the cement gland, promoted local trigeminal axon arborisation in vivo. BDNF is necessary locally to promote end stage target innervation of trigeminal axons in vivo, suggesting that BDNF functions as a short-range signal that stimulates mandibular trigeminal axon arborisation and growth into the cement gland.

  19. Exercise does not protect against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in BDNF haploinsufficient mice.

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    Kim M Gerecke

    Full Text Available Exercise has been demonstrated to potently protect substantia nigra pars compacta (SN dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. One mechanism proposed to account for this neuroprotection is the upregulation of neurotrophic factors. Several neurotrophic factors, including Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, have been shown to upregulate in response to exercise. In order to determine if exercise-induced neuroprotection is dependent upon BDNF, we compared the neuroprotective effects of voluntary exercise in mice heterozygous for the BDNF gene (BDNF+/- with strain-matched wild-type (WT mice. Stereological estimates of SNpc DA neurons from WT mice allowed 90 days exercise via unrestricted running demonstrated complete protection against the MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. However, BDNF+/- mice allowed 90 days of unrestricted exercise were not protected from MPTP-induced SNpc DA neuron loss. Proteomic analysis comparing SN and striatum from 90 day exercised WT and BDNF+/- mice showed differential expression of proteins related to energy regulation, intracellular signaling and trafficking. These results suggest that a full genetic complement of BDNF is critical for the exercise-induced neuroprotection of SNpc DA neurons.

  20. The requirement of BDNF for hippocampal synaptic plasticity is experience-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarse, Janna; Herlitze, Stefan; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation and has been implicated in forms of hippocampus-dependent learning. In vitro, a specific role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity has been described, although not all experience-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity critically depend on BDNF. Synaptic plasticity is likely to enable long-term synaptic information storage and memory, and the induction of persistent (>24 h) forms, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) is tightly associated with learning specific aspects of a spatial representation. Whether BDNF is required for persistent (>24 h) forms of LTP and LTD, and how it contributes to synaptic plasticity in the freely behaving rodent has never been explored. We examined LTP, LTD, and related forms of learning in the CA1 region of freely dependent mice that have a partial knockdown of BDNF (BDNF(+/-) ). We show that whereas early-LTD (synaptic plasticity may circumvent the need for BDNF, rather it may play a specific role in the optimization of weaker forms of plasticity. The finding that both learning-facilitated LTD and spatial reference memory are both impaired in BDNF(+/-) mice, suggests moreover, that it is critically required for the physiological encoding of hippocampus-dependent memory. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

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    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  2. Effects of crack cocaine addiction and stress-related genes on peripheral BDNF levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovaris, Diego L; Schuch, Jaqueline B; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Sanvicente-Vieira, Breno; da Silva, Bruna S; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Müller, Diana; Stolf, Anderson R; von Diemen, Lisia; Ceresér, Keila M M; Pianca, Thiago G; Szobot, Claudia M; Kessler, Felix H P; Roman, Tatiana; Bau, Claiton H D

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the effects of glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes on susceptibility to crack cocaine addiction and BDNF levels. Crack addicted patients who sought treatment (n = 280) and non-addicted individuals (n = 241) were assessed. Three SNPs in NR3C1 (rs6198, rs41423247, and rs10052957), three in CRHR1 (rs12944712, rs110402, and rs878886), and one in BDNF (rs6265) were genotyped. No significant effect was seen in the case-control analyses. Crack cocaine addicted patients showed significantly lower serum BDNF levels. Significant effects were observed for NR3C1 rs41423247 and rs10052957. These effects were restricted to non-addicted individuals and they were supported by significant gene-by-disease status interactions. For CRHR1, all SNPs were associated with BDNF levels. Although there were significant effects only in the analysis restricted to non-addicted individuals, the lack of significant results in the gene-by-disease status interaction analyses suggest a general effect on BDNF levels. The haplotype analyses presented the same effect seen in the single marker analyses. This study suggests that SNPs in the NR3C1 and CRHR1 genes may influence BDNF levels, but this effect is blunted in the context of crack cocaine addiction. Therefore, our data may be interpreted in light of several studies showing pronounced effects of crack cocaine on BDNF levels. Since peripheral BDNF is a biomarker for several psychiatric phenotypes, our results may be useful in interpreting previous associations between stress-related SNPs, drug addiction, and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons/aromatics, BDNF and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica; Phillips, David H; Wang, Ya; Roen, Emily; Herbstman, Julie; Rauh, Virginia; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Deliang

    2015-10-01

    Within a New York City (NYC) birth cohort, we assessed the associations between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and other aromatic DNA adducts and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in umbilical cord blood, and neurodevelopment at age 2 years and whether BDNF is a mediator of the associations between PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts and neurodevelopment. PAH/aromatic-DNA adduct concentrations in cord blood were measured in 505 children born to nonsmoking African-American and Dominican women residing in NYC, and a subset was assessed for neurodevelopment at 2 years using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Mental Development Index (MDI). A spectrum of PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts was measured using the (32)P-postlabeling assay; DNA adducts formed by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a representative PAH, were measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)/fluorescence. BDNF mature protein in cord blood plasma was quantified by an ELISA. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounders, was conducted. PAH/aromatic-DNA adduct concentration measured by postlabeling was inversely associated with BDNF concentration (p=0.02) and with MDI scores at 2 years (p=0.04). BDNF level was positively associated with MDI scores (p=0.003). Restricting to subjects having all three measures (PAH/aromatic-DNA adducts by postlabeling, MDI, and BDNF), results were similar but attenuated (p=0.13, p=0.05, p=0.01, respectively). Associations between B[a]P-DNA adducts and BDNF and B[a]P-DNA adducts and MDI at age 2 years were not significant. At age 3 years, the positive association of BDNF with MDI was not observed. The results at age 2 suggest that prenatal exposure to a spectrum of PAH/aromatic pollutants may adversely affect early neurodevelopment, in part by reducing BDNF levels during the fetal period. However, the same relationship was not seen at age 3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of BDNF Val66MET Polymorphism With Parkinson's Disease and Depression and Anxiety Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagni, Fernanda Carvalho; Campêlo, Clarissa Loureiro das Chagas; Coimbra, Daniel Gomes; Barbosa, Mayara Rodrigues; Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga Oliveira; Neto, Antônio Braz Silva; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Júnior, Clécio de Oliveira Godeiro; Gomes de Andrade, Tiago; Silva, Regina Helena

    2017-01-01

    An association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was suggested by several studies, with contradictory results. BDNF is necessary for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Val66Met is a common polymorphism of the BDNF gene that affects cognitive and motor processes. The authors studied 104 Brazilian patients with PD and 96 control participants. The G/G genotype was significantly associated with depression and anxiety symptoms and development of PD. This is the first study that associates this genotype with PD.

  5. Postresuscitative Changes of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF Protein Expression: Association With Neuronal Death

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    M. Sh. Avrushchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: to evaluate expression level of BDNF and its association with the postresuscitative neuronal death in highly hypoxia-sensitive brain regions.Materials and methods. Cardiac arrest in adult albino male rats was evoked by intrathoracic clamping of supracardiac bundle of vessels for 10 min. Pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum were analyzed at various time points after resuscitation (days 1, 4, 7, 14. Shame-operated rats served as controls. The expression of BDNF protein was immunohistochemically determined. The BDNF expression level was determined by evalution on the base of the average optical density. The number of neurons with different BDNF expression levels and the total number of neurons per 1 mm of the layer length were computed. Image analysis systems (Intel personal computer, Olympus BX-41 microscope, ImageScopeM, ImageJ 1,48v and MS Excel 2007 software packages were used in the study. Data statistical processing was performed with the aid of Statistica 7.0 program and Kolmogorov-Smirnov λ-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Student's t-test.Results. The dynamics of postresuscitative shifts of BDNF immunoreactivity in neuronal populations of hippocampal pyramidal cells and cerebellar Purkinje cells was established. It was shown that the level of BDNF expression within the two neuronal populations decreased, that was accompanied by neuronal death. In the Purkinje cell population the neuronal death occurred by the 4th day after resuscitation, while in the hippocampus, it occurs only by the 7th day. Notably, only BDNF-negative neurons or neurons with low level of BDNF expression died in both neuronal populations.Conclusion. The results of the study indicate the existence of an interrelation between the shifts in BDNF expression and the postresuscitative neuronal death. It was shown that only the cells with none or poor BDNF expression underwent death in highly hypoxia-sensitive neuronal

  6. Polymorphisms of the BDNF gene show neither association with multiple sclerosis susceptibility nor clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Smestad, Cathrine; Lie, Benedicte A; Lorentzen, Åslaug R; Sandvik, Leiv; Landrø, Nils Inge; Aarseth, Jan H; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Celius, Elisabeth G; Harbo, Hanne F

    2012-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed a protective role in multiple sclerosis (MS) in several studies. The val(66)met polymorphism alters the function of the BDNF protein, and has along with rs56164415 previously been reported to be associated with MS. We genotyped BDNF SNPs val(66)met and rs56164415 in 2149 Norwegian MS patients and 2747 healthy controls. No association was found for any of the SNPs to disease susceptibility or any clinical or demographic parameters including sex, age at onset, disease course, disease severity and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A multilevel multiscale mimetic method for an anisotropic infiltration problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moulton, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Modeling of multiphase flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media must capture a broad range of coupled spatial and temporal scales. Recently, a hierarchical approach dubbed the Multilevel Multiscale Mimetic (M3) method, was developed to simulate two-phase flow in porous media. The M{sup 3} method is locally mass conserving at all levels in its hierarchy, it supports unstructured polygonal grids and full tensor permeabilities, and it can achieve large coarsening factors. In this work we consider infiltration of water into a two-dimensional layered medium. The grid is aligned with the layers but not the coordinate axes. We demonstrate that with an efficient temporal updating strategy for the coarsening parameters, fine-scale accuracy of prominent features in the flow is maintained by the M{sup 3} method.

  8. Self-assembly of fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexeisen, Emilie Lynn

    Many therapeutic strategies incorporate peptides into their designs to mimic the natural protein ligands found in vivo. A few examples are the short peptide sequences RGD and PHSRN that mimic the primary and synergy-binding domains of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, which is recognized by the cell surface receptor, alpha5beta 1 integrin. Even though scaffold modification with biomimetic peptides remains one of the most promising approaches for tissue engineering, the use of these peptides in therapeutic tissue-engineered products and drug delivery systems available on the commercial market is limited because the peptides are not easily able to mimic the natural protein. The design of a peptide that can effectively target the alpha5beta1 integrin would greatly increase biomimetic scaffold therapeutic potential. A novel peptide containing both the RGD primary binding domain and PHSRN synergy-binding domain for fibronectin joined with the appropriate linker should bind alpha 5beta1 integrin more efficiently and lead to greater cell adhesion over RGD alone. Several fibronectin mimetic peptides were designed and coupled to dialkyl hydrocarbon tails to make peptide-amphiphiles. The peptides contained different linkers connecting the two binding domains and different spacers separating the hydrophobic tails from the hydrophilic headgroups. The peptide-amphiphiles were deposited on mica substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Langmuir isotherms indicated that the peptide-amphiphiles that contained higher numbers of serine residues formed a more tightly packed monolayer, but the increased number of serines also made transferring the amphiphiles to the mica substrate more difficult. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the bilayers showed that the headgroups might be bent, forming small divots in the surface. These divots may help expose the PHSRN synergy-binding domain. Parallel studies undertaken by fellow group members showed that human

  9. Ancient homology underlies adaptive mimetic diversity across butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Jason R.; Imhoff, Vance E.; Martin, Arnaud; Savage, Wesley K.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Pote, Ben L.; Peterson, Chelsea; Smith, Gabriella E.; Evans, Benjamin; Reed, Robert D.; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mullen, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Convergent evolution provides a rare, natural experiment with which to test the predictability of adaptation at the molecular level. Little is known about the molecular basis of convergence over macro-evolutionary timescales. Here we use a combination of positional cloning, population genomic resequencing, association mapping and developmental data to demonstrate that positionally orthologous nucleotide variants in the upstream region of the same gene, WntA, are responsible for parallel mimetic variation in two butterfly lineages that diverged >65 million years ago. Furthermore, characterization of spatial patterns of WntA expression during development suggests that alternative regulatory mechanisms underlie wing pattern variation in each system. Taken together, our results reveal a strikingly predictable molecular basis for phenotypic convergence over deep evolutionary time. PMID:25198507

  10. Melatonin ameliorates cognitive impairment induced by sleep deprivation in rats: role of oxidative stress, BDNF and CaMKII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hu-Qin; Liang, Xiang-Yan; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Fang-E

    2013-11-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been shown to induce oxidative stress which causes cognitive impairment. Melatonin, an endogenous potent antioxidant, protects neurons from oxidative stress in many disease models. The present study investigated the effect of melatonin against SD-induced cognitive impairment and attempted to define the possible mechanisms involved. SD was induced in rats using modified multiple platform model. Melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to the rats via intraperitoneal injection. The open field test and Morris water maze were used to evaluate cognitive ability. The cerebral cortex (CC) and hippocampus were dissected and homogenized. Nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity of hippocampal and cortical tissues (10% wet weight per volume) were performed to determine the level of oxidative stress. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) proteins in CC and hippocampus was assayed by means of immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that SD impairs cognitive ability, while melatonin treatment prevented these changes. In addition, melatonin reversed SD-induced changes in NO, MDA and SOD in both of the CC and hippocampus. The results of immunoreactivity showed that SD decreased gray values of BDNF and CaMKII in CC and hippocamal CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions, whereas melatonin improved the gray values. In conclusion, our results suggest that melatonin prevents cognitive impairment induced by SD. The possible mechanism may be attributed to its ability to reduce oxidative stress and increase the levels of CaMKII and BDNF in CC and hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of 12-weeks concurent training on the serum levels NGF, BDNF, and VDBP in women with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Khademosharie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that patients with multiple sclerosis(MS have low levels of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor(NGF, brain-derived neurothrophic factor(BDNF and the vitamin D-binding protein(VDBP, and exercise training may affects these factors in people with MS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a combined exercise training programon the serum levels of neurotrophic factos in women with MS. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in 24 volunteer MS patients(Expanded Disability Status Scale range of 1–5. Resting serum levels of BDNF, NGF, VDBP, body composition variables, and disability scale values were determined before and  after the intervention. The intervention consisted of  three sessions of combined training a week for 12 weeks(two sessions of aerobic and one session of resistance training, progressively. Aerobic training consisted of interval training with 4-13 repetition of aerobic activity at 40-55% of heart rate reserve; and resistance training consisted of 8-12 repetitions with 60-80% of 1RM for eight movements. The results showed a significant decrease in body fat percentage (p=0.003 and disability scale value(p=0.007 in the experimental group. no other significant changes was observed for other variables or in the control group. This study indicates that although the combined aerobic and resistance training in three non-consecutive days per week for 12 weeks has no effect on NGF, BDNF, and VDBP; however with positive effects on the body fat percentage and disability scale value can be for women with MS.

  12. Effect of Vanadyl Rosiglitazone, a New Insulin-Mimetic Vanadium Complexes, on Glucose Homeostasis of Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingzhe; Dong, Zhen; Ma, Baicheng; Ni, Zaizhong; Duan, Huikun; Li, Xiaodan; Wang, Bin; Ma, Xiaofeng; Wei, Qian; Ji, Xiangzhen; Li, Minggang

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes has been cited as the most challenging health problem in the twenty-first century. Accordingly, it is urgent to develop a new type of efficient and low-toxic antidiabetic medication. Since vanadium compounds have insulin-mimetic and potential hypoglycemic activities for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, a new trend has been developed using vanadium and organic ligands to form a new compound in order to increase the intestinal absorption and reduce the toxicity of vanadium compound. In the current investigation, a new organic vanadium compounds, vanadyl rosiglitazone, was synthesized and determined by infrared spectra. Vanadyl rosiglitazone and three other organic vanadium compounds were administered to the diabetic mice through oral administration for 5 weeks. The results of mouse model test indicated that vanadyl rosiglitazone could regulate the blood glucose level and relieve the symptoms of polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, and weight loss without side effects and was more effective than the other three organic vanadium compounds including vanadyl trehalose, vanadyl metformin, and vanadyl quercetin. The study indicated that vanadyl rosiglitazone presents insulin-mimetic activities, and it will be a good potential candidate for the development of a new type of oral drug for type 2 diabetes.

  13. A mucosa-mimetic material for the mucoadhesion testing of thermogelling semi-solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jéssica Bassi; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Bruschi, Marcos L; Cook, Michael T

    2017-08-07

    Mucosa-mimetic materials are synthetic substrates which aim to replace animal tissue in mucoadhesion experiments. One potential mucosa-mimetic material is a hydrogel comprised of N-acryloyl-d-glucosamine and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, which has been investigated as a surrogate for animal mucosae in the mucoadhesion testing of tablets and solution formulations. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of this mucosa-mimetic material in the testing of thermogelling semi-solid formulations, which transition from solution to gel upon warming. Two methods for assessing mucoadhesion have been used; tensile testing and a flow-through system, which allow for investigation under dramatically different conditions. It was found that the mucosa-mimetic material was a good surrogate for buccal mucosa using both testing methods. This material may be used to replace animal tissue in these experiments, potentially reducing the number of laboratory animals used in studies of this type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svyatskiy, Daniil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bertolazzi, Enrico [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Frego, Marco [Univ. of Trento (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  15. Possible involvement of CREB/BDNF signaling pathway in neuroprotective effects of topiramate against methylphenidate induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in isolated hippocampus of rats: Molecular, biochemical and histological evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Babalouei, Fatemeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Heidari, Mansour; Madjd, Zahra

    2017-06-01

    Chronic abuse of methylphenidate (MPH) can cause serious neurotoxicity. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) were approved, but its putative mechanism remains unclear. In current study the role of CREB/BDNF signaling pathway in TPM protection against methylphenidate-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus was evaluated. 60 adult male rats were divided randomly into six groups. Groups received MPH (10mg/kg) only and concurrently with TPM (50mg/kg and 100mg/kg) and TPM (50 and 100mg/kg) only for 14 days. Open field test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity. Some biomarkers of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were also measured in hippocampus. Expression of total (inactive) and phosphorylated (active) CREB and BDNF were also measured in gene and protein levels in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of hippocampus. MPH caused significant decreases in motor activity in OFT while TPM (50 and 100mg/kg) inhibited MPH-induced decreases in motor activity. On the other hand, MPH caused remarkable increases in Bax protein level, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, IL-1β and TNF-α levels in hippocampal tissue. MPH also caused significant decreases of superoxide dismutase, activity and also decreased CREB, in both forms, BDNF and Bcl-2 protein levels. TPM, by the mentioned doses, attenuated these effects and increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and also increased CREB, in both forms, BDNF and Bcl-2 protein levels and inhibited MPH induced increase in Bax protein level, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, IL-1β and TNF-α levels. TPM also inhibited MPH induced decreases in cell number and changes in cell shapes in DG and CA1 areas. TPM can probably act as a neuroprotective agent against MPH induced neurotoxicity and this might have been mediated by CREB/BDNF signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  17. The Benefits of Calorie Restriction and Calorie Restriction Mimetics as Related to the Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Anekonda, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of calorie restriction without malnutrition seem to possess many beneficial effects in numerous disease states. Recently, studies related to calorie restriction mimetics that biochemically mimic the effects of calorie restriction are also becoming increasingly popular. Both calorie restriction and calorie restriction mimetics trigger an adaptive response reminiscent of mild-stress or low-dose toxic response, which is frequently referred to as hormesis in the toxicology literature....

  18. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase-Mimetic Drug, Ameliorates Progression of Renal Disease in CKD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD and antioxidants may ameliorate disease progression. We investigate the beneficial effect of Tempol, a superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, on progression of disease in a mouse model of CKD. Methods: CKD was surgically induced in c57BL/6 mice by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham group, 5/6 nephrectomized group (Nx and Nx+Tempol (2 mmol/l in drinking water. Mice were sacrificed at the end of 12 weeks. Renal function, structure as well as expression of key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, fibrosis and progression in mice were measured. Results: Reduced body weight and impaired renal function (elevation on serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine albumin, segmental sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage was demonstrated in Nx mice but was significantly improved by Tempol administration. Nx animals exhibited significantly elevated proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, activation of NF-κB, increased expression of NADPH oxidase related subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox, and elevated activation of TGF-ß/Smad3, EGFR, MAPK signaling pathway. Tempol inhibited NF-κB mediated inflammation, TGF-ß/Smad3-induced renal fibrosis as well as EGFR and MAPK signaling pathway activation. Conclusions: Tempol administration attenuated renal injury in CKD mice through NF-κB, TGF-ß/Smad3, redox-senstive EGFR activation and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways.

  19. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase-Mimetic Drug, Ameliorates Progression of Renal Disease in CKD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Gu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and antioxidants may ameliorate disease progression. We investigate the beneficial effect of Tempol, a superoxide dismutase-mimetic drug, on progression of disease in a mouse model of CKD. CKD was surgically induced in c57BL/6 mice by 5/6 nephrectomy. Mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham group, 5/6 nephrectomized group (Nx) and Nx+Tempol (2 mmol/l in drinking water). Mice were sacrificed at the end of 12 weeks. Renal function, structure as well as expression of key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, fibrosis and progression in mice were measured. Reduced body weight and impaired renal function (elevation on serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine albumin, segmental sclerosis and tubulointerstitial damage) was demonstrated in Nx mice but was significantly improved by Tempol administration. Nx animals exhibited significantly elevated proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, activation of NF-κB, increased expression of NADPH oxidase related subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox), and elevated activation of TGF-β/Smad3, EGFR, MAPK signaling pathway. Tempol inhibited NF-κB mediated inflammation, TGF-β/Smad3-induced renal fibrosis as well as EGFR and MAPK signaling pathway activation. Tempol administration attenuated renal injury in CKD mice through NF-κB, TGF-β/Smad3, redox-senstive EGFR activation and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. BDNF is a novel marker of cognitive function in ageing women: the DR's EXTRA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, P.; Pedersen, Maria; Hanninen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the key molecules modulating brain plasticity. While low circulating levels of BDNF have been suggested to predispose to Alzheimer's disease, very little data are available on its association with cognitive function in general population. We...... evaluated the association between plasma BDNF levels and cognition in a representative population sample of ageing men and women. The subjects (n=1389) were participants of the Dose-Responses to Exercise Training (DR's EXTRA) Study and represent a random sample of Eastern Finnish people (684 men and 705...... women), 57-79 years of age at baseline of the study. Plasma BDNF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cognitive function was evaluated using the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological test battery. Women had a higher mean...

  1. The effects of senior brain health exercise program on basic physical fitness, cognitive function and BDNF of elderly women - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Eun; Kang, Eun-Bum

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate the impacts of senior brain heath exercise (SBHE) program for 12 weeks to basic active physical fitness, cognitive function and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in elderly women. Subject of this study is total of 24 women in the age of 65-79 who can conduct normal daily activity and communication but have not participated in regular exercise in recent 6 months. The study groups were divided into an exercise group (EG, n=13) and a control group (CG, n=11). The exercise program was consisted of SBHE, and training frequency was 4 times weekly, of which training time was a total of 50 minutes each time in level of intensity of 9-14 by rating of perceived exertion (RPE). First, 12-week SBHE program has shown statistical increase in basic physical fitness in the EG comparing with the CG, such as lower body strength, upper body strength and aerobic endurance, but not in flexibility, agility and dynamic balance. Second, in the case of Mini-mental state examination Korean version (MMSE-K) and BDNF, it showed that there was a statistically significant increase in the EG comparing with the CG. In this study, 12-week SBHE program has resulted in positive effect on change of basic physical fitness (strength and aerobic endurance), cognitive function and BDNF. If above program adds movements that can enhance flexibility, dynamic balance and agility, this can be practical exercise program to help seniors maintain overall healthy lifestyle.

  2. Two-Stage Translational Control of Dentate Gyrus LTP Consolidation Is Mediated by Sustained BDNF-TrkB Signaling to MNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Panja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BDNF signaling contributes to protein-synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the dynamics of TrkB signaling and mechanisms of translation have not been defined. Here, we show that long-term potentiation (LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus of live rodents requires sustained (hours BDNF-TrkB signaling. Surprisingly, this sustained activation maintains an otherwise labile signaling pathway from TrkB to MAP-kinase-interacting kinase (MNK. MNK activity promotes eIF4F translation initiation complex formation and protein synthesis in mechanistically distinct early and late stages. In early-stage translation, MNK triggers release of the CYFIP1/FMRP repressor complex from the 5′-mRNA cap. In late-stage translation, MNK regulates the canonical translational repressor 4E-BP2 in a synapse-compartment-specific manner. This late stage is coupled to MNK-dependent enhanced dendritic mRNA translation. We conclude that LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus is mediated by sustained BDNF signaling to MNK and MNK-dependent regulation of translation in two functionally and mechanistically distinct stages.

  3. Blueberry-induced changes in spatial working memory correlate with changes in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Claire M; El Mohsen, Manal Abd; Vauzour, David; Rendeiro, Catarina; Butler, Laurie T; Ellis, Judi A; Whiteman, Matthew; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2008-08-01

    Phytochemical-rich foods have been shown to be effective at reversing age-related deficits in memory in both animals and humans. We show that a supplementation with a blueberry diet (2% w/w) for 12 weeks improves the performance of aged animals in spatial working memory tasks. This improvement emerged within 3 weeks and persisted for the remainder of the testing period. Memory performance correlated well with the activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and increases in both pro- and mature levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. Changes in CREB and BDNF in aged and blueberry-supplemented animals were accompanied by increases in the phosphorylation state of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), rather than that of calcium calmodulin kinase (CaMKII and CaMKIV) or protein kinase A. Furthermore, age and blueberry supplementation were linked to changes in the activation state of Akt, mTOR, and the levels of Arc/Arg3.1 in the hippocampus, suggesting that pathways involved in de novo protein synthesis may be involved. Although causal relationships cannot be made among supplementation, behavior, and biochemical parameters, the measurement of anthocyanins and flavanols in the brain following blueberry supplementation may indicate that changes in spatial working memory in aged animals are linked to the effects of flavonoids on the ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway.

  4. On the genetics of loss aversion: An interaction effect of BDNF Val66Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Gesine; Montag, Christian; Markett, Sebastian; Reuter, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Loss aversion is the tendency to overweight losses compared with gains in decision situations. Several studies have investigated the neurobiological background of this phenomenon and it was found that activation in the mesolimbic-mesocortical dopamine system during a gambling decision correlates with loss aversion. In a behavioral experiment with N = 143 subjects, the present study investigates the influence of 2 functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the BDNF gene (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism) and ANKK1 gene (DRD2 Taq1a/ANKK1 polymorphism), that are known to affect the dopamine system, on loss aversion. Additionally, associations of alexithymia, a personality construct describing the disability to consciously experience emotions in the self, with loss aversion and with the mentioned polymorphisms were assessed using the TAS-20 questionnaire, to replicate associations that have been reported before. Results revealed a significant interaction effect of the 2 polymorphisms on loss aversion. Carriers of the genetic constellation 66Met+/A1+ had the lowest loss aversion scores, compared with all other allelic groups. According to the literature this allelic configuration is characterized by a relatively low D2/3 receptor binding in the striatum and an impaired activity-dependent secretion of BDNF. This is the first study showing that loss aversion is related to naturally occurring differences in dopamine function. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Blueberry supplementation induces spatial memory improvements and region-specific regulation of hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendeiro, Catarina; Vauzour, David; Kean, Rebecca J; Butler, Laurie T; Rattray, Marcus; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Williams, Claire M

    2012-10-01

    Flavonoid-rich foods have been shown to be able to reverse age-related cognitive deficits in memory and learning in both animals and humans. However, to date, there have been only a limited number of studies investigating the effects of flavonoid-rich foods on cognition in young/healthy animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a blueberry-rich diet in young animals using a spatial working memory paradigm, the delayed non-match task, using an eight-arm radial maze. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying such behavioural effects were investigated. We show that a 7-week supplementation with a blueberry diet (2 % w/w) improves the spatial memory performance of young rats (2 months old). Blueberry-fed animals also exhibited a faster rate of learning compared to those on the control diet. These behavioural outputs were accompanied by the activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), increases in total cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and elevated levels of pro- and mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. Changes in hippocampal CREB correlated well with memory performance. Further regional analysis of BDNF gene expression in the hippocampus revealed a specific increase in BDNF mRNA in the dentate gyrus and CA1 areas of hippocampi of blueberry-fed animals. The present study suggests that consumption of flavonoid-rich blueberries has a positive impact on spatial learning performance in young healthy animals, and these improvements are linked to the activation of ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway in the hippocampus.

  6. Using superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics to manipulate the redox environment of neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Giedzinski, E.; Baure, J.; Doctrow, S. R.; Rola, R.; Fike, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Past work has shown that neural precursor cells are predisposed to redox sensitive changes, and that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the acute and persistent changes that occur within the irradiated CNS. Irradiation leads to a marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that correlates with oxidative endpoints in vivo and reductions in neuro-genesis. To better understand the impact of oxidative stress on neural precursor cells, and to determine if radiation-induced oxidative damage and precursor cell loss after irradiation could be reduced, a series of antioxidant compounds (EUK-134, EUK-163, EUK-172, EUK-189) were tested, three of which possess both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and one (EUK-163) whose only significant activity is SOD. Our results show that these SOD/catalase mimetics apparently increase the oxidation of a ROS-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye, particularly after short (12 h) treatments, but that longer treatments (24 h) decrease oxidation attributable to radiation-induced ROS. Similarly, other studies found that cells incubated with CuZnSOD showed some increase in intracellular ROS levels. Subsequent data suggested that the dye-oxidising capabilities of the EUK compounds were linked to differences in their catalase activity and, most likely, their ability to catalyse per-oxidative pathways. In unirradiated mice, the EUK-134 analogue induced some decrease of proliferating precursor cells and immature neurons 48 h after radiation, an effect that may be attributable to cytotoxicity and/or inhibition of precursor proliferation. In irradiated mice, a single injection of EUK-134 was not found to be an effective radioprotector at acute times (48 h). The present results support continued development of our in vitro model as a tool for predicting certain in vivo responses, and suggest that in some biological systems the capability to scavenge superoxide but produce excess H 2 O 2 , as is known for CuZnSOD, may be

  7. Smac Mimetic-Induced Upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1 Triggers Migration and Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells and Influences the Tumor Microenvironment in a Paracrine Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Lindemann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac mimetics are considered as promising anticancer therapeutics that are currently under investigation in early clinical trials. They induce apoptosis by antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, which are frequently overexpressed in cancer. We previously reported that Smac mimetics, such as BV6, additionally exert non-apoptotic functions in glioblastoma (GBM cells by stimulating migration and invasion in a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-dependent manner. Because NF-κB target genes mediating these effects are largely unknown, we performed whole-genome expression analyses. Here, we identify chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 as the top-listed NF-κB-regulated gene being upregulated upon BV6 treatment in GBM cells. BV6-induced upregulation and secretion of CCL2 are required for migration and invasion of GBM cells because knockdown of CCL2 in GBM cells abolishes these effects. Co-culture experiments of GBM cells with non-malignant astroglial cells reveal that BV6-stimulated secretion of CCL2 by GBM cells into the supernatant triggers migration of astroglial cells toward GBM cells because CCL2 knockdown in BV6-treated GBM cells impedes BV6-stimulated migration of astroglial cells. In conclusion, we identify CCL2 as a BV6-induced NF-κB target gene that triggers migration and invasion of GBM cells and exerts paracrine effects on the GBM's microenvironment by stimulating migration of astroglial cells. These findings provide novel insights into the biological functions of Smac mimetics with important implications for the development of Smac mimetics as cancer therapeutics.

  8. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E Manning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous mutant mice (HET has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and WT littermates were treated during young-adulthood with METH and, following a two-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioural endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behaviour. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  9. Decreased BDNF levels in amygdala and hippocampus after intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain

    OpenAIRE

    Jornada, Luciano K.; Valvassori, Samira S.; Resende, Wilson R.; Moretti, Morgana; Ferreira, Camila L.; Fries, Gabriel R.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to investigate the effects of ouabain intracerebroventricular injection on BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus of Wistar rats. METHODS: Animals received a single intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain (10-3 and 10-2 M) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid and immediately, 1h, 24h, or seven days after injection, BDNF levels were measured in the rat's amygdala and hippocampus by sandwich-ELISA (n = 8 animals per group). RESULTS: When evaluated immedi...

  10. EPOR-Based Purification and Analysis of Erythropoietin Mimetic Peptides from Human Urine by Cys-Specific Cleavage and LC/MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matthias; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-09-01

    The development of a new class of erythropoietin mimetic agents (EMA) for treating anemic conditions has been initiated with the discovery of oligopeptides capable of dimerizing the erythropoietin (EPO) receptor and thus stimulating erythropoiesis. The most promising amino acid sequences have been mounted on various different polymeric structures or carrier molecules to obtain highly active EPO-like drugs exhibiting beneficial and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Concomitant with creating new therapeutic options, erythropoietin mimetic peptide (EMP)-based drug candidates represent means to artificially enhance endurance performance and necessitate coverage by sports drug testing methods. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a strategy for the comprehensive detection of EMPs in doping controls, which can be used complementary to existing protocols. Three model EMPs were used to provide proof-of-concept data. Following EPO receptor-facilitated purification of target analytes from human urine, the common presence of the cysteine-flanked core structure of EMPs was exploited to generate diagnostic peptides with the aid of a nonenzymatic cleavage procedure. Sensitive detection was accomplished by targeted-SIM/data-dependent MS2 analysis. Method characterization was conducted for the EMP-based drug peginesatide concerning specificity, linearity, precision, recovery, stability, ion suppression/enhancement, and limit of detection (LOD, 0.25 ng/mL). Additionally, first data for the identification of the erythropoietin mimetic peptides EMP1 and BB68 were generated, demonstrating the multi-analyte testing capability of the presented approach.

  11. Antitumor efficacy of a thrombospondin 1 mimetic CovX-body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingna; Leedom, Tom A; Do, Janet; Huang, Hanhua; Lai, JingYu; Johnson, Kim; Osothprarop, Trina F; Rizzo, John D; Doppalapudi, Venkata R; Bradshaw, Curt W; Lappe, Rodney W; Woodnutt, Gary; Levin, Nancy J; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven R

    2011-08-01

    CVX-045 is produced by covalently attaching a thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) mimetic comprising a peptidic sequence and a linker to the Fab binding site of a proprietary scaffold antibody. CVX-045 possesses the potency of the TSP-1-derived peptide, along with the advantageous pharmacokinetics of an antibody. Antitumor activity of CVX-045 was evaluated in human xenograft models alone and in combination with standard chemotherapies and targeted molecules. In A549 and A431 xenograft models, CVX-045 demonstrated significant (P CVX-045 in combination with 5-fluorouracil significantly (P CVX-045, or 5-fluorouracil alone. Cotreatment of CVX-045 plus CPT-11 delayed progression of tumor growth from day 28 to 60. In contrast CVX-045 alone treatment did not delay the progression of tumor growth, and CPT-11 alone delayed progression of tumor growth to day 39. Cotreatment of CVX-045 with sunitinib extended the time to reach tumor load from day 26 to 40. In summary, CVX-045 exhibits significant antiangiogenic activity in several tumor models and enhances antitumor activity in combination with chemotherapy or targeted therapies. These data suggest future avenues for effective combination therapy in treating solid tumors. CVX-045 has recently completed a phase 1 trial in solid tumors where it has been well tolerated.

  12. Suicide attempt, clinical correlates, and BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in chronic patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haisen; Zhang, Guangya; Du, Xiangdong; Zhang, Yingyang; Yin, Guangzhong; Dai, Jing; He, Man-Xi; Soares, Jair C; Li, Xiaosi; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2018-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior. Because schizophrenia patients usually have high suicide rates and numerous studies have suggested that BDNF may contribute to the psychopathology of schizophrenia, we hypothesized that the functional polymorphism of BDNF (Val66Met) was associated with suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population. This polymorphism was genotyped in 825 chronic schizophrenia patients with (n = 123) and without (n = 702) suicide attempts and 445 healthy controls without a history of suicide attempts using a case-control design. The schizophrenia symptoms were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. There were no significant differences in BDNF Val66Met genotype and allele distributions between the patients and healthy controls. However, we found the Val allele (p = .023) and the Val/Val genotypes (p = .058) to be associated with a history of suicide attempts. Moreover, some clinical characteristics, including age and cigarettes smoked each day, interacted with the BDNF gene variant and appeared to play an important role in suicide attempts among schizophrenia patients. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism itself and its interaction with some clinical variables may influence suicide attempts among schizophrenia patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Effect of Clotting Duration and Temperature on BDNF Measurement in Human Serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Patrizia; Sandrini, Leonardo; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurothrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin expressed in different tissues and cells, including neurons, endothelial cells, leukocytes, megakaryocytes and platelets. Modifications of BDNF in plasma and/or in serum are associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome and with mortality risk. Indeed, changes in blood levels of BDNF may reflect those of its tissue of origin and/or promote pathological dysfunctions. The measurement of BDNF amount in plasma or in serum has been characterized with particular attention in the impact of different anti-coagulants, clotting duration, temperature (≤21 °C) and delay in blood sample centrifugation as well as in stability of storage. However, the influences of normothermic conditions (37 °C) and of clotting duration on BDNF levels in human serum have not been investigated yet. Here, we showed that time and temperature during serum preparation could be taken into consideration to assess the association and/or impact of BDNF levels in the occurrence of pathological conditions. PMID:28914800

  14. Effect of Mozart Music on Hippocampal Content of BDNF in Postnatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has shown that listening to Mozart music can potentiate spatial tasks in human and reduce seizure attacks in epileptic patients. A few studies have reported the effects of prenatal plus postpartum exposure of mice to the Mozart music on brain-drived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus. Here we investigated the effect of postpartum exposure to The Mozart music on BDNF concentration in the hippocampus of rat.Methods: Thirty male one day old newborn Wistar rats divided randomly in two equal experimental and control groups. Experimental group exposed to slow rhythm Mozart music (Mozart Sonata for two pianos KV 448, 6 hour per day sound pressure levels, between 80 and 100 dB for 60 successive days. The control group was kept in separate room with housing conditions like experimental group except music exposure. After 60 days the rats were euthanized and hippocampuses extracted then the content of BDNF protein was measured using ELISA sandwich method. Results: Data analysis revealed that rats exposed to Mozart Sonata music had significantly increased BDNF content in the hippocampus as compared to control rats (P±0.01. The concentrations of BDNF were 86.30±2.26 and 94.60 ±6.22 ng/g wet weight in control and music exposure groups respectively.Discussion: Exposure to the Mozart music early in life can increase the BDNF concentration in the hippocampus in rats.

  15. Effect of Mozart Music on Hippocampal Content of BDNF in Postnatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has shown that listening to Mozart music can potentiate spatial tasks in human; and reduce seizure attacks in epileptic patients. A few studies have reported the effects of prenatal plus postpartum exposure of mice to the Mozart music on brain-drived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus. Here we investigated the effect of postpartum exposure to The Mozart music on BDNF concentration in the hippocampus of rat.Methods: Thirty male one day old newborn Wistar rats divided randomly in two equal experimental and control groups. Experimental group exposed to slow rhythm Mozart music (Mozart Sonata for two pianos KV 448, 6 hour per day; sound pressure levels, between 80 and 100 dB for 60 successive days. The control group was kept in separate room with housing conditions like experimental group except music exposure. After 60 days the rats were euthanized and hippocampuses extracted; then the content of BDNF protein was measured using ELISA sandwich method. Results: Data analysis revealed that rats exposed to Mozart Sonata music had significantly increased BDNF content in the hippocampus as compared to control rats (P±0.01. The concentrations of BDNF were 86.30±2.26 and 94.60 ±6.22 ng/g wet weight in control and music exposure groups respectively.Discussion: Exposure to the Mozart music early in life can increase the BDNF concentration in the hippocampus in rats.

  16. Molecular Therapy of Melanocortin-4-Receptor Obesity by an Autoregulatory BDNF Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Siu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R comprise the most common monogenic form of severe early-onset obesity, and conventional treatments are either ineffective long-term or contraindicated. Immediately downstream of MC4R—in the pathway for regulating energy balance—is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Our previous studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated hypothalamic BDNF gene transfer alleviates obesity and diabetes in both diet-induced and genetic models. To facilitate clinical translation, we developed a built-in autoregulatory system to control therapeutic gene expression mimicking the body’s natural feedback systems. This autoregulatory approach leads to a sustainable plateau of body weight after substantial weight loss is achieved. Here, we examined the efficacy and safety of autoregulatory BDNF gene therapy in Mc4r heterozygous mice, which best resemble MC4R obese patients. Mc4r heterozygous mice were treated with either autoregulatory BDNF vector or YFP control and monitored for 30 weeks. BDNF gene therapy prevented the development of obesity and metabolic syndromes characterized by decreasing body weight and adiposity, suppressing food intake, alleviating hyperleptinemia and hyperinsulinemia, improving glucose and insulin tolerance, and increasing energy expenditure, without adverse cardiovascular function or behavioral disturbances. These safety and efficacy data provide preclinical evidence that BDNF gene therapy is a compelling treatment option for MC4R-deficient obese patients.

  17. Analysis of BDNF Val66Met allele-specific mRNA levels in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Vincenzo; Strauss, John; Semeralul, Mawahib; Huang, Sheeda; Li, Peter P; Warsh, Jerry J; Kennedy, James L; Wong, Albert H C

    2008-08-22

    We have previously reported an association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and bipolar disorder (BD). However, the possibility that genomic imprinting in BDNF gene affects risk for BD has not been investigated. To examine the possibility of genomic imprinting in the BDNF gene in BD, we analyzed the parent-of-origin effect (POE) and differential expression of the BDNF Val66Met alleles in BD. We performed a family-based association study and ETDT analyses of the Val66Met polymorphism in 312 BD nuclear families, and compared allele-specific mRNA levels in both post-mortem brain samples and B lymphoblasts from BD patients and controls. The BDNF Val66 allele was transmitted significantly more often to patients with BD (maternal transmissions: 46/22, p=0.003; paternal transmissions: 55/30, p=0.006). There was no significant difference between maternal and paternal transmission ratios. There was no significant difference in the ratio of Val/Met-specific mRNA expression between BD and controls, in either brain or B lymphoblasts. The Val/Met ratio was much lower in the brain vs. B lymphoblasts. These data do not support a role for genomic imprinting as a modifier of the contribution of BDNF gene to risk of susceptibility to BD.

  18. Reissner–Nordström Anti-de Sitter Black Holes in Mimetic F(R Gravity

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    V. K. Oikonomou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study under which conditions the Reissner–Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole can be a solution of the vacuum mimetic F ( R gravity with Lagrange multiplier and mimetic scalar potential. As the author demonstrates, the resulting picture in the mimetic F ( R gravity case is a trivial extension of the standard F ( R approach, and in effect, the metric perturbations in the mimetic F ( R gravity case, for the Reissner–Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole metric, at the first order of the perturbed variables are the same at the leading order.

  19. Behavioral phenotype and BDNF differences related to apoE isoforms and sex in young transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reverte, Ingrid; Klein, Anders Bue; Ratner, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    in the exploration of an open-field, which is compatible with a hyperactive behavior, was found in apoE2 females, while a decreased activity was observed in apoE4 mice. Increased BDNF levels in the frontal cortex were observed in apoE2 mice compared to apoE3. These results underscore behavioral differences between......, very little information is available on apoE2 genotype. In the present study, we have characterized behavioral and learning phenotypes in young transgenic mice apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4 of both sexes. We have also determined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor Trk......B in cortex and hippocampus of male and female mice carrying either genotype. Our results show a worse performance of apoE4 and apoE2 mice in the acquisition of a spatial task compared to apoE3 mice, and a worse retention in apoE2 mice compared to the other two genotypes. On the other hand, an increase...

  20. Whole blood BDNF levels in healthy twins discordant for affective disorder: association to life events and neuroticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, V.; Vinberg, M.; Aznar, S.

    2008-01-01

    and protected against affective disorder. Whole blood assessed for BDNF concentrations and correlated to risk status, neuroticism, and number of stressful life events. RESULTS: Between the groups, we found no significant difference in whole blood BDNF levels. Women at high-risk for depression who had......BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with decreased blood BDNF concentrations; but it is unclear if low blood BDNF levels are a state or a trait marker of depression. METHODS: We investigated blood BDNF concentrations in a twin population including both subjects highly predisposed...... experienced three or more recent stressful events (n=26) had decreased whole blood BDNF levels compared to high-risk women with two or less recent stressful events (n=35), 21.6+/-7.0 vs. 18.5+/-4.1 ng/ml, respectively, (p

  1. Effect of variation in BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism, smoking, and nicotine dependence on symptom severity of depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Mumtaz; Van der Does, Willem; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2015-03-01

    Smoking, especially nicotine dependence is associated with more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. We investigated the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met polymorphism on the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms in never-smokers, former smokers, non-dependent, and nicotine-dependent smokers with a current diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety. Patients with depressive or anxiety disorders and with available BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism data (N=1271) were selected from Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Dependent variables were severity of symptoms. Independent variables were smoking status and BDNF genotype. Age, sex, education, recent negative life events, alcohol use, body mass index, and physical activity were treated as covariates. After controlling for covariates, nicotine-dependent smokers had more severe depressive symptoms than non-dependent smokers, former and never-smokers. The latter three groups did not differ in severity of depression. In Val(66)Val carriers, nicotine-dependent smokers had more severe symptoms of depression and anxiety than the other three groups, which were comparable in symptom severity. In Met(66) carriers, there were no group differences on severity of depression and anxiety. Nicotine dependence was the strongest predictor of severity of symptoms only in Val(66)Val carriers. In patients with a current diagnosis of depression or anxiety, the relationship between nicotine dependence and symptom severity may be moderated by BDNF Val(66)Met. These results suggest that inherent genetic differences may be crucial for the worse behavioral outcome of nicotine, and that Val(66)Val carriers may benefit most in mental health from smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diphenyl diselenide ameliorates monosodium glutamate induced anxiety-like behavior in rats by modulating hippocampal BDNF-Akt pathway and uptake of GABA and serotonin neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Suzan Gonçalves; Quines, Caroline Brandão; Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2016-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavor enhancer used in food, administered to neonatal rats causes neuronal lesions and leads to anxiety when adulthood. We investigated the anxiolytic-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and its mechanisms on anxiety induced by MSG. Neonatal male and female Wistar rats received a subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4 g/kg/day) from the 1st to 10th postnatal day. At 60 days of life, the rats received (PhSe)2 (1mg/kg/day) or vehicle by the intragastric route for 7 days. The spontaneous locomotor activity (LAM), elevated plus maze test (EPM) and contextual fear conditioning test (CFC) as well as neurochemical ([(3)H]GABA and [(3)H]5-HT uptake) and molecular analyses (Akt and p-Akt and BDNF levels) were carried out after treatment with (PhSe)2. Neonatal exposure to MSG increased all anxiogenic parameters in LAM, EPM and CFC tests. MSG increased GABA and 5-HT uptake in hippocampus of rats, without changing uptake in cerebral cortex. The levels of BDNF and p-Akt were reduced in hippocampus of rats treated with MSG. The administration of (PhSe)2 to rats reversed all behavioral anxiogenic parameters altered by MSG. The increase in hippocampal GABA and 5-HT uptake induced by MSG was reversed by (PhSe)2. (PhSe)2 reversed the reduction in hippocampal BDNF and p-Akt levels induced by MSG. In conclusion, the anxiolytic-like action of (PhSe)2 in rats exposed to MSG during their neonatal period is related to its modulation of hippocampal GABA and 5-HT uptake as well as the BDNF-Akt pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TNF-alpha inhibition prevents cognitive decline and maintains hippocampal BDNF levels in the unpredictable chronic mild stress rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Tuğçe Demirtaş; Karson, Ayşe; Balcı, Fuat; Yazır, Yusufhan; Bayramgürler, Dilek; Utkan, Tijen

    2015-10-01

    Previous findings have shown that patients with depression express higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. We have recently found that Infliximab (a TNF-α inhibitor) decreased anhedonia and despair-like behavior in the rat unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model of depression suggesting that inflammation might play an important role in depression. An increasing number of studies suggest that inflammation is also associated with cognitive impairments. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of UCMS on the cognitive performance of rats and their hippocampal BDNF levels and the effect of chronic Infliximab (5mg/kg/weekly, i.p.) treatment on these measures. Rats were subjected to different types of stressors daily for a period of 56 days to induce depression-like state. The UCMS resulted in impairments in spatial and emotional memory acquisition and retention with no effect on the level of locomotor activity. These behavioral effects of UCMS were accompanied by reduction in the level of BDNF in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Chronic Infliximab treatment prevented the UCMS-induced cognitive impairments as well as the reduction in the levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These results suggest that Infliximab improves the spatial and emotional memory impairments induced by chronic stress in rats likely through its effects on hippocampal function by modulating inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Antidepressant Effect of Angelica sinensis Extracts on Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress-Induced Depression Is Mediated via the Upregulation of the BDNF Signaling Pathway in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelica sinensis (AS, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has pharmaceutical effects on menstrual illness, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cognitive impairments. However, until recently, few studies had explored its antidepressant effect. The current study attempts to investigate the effect of AS extracts on chronic unpredictable mild stress- (CUMS- induced depression in rats. Male SD rats were exposed to a CUMS-inducing procedure for 5 weeks, resulting in rodent depressive behaviors that included reduced sucrose consumption and lessened sucrose preference ratios in sucrose preference test, prolonged immobility times and decreased struggling time in force swim test, and decreased locomotor activity in open field test. Moreover, the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK 1/2 were markedly decreased in the hippocampus in depressed rats. However, chronically treating the depressed rats with AS (1 g/kg normalized their depression-related behaviors and molecular profiles. In conclusion, in the present study, we show that AS extracts exerted antidepressant effects that were mediated by the BDNF signaling pathway: in AS-treated depressed rats, the expression of the BDNF protein and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets (ERK 1/2, CREB were upregulated in the hippocampus.

  5. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  6. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses

  7. Non-Covalent Photo-Patterning of Gelatin Matrices Using Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hoa San, Boi; L. Kessler, Julian; Hwan Kim, Jin; Xu, Qingguo; Hanes, Justin; Yu, Seungju Michael

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in photolithography have enabled us to spatially encode biochemical cues in biocompatible platforms such as synthetic hydrogels. Conventional patterning works through photo-activated chemical reactions on inert polymer networks. However, these techniques cannot be directly applied to protein hydrogels without chemically altering the protein scaffolds. To this end, we developed a non-covalent photo-patterning strategy for gelatin (denatured collagen) hydrogels utilizing a caged collagen mimetic peptide (caged CMP) which binds to gelatin strands through UV activated, triple helix hybridization. Here we present 2D and 3D photo-patterning of gelatin hydrogels enabled by the caged CMPs as well as creation of concentration gradients of CMPs. We show that photo-patterning of PEG-conjugated caged CMPs can be used to spatially control cell adhesion on gelatin films. CMP’s specificity for binding to gelatin allows patterning of almost any synthetic or natural gelatin-containing matrix, such as zymograms, gelatin-methacrylate hydrogels, and even a corneal tissue. Since the CMP is a chemically and biologically inert peptide which is proven to be an ideal carrier for bioactive molecules, our patterning method provides a radically new tool for immobilizing drugs to natural tissues and for functionalizing scaffolds for complex tissue formation. PMID:25476588

  8. Potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of cIAP1/2 proteins reveal that the binding of Smac mimetics to XIAP BIR3 is not required for their effective induction of cell death in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiying; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Wang, Shaomeng

    2014-04-18

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 and 2 (cIAP1/2) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) are key apoptosis regulators and promising new cancer therapeutic targets. This study describes a set of non-peptide, small-molecule Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases) mimetics that are selective inhibitors of cIAP1/2 over XIAP. The most potent and most selective compounds bind to cIAP1/2 with affinities in the low nanomolar range and show >1,000-fold selectivity for cIAP1 over XIAP. These selective cIAP inhibitors effectively induce degradation of the cIAP1 protein in cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations and do not antagonize XIAP in a cell-free functional assay. They potently inhibit cell growth and effectively induce apoptosis at low nanomolar concentrations in cancer cells with a mechanism of action similar to that of other known Smac mimetics. Our study shows that binding of Smac mimetics to XIAP BIR3 is not required for effective induction of apoptosis in tumor cells by Smac mimetics. These potent and highly selective cIAP1/2 inhibitors are powerful tools in the investigation of the role of these IAP proteins in the regulation of apoptosis and other cellular processes.

  9. Interaction of a Cyclic, Bivalent Smac Mimetic with the X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Sheng; Yang, Chao-Yie; Qiu, Su; Roller, Peter P.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wang, Shaomeng (Michigan); (NIH)

    2009-02-25

    We have designed and synthesized a cyclic, bivalent Smac mimetic (compound 3) and characterized its interaction with the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Compound 3 binds to XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains with a biphasic dose-response curve representing two binding sites with IC{sub 50} values of 0.5 and 406 nM, respectively. Compound 3 binds to XIAPs containing the BIR3-only and BIR2-only domain with K{sub i} values of 4 nM and 4.4 {mu}M, respectively. Gel filtration experiments using wild-type and mutated XIAPs showed that 3 forms a 1:2 stoichiometric complex with XIAP containing the BIR3-only domain. However, it forms a 1:1 stoichiometric complex with XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains, and both BIR domains are involved in the binding. Compound 3 efficiently antagonizes inhibition of XIAP in a cell-free functional assay and is >200 times more potent than its corresponding monovalent compound 2. Determination of the crystal structure of 3 in complex with the XIAP BIR3 domain confirms that 3 induces homodimerization of the XIAP BIR3 domain and provides a structural basis for the cooperative binding of one molecule of compound 3 to two XIAP BIR3 molecules. On the basis of this crystal structure, a binding model of XIAP containing both BIR2 and BIR3 domains and 3 was constructed, which sheds light on the ability of 3 to relieve the inhibition of XIAP with not only caspase-9 but also caspase-3/-7. Compound 3 is cell-permeable, effectively activates caspases in whole cells, and potently inhibits cancer cell growth. Compound 3 is a useful biochemical and pharmacological tool for further elucidating the role of XIAP in regulation of apoptosis and represents a promising lead compound for the design of potent, cell-permeable Smac mimetics for cancer treatment.

  10. A Large, Cross-sectional Observational Study of Serum BDNF, Cognitive Function, and Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eShimada

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The clinical relationship between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and cognitive function or mild cognitive impairment (MCI is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between serum BDNF and cognitive function and MCI, and determine whether serum BDNF level might be a useful biomarker for assessing risk for MCI in older people.Materials and Methods: A total of 4463 individuals aged 65 years or older (mean age 72 years participating in the study. We measured performance in a battery of neuropsychological and cognitive function tests; serum BDNF concentration.Results: Eight hundred twenty-seven participants (18.8% had MCI. After adjustment for sex, age, education level, diabetes, and current smoking, serum BDNF was associated with poorer performance in the story memory, and digit symbol substitution task scores. Serum BDNF was marginally associated with the presence of MCI (OR, 95% CI: 1.41, 1.00–1.99 when BDNF was 1.5 SD lower than the mean value standardized for sex and age, education level, diabetes, and current smoking.Conclusion: Low serum BDNF was associated with lower cognitive test scores and MCI. Future prospective studies should establish the discriminative value of serum BDNF for the risk of MCI.

  11. Demethylation of c-MYB binding site mediates upregulation of Bdnf IV in cocaine-conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weiping; Wang, Jiesi; Zhang, Ke; Teng, Huajing; Li, Chong; Szyf, Moshe; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Zhao, Mei

    2016-02-25

    Abnormal BDNF signaling contributes to the structural and behavioral plasticity induced by drugs of abuse. However, the mechanisms regulating expression of Bdnf in drug addiction remain elusive. In the present study, using the conditioned place preference (CPP) model, we showed that expression of Bdnf IV is upregulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of conditioned animals while Bdnf I is upregulated in cocaine-treated mice irrespective of conditioning. The methylation level of a putative c-MYB binding site in the promoter region of Bdnf IV was significantly decreased in the NAc under cocaine CPP conditioning but remained unchanged without conditioning, concurrently with increased binding of c-MYB to this site. Exon IV promoter/luciferase reporter assays revealed that transactivation of Bdnf by c-MYB was blocked by methylation of this c-MYB binding site. Administration of methionine, a precursor of SAM, inhibited cocaine CPP, reversed demethylation of c-MYB binding site and induction of Bdnf IV expression by cocaine CPP. Our results imply that Bdnf IV demethylation at c-MYB binding site is involved in cocaine-triggered seeking behavior, whereas Bdnf I responds to the immediate pharmacological effects of cocaine.

  12. The therapeutic potential of insulin-mimetic vanadium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hiromu; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yusuke

    2003-07-01

    Throughout the world, the number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing on a daily basis, probably due to change in lifestyle. DM is mainly classified as either insulin-dependent Type 1 or non-insulin-dependent Type 2, according to the definition of WHO. To treat DM, which has many severe complications, several types of insulin preparations and synthetic drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 DM, respectively, have been developed and are in clinical use. However, there are several problems concerning the insulin preparations and synthetic drugs, such as physical and mental pain due to daily insulin injections and defects involving side effects, respectively. Consequently, a new class of therapeutic agents is anticipated. For this purpose, vanadium-containing complexes are expected to treat or improve both types of DM by using unique characteristics of the transition metal. In this article, the current state of research on insulin-mimetic vanadium complexes are reviewed, with special focus on the paramagnetic vanadyl (+4 oxidation state of vanadium) complexes with different coordination modes. To analyse the blood glucose-lowering effects of the vanadyl complexes, new results on the organ distribution and pharmacokinetic analysis of the vanadyl state in the blood of rats are also described.

  13. Membrane mimetic surface functionalization of nanoparticles: Methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Jacob; Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Sun, Xue-Long

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), due to their size-dependent physical and chemical properties, have shown remarkable potential for a wide range of applications over the past decades. Particularly, the biological compatibilities and functions of NPs have been extensively studied for expanding their potential in areas of biomedical application such as bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery. In doing so, surface functionalization of NPs by introducing synthetic ligands and/or natural biomolecules has become a critical component in regards to the overall performance of the NP system for its intended use. Among known examples of surface functionalization, the construction of an artificial cell membrane structure, based on phospholipids, has proven effective in enhancing biocompatibility and has become a viable alternative to more traditional modifications, such as direct polymer conjugation. Furthermore, certain bioactive molecules can be immobilized onto the surface of phospholipid platforms to generate displays more reminiscent of cellular surface components. Thus, NPs with membrane-mimetic displays have found use in a range of bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery applications. This review herein describes recent advances in the preparations and characterization of integrated functional NPs covered by artificial cell membrane structures and their use in various biomedical applications. PMID:23688632

  14. SOCS1 Mimetic Peptide Suppresses Chronic Intraocular Inflammatory Disease (Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening disease characterized by repeated cycles of remission and recurrent inflammation. The JAK/STAT pathway regulates the differentiation of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells that mediate uveitis. A SOCS1 mimetic peptide (SOCS1-KIR that inhibits JAK2/STAT1 pathways has recently been shown to suppress experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. However, it is not clear whether SOCS1-KIR ameliorated uveitis by targeting JAK/STAT pathways of pathogenic lymphocytes or via inhibition of macrophages and antigen-presenting cells that also enter the retina during EAU. To further investigate mechanisms that mediate SOCS1-KIR effects and evaluate the efficacy of SOCS1-KIR as an investigational drug for chronic uveitis, we induced EAU in rats by adoptive transfer of uveitogenic T-cells and monitored disease progression and severity by slit-lamp microscopy, histology, and optical coherence tomography. Topical administration of SOCS1-KIR ameliorated acute and chronic posterior uveitis by inhibiting Th17 cells and the recruitment of inflammatory cells into retina while promoting expansion of IL-10-producing Tregs. We further show that SOCS1-KIR conferred protection of resident retinal cells that play critical role in vision from cytotoxic effects of inflammatory cytokines by downregulating proapoptotic genes. Thus, SOCS1-KIR suppresses uveitis and confers neuroprotective effects and might be exploited as a noninvasive treatment for chronic uveitis.

  15. Metal stabilization of collagen and de novo designed mimetic peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S.; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H.; Belure, Sandeep V.; Hasan, Nida F.; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E.; Shreiber, David I.; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. PMID:26225466

  16. The CNTF-derived peptide mimetic Cintrofin attenuates spatial-learning deficits in a rat post-status epilepticus model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russmann, Vera; Seeger, Natalie; Zellinger, Christina

    2013-01-01

    . Whereas status epilepticus caused a significant disturbance in spatial learning in reversed peptide-treated rats, the performance of Cintrofin-treated rats did not differ from controls. The study confirms that Cintrofin comprises an active sequence mimicking effects of its parent molecule. While the data......Ciliary neurotrophic growth factor is considered a potential therapeutic agent for central nervous system diseases. We report first in vivo data of the ciliary neurotrophic growth factor peptide mimetic Cintrofin in a rat post-status epilepticus model. Cintrofin prevented long-term alterations...... in the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitor cells and attenuated the persistence of basal dendrites. In contrast, Cintrofin did neither affect acute status epilepticus-associated alterations in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis nor reveal any relevant effect on seizure activity...

  17. BDNF genotype interacts with motor-function to influence rehabilitation responsiveness post-stroke

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    Christine T Shiner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Persistent motor impairment is common but highly heterogeneous post-stroke. Genetic polymorphisms, including those identified on the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and apolipoprotein E (APOE genes, may contribute to this variability by limiting the capacity for use-dependent neuroplasticity, and hence rehabilitation responsiveness.Objective. To determine whether BDNF and APOE genotypes influence motor improvement facilitated by post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation. Methods. BDNF Val66Met and APOE isoform genotypes were determined using leukocyte DNA for 55 community-dwelling patients 2-123 months post-stroke. All patients completed a dose-matched upper-limb rehabilitation program of either Wii-based Movement Therapy or Constraint-induced Movement Therapy. Upper-limb motor-function was assessed pre- and post-therapy using a suite of functional measures. Results. Motor-function improved for all patients post-therapy, with no difference between therapy groups. In the pooled data, there was no significant effect of BDNF or APOE genotype on motor-function at baseline, or following the intervention. However, a significant interaction between the level of residual motor-function and BDNF genotype was identified (p=0.029, whereby post-therapy improvement was significantly less for Met allele carriers with moderate and high, but not low motor-function. There was no significant association between APOE genotype and therapy outcomes. Conclusions. This study identified a novel interaction between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, motor-function status and the magnitude of improvement with rehabilitation in chronic stroke. This polymorphism does not preclude, but may reduce, the magnitude of motor improvement with therapy, particularly for patients with higher but not lower residual motor-function. BDNF genotype should be considered in the design and interpretation of clinical trials.

  18. Effects of Ethanol on the Expression Level of Various BDNF mRNA Isoforms and Their Encoded Protein in the Hippocampus of Adult and Embryonic Rats

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    Shahla Shojaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the effects of oral ethanol (Eth alone or combined with the phytoestrogen resveratrol (Rsv on the expression of various brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF transcripts and the encoded protein pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of pregnant and embryonic rats. A low (0.25 g/kg body weight (BW/day dose of Eth produced an increase in the expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and a decrease in that of the exon IX in embryos, but failed to affect BDNF transcript and pro-BDNF protein expression in adults. However, co-administration of Eth 0.25 g/kg·BW/day and Rsv led to increased expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and to a small but significant increase in the level of pro-BDNF protein in maternal rats. A high (2.5 g/kg·BW/day dose of Eth increased the expression of BDNF exons III and IV in embryos, but it decreased the expression of exon IX containing BDNF mRNAs in the maternal rats. While the high dose of Eth alone reduced the level of pro-BDNF in adults, it failed to change the levels of pro-BDNF in embryos. Eth differentially affects the expression pattern of BDNF transcripts and levels of pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of both adult and embryonic rats.

  19. Elementary dispersion analysis of some mimetic discretizations on triangular C-grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, P., E-mail: peter.korn@mpimet.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Danilov, S. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Spurious modes supported by triangular C-grids limit their application for modeling large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Their behavior can be modified within a mimetic approach that generalizes the scalar product underlying the triangular C-grid discretization. The mimetic approach provides a discrete continuity equation which operates on an averaged combination of normal edge velocities instead of normal edge velocities proper. An elementary analysis of the wave dispersion of the new discretization for Poincaré, Rossby and Kelvin waves shows that, although spurious Poincaré modes are preserved, their frequency tends to zero in the limit of small wavenumbers, which removes the divergence noise in this limit. However, the frequencies of spurious and physical modes become close on shorter scales indicating that spurious modes can be excited unless high-frequency short-scale motions are effectively filtered in numerical codes. We argue that filtering by viscous dissipation is more efficient in the mimetic approach than in the standard C-grid discretization. Lumping of mass matrices appearing with the velocity time derivative in the mimetic discretization only slightly reduces the accuracy of the wave dispersion and can be used in practice. Thus, the mimetic approach cures some difficulties of the traditional triangular C-grid discretization but may still need appropriately tuned viscosity to filter small scales and high frequencies in solutions of full primitive equations when these are excited by nonlinear dynamics.

  20. Inhibition of human amylin fibril formation by insulin-mimetic vanadium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhao, Cong; Zhu, Dengsen; Du, Weihong

    2014-05-01

    The toxicity of amyloid-forming proteins can be linked to many degenerative and systemic diseases. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, amylin) has been associated with type II diabetes. Methods for efficient inhibition of amyloid fibril formation are highly clinically important. This study demonstrated the significant inhibitory effects of six vanadium complexes on hIAPP aggregation. Vanadium complexes, such as bis(maltolato)-oxovanadium (BMOV), have been used as insulin-mimetic agents for the treatment of diabetes for many years. Different biophysical methods were applied to investigate the interaction between V complexes and hIAPP. The results indicated that the selected compounds affected the peptide aggregation by different action modes and protected the cells from the cytotoxicity induced by hIAPP. Both the high binding affinity and the ligand spatial effect on inhibiting hIAPP aggregation are significant. Although some of these compounds undergo biotransformation under the conditions of the experiments, and the active species are not identified, it is understood that the effect results from a particular compound and its conversion products. Importantly, our work provided information on the effects of the selected V complexes on hIAPP and demonstrated multiple levels of effects of V complexes against amyloid-related diseases.

  1. M402, a novel heparan sulfate mimetic, targets multiple pathways implicated in tumor progression and metastasis.

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    He Zhou

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs play a key role in shaping the tumor microenvironment by presenting growth factors, cytokines, and other soluble factors that are critical for host cell recruitment and activation, as well as promoting tumor progression, metastasis, and survival. M402 is a rationally engineered, non-cytotoxic heparan sulfate (HS mimetic, designed to inhibit multiple factors implicated in tumor-host cell interactions, including VEGF, FGF2, SDF-1α, P-selectin, and heparanase. A single s.c. dose of M402 effectively inhibited seeding of B16F10 murine melanoma cells to the lung in an experimental metastasis model. Fluorescent-labeled M402 demonstrated selective accumulation in the primary tumor. Immunohistological analyses of the primary tumor revealed a decrease in microvessel density in M402 treated animals, suggesting anti-angiogenesis to be one of the mechanisms involved in-vivo. M402 treatment also normalized circulating levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice. Chronic administration of M402, alone or in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel, inhibited spontaneous metastasis and prolonged survival in an orthotopic 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. These data demonstrate that modulating HSPG biology represents a novel approach to target multiple factors involved in tumor progression and metastasis.

  2. Evidence of associations between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF serum levels and gene polymorphisms with tinnitus

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    Aysun Coskunoglu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene polymorphisms are associated with abnormalities in regulation of BDNF secretion. Studies also linked BDNF polymorphisms with changes in brainstem auditory-evoked response test results. Furthermore, BDNF levels are reduced in tinnitus, psychiatric disorders, depression, dysthymic disorder that may be associated with stress, conversion disorder, and suicide attempts due to crises of life. For this purpose, we investigated whether there is any role of BDNF changes in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined the possible effects of BDNF variants in individuals diagnosed with tinnitus for more than 3 months. Fifty-two tinnitus subjects between the ages of 18 and 55, and 42 years healthy control subjects in the same age group, who were free of any otorhinolaryngology and systemic disease, were selected for examination. The intensity of tinnitus and depression was measured using the tinnitus handicap inventory, and the differential diagnosis of psychiatric diagnoses made using the Structured Clinical Interview for Fourth Edition of Mental Disorders. BDNF gene polymorphism was analyzed in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA samples extracted from the venous blood, and the serum levels of BDNF were measured. One-way analysis of variance and Chi-squared tests were applied. Results: Serum BDNF level was found lower in the tinnitus patients than controls, and it appeared that there is no correlation between BDNF gene polymorphism and tinnitus. Conclusions: This study suggests neurotrophic factors such as BDNF may have a role in tinnitus etiology. Future studies with larger sample size may be required to further confirm our results.

  3. The effect of childhood trauma on serum BDNF in bipolar depression is modulated by the serotonin promoter genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Ambrée, Oliver; Locatelli, Clara; Lorenzi, Cristina; Poletti, Sara; Colombo, Cristina; Arolt, Volker

    2017-08-24

    In healthy humans, both childhood trauma and the short form of the serotonin promoter transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) are associated with lower levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In subjects with bipolar disorder (BD), lower levels of BDNF and a higher degree of childhood trauma were observed compared with healthy controls. However, is still unknown if the functional 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms exerts an effect on both abnormalities. In 40 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in the course of BD, we genotyped 5-HTTLPR, measured serum BDNF with ELISA, and assessed early adversities by the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ). Data were analyzed in the context of the general linear model correcting for age, sex, ongoing lithium treatment, severity of current depression, and CTQ minimization/denial scores to investigate the effect of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and childhood trauma on BDNF levels. Early trauma were negatively associated with BDNF serum levels (higher CTQ scores, lower BDNF; p=0.0019). 5-HTTLPR l/l homozygotes showed significantly higher BDNF levels than 5-HTTLPR*s carriers (30.57±6.13 vs 26.82±6.41; p=0.0309). A separate-slopes analysis showed that 5-HTTLPR significantly influenced the relationship between early trauma and adult BDNF (interaction of 5-HTTLPR with CTQ scores: p=0.0023), due to a significant relationship between trauma and BDNF in 5-HTTLPR*s carriers, but not among l/l homozygotes. Putatively detrimental effects of childhood trauma exposure on adult BDNF serum levels are influenced by 5-HTTLPR genotype in patients affected by BD. Possible mechanisms include epigenetic modulation of BDNF gene expression, due to different reactivity to stressors in 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prefrontal cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin expression and cell density increase during adolescence and are modified by BDNF and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Serena, K; Hwang, W; Grech, A M; Wu, Y W C; Schroeder, A; Hill, R A

    2018-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to play a critical role early in the development of cortical GABAergic interneurons. Recently our laboratory and others have shown protracted development of specific subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons extending into adolescence. BDNF expression also changes significantly across adolescent development. However the role of BDNF in regulating GABAergic changes across adolescence remains unclear. Here, we performed a week-by-week analysis of the protein expression and cell density of three major GABAergic interneurons, parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SST) and calretinin (Cal) in the medial prefrontal cortex from prepubescence (week 3) to adulthood (week 12). In order to assess how BDNF and sex might influence the adolescent trajectory of GABAergic interneurons we compared WT as well as BDNF heterozygous (+/-) male and female mice. In both males and females PV expression increases during adolescent development in the mPFC. Compared to wild-types, PV expression was reduced in male but not female BDNF+/- mice throughout adolescent development. This reduction in protein expression corresponded with reduced cell density, specifically within the infralimbic prefrontal cortex. SST expression increased in early adolescent WT females and this upregulation was delayed in BDNF+/-. SST cell density also increased in early adolescent mPFC of WT female mice, with BDNF+/- again showing a reduced pattern of expression. Cal protein expression was also sex-dependently altered across adolescence with WT males showing a steady decline but that of BDNF+/- remaining unaltered. Reduced cell density in on the other hand was observed particularly in male BDNF+/- mice. In females, Cal protein expression and cell density remained largely stable. Our results show that PV, SST and calretinin interneurons are indeed still developing into early adolescence in the mPFC and that BDNF plays a critical, sex-specific role in mediating expression and

  5. Prey from the eyes of predators: Color discriminability of aposematic and mimetic butterflies from an avian visual perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shiyu; Lim, Matthew; Kunte, Krushnamegh

    2015-11-01

    Predation exerts strong selection on mimetic butterfly wing color patterns, which also serve other functions such as sexual selection. Therefore, specific selection pressures may affect the sexes and signal components differentially. We tested three predictions about the evolution of mimetic resemblance by comparing wing coloration of aposematic butterflies and their Batesian mimics: (a) females gain greater mimetic advantage than males and therefore are better mimics, (b) due to intersexual genetic correlations, sexually monomorphic mimics are better mimics than female-limited mimics, and (c) mimetic resemblance is better on the dorsal wing surface that is visible to predators in flight. Using a physiological model of avian color vision, we quantified mimetic resemblance from predators' perspective, which showed that female butterflies were better mimics than males. Mimetic resemblance in female-limited mimics was comparable to that in sexually monomorphic mimics, suggesting that intersexual genetic correlations did not constrain adaptive response to selection for female-limited mimicry. Mimetic resemblance on the ventral wing surface was better than that on the dorsal wing surface, implying stronger natural and sexual selection on ventral and dorsal surfaces, respectively. These results suggest that mimetic resemblance in butterfly mimicry rings has evolved under various selective pressures acting in a sex- and wing surface-specific manner. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Neuroprotection, Growth Factors and BDNF-TrkB Signalling in Retinal Degeneration

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    Atsuko Kimura

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factors play key roles in the development and survival of neurons. The potent neuroprotective effects of neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF, suggest that they are good therapeutic candidates for neurodegenerative diseases. Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease of the eye that causes irreversible blindness. It is characterized by damage to the optic nerve, usually due to high intraocular pressure (IOP, and progressive degeneration of retinal neurons called retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Current therapy for glaucoma focuses on reduction of IOP, but neuroprotection may also be beneficial. BDNF is a powerful neuroprotective agent especially for RGCs. Exogenous application of BDNF to the retina and increased BDNF expression in retinal neurons using viral vector systems are both effective in protecting RGCs from damage. Furthermore, induction of BDNF expression by agents such as valproic acid has also been beneficial in promoting RGC survival. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors in retinal diseases and focus on the differential roles of glial and neuronal TrkB in neuroprotection. We also discuss the role of neurotrophic factors in neuroregeneration.

  7. Decreased BDNF levels in amygdala and hippocampus after intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain

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    Luciano K. Jornada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to investigate the effects of ouabain intracerebroventricular injection on BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus of Wistar rats. METHODS: Animals received a single intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain (10-3 and 10-2 M or artificial cerebrospinal fluid and immediately, 1h, 24h, or seven days after injection, BDNF levels were measured in the rat's amygdala and hippocampus by sandwich-ELISA (n = 8 animals per group. RESULTS: When evaluated immediately, 3h, or 24h after injection, ouabain in doses of 10-2 and 10-3 M does not alter BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus. However, when evaluated seven days after injection, ouabain in 10-2 and 10-3 M, showed a significant reduction in BDNF levels in both brain regions evaluated. DISCUSSION: In conclusion, we propose that the ouabain decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and amygdala when assessed seven days after administration, supporting the Na/K ATPase hypothesis for bipolar illness.

  8. Parent of origin effect and differential allelic expression of BDNF Val66Met in suicidal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Vincenzo; Souza, Renan P; Zai, Clement C; Panariello, Fabio; Javaid, Naima; Strauss, John; Kennedy, James L; Tallerico, Teresa; Wong, Albert H

    2011-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and may also be involved in suicidal behaviour since BDNF levels are decreased in brain and plasma of suicide victims. Because the differential allelic expression of Val66Met BDNF gene on suicidal behaviour has not been investigated, we analyzed the parent-of-origin effect (POE) in suicide attempters and the differential expression of BDNF Val66Met alleles in suicide victims. We performed a family-based association study and ETDT analyses of the Val66Met polymorphism in nuclear families with at least one subject affected by major psychosis with suicidal behaviour, and compared allele-specific mRNA levels in post-mortem brain samples from suicide and non-suicide victims. The subjects included in this study have diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I and type II. Allele 3 in the GT repeat polymorphism was transmitted significantly more often to patients who attempted suicide (maternal transmissions: 46/22, P = 0.003; paternal transmissions: 55/30, P = 0.006). There was no significant difference between maternal and paternal transmission ratios. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the ratio of Val/Met-specific mRNA expression between suicide victims and controls. These data do not support a role for allelic imbalance or POE of BDNF for suicidal behaviour in major psychoses.

  9. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels as a possible predictor of psychopathology in healthy twins at high and low risk for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a potential biomarker of affective disorder. However, longitudinal studies evaluating a potential predictive role of BDNF on subsequent psychopathology are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF alone or in interaction with the B......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a potential biomarker of affective disorder. However, longitudinal studies evaluating a potential predictive role of BDNF on subsequent psychopathology are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF alone or in interaction...... with the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism predict onset of affective disorder in healthy individuals at heritable risk for affective disorder. In a high-risk study, we assessed whole blood levels of BDNF in 234 healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with or without a co-twin history of affective disorder (high...

  10. Dual action Smac mimetics-zinc chelators as pro-apoptotic antitumoral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Leonardo; Gornati, Davide; Manzotti, Mattia; Cairati, Silvia; Bossi, Alberto; Arosio, Daniela; Lecis, Daniele; Seneci, Pierfausto

    2016-10-01

    Dual action compounds (DACs) based on 4-substituted aza-bicyclo[5.3.0]decane Smac mimetic scaffolds (ABDs) linked to a Zn(2+)-chelating moiety (DPA, o-hydroxy, m-allyl, N-acyl (E)-phenylhydrazone) through their 10 position are reported and characterized. Their synthesis, their target affinity (XIAP BIR3, Zn(2+)) in cell-free assays, their pro-apoptotic effects and cytotoxicity in tumor cells with varying sensitivity to Smac mimetics are described. The results are interpreted to evaluate the influence of Zn(2+) chelators on cell-free potency and on cellular permeability of DACs, and to propose novel avenues towards more potent antitumoral DACs based on Smac mimetics and Zn(2+) chelation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthy imperfect dark matter from effective theory of mimetic cosmological perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Shin'ichi; Nishi, Sakine; Kobayashi, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of a recently proposed model of scalar-field matter called mimetic dark matter or imperfect dark matter. It has been known that mimetic matter with higher derivative terms suffers from gradient instabilities in scalar perturbations. To seek for an instability-free extension of imperfect dark matter, we develop an effective theory of cosmological perturbations subject to the constraint on the scalar field's kinetic term. This is done by using the unifying framework of general scalar-tensor theories based on the ADM formalism. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to construct a model of imperfect dark matter which is free from ghost and gradient instabilities. As a side remark, we also show that mimetic F (R) theory is plagued with the Ostrogradsky instability.

  12. A review of underwater bio-mimetic propulsion: cruise and fast-start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Ming; Cao, Yong-Hui; Pan, Guang

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the understanding of underwater bio-mimetic propulsion. Two impressive models of underwater propulsion are considered: cruise and fast-start. First, we introduce the progression of bio-mimetic propulsion, especially underwater propulsion, where some primary conceptions are touched upon. Second, the understanding of flapping foils, considered as one of the most efficient cruise styles of aquatic animals, is introduced, where the effect of kinematics and the shape and flexibility of foils on generating thrust are elucidated respectively. Fast-start propulsion is always exhibited when predator behaviour occurs, and we provide an explicit introduction of corresponding zoological experiments and numerical simulations. We also provide some predictions about underwater bio-mimetic propulsion.

  13. René Girard and the Mimetic Nature of Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Mattias

    2018-03-07

    French historian and literary critic René Girard (1923-2015), most widely known for the concepts of mimetic desire and scapegoating, also engaged in the discussion of the surge of eating disorders in his 1996 essay Eating Disorders and Mimetic Desire. This article explores Girard's ideas on the mimetic nature and origin of eating disorders from a clinical psychiatric perspective and contextualizes them within the field of eating disorders research as well as in relation to broader psychological, sociological and anthropological models of social comparison and non-consumption. Three main themes in Girard's thinking on the topic of eating disorders are identified and explored: the 'end of prohibitions' as a driving force in the emergence of eating disorders, eating disorders as a phenomenon specific to modernity, and the significance of 'conspicuous non-consumption' in the emergence of eating disorders.

  14. Modeling seismic wave propagation using staggered-grid mimetic finite differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freysimar Solano-Feo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mimetic finite difference (MFD approximations of continuous gradient and divergence operators satisfy a discrete version of the Gauss-Divergence theorem on staggered grids. On the mimetic approximation of this integral conservation principle, an unique boundary flux operator is introduced that also intervenes on the discretization of a given boundary value problem (BVP. In this work, we present a second-order MFD scheme for seismic wave propagation on staggered grids that discretized free surface and absorbing boundary conditions (ABC with same accuracy order. This scheme is time explicit after coupling a central three-level finite difference (FD stencil for numerical integration. Here, we briefly discuss the convergence properties of this scheme and show its higher accuracy on a challenging test when compared to a traditional FD method. Preliminary applications to 2-D seismic scenarios are also presented and show the potential of the mimetic finite difference method.

  15. A novel insulin mimetic vanadium-flavonol complex: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation in STZ-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy

    2013-05-01

    Since 1985, when Heyliger et al., first demonstrated a serendipitous discovery that oral administration of 0.8 mg/ml of sodium orthovanadate in drinking water to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in normoglycemia, numerous extensive studies have been pursued on the anti-diabetic and insulinomimetic actions of vanadium. The acceptance of vanadium compounds as promising therapeutic antidiabetic agents has been slowed due to the concern for chronic toxicity associated with vanadium accumulation. In order to circumvent the toxic effects of vanadium, we have taken up a combinational approach wherein a novel vanadium-flavonol complex was synthesized, characterized and its toxic as well as insulin mimetic potential was evaluated in STZ-induced experimental diabetes in rats. The results indicate that the complex is non-toxic and possess anti-diabetic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of multivalent carbohydrate mimetics with aminopolyol end groups and their evaluation as L-selectin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Salta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article a series of divalent and trivalent carbohydrate mimetics on the basis of an enantiopure aminopyran and of serinol is described. These aminopolyols are connected by amide bonds to carboxylic acid derived spacer units either by Schotten–Baumann acylation or by coupling employing HATU as reagent. The O-sulfation employing the SO3·DMF complex was optimized. It was crucial to follow this process by 700 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy to ensure full conversion and to use a refined neutralization and purification protocol. Many of the compounds could not be tested as L-selectin inhibitor by SPR due to their insolubility in water, nevertheless, a divalent and a trivalent amide showed surprisingly good activities with IC50 values in the low micromolar range.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvid, L G; Nielsen, M K F; Simonsen, C; Andersen, M; Caserotti, P

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very high extent, it may be particularly effective in terms of eliciting increases in systemic BDNF levels. We examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on mature BDNF (mBDNF) and total BDNF (tBDNF) in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 47 older men and women: n=22 in the training group (TG: progressive high intensity power training, 2 sessions per week; age 82.7±5.4years, 55% women) and n=25 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age 82.2±4.5years, 76% women). Following overnight fasting, basal serum levels of mBDNF and tBDNF were assessed (human ELISA kits) at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, mBDNF and tBDNF levels were comparable in the two groups, TG and CG. Post-intervention, no significant within-group or between-group changes were observed in mBDNF or tBDNF. Moreover, when divided into responder tertiles based upon changes in mBDNF and tBDNF (i.e. decliners, maintainers, improvers), respectively, comparable findings were observed for TG and CG. Altogether, basal systemic levels of serum mBDNF and tBDNF are not affected in mobility-limited older adults following 12-weeks of power training, and do not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant increases the risk of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Peng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Quek, Jia Min; Lee, Bernett; Au, Bijin; Sio, Yang Yie; Irwanto, Astrid; Schurmann, Claudia; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Larbi, Anis; Xu, Xin; Poidinger, Michael; Liu, Jianjun; Chew, Fook Tim; Rotzschke, Olaf; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secretory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic asthma, and eczema, but it is currently unknown whether BDNF polymorphisms influence susceptibility to moderate-to-severe AR. Objective: We

  20. Neurogenesis Inhibition Prevents Enriched Environment to Prolong and Strengthen Social Recognition Memory, But Not to Increase BDNF Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Caixeta, Ana Raquel; Guarnieri, Leonardo O; Pena, Roberta R; Dias, Thomáz L; Pereira, Grace Schenatto

    2017-07-01

    Hippocampus-dependent memories, such as social recognition (SRM), are modulated by neurogenesis. However, the precise role of newborn neurons in social memory processing is still unknown. We showed previously that 1 week of enriched environment (EE) is sufficient to increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus (HIP) and the olfactory bulb (OB) of mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 1 week of EE would enhance SRM persistence and strength. In addition, as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may mediate some of the neurogenesis effects on memory, we also tested if 1 week of EE would increase BDNF expression in the HIP and OB. We also predicted that neurogenesis inhibition would block the gain of function caused by EE on both SRM and BDNF expression. We found that EE increased BDNF expression in the HIP and OB of mice; at the same time, it allowed SRM to last longer. In addition, mice on EE had their SRM unaffected by memory consolidation interferences. As we predicted, treatment with the anti-mitotic drug AraC blocked EE effects on SRM. Surprisingly, neurogenesis inhibition did not affect the BDNF expression, increased by EE. Together, our results suggest that newborn neurons improve SRM persistence through a BDNF-independent mechanism. Interestingly, this study on social memory uncovered an unexpected dissociation between the effect of adult neurogenesis and BDNF expression on memory persistence, reassuring the idea that not all neurogenesis effects on memory are BDNF-dependent.

  1. Plasma BDNF Is Reduced among Middle-Aged and Elderly Women with Impaired Insulin Function: Evidence of a Compensatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentoft, Alyssa; Sweat, Victoria; Starr, Vanessa; Oliver, Stephen; Hassenstab, Jason; Bruehl, Hannah; Tirsi, Aziz; Javier, Elizabeth; McHugh, Pauline F.; Convit, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity and has been linked to glucose regulation and cognition. Associations among plasma BDNF, cognition, and insulin function were explored. Forty-one participants with impaired insulin function (IIF), ranging from insulin resistance to…

  2. BDNF Val66Met polymorphism as a moderator of exercise enhancement of smoking cessation treatment in anxiety vulnerable adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Powers, M.B.; Rosenfield, D.; Zvolensky, M.J.; Jacquart, J.; Davis, M.L.; Beevers, C.G.; Marcus, B.H.; Church, T.S.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise interventions facilitate the odds of quit success among high-anxiety sensitive adults smokers. We examined the dependency of these benefits on the genetic BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism; individuals who are Met carriers have lower BDNF responses and reduced associated

  3. Adaptation of slow myofibers: the effect of sustained BDNF treatment of extraocular muscles in infant nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Christy L; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M; Mustari, Michael J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated promising new treatment options for strabismus. Neurotrophic factors have emerged as a potential treatment for oculomotor disorders because of diverse roles in signaling to muscles and motor neurons. Unilateral treatment with sustained release brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to a single lateral rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop in correlation with extraocular muscle (EOM) changes during the critical period for development of binocularity. The lateral rectus muscles of one eye in two infant macaques were treated with sustained delivery of BDNF for 3 months. Eye alignment was assessed using standard photographic methods. Muscle specimens were analyzed to examine the effects of BDNF on the density, morphology, and size of neuromuscular junctions, as well as myofiber size. Counts were compared to age-matched controls. No change in eye alignment occurred with BDNF treatment. Compared to control muscle, neuromuscular junctions on myofibers expressing slow myosins had a larger area. Myofibers expressing slow myosin had larger diameters, and the percentage of myofibers expressing slow myosins increased in the proximal end of the muscle. Expression of BDNF was examined in control EOM, and observed to have strongest immunoreactivity outside the endplate zone. We hypothesize that the oculomotor system adapted to sustained BDNF treatment to preserve normal alignment. Our results suggest that BDNF treatment preferentially altered myofibers expressing slow myosins. This implicates BDNF signaling as influencing the slow twitch properties of EOM.

  4. Metallokinetic analysis of disposition of vanadyl complexes as insulin-mimetics in rats using BCM-ESR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, H; Takechi, K; Sakurai, H

    2000-02-01

    Among vanadium's wide variety of biological functions, its insulin-mimetic effect is the most interesting and important. Recently, the vanadyl ion (+4 oxidation state of vanadium) and its complexes have been shown to normalize the blood glucose levels of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-rats). During our investigations to find more effective and less toxic vanadyl complexes, the vanadyl-methylpicolinate complex (VO-MPA) was found to exhibit higher insulin-mimetic activity and less toxicity than other complexes, as evaluated by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is capable of measuring the paramagnetic species in biological samples. We have developed the in vivo blood circulation monitoring-electron spin resonance (BCM-ESR) method to analyze the ESR signals due to stable organic radicals in real time. In the present investigation, we have applied this method to elucidate the relationship between the blood glucose normalizing effect of VO-MPA and the global disposition of paramagnetic vanadyl species. This paper describes the results of vanadyl species in the circulating blood of rats following intravenous administration of vanadyl compounds. ESR spectra due to the presence of vanadyl species were obtained in the circulating blood, and their pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using compartment models. The results indicate that vanadyl species are distributed considerably to the peripheral tissues, as estimated by BCM-ESR, and eliminated from the body through the urine, as estimated by ESR at 77 K. The exposure of vanadyl species in the blood was found to be enhanced by VO-MPA treatment. Given these results, we concluded that the pharmacokinetic character of vanadyl species is closely related with the structure and antidiabetic activity of the vanadyl compounds.

  5. Persistent inflammation-induced up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes synaptic delivery of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor GluA1 subunits in descending pain modulatory circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wenjuan; Chen, Quan; Zhou, Wenjie; Wang, Yunping; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhi

    2014-08-08

    The enhanced AMPA receptor phosphorylation at GluA1 serine 831 sites in the central pain-modulating system plays a pivotal role in descending pain facilitation after inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We show here that, in the rat brain stem, in the nucleus raphe magnus, which is a critical relay in the descending pain-modulating system of the brain, persistent inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) can enhance AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and the GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor-mediated rectification index. Western blot analysis showed an increase in GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 but not at Ser-845. This was accompanied by an increase in distribution of the synaptic GluA1 subunit. In parallel, the level of histone H3 acetylation at bdnf gene promoter regions was reduced significantly 3 days after CFA injection, as indicated by ChIP assays. This was correlated with an increase in BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF protein levels. Sequestering endogenous extracellular BDNF with TrkB-IgG in the nucleus raphe magnus decreased AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 3 days after CFA injection. Under the same conditions, blockade of TrkB receptor functions, phospholipase C, or PKC impaired GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 and decreased excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic up-regulation of BDNF by peripheral inflammation induces GluR1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 sites through activation of the phospholipase C-PKC signaling cascade, leading to the trafficking of GluA1 to pain-modulating neuronal synapses. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Endothelial targeting of liposomes encapsulating SOD/catalase mimetic EUK-134 alleviates acute pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Melissa D; Greineder, Colin F; Hood, Elizabeth D; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2014-03-10

    Production of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vascular endothelium is a common pathogenic pathway in many dangerous conditions, including acute lung injury, ischemia-reperfusion, and inflammation. Ineffective delivery of antioxidants to the endothelium limits their utility for management of these conditions. In this study, we devised a novel translational antioxidant intervention targeted to the vascular endothelium using PEG-liposomes loaded with EUK-134 (EUK), a potent superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic. EUK loaded into antibody-coated liposomes (size 197.8±4.5 nm diameter, PDI 0.179±0.066) exerted partial activity in the intact carrier, while full activity was recovered upon liposome disruption. For targeting we used antibodies (Abs) to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1). Both streptavidin-biotin and SATA/SMCC conjugation chemistries provided binding of 125-150 Ab molecules per liposome. Ab/EUK/liposomes, but not IgG/EUK/liposomes: i) bound to endothelial cells and inhibited cytokine-induced inflammatory activation in vitro; and, ii) accumulated in lungs after intravascular injection, providing >60% protection against pulmonary edema in endotoxin-challenged mice (vs <6% protection afforded by IgG/liposome/EUK counterpart). Since the design elements of this drug delivery system are already in clinical use (PEG-liposomes, antibodies, SATA/SMCC conjugation), it is an attractive candidate for translational interventions using antioxidant molecules such as EUK and other clinically acceptable drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Perylene Diimide as a Precise Graphene-like Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilov, Almaz S.; Nilewski, Lizanne G.; Berka, Vladimir [Hematology,; Zhang, Chenhao; Yakovenko, Andrey A. [Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division,; Wu, Gang [Hematology,; Kent, Thomas A. [Department; Center for Translational Research in Inflammatory Diseases, Michel E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas 77030, United States; Tsai, Ah-Lim [Hematology,; Tour, James M.

    2017-01-31

    Here we show that the active portion of a graphitic nanoparticle can be mimicked by a perylene diimide (PDI) to explain the otherwise elusive biological and electrocatalytic activity of the nanoparticle construct. Development of molecular analogues that mimic the antioxidant properties of oxidized graphenes, in this case the poly(ethylene glycolated) hydrophilic carbon clusters (PEG–HCCs), will afford important insights into the highly efficient activity of PEG–HCCs and their graphitic analogues. PEGylated perylene diimides (PEGn–PDI) serve as well-defined molecular analogues of PEG–HCCs and oxidized graphenes in general, and their antioxidant and superoxide dismutase-like (SOD-like) properties were studied. PEGn–PDIs have two reversible reduction peaks, which are more positive than the oxidation peak of superoxide (O2•–). This is similar to the reduction peak of the HCCs. Thus, as with PEG–HCCs, PEGn–PDIs are also strong single-electron oxidants of O2•–. Furthermore, reduced PEGn–PDI, PEGn–PDI•–, in the presence of protons, was shown to reduce O2•– to H2O2 to complete the catalytic cycle in this SOD analogue. The kinetics of the conversion of O2•– to O2 and H2O2 by PEG8–PDI was measured using freeze-trap EPR experiments to provide a turnover number of 133 s–1; the similarity in kinetics further supports that PEG8–PDI is a true SOD mimetic. Finally, PDIs can be used as catalysts in the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction in water, which proceeds by a two-electron process with the production of H2O2, mimicking graphene oxide nanoparticles that are otherwise difficult to study spectroscopically.

  8. Age-related decrease in the mitochondrial sirtuin deacetylase Sirt3 expression associated with ROS accumulation in the auditory cortex of the mimetic aging rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zeng

    Full Text Available Age-related dysfunction of the central auditory system, also known as central presbycusis, can affect speech perception and sound localization. Understanding the pathogenesis of central presbycusis will help to develop novel approaches to prevent or treat this disease. In this study, the mechanisms of central presbycusis were investigated using a mimetic aging rat model induced by chronic injection of D-galactose (D-Gal. We showed that malondialdehyde (MDA levels were increased and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2 activity was reduced in the auditory cortex in natural aging and D-Gal-induced mimetic aging rats. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA 4834 bp deletion, abnormal ultrastructure and cell apoptosis in the auditory cortex were also found in natural aging and D-Gal mimetic aging rats. Sirt3, a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent deacetylase, has been shown to play a crucial role in controlling cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS homeostasis. However, the role of Sirt3 in the pathogenesis of age-related central auditory cortex deterioration is still unclear. Here, we showed that decreased Sirt3 expression might be associated with increased SOD2 acetylation, which negatively regulates SOD2 activity. Oxidative stress accumulation was likely the result of low SOD2 activity and a decline in ROS clearance. Our findings indicate that Sirt3 might play an essential role, via the mediation of SOD2, in central presbycusis and that manipulation of Sirt3 expression might provide a new approach to combat aging and oxidative stress-related diseases.

  9. Pgrmc1/BDNF Signaling Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Glia-Neuron Cross Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fen; Nguyen, Trinh; Jin, Xin; Huang, Renqi; Chen, Zhenglan; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang

    2016-05-01

    Progesterone (P4) exerts robust cytoprotection in brain slice cultures (containing both neurons and glia), yet such protection is not as evident in neuron-enriched cultures, suggesting that glia may play an indispensable role in P4's neuroprotection. We previously reported that a membrane-associated P4 receptor, P4 receptor membrane component 1, mediates P4-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release from glia. Here, we sought to determine whether glia are required for P4's neuroprotection and whether glia's roles are mediated, at least partially, via releasing soluble factors to act on neighboring neurons. Our data demonstrate that P4 increased the level of mature BDNF (neuroprotective) while decreasing pro-BDNF (potentially neurotoxic) in the conditioned media (CMs) of cultured C6 astrocytes. We examined the effects of CMs derived from P4-treated astrocytes (P4-CMs) on 2 neuronal models: 1) all-trans retinoid acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and 2) mouse primary hippocampal neurons. P4-CM increased synaptic marker expression and promoted neuronal survival against H2O2. These effects were attenuated by Y1036 (an inhibitor of neurotrophin receptor [tropomysin-related kinase] signaling), as well as tropomysin-related kinase B-IgG (a more specific inhibitor to block BDNF signaling), which pointed to BDNF as the key protective component within P4-CM. These findings suggest that P4 may exert its maximal protection by triggering a glia-neuron cross talk, in which P4 promotes mature BDNF release from glia to enhance synaptogenesis as well as survival of neurons. This recognition of the importance of glia in mediating P4's neuroprotection may also inform the design of effective therapeutic methods for treating diseases wherein neuronal death and/or synaptic deficits are noted.

  10. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes. PMID:21960964

  11. Juvenile methylphenidate reduces prefrontal cortex plasticity via D3 receptor and BDNF in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L Andersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early drug intervention in childhood disorders aims to maximize individual potential in the short- and long-term. Consistently, juvenile exposure to psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (MPH, reduces risk for substance use in animals and sub-populations of individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. We investigated the effects of MPH on brain plasticity via dopamine receptor D3 (D3R and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in developing rats. Methods: Between postnatal days 20-35, rat pups were administered saline vehicle (Veh or MPH (2 mg/kg, the D3R-preferring agonist ± 7-OHDPAT, or the antagonist nafadotride (0.05 mg/kg alone, or in combination with MPH twice a day. In adulthood, subjects were challenged to Veh or cocaine (10 mg/kg for two days. The prefrontal cortex was analyzed for protein and mRNA levels of total BDNF, its splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI, and D3 receptors. A separate group of subjects was assessed for splice variants at 20, 35, 40 and 60 days. Results: Across age strong correlations were evident between Drd3 and Bdnf mRNA levels (r=0.65 and a negative relationship between Drd3 and exon IIc after MPH exposure (r=-0.73. BDNF protein levels did not differ between Veh- and MPH subjects at baseline, but were significantly lower in MPH-treated and cocaine challenged subjects (30.3 ± 9.7%. Bdnf mRNA was significantly higher in MPH subjects, and reversed upon exposure to cocaine. This effect was blocked by nafadotride. Furthermore, Bdnftotal and Bdnf splice variants I, IIc, III/IV, and IV/VI changed across the transitions between juvenility and late adolescence. Conclusions: These data suggest a sensitive window of vulnerability to modulations of BDNF expression around adolescence, and that compared to normal animals, juvenile exposure to MPH permanently reduces prefrontal BDNF transcription and translation upon cocaine exposure in adulthood by a D3R

  12. BDNF val66met association with serotonin transporter binding in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, P. M.; Ozenne, B.; Svarer, C.

    2017-01-01

    -carriers have increased subcortical 5-HTT binding. The small difference suggests limited statistical power may explain previously reported null effects. Our finding adds to emerging evidence that BDNF val66met contributes to differences in the human brain serotonin system, informing how variability in the 5-HTT......The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key feature of the serotonin system, which is involved in behavior, cognition and personality and implicated in neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms have predicted...

  13. BDNF and BMI effects on brain structures of bipolar offspring: results from the global mood and brain science initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, R B; Brietzke, E; McIntyre, R S; Cao, B; Lee, Y; Japiassú, L; Chen, K; Lu, R; Lu, W; Li, T; Xu, G; Lin, K

    2017-12-01

    To compare brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels between offspring of individuals with bipolar disorders (BD) and healthy controls (HCs) and investigate the effects of BDNF levels and body mass index (BMI) on brain structures. Sixty-seven bipolar offspring and 45 HCs were included (ages 8-28). Structural images were acquired using 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Serum BDNF levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Multivariate and univariate analyses of covariance were conducted. Significantly higher BDNF levels were observed among bipolar offspring, relative to HCs (P > 0.025). Offspring status moderated the association between BDNF and BMI (F 1 =4.636, P = 0.034). After adjustment for relevant covariates, there was a trend for a significant interaction of group and BDNF on neuroimaging parameters (Wilks'λ F 56,94 =1.463, P = 0.052), with significant effects on cerebellar white matter and superior and middle frontal regions. Brain volume and BDNF were positively correlated among HCs and negatively correlated among bipolar offspring. Interactions between BDNF and BMI on brain volumes were non-significant among HCs (Wilks'λ F 28,2 =2.229, P = 0.357), but significant among bipolar offspring (Wilks'λ F 28,12 =2.899, P = 0.028). Offspring status and BMI moderate the association between BDNF levels and brain structures among bipolar offspring, underscoring BDNF regulation and overweight/obesity as key moderators of BD pathogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Filling the void: a role for exercise-induced BDNF and brain amyloid precursor protein processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Rebecca E K

    2017-11-01

    Inactivity, obesity, and insulin resistance are significant risk factors for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several studies have demonstrated that diet-induced obesity, inactivity, and insulin resistance exacerbate the neuropathological hallmarks of AD. The aggregation of β-amyloid peptides is one of these hallmarks. β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, leading to β-amyloid peptide formation. Understanding how BACE1 content and activity are regulated is essential for establishing therapies aimed at reducing and/or slowing the progression of AD. Exercise training has been proven to reduce the risk of AD as well as decrease β-amyloid production and BACE1 content and/or activity. However, these long-term interventions also result in improvements in adiposity, circulating metabolites, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity making it difficult to determine the direct effects of exercise on brain APP processing. This review highlights this large void in our knowledge and discusses our current understanding of the direct of effect of exercise on β-amyloid production. We have concentrated on the central role that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play in mediating the direct effects of exercise on reducing brain BACE1 content and activity as well as β-amyloid production. Future studies should aim to generate a greater understanding of how obesity and exercise can directly alter APP processing and AD-related pathologies. This knowledge could provide evidence-based hypotheses for designing therapies to reduce the risk of AD and dementia. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Physical exercise neuroprotects ovariectomized 3xTg-AD mice through BDNF mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Revilla, Susana; Gómez-Cabrera, M Carmen; Gambini, Juan; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Cristòfol, Rosa; Viña, José; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2014-07-01

    Postmenopausal women may be more vulnerable to cognitive loss and Alzheimer's disease (AD) than premenopausal women because of their deficiency in estrogens, in addition to their usually older age. Aerobic physical exercise has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for maintaining health and well-being in postmenopausal women, and for improving brain health and plasticity in populations at high risk for AD. To study the neuroprotective mechanisms of physical exercise in a postmenopausal animal model, we submitted previously ovariectomized, six-month old non-transgenic and 3xTg-AD mice to three months of voluntary exercise in a running wheel. At nine months of age, we observed lower grip strength and some exacerbation of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)-like involving active exploratory activities. A similar major cognitive impairment was observed of ovariectomized 3xTg-AD mice in comparison with sham-operated 3xTg-AD mice. A reduction of bodily fitness and lack of retention of memory were observed in the ovariectomized non-transgenic mice. Physical exercise protected against all deleterious behaviors and normalized learning and memory. It also protected against body frailty, as expected. Analyses of hippocampal key markers of antioxidant and neuroplasticity signaling pathways, showed that ovariectomy impairs the activation of CREB through physical exercise. Furthermore, molecular and behavioral correlates suggested a central role of BDNF in the neuroprotection mediated by physical exercise therapy against apathy and memory loss induced by ovariectomy and the AD-genotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Topiramate Confers Neuroprotection Against Methylphenidate-Induced Neurodegeneration in Dentate Gyrus and CA1 Regions of Hippocampus via CREB/BDNF Pathway in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Heidari, Mansour; Madjd, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) abuse can cause serious neurological damages. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) have been reported already, but its mechanism of action still remains unclear. The current study evaluates in vivo role of CREB/BDNF in TPM protection of the rat hippocampal cells from methylphenidate-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. A total of 60 adult male rats were divided into six groups. Groups 1 and 2 received normal saline (0.7 ml/rat) and MPH (10 mg/kg) respectively for 14 days. Groups 3 and 4 were concurrently treated with MPH (10 mg/kg) and TPM 50 and 100 mg/kg respectively for 14 days. Groups 5 and 6 were treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg TPM only respectively. After drug administration, open field test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity. The hippocampus was then isolated and the apoptotic, antiapoptotic, oxidative, antioxidant, and inflammatory factors were measured. Expression of the total and phosphorylated CREB and BDNF in gene and protein levels, and gene expression of Ak1, CaMK4, MAPK3, PKA, and c-Fos levels were also measured. MPH significantly decreased motor activity in OFT. TPM (50 and 100 mg/kg) decreased MPH-induced motor activity disturbance. Additionally, MPH significantly increased Bax protein level, CaMK4 gene expression, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, mitochondrial GSH, IL-1β, and TNF-α levels in isolated hippocampal cells. Also CREB, in total and phosphorylated forms, BDNF and Bcl-2 protein levels, Ak1, MAPK3, PKA and c-Fos gene expression, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities decreased significantly by MPH. TPM (50 and 100 mg/kg), both in the presence and absence of MPH, attenuated the effects of MPH. Immunohistochemistry data showed that TPM increased localization of the total and phosphorylated forms of CREB in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of the hippocampus. It seems that TPM can be used as a neuroprotective agent against

  17. The conversion in the René Girard’s mimetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Moreno Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the specific peculiarities of René Girard’s mimetic theory is the recovery of the concept of conversion. In this article we expose, in a detailed way, the three senses of the conversion according to his thinking: novelistic, religious and epistemological. There is an interaction between the three senses and also different significations for each other.

  18. A Smac mimetic augments the response of urothelial cancer cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugene K; Jinesh G, Goodwin; Laing, Naomi M; Choi, Woonyoung; McConkey, David J; Kamat, Ashish M

    2013-09-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is considered the gold standard for patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, despite initial response, many patients will relapse; therefore, novel salvage treatment strategies are desperately needed. Herein, we studied a mechanism based treatment combination using a Smac mimetic with standard chemotherapy. Using a panel of 10 urothelial cancer cell lines, we exposed them to a combination of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and a Smac mimetic. Sensitivity was determined using a DNA fragmentation assay. We determined that three cell lines (UMUC-3, UMUC-13, and RT4v6) were considered sensitive to the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin and an additional three cell lines were sensitized to gemcitabine and cisplatin with the addition of the Smac mimetic (UMUC-6, UMUC-12, and UMUC-18). We next explored the constitutive expression of selected members of the IAP family (XIAP, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, and Survivin), the BCL family (BCL-2, BCLXL, and BAX) and Smac using gene expression profiling and western blotting. We determined that RNA and protein expression of SMAC, selected members of the IAP family and members of the BCL family did not correlate to drug sensitivity. Lastly, using an in vivo mouse model, we determined that treatment with the Smac mimetic in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin resulted in increased apoptosis, decreased microvessel density and decreased cellular proliferation. This novel treatment strategy may be effective in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma and warrants further investigation.

  19. Mimetic Divergence and the Speciation Continuum in the Mimic Poison Frog Ranitomeya imitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twomey, Evan; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Venegas, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    While divergent ecological adaptation can drive speciation, understanding the factors that facilitate or constrain this process remains a major goal in speciation research. Here, we study two mimetic transition zones in the poison frog Ranitomeya imitator, a species that has undergone a Mullerian...

  20. Effect of tempol on redox homeostasis and stress tolerance in mimetically aged Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksu, Ugur; Yanar, Karolin; Terzioglu, Duygu; Erkol, Tugçe; Ece, Evrim; Aydin, Seval; Uslu, Ezel; Çakatay, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test our hypothesis that scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) with tempol, a membrane permeable antioxidant, affects the type and magnitude of oxidative damage and stress tolerance through mimetic aging process in Drosophila. Drosophila colonies were randomly divided into three

  1. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide 4F blocks sphingomyelinase-induced LDL aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Su Duy; Javanainen, Matti; Rissanen, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Lipolytic modification of LDL particles by SMase generates LDL aggregates with a strong affinity for human arterial proteoglycans and may so enhance LDL retention in the arterial wall. Here, we evaluated the effects of apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F on structural and functional properties of the SMase...

  2. Functional coupling analysis suggests link between the obesity gene FTO and the BDNF-NTRK2 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rask-Andersen Mathias

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Fat mass and obesity gene (FTO has been identified through genome wide association studies as an important genetic factor contributing to a higher body mass index (BMI. However, the molecular context in which this effect is mediated has yet to be determined. We investigated the potential molecular network for FTO by analyzing co-expression and protein-protein interaction databases, Coxpresdb and IntAct, as well as the functional coupling predicting multi-source database, FunCoup. Hypothalamic expression of FTO-linked genes defined with this bioinformatics approach was subsequently studied using quantitative real time-PCR in mouse feeding models known to affect FTO expression. Results We identified several candidate genes for functional coupling to FTO through database studies and selected nine for further study in animal models. We observed hypothalamic expression of Profilin 2 (Pfn2, cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit beta (Prkacb, Brain derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (Ntrk2, Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3, and Btbd12 to be co-regulated in concert with Fto. Pfn2 and Prkacb have previously not been linked to feeding regulation. Conclusions Gene expression studies validate several candidates generated through database studies of possible FTO-interactors. We speculate about a wider functional role for FTO in the context of current and recent findings, such as in extracellular ligand-induced neuronal plasticity via NTRK2/BDNF, possibly via interaction with the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ.

  3. Cross-sectional associations of objectively measured physical activity with brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Tao; Gejl, Anne Kær; Tarp, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between objectively measured physical activity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses were performed using data from 415 adolescents who participated in the 2015 follow......-up of the Childhood Health Activity and Motor Performance School Study Denmark (the CHAMPS-study DK). Physical activity was objectively measured by accelerometry monitors. Serum BDNF levels were analyzed using the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anthropometrics and pubertal status were measured using.......035). In girls, mean physical activity and MVPA were not associated with serum BDNF. Without adjustment for wear time, sedentary time was not associated with serum BDNF in either sex. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that higher physical activity is associated with lower serum BDNF in boys, but not in girls....

  4. Z-Guggulsterone Improves the Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments Through Enhancement of the BDNF Signal in C57BL/6J Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Huang, Chao; Ding, Wenbin

    2016-12-01

    Memory impairment is a common symptom in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, and its suppression could be beneficial to improve the quality of life of those patients. Z-guggulsterone, a compound extracted from the resin of plant Commiphora whighitii, exhibits numerous pharmacological effects in clinical practice, such as treatment of inflammation, arthritis, obesity and lipid metabolism disorders. However, the role and possible mechanism of Z-guggulsterone on brain-associated memory impairments are largely unknown. This issue was addressed in the present study in a memory impairment model induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, using the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze tests. Results showed that scopolamine significantly decreased the step-through latency and spontaneous alternation of C57BL/6J mice in passive avoidance and Y-maze test, whereas increased the mean escape latency and decreased the swimming time in target quadrant in Morris water maze test. Pretreatment of mice with Z-guggulsterone at doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg effectively reversed the scopolamine-induced memory impairments. Mechanistic studies revealed that Z-guggulsterone pretreatment reversed the scopolamine-induced increase in acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, as well as decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation levels in the hippocampus and cortex. Inhibition of the BDNF signal, however, blocked the memory-enhancing effect of Z-guggulsterone. Therefore, these findings demonstrate that Z-guggulsterone attenuates the scopolamine-induced memory impairments mainly through activation of the CREB-BDNF signaling pathway, thereby exhibiting memory-improving effects.

  5. cAMP/PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling pathway in hippocampus mediates cyclooxygenase 2-induced learning/memory deficits of rats subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Kuang, Shengnan; Li, Huan; Ran, Dongzhi; Yang, Junqing

    2017-05-30

    To investigate the mechanism of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in learning and memory impairments in rats subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), meloxicam was used intragastrically to inhibit the activity of cyclooxygenase 2. Moreover, cyclooxygenase 2 over-expressing or RNA interfere lentivirus was injected intraventricularly to increase or decrease the enzyme's expression, respectively. The body weights and sucrose consumption were used to analyze depressive behaviors, while the Morris water maze and step-down-type passive avoidance tests were carried out to evaluate the learning-memory functions. The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured to estimate inflammation and the contents of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) were used to measure the levels of the second messenger. Changes in cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA levels were analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, the expression of cyclooxygenase 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prostaglandins receptor 3 (EP3), protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and phosphorylated CREB were estimated using immunohistochemical staining or western blotting. The results showed that CUMS led to significant depressive-like behaviors and learning and memory dysfunctions. Also, the cAMP levels decreased significantly, while levels of inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins E2 increased significantly. The expressions of PKA, BDNF, phosphorylated CREB/CREB declined and cyclooxygenase 2 was increased. Meloxicam and cyclooxygenase 2 RNA interfere lentivirus reversed the changes caused by CUMS while cyclooxygenase 2-overexpressing lentivirus worsened these abnormalities. The findings also showed that CUMS increased cyclooxygenase 2 expression, which can cause learning and memory impairments, mainly through activating the hippocampal neuronal cAMP/PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling pathways.

  6. DNA-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) binding to CpG rich GABAergic and BDNF promoters is increased in the brain of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, E; Ruzicka, W B; Grayson, D R; Guidotti, A

    2015-09-01

    The down regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD1), reelin (RELN), and BDNF expression in brain of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients is associated with overexpression of DNA methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) and ten-eleven translocase methylcytosine dioxygenase1 (TET1). DNMT1 and TET1 belong to families of enzymes that methylate and hydroxymethylate cytosines located proximal to and within cytosine phosphodiester guanine (CpG) islands of many gene promoters, respectively. Altered promoter methylation may be one mechanism underlying the down-regulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic gene expression. However, recent reports suggest that both DNMT1 and TET1 directly bind to unmethylated CpG rich promoters through their respective Zinc Finger (ZF-CXXC) domains. We report here, that the binding of DNMT1 to GABAergic (GAD1, RELN) and glutamatergic (BDNF-IX) promoters is increased in SZ and BP disorder patients and this increase does not necessarily correlate with enrichment in promoter methylation. The increased DNMT1 binding to these promoter regions is detected in the cortex but not in the cerebellum of SZ and BP disorder patients, suggesting a brain region and neuron specific dependent mechanism. Increased binding of DNMT1 positively correlates with increased expression of DNMT1 and with increased binding of MBD2. In contrast, the binding of TET1 to RELN, GAD1 and BDNF-IX promoters failed to change. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the down-regulation of specific GABAergic and glutamatergic genes in SZ and BP disorder patients may be mediated, at least in part, by a brain region specific and neuronal-activity dependent DNMT1 action that is likely independent of its DNA methylation activity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Smac mimetics in combination with TRAIL selectively target cancer stem cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man-Si; Wang, Guang-Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Liang, Yi; Wang, Heng-Bang; Wu, Miao-Yi; Min, Ping; Chen, Li-zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Bei, Jin-Xin; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Yang, Dajun

    2013-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a common malignancy in Southern China. After radiotherapy and chemotherapy, a considerable proportion of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma suffered tumor relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been shown with resistance against therapies and thus considered as the initiator of recurrence and metastasis in tumors, where the antiapoptotic property of CSCs play an important role. Smac/DIABLO is an inverse regulator for the inhibitors of apoptosis protein family (IAP), which have been involved in apoptosis. Here, the effects of Smac mimetics on the CSCs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma were studied both in vitro and in vivo, using two clones of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE2 as models. We found that one of the clones, S18, had CSC-like properties and IAPs were overexpressed. The combination of Smac mimetics and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can reduce the percentage of SP cells and inhibit the colony- and sphere-forming abilities of S18 cells, indicating their ability to attenuate the CSCs. Moreover, in a nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft model, the administration of Smac mimetics in combination with TRAIL also led to the elimination of nasopharyngeal carcinoma stem cells. Furthermore, the Smac mimetics in combination with TRAIL induced the degradation of cIAP1 and XIAP and thus induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that Smac mimetics exerted an antitumor effect on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cancer stem cells, and this combination treatment should be considered as a promising strategy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  8. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wu, Huixian; Vardy, Eyal; Huang, Xi-Ping; Trapella, Claudio; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Ferrara); (Scripps); (UNC)

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.

  9. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang R. Amin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (biofunctional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, zeta-potential, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 µg mL−1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  10. Mechanisms of vanadium action: insulin-mimetic or insulin-enhancing agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, M C; Brownsey, R W; McNeill, J H

    2000-10-01

    The demonstration that the trace element vanadium has insulin-like properties in isolated cells and tissues and in vivo has generated considerable enthusiasm for its potential therapeutic value in human diabetes. However, the mechanisms by which vanadium induces its metabolic effects in vivo remain poorly understood, and whether vanadium directly mimics or rather enhances insulin effects is considered in this review. It is clear th