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Sample records for bdbe dose calculation

  1. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-11-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a dose consequence analysis of high-level waste (HLW) consisting of plutonium immobilized in vitrified HLW to be handled at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain for a beyond design basis event (BDBE) under expected conditions using best estimate values for each calculation parameter. In addition to the dose calculation, a plutonium respirable particle size for dose calculation use is derived. The current concept for this waste form is plutonium disks enclosed in cans immobilized in canisters of vitrified HLW (i.e., glass). The plutonium inventory at risk used for this calculation is selected from Plutonium Immobilization Project Input for Yucca Mountain Total Systems Performance Assessment (Shaw 1999). The BDBE examined in this calculation is a nonmechanistic initiating event and the sequence of events that follow to cause a radiological release. This analysis will provide the radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated BDBE. Results may be considered in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components. This calculation uses best available technical information because the BDBE frequency is very low (i.e., less than 1.0E-6 events/year) and is not required for License Application for the Monitored Geologic Repository. The results of this calculation will not be used as part of a licensing or design basis.

  2. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both

  3. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  4. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  5. Dose calculation for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    The joint working group of ICRP/ICRU is advancing the works of reviewing the ICRP publication 51 by investigating the data related to radiation protection. In order to introduce the 1990 recommendation, it has been demanded to carry out calculation for neutrons, photons and electrons. As for electrons, EURADOS WG4 (Numerical Dosimetry) rearranged the data to be calculated at the meeting held in PTB Braunschweig in June, 1992, and the question and request were presented by Dr. J.L. Chartier, the responsible person, to the researchers who are likely to undertake electron transport Monte Carlo calculation. The author also has carried out the requested calculation as it was the good chance to do the mutual comparison among various computation codes regarding electron transport calculation. The content that the WG requested to calculate was the absorbed dose at depth d mm when parallel electron beam enters at angle α into flat plate phantoms of PMMA, water and ICRU4-element tissue, which were placed in vacuum. The calculation was carried out by the versatile electron-photon shower computation Monte Carlo code, EGS4. As the results, depth dose curves and the dependence of absorbed dose on electron energy, incident angle and material are reported. The subjects to be investigated are pointed out. (K.I.)

  6. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Hill, G.S.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-09-01

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  7. Calculating radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods and procedures used to calculate the radiation exposures and radiation doses to designated employees of the Olympic Dam Project. Each of the three major exposure pathways are examined. These are: gamma irradiation, radon daughter inhalation and radioactive dust inhalation. A further section presents ICRP methodology for combining individual pathway exposures to give a total dose figure. Computer programs used for calculations and data storage are also presented briefly

  8. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P.; Roeser, A.

    2015-01-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  9. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  10. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses

  12. Simplified dose calculation method for mantle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaff, L.A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified dose calculation method for mantle technique is described. In the routine treatment of lymphom as using this technique, the daily doses at the midpoints at five anatomical regions are different because the thicknesses are not equal. (Author) [pt

  13. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  14. Electron and bremsstrahlung penetration and dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Burrell, M. O.

    1972-01-01

    Various techniques for the calculation of electron and bremsstrahlung dose deposition are described. Energy deposition, transmission, and reflection coefficients for electrons incident on plane slabs are presented, and methods for their use in electron dose calculations were developed. A method using the straight-ahead approximation was also developed, and the various methods were compared and found to be in good agreement. Both accurate and approximate methods of calculating bremsstrahlung dose were derived and compared. Approximation is found to give a good estimate of dose where the electron spectrum falls off exponentially with energy.

  15. Practical applications of internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1994-06-01

    Accurate estimates of intake magnitude and internal dose are the goal for any assessment of an actual intake of radioactivity. When only one datum is available on which to base estimates, the choices for internal dose assessment become straight-forward: apply the appropriate retention or excretion function, calculate the intake, and calculate the dose. The difficulty comes when multiple data and different types of data become available. Then practical decisions must be made on how to interpret conflicting data, or how to adjust the assumptions and techniques underlying internal dose assessments to give results consistent with the data. This article describes nine types of adjustments which can be incorporated into calculations of intake and internal dose, and then offers several practical insights to dealing with some real-world internal dose puzzles

  16. Methods of bone marrow dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboaco, R.C.

    1982-02-01

    Several methods of bone marrow dose calculation for photon irradiation were analised. After a critical analysis, the author proposes the adoption, by the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/CNEN, of Rosenstein's method for dose calculations in Radiodiagnostic examinations and Kramer's method in case of occupational irradiation. It was verified by Eckerman and Simpson that for monoenergetic gamma emitters uniformly distributed within the bone mineral of the skeleton the dose in the bone surface can be several times higher than dose in skeleton. In this way, is also proposed the Calculation of tissue-air ratios for bone surfaces in some irradiation geometries and photon energies to be included in the Rosenstein's method for organ dose calculation in Radiodiagnostic examinations. (Author) [pt

  17. Dose calculation system for remotely supporting radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kunieda, E.; Narita, Y.; Kimura, H.; Hirai, M.; Deloar, H. M.; Kaneko, K.; Ozaki, M.; Fujisaki, T.; Myojoyama, A.; Saitoh, H.

    2005-01-01

    The dose calculation system IMAGINE is being developed keeping in mind remotely supporting external radiation therapy using photon beams. The system is expected to provide an accurate picture of the dose distribution in a patient body, using a Monte Carlo calculation that employs precise models of the patient body and irradiation head. The dose calculation will be performed utilising super-parallel computing at the dose calculation centre, which is equipped with the ITBL computer, and the calculated results will be transferred through a network. The system is intended to support the quality assurance of current, widely carried out radiotherapy and, further, to promote the prevalence of advanced radiotherapy. Prototypes of the modules constituting the system have already been constructed and used to obtain basic data that are necessary in order to decide on the concrete design of the system. The final system will be completed in 2007. (authors)

  18. Text book of dose calculation for operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Haruki; Gonda, Kozo

    1979-07-01

    This is a text book of dose calculation for the operators of the reprocessing factory of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The radiations considered are beta-ray and gamma-ray. The method used is a point attenuation nuclear integral method. Radiation sources are considered as the assemblies of point sources. Dose from each point source is calculated, then, total dose is obtained by the integration for all sources. Attenuation is calculated by considering the attenuation owing to distance and the absorption by absorbers. The build-up factor is introduced for the correction for scattered gamma-ray. The build-up factor is given in a table for various scatterers. The operators are able to calculate dose by themselves. The results of integral calculation expressed with formulas are given in graphs. (Kato, T.)

  19. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Dose calculations for severe LWR accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, T.S.; Martin, J.A. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents a set of precalculated doses based on a set of postulated accident releases and intended for use in emergency planning and emergency response. Doses were calculated for the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident categories of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) using the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) code. Whole body and thyroid doses are presented for a selected set of weather cases. For each weather case these calculations were performed for various times and distances including three different dose pathways - cloud (plume) shine, ground shine and inhalation. During an emergency this information can be useful since it is immediately available for projecting offsite radiological doses based on reactor accident sequence information in the absence of plant measurements of emission rates (source terms). It can be used for emergency drill scenario development as well

  1. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr

  2. The Monte Carlo applied for calculation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is showed for the calculation of absorbed dose. The trajectory of the photon is traced simulating sucessive interaction between the photon and the substance that consist the human body simulator. The energy deposition in each interaction of the simulator organ or tissue per photon is also calculated. (C.G.C.) [pt

  3. Dose rate calculations for a reconnaissance vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, L.; Mackey, J.; Salmon, M.; Smith, C.; Wall, S.

    2005-01-01

    A Chemical Nuclear Reconnaissance System (CNRS) has been developed by the British Ministry of Defence to make chemical and radiation measurements on contaminated terrain using appropriate sensors and recording equipment installed in a land rover. A research programme is under way to develop and validate a predictive capability to calculate the build-up of contamination on the vehicle, radiation detector performance and dose rates to the occupants of the vehicle. This paper describes the geometric model of the vehicle and the methodology used for calculations of detector response. Calculated dose rates obtained using the MCBEND Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code in adjoint mode are presented. These address the transient response of the detectors as the vehicle passes through a contaminated area. Calculated dose rates were found to agree with the measured data to be within the experimental uncertainties, thus giving confidence in the shielding model of the vehicle and its application to other scenarios. (authors)

  4. Infinite slab-shield dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    I calculated neutron and gamma-ray equivalent doses leaking through a variety of infinite (laminate) slab-shields. In the shield computations, I used, as the incident neutron spectrum, the leakage spectrum (<20 MeV) calculated for the LANSCE tungsten production target at 90 degree to the target axis. The shield thickness was fixed at 60 cm. The results of the shield calculations show a minimum in the total leakage equivalent dose if the shield is 40-45 cm of iron followed by 20-15 cm of borated (5% B) polyethylene. High-performance shields can be attained by using multiple laminations. The calculated dose at the shield surface is very dependent on shield material. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Validation of dose calculation programmes for recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Shankar; Brun-Yaba, Christine; Yu, Charley; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Williams, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    This report contains the results from an international project initiated by the SSI in 1999. The primary purpose of the project was to validate some of the computer codes that are used to estimate radiation doses due to the recycling of scrap metal. The secondary purpose of the validation project was to give a quantification of the level of conservatism in clearance levels based on these codes. Specifically, the computer codes RESRAD-RECYCLE and CERISE were used to calculate radiation doses to individuals during the processing of slightly contaminated material, mainly in Studsvik, Sweden. Calculated external doses were compared with measured data from different steps of the process. The comparison of calculations and measurements shows that the computer code calculations resulted in both overestimations and underestimations of the external doses for different recycling activities. The SSI draws the conclusion that the accuracy is within one order of magnitude when experienced modellers use their programmes to calculate external radiation doses for a recycling process involving material that is mainly contaminated with cobalt-60. No errors in the codes themselves were found. Instead, the inaccuracy seems to depend mainly on the choice of some modelling parameters related to the receptor (e.g., distance, time, etc.) and simplifications made to facilitate modelling with the codes (e.g., object geometry). Clearance levels are often based on studies on enveloping scenarios that are designed to cover all realistic exposure pathways. It is obvious that for most practical cases, this gives a margin to the individual dose constraint (in the order of 10 micro sievert per year within the EC). This may be accentuated by the use of conservative assumptions when modelling the enveloping scenarios. Since there can obviously be a fairly large inaccuracy in the calculations, it seems reasonable to consider some degree of conservatism when establishing clearance levels based on

  6. Validation of dose calculation programmes for recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Shankar [Menon Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden); Brun-Yaba, Christine [Inst. de Radioprotection et Securite Nucleaire (France); Yu, Charley; Cheng, Jing-Jy [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Bjerler, Jan [Studsvik Stensand, Nykoeping (Sweden); Williams, Alexander [Dept. of Energy (United States). Office of Environmental Management

    2002-12-01

    This report contains the results from an international project initiated by the SSI in 1999. The primary purpose of the project was to validate some of the computer codes that are used to estimate radiation doses due to the recycling of scrap metal. The secondary purpose of the validation project was to give a quantification of the level of conservatism in clearance levels based on these codes. Specifically, the computer codes RESRAD-RECYCLE and CERISE were used to calculate radiation doses to individuals during the processing of slightly contaminated material, mainly in Studsvik, Sweden. Calculated external doses were compared with measured data from different steps of the process. The comparison of calculations and measurements shows that the computer code calculations resulted in both overestimations and underestimations of the external doses for different recycling activities. The SSI draws the conclusion that the accuracy is within one order of magnitude when experienced modellers use their programmes to calculate external radiation doses for a recycling process involving material that is mainly contaminated with cobalt-60. No errors in the codes themselves were found. Instead, the inaccuracy seems to depend mainly on the choice of some modelling parameters related to the receptor (e.g., distance, time, etc.) and simplifications made to facilitate modelling with the codes (e.g., object geometry). Clearance levels are often based on studies on enveloping scenarios that are designed to cover all realistic exposure pathways. It is obvious that for most practical cases, this gives a margin to the individual dose constraint (in the order of 10 micro sievert per year within the EC). This may be accentuated by the use of conservative assumptions when modelling the enveloping scenarios. Since there can obviously be a fairly large inaccuracy in the calculations, it seems reasonable to consider some degree of conservatism when establishing clearance levels based on

  7. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  8. Selection of skin dose calculation methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports that good health physics practice dictates that a dose assessment be performed for any significant skin contamination incident. There are, however, several methodologies that could be used, and while there is probably o single methodology that is proper for all cases of skin contamination, some are clearly more appropriate than others. This can be demonstrated by examining two of the more distinctly different options available for estimating skin dose the calculational methods. The methods compiled by Healy require separate beta and gamma calculations. The beta calculational method is the derived by Loevinger, while the gamma dose is calculated from the equation for dose rate from an infinite plane source with an absorber between the source and the detector. Healy has provided these formulas in graphical form to facilitate rapid dose rate determinations at density thicknesses of 7 and 20 mg/cm 2 . These density thicknesses equate to the regulatory definition of the sensitive layer of the skin and a more arbitrary value to account of beta absorption in contaminated clothing

  9. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs

  10. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  11. Dose calculation in brachytherapy with microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    The computer algorithms, that allow the calculation of brachytherapy doses and its graphic representation for implants, using programs developed for Pc microcomputers are presented. These algorithms allow to localized the sources in space, from their projection in radiographics images and trace isodose counter. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Dose calculations for intakes of ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.S.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes a methodology for calculating the committed effective dose for mixtures of radionuclides, such as those which occur in natural radioactive ores and dusts. The formulae are derived from first principles, with the use of reasonable assumptions concerning the nature and behaviour of the radionuclide mixtures. The calculations are complicated because these 'ores' contain a range of particle sizes, have different degrees of solubility in blood and other body fluids, and also have different biokinetic clearance characteristics from the organs and tissues in the body. The naturally occurring radionuclides also tend to occur in series, i.e. one is produced by the radioactive decay of another 'parent' radionuclide. The formulae derived here can be used, in conjunction with a model such as LUDEP, for calculating total dose resulting from inhalation and/or ingestion of a mixture of radionuclides, and also for deriving annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations for these mixtures

  13. Validation of Dose Calculation Codes for Clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.; Wirendal, B.; Bjerler, J.; Studsvik; Teunckens, L.

    2003-01-01

    Various international and national bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have put forward proposals or guidance documents to regulate the ''clearance'' from regulatory control of very low level radioactive material, in order to allow its recycling as a material management practice. All these proposals are based on predicted scenarios for subsequent utilization of the released materials. The calculation models used in these scenarios tend to utilize conservative data regarding exposure times and dose uptake as well as other assumptions as a safeguard against uncertainties. None of these models has ever been validated by comparison with the actual real life practice of recycling. An international project was organized in order to validate some of the assumptions made in these calculation models, and, thereby, better assess the radiological consequences of recycling on a practical large scale

  14. After Action Report:Idaho National Laboratory (INL) 2014 Multiple Facility Beyond Design Basis (BDBE) Evaluated Drill October 21, 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, V. Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    On October 21, 2014, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in coordination with local jurisdictions, and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) conducted an evaluated drill to demonstrate the ability to implement the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System” when responding to a beyond design basis event (BDBE) scenario as outlined in the Office of Health, Safety, and Security Operating Experience Level 1 letter (OE-1: 2013-01). The INL contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA), in coordination with CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI), and Idaho Treatment Group LLC (ITG), successfully demonstrated appropriate response measures to mitigate a BDBE event that would impact multiple facilities across the INL while protecting the health and safety of personnel, the environment, and property. Offsite response organizations participated to demonstrate appropriate response measures.

  15. Calculation of dose distribution above contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junya; Tenzou, Hideki; Manabe, Seiya; Iwakura, Yukiko

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between altitude and the distribution of the ambient dose rate in the air over soil decontamination area by using PHITS simulation code. The geometry configuration was 1000 m ×1000 m area and 1m in soil depth and 100m in altitude from the ground to simulate the area of residences or a school grounds. The contaminated region is supposed to be uniformly contaminated by Cs-137 γ radiation sources. The air dose distribution and space resolution was evaluated for flux of the gamma rays at each altitude, 1, 5, 10, and 20m. The effect of decontamination was calculated by defining sharpness S. S was the ratio of an average flux and a flux at the center of denomination area in each altitude. The suitable flight altitude of the drone is found to be less than 15m above a residence and 31m above a school grounds to confirm the decontamination effect. The calculation results can be a help to determine a flight planning of a drone to minimize the clash risk.

  16. Validation of GPU based TomoTherapy dose calculation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Yu; Chen, Mingli; Henderson, Douglas; Sterpin, Edmond

    2012-04-01

    The graphic processing unit (GPU) based TomoTherapy convolution/superposition(C/S) dose engine (GPU dose engine) achieves a dramatic performance improvement over the traditional CPU-cluster based TomoTherapy dose engine (CPU dose engine). Besides the architecture difference between the GPU and CPU, there are several algorithm changes from the CPU dose engine to the GPU dose engine. These changes made the GPU dose slightly different from the CPU-cluster dose. In order for the commercial release of the GPU dose engine, its accuracy has to be validated. Thirty eight TomoTherapy phantom plans and 19 patient plans were calculated with both dose engines to evaluate the equivalency between the two dose engines. Gamma indices (Γ) were used for the equivalency evaluation. The GPU dose was further verified with the absolute point dose measurement with ion chamber and film measurements for phantom plans. Monte Carlo calculation was used as a reference for both dose engines in the accuracy evaluation in heterogeneous phantom and actual patients. The GPU dose engine showed excellent agreement with the current CPU dose engine. The majority of cases had over 99.99% of voxels with Γ(1%, 1 mm) engine also showed similar degree of accuracy in heterogeneous media as the current TomoTherapy dose engine. It is verified and validated that the ultrafast TomoTherapy GPU dose engine can safely replace the existing TomoTherapy cluster based dose engine without degradation in dose accuracy.

  17. Recommendations on dose buildup factors used in models for calculating gamma doses for a plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-09-01

    Calculations of external γ-doses from radioactivity released to the atmosphere have been made using different dose buildup factor formulas. Some of the dose buildup factor formulas are used by the Nordic countries in their respective γ-dose models. A comparison of calculated γ-doses using these dose buildup factors shows that the γ-doses can be significantly dependent on the buildup factor formula used in the calculation. Increasing differences occur for increasing plume height, crosswind distance, and atmospheric stability and also for decreasing downwind distance. It is concluded that the most accurate γ-dose can be calculated by use of Capo's polynomial buildup factor formula. Capo-coefficients have been calculated and shown in this report for γ-energies below the original lower limit given by Capo. (author)

  18. Development of internal dose calculation programing via food ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, W. K.; Lee, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Most of dose for public via ingestion pathway is calculating for considering several pathways; which start from radioactive material released from a nuclear power plant to diffusion and migration. But in order to model these complicate pathways mathematically, some assumptions are essential and lots of input data related with pathways are demanded. Since there is uncertainty related with environment in these assumptions and input data, the accuracy of dose calculating result is not reliable. To reduce, therefore, these uncertain assumptions and inputs, this paper presents exposure dose calculating method using the activity of environmental sample detected in any pathway. Application of dose calculation is aim at peoples around KORI nuclear power plant and the value that is used to dose conversion factor recommended in ICRP Publ. 60

  19. Method for dose calculation in intracavitary irradiation of endometrical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevrieva, I.F.; Ivashchenko, N.T.; Musapirova, N.A.; Fel'dman, S.Z.; Sajbekov, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A method for dose calculation for the conditions of intracavitary gamma therapy of endometrial carcinoma using spherical and linear 60 Co sources was elaborated. Calculations of dose rates for different amount and orientation of spherical radiation sources and for different planes were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimet were made with the aid of BEhSM-4M computer. Dosimetric study of dose fields was made using a phantom imitating the real conditions of irradiation. Discrepancies between experimental and calculated values are within the limits of the experiment accuracy

  20. Clinical implementation and evaluation of the Acuros dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chenyu; Combine, Anthony G; Bednarz, Greg; Lalonde, Ronald J; Hu, Bin; Dickens, Kathy; Wynn, Raymond; Pavord, Daniel C; Saiful Huq, M

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of this study is to validate the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm for a Varian Clinac iX linac in our clinics, and subsequently compare it with the wildely used AAA algorithm. The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were validated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. In addition, the accuracy of Acuros was evaluated for wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60°. Similarly, variable field sizes for an inhomogeneous phantom were chosen to validate the Acuros algorithm. In addition, doses calculated by Acuros and AAA at the center of lung equivalent tissue from three different VMAT plans were compared to the ion chamber measured doses in QUASAR phantom, and the calculated dose distributions by the two algorithms and their differences on patients were compared. Computation time on VMAT plans was also evaluated for Acuros and AAA. Differences between dose-to-water (calculated by AAA and Acuros XB) and dose-to-medium (calculated by Acuros XB) on patient plans were compared and evaluated. For open 6 MV photon beams on the homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculations were within 1% of measurements. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. Testing on the inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated that AAA overestimated doses by up to 8.96% at a point close to lung/solid water interface, while Acuros XB reduced that to 1.64%. The test on QUASAR phantom showed that Acuros achieved better agreement in lung equivalent tissue while AAA underestimated dose for all VMAT plans by up to 2.7%. Acuros XB computation time was about three times faster than AAA for VMAT plans, and

  1. Three-dimensional electron-beam dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    The MDAH pencil-beam algorithm developed by Hogstrom et al (1981) has been widely used in clinics for electron-beam dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning. The primary objective of this research was to address several deficiencies of that algorithm and to develop an enhanced version. Two enhancements were incorporated into the pencil-beam algorithm; one models fluence rather than planar fluence, and the other models the bremsstrahlung dose using measured beam data. Comparisons of the resulting calculated dose distributions with measured dose distributions for several test phantoms have been made. From these results it is concluded (1) that the fluence-based algorithm is more accurate to use for the dose calculation in an inhomogeneous slab phantom, and (2) the fluence-based calculation provides only a limited improvement to the accuracy the calculated dose in the region just downstream of the lateral edge of an inhomogeneity. A pencil-beam redefinition model was developed for the calculation of electron-beam dose distributions in three dimensions

  2. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli, E-mail: wlu@tomotherapy.co [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N{sup 3}) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  3. Calculation of committed dose equivalent from intake of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, D.V.

    1978-08-01

    A new computerized method of calculating the committed dose equivalent from the intake of tritiated water at Harwell is described in this report. The computer program has been designed to deal with a variety of intake patterns and urine sampling schemes, as well as to produce committed dose equivalents corresponding to any periods for which individual monitoring for external radiation is undertaken. Details of retrospective doses are added semi-automatically to the Radiation Dose Records and committed dose equivalents are retained on a separate file. (author)

  4. Thermal neutron dose calculation in synovium membrane for BNCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Khalid; Naqvi, A.A.; Maalej, N.; El-Shahat, B.

    2006-01-01

    A D(d,n) reaction based setup has been optimized for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield. The neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron to determine therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values. (author)

  5. Methodology of dose calculation for the SRS SAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.B.

    1991-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Safety Analysis Report (SAR) covering K reactor operation assesses a spectrum of design basis accidents. The assessment includes estimation of the dose consequences from the analyzed accidents. This report discusses the methodology used to perform the dose analysis reported in the SAR and also includes the quantified doses. Doses resulting from postulated design basis reactor accidents in Chapter 15 of the SAR are discussed, as well as an accident in which three percent of the fuel melts. Doses are reported for both atmospheric and aqueous releases. The methodology used to calculate doses from these accidents as reported in the SAR is consistent with NRC guidelines and industry standards. The doses from the design basis accidents for the SRS reactors are below the limits set for commercial reactors by the NRC and also meet industry criteria. A summary of doses for various postulated accidents is provided

  6. Acceleration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose calculation by importance sampling of the calculation matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieke, Christian; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the dose calculation is a crucial element limiting both the maximum achievable plan quality and the speed of the optimization process. One way to integrate accurate dose calculation algorithms into inverse planning is to precalculate the dose contribution of each beam element to each voxel for unit fluence. These precalculated values are stored in a big dose calculation matrix. Then the dose calculation during the iterative optimization process consists merely of matrix look-up and multiplication with the actual fluence values. However, because the dose calculation matrix can become very large, this ansatz requires a lot of computer memory and is still very time consuming, making it not practical for clinical routine without further modifications. In this work we present a new method to significantly reduce the number of entries in the dose calculation matrix. The method utilizes the fact that a photon pencil beam has a rapid radial dose falloff, and has very small dose values for the most part. In this low-dose part of the pencil beam, the dose contribution to a voxel is only integrated into the dose calculation matrix with a certain probability. Normalization with the reciprocal of this probability preserves the total energy, even though many matrix elements are omitted. Three probability distributions were tested to find the most accurate one for a given memory size. The sampling method is compared with the use of a fully filled matrix and with the well-known method of just cutting off the pencil beam at a certain lateral distance. A clinical example of a head and neck case is presented. It turns out that a sampled dose calculation matrix with only 1/3 of the entries of the fully filled matrix does not sacrifice the quality of the resulting plans, whereby the cutoff method results in a suboptimal treatment plan

  7. Current evaluation of dose rate calculation - analytical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Marcos; Vilhena, Marco Tulio

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy of the dose calculations based on pencil beam formulas such as Fokker-Plank equations and Fermi equations for charged particle transport are studied and a methodology to solve the Boltzmann transport equation is suggested

  8. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  9. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering

  10. Educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patient safety is a key concern for nurses; ability to calculate drug ... Specific objectives were to assess learning from targeted teaching, to identify problem areas in perfor- .... this could result in reduced risk of drug dose error in.

  11. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  12. Dose Calculation Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Algorithm for CyberKnife Compared with Other Commercially Available Dose Calculation Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph; Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  13. Testing of the analytical anisotropic algorithm for photon dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, Ann van; Tillikainen, Laura; Pyykkonen, Jukka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Helminen, Hannu; Siljamaeki, Sami; Alakuijala, Jyrki; Paiusco, Marta; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) was implemented in the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) treatment planning system to replace the single pencil beam (SPB) algorithm for the calculation of dose distributions for photon beams. AAA was developed to improve the dose calculation accuracy, especially in heterogeneous media. The total dose deposition is calculated as the superposition of the dose deposited by two photon sources (primary and secondary) and by an electron contamination source. The photon dose is calculated as a three-dimensional convolution of Monte-Carlo precalculated scatter kernels, scaled according to the electron density matrix. For the configuration of AAA, an optimization algorithm determines the parameters characterizing the multiple source model by optimizing the agreement between the calculated and measured depth dose curves and profiles for the basic beam data. We have combined the acceptance tests obtained in three different departments for 6, 15, and 18 MV photon beams. The accuracy of AAA was tested for different field sizes (symmetric and asymmetric) for open fields, wedged fields, and static and dynamic multileaf collimation fields. Depth dose behavior at different source-to-phantom distances was investigated. Measurements were performed on homogeneous, water equivalent phantoms, on simple phantoms containing cork inhomogeneities, and on the thorax of an anthropomorphic phantom. Comparisons were made among measurements, AAA, and SPB calculations. The optimization procedure for the configuration of the algorithm was successful in reproducing the basic beam data with an overall accuracy of 3%, 1 mm in the build-up region, and 1%, 1 mm elsewhere. Testing of the algorithm in more clinical setups showed comparable results for depth dose curves, profiles, and monitor units of symmetric open and wedged beams below d max . The electron contamination model was found to be suboptimal to model the dose around d max , especially for physical

  14. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Biaggio, Maria F. de

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author)

  15. Calculating gamma dose factors for hot particle exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    1990-01-01

    For hot particle exposures to the skin, the beta component of radiation delivers the majority of the dose. However, in order to fully demonstrate regulatory compliance, licenses must ordinarily provide reasonable bases for assuming that both the gamma component of the skin dose and the whole body doses are negligible. While beta dose factors are commonly available in the literature, gamma dose factors are not. This paper describes in detail a method by which gamma skin dose factors may be calculated using the Specific Gamma-ray Constant, even if the particle is not located directly on the skin. Two common hot particle exposure geometries are considered: first, a single square centimeter of skin lying at density thickness of 7 mg/cm 2 and then at 1000 mg/cm 2 . A table provides example gamma dose factors for a number of isotopes encountered at power reactors

  16. Dose calculations algorithm for narrow heavy charged-particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barna, E A; Kappas, C [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Scarlat, F [National Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    1999-12-31

    The dose distributional advantages of the heavy charged-particles can be fully exploited by using very efficient and accurate dose calculation algorithms, which can generate optimal three-dimensional scanning patterns. An inverse therapy planning algorithm for dynamically scanned, narrow heavy charged-particle beams is presented in this paper. The irradiation `start point` is defined at the distal end of the target volume, right-down, in a beam`s eye view. The peak-dose of the first elementary beam is set to be equal to the prescribed dose in the target volume, and is defined as the reference dose. The weighting factor of any Bragg-peak is determined by the residual dose at the point of irradiation, calculated as the difference between the reference dose and the cumulative dose delivered at that point of irradiation by all the previous Bragg-peaks. The final pattern consists of the weighted Bragg-peaks irradiation density. Dose distributions were computed using two different scanning steps equal to 0.5 mm, and 1 mm respectively. Very accurate and precise localized dose distributions, conform to the target volume, were obtained. (authors) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fit in a GIS, which include the variation of all explanatory variables, to visualize the univariate response to the dose variable. Application of the Dose-Response Calculator can be extended beyond the assessment of statistical model predictions and may be used to visualize the relationship between any two raster GIS datasets (see example in tool instructions). This tool generates tabular data for use in further exploration of dose-response relationships and a graph of the dose-response curve.

  18. Motion-encoded dose calculation through fluence/sinogram modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy treatment planning systems rely on a static computed tomography (CT) image for planning and evaluation. Intra/inter-fraction patient motions may result in significant differences between the planned and the delivered dose. In this paper, we develop a method to incorporate the knowledge of intra/inter-fraction patient motion directly into the dose calculation. By decomposing the motion into a parallel (to beam direction) component and perpendicular (to beam direction) component, we show that the motion effects can be accounted for by simply modifying the fluence distribution (sinogram). After such modification, dose calculation is the same as those based on a static planning image. This method is superior to the 'dose-convolution' method because it is not based on 'shift invariant' assumption. Therefore, it deals with material heterogeneity and surface curvature very well. We test our method using extensive simulations, which include four phantoms, four motion patterns, and three plan beams. We compare our method with the 'dose-convolution' and the 'stochastic simulation' methods (gold standard). As for the homogeneous flat surface phantom, our method has similar accuracy as the 'dose-convolution' method. As for all other phantoms, our method outperforms the 'dose-convolution'. The maximum motion encoded dose calculation error using our method is within 4% of the gold standard. It is shown that a treatment planning system that is based on 'motion-encoded dose calculation' can incorporate random and systematic motion errors in a very simple fashion. Under this approximation, in principle, a planning target volume definition is not required, since it already accounts for the intra/inter-fraction motion variations and it automatically optimizes the cumulative dose rather than the single fraction dose

  19. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S; Deme, S; Lang, E

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E{sub {gamma}}, {sigma}{sub y}, the asymmetry factor - {sigma}{sub y}/{sigma}{sub z}, the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R{sub xy}. To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs.

  20. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E γ , σ y , the asymmetry factor - σ y /σ z , the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R xy . To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs

  1. The calculation of dose rates from rectangular sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    A common problem in radiation protection is the calculation of dose rates from extended sources and irregular shapes. Dose rates are proportional to the solid angle subtended by the source at the point of measurement. Simple methods of calculating solid angles would assist in estimating dose rates from large area sources and therefore improve predictive dose estimates when planning work near such sources. The estimation of dose rates is of particular interest to producers of radioactive ores but other users of bulk radioactive materials may have similar interest. The use of spherical trigonometry can assist in determination of solid angles and a simple equation is derived here for the determination of the dose at any distance from a rectangular surface. The solid angle subtended by complex shapes can be determined by modelling the area as a patchwork of rectangular areas and summing the solid angles from each rectangle. The dose rates from bags of thorium bearing ores is of particular interest in Western Australia and measured dose rates from bags and containers of monazite are compared with theoretical estimates based on calculations of solid angle. The agreement is fair but more detailed measurements would be needed to confirm the agreement with theory. (author)

  2. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  3. Calculation method for gamma-dose rates from spherical puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1993-05-01

    The Lagrangian puff-models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of atmospheric releases. Basic output from such models are concentrations of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for points far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using the volume integral requires significant computer time. The volume integral for the gamma dose could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor due to the fact that the same correction factors are used for all isotopes. The authors describe a more elaborate correction method. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma-dose rate as a function of the puff dispersion parameter (δ p ) and the distance from the puff centre for four energy groups. The release of energy for each radionuclide in each energy group has been calculated and tabulated. Based on these tables and a suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses takes very short time and is almost independent of the number of radionuclides. (au) (7 tabs., 7 ills., 12 refs.)

  4. Time improvement of photoelectric effect calculation for absorbed dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J M; Wainschenker, R S; Doorn, J H; Caselli, E E

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy is a very useful tool in cancer treatment. It is very important to determine absorbed dose in human tissue to accomplish an effective treatment. A mathematical model based on affected areas is the most suitable tool to estimate the absorbed dose. Lately, Monte Carlo based techniques have become the most reliable, but they are time expensive. Absorbed dose calculating programs using different strategies have to choose between estimation quality and calculating time. This paper describes an optimized method for the photoelectron polar angle calculation in photoelectric effect, which is significant to estimate deposited energy in human tissue. In the case studies, time cost reduction nearly reached 86%, meaning that the time needed to do the calculation is approximately 1/7 th of the non optimized approach. This has been done keeping precision invariant

  5. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. - Highlights: • Elemental composition and density of nails were determined. • MIRD-type mathematical human phantom with arms and hands was created. • Organ doses and doses to nails were calculated for external photon exposure in air. • Effective dose and nail doses values are close for rotational and soil surface exposures.

  6. Computer code for calculating personnel doses due to tritium exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, C.L.; Parlagreco, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a computer code written in LLL modified Fortran IV that can be used on a CDC 7600 for calculating personnel doses due to internal exposures to tritium. The code is capable of handling various exposure situations and is also capable of detecting a large variety of data input errors that would lead to errors in the dose assessment. The critical organ is the body water

  7. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 x 10 8 rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 x 10 8 rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  8. Enamel dose calculation by electron paramagnetic resonance spectral simulation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Guofu; Cong Jianbo; Guo Linchao; Ning Jing; Xian Hong; Wang Changzhen; Wu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To optimize the enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral processing by using the EPR spectral simulation method to improve the accuracy of enamel EPR dosimetry and reduce artificial error. Methods: The multi-component superimposed EPR powder spectral simulation software was developed to simulate EPR spectrum models of the background signal (BS) and the radiation- induced signal (RS) of irradiated enamel respectively. RS was extracted from the multi-component superimposed spectrum of irradiated enamel and its amplitude was calculated. The dose-response curve was then established for calculating the doses of a group of enamel samples. The result of estimated dose was compared with that calculated by traditional method. Results: BS was simulated as a powder spectrum of gaussian line shape with the following spectrum parameters: g=2.00 35 and Hpp=0.65-1.1 mT, RS signal was also simulated as a powder spectrum but with axi-symmetric spectrum characteristics. The spectrum parameters of RS were: g ⊥ =2.0018, g ‖ =1.9965, Hpp=0.335-0.4 mT. The amplitude of RS had a linear response to radiation dose with the regression equation as y=240.74x + 76 724 (R 2 =0.9947). The expectation of relative error of dose estimation was 0.13. Conclusions: EPR simulation method has improved somehow the accuracy and reliability of enamel EPR dose estimation. (authors)

  9. Reducing dose calculation time for accurate iterative IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Lauterbach, Marc; Tong, Shidong; Wu Qiuwen; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    A time-consuming component of IMRT optimization is the dose computation required in each iteration for the evaluation of the objective function. Accurate superposition/convolution (SC) and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are currently considered too time-consuming for iterative IMRT dose calculation. Thus, fast, but less accurate algorithms such as pencil beam (PB) algorithms are typically used in most current IMRT systems. This paper describes two hybrid methods that utilize the speed of fast PB algorithms yet achieve the accuracy of optimizing based upon SC algorithms via the application of dose correction matrices. In one method, the ratio method, an infrequently computed voxel-by-voxel dose ratio matrix (R=D SC /D PB ) is applied for each beam to the dose distributions calculated with the PB method during the optimization. That is, D PB xR is used for the dose calculation during the optimization. The optimization proceeds until both the IMRT beam intensities and the dose correction ratio matrix converge. In the second method, the correction method, a periodically computed voxel-by-voxel correction matrix for each beam, defined to be the difference between the SC and PB dose computations, is used to correct PB dose distributions. To validate the methods, IMRT treatment plans developed with the hybrid methods are compared with those obtained when the SC algorithm is used for all optimization iterations and with those obtained when PB-based optimization is followed by SC-based optimization. In the 12 patient cases studied, no clinically significant differences exist in the final treatment plans developed with each of the dose computation methodologies. However, the number of time-consuming SC iterations is reduced from 6-32 for pure SC optimization to four or less for the ratio matrix method and five or less for the correction method. Because the PB algorithm is faster at computing dose, this reduces the inverse planning optimization time for our implementation

  10. Dose calculation of X-ray in medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanmei; Xue Dingyu; Xu Xinhe; Chen Zhen; Dong Zaili

    2006-01-01

    The photon transportation in radiotherapy is studied based on Monte Carlo method. The dose calculation based on the MC simulation package DPM has been carried out, and the results have been visualized using MEX technology of Matlab. The dose results of X-ray in homogeneity and inhomogeneity medium have been compared with experimental data and those of other MC simulation package, and these results all agree. The calculation method we proposed has the advantage of high speed and good accuracy, therefore, is applicable in practice. (authors)

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvie, Stephane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities

  12. Smartphone apps for calculating insulin dose: a systematic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckvale, Kit; Adomaviciute, Samanta; Prieto, José Tomás; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Car, Josip

    2015-05-06

    Medical apps are widely available, increasingly used by patients and clinicians, and are being actively promoted for use in routine care. However, there is little systematic evidence exploring possible risks associated with apps intended for patient use. Because self-medication errors are a recognized source of avoidable harm, apps that affect medication use, such as dose calculators, deserve particular scrutiny. We explored the accuracy and clinical suitability of apps for calculating medication doses, focusing on insulin calculators for patients with diabetes as a representative use for a prevalent long-term condition. We performed a systematic assessment of all English-language rapid/short-acting insulin dose calculators available for iOS and Android. Searches identified 46 calculators that performed simple mathematical operations using planned carbohydrate intake and measured blood glucose. While 59% (n = 27/46) of apps included a clinical disclaimer, only 30% (n = 14/46) documented the calculation formula. 91% (n = 42/46) lacked numeric input validation, 59% (n = 27/46) allowed calculation when one or more values were missing, 48% (n = 22/46) used ambiguous terminology, 9% (n = 4/46) did not use adequate numeric precision and 4% (n = 2/46) did not store parameters faithfully. 67% (n = 31/46) of apps carried a risk of inappropriate output dose recommendation that either violated basic clinical assumptions (48%, n = 22/46) or did not match a stated formula (14%, n = 3/21) or correctly update in response to changing user inputs (37%, n = 17/46). Only one app, for iOS, was issue-free according to our criteria. No significant differences were observed in issue prevalence by payment model or platform. The majority of insulin dose calculator apps provide no protection against, and may actively contribute to, incorrect or inappropriate dose recommendations that put current users at risk of both catastrophic overdose and more

  13. Parallel processing of dose calculation for external photon beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Etsuo; Ando, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Ito, Hisao; Kubo, Atsushi

    1994-01-01

    We implemented external photon beam dose calculation programs into a parallel processor system consisting of Transputers, 32-bit processors especially suitable for multi-processor configuration. Two network conformations, binary-tree and pipeline, were evaluated for rectangular and irregular field dose calculation algorithms. Although computation speed increased in proportion to the number of CPU, substantial overhead caused by inter-processor communication occurred when a smaller computation load was delivered to each processor. On the other hand, for irregular field calculation, which requires more computation capability for each calculation point, the communication overhead was still less even when more than 50 processors were involved. Real-time responses could be expected for more complex algorithms by increasing the number of processors. (author)

  14. A Monte Carlo dose calculation tool for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.S.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S.B.; Deng, J.; Lee, M.C.; Koumrian, T.; Luxton, M.; Brain, S.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo user code, MCDOSE, has been developed for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) dose calculations. MCDOSE is designed as a dose calculation module suitable for adaptation to host RTP systems. MCDOSE can be used for both conventional photon/electron beam calculation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. MCDOSE uses a multiple-source model to reconstruct the treatment beam phase space. Based on Monte Carlo simulated or measured beam data acquired during commissioning, source-model parameters are adjusted through an automated procedure. Beam modifiers such as jaws, physical and dynamic wedges, compensators, blocks, electron cut-outs and bolus are simulated by MCDOSE together with a 3D rectilinear patient geometry model built from CT data. Dose distributions calculated using MCDOSE agreed well with those calculated by the EGS4/DOSXYZ code using different beam set-ups and beam modifiers. Heterogeneity correction factors for layered-lung or layered-bone phantoms as calculated by both codes were consistent with measured data to within 1%. The effect of energy cut-offs for particle transport was investigated. Variance reduction techniques were implemented in MCDOSE to achieve a speedup factor of 10-30 compared to DOSXYZ. (author)

  15. New formula for calculation of cobalt-60 percent depth dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, M. J.; Ghorbani, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of percent depth dose calculation, the application of - dosimetry in radiotherapy has an important role to play in reducing the chance of tumor recurrence. The aim of this study is to introduce a new formula for calculating the central axis percent depth doses of Cobalt-60 beam. Materials and Methods: In the present study, based on the British Journal of Radiology table, nine new formulas are developed and evaluated for depths of 0.5 - 30 cm and fields of (4*4) - (45*45) cm 2 . To evaluate the agreement between the formulas and the table, the average of the absolute differences between the values was used and the formula with the least average was selected as the best fitted formula. The Microsoft Excel 2000 and the Data fit 8.0 soft wares were used to perform the calculations. Results: The results of this study indicated that one amongst the nine formulas gave a better agreement with the percent depth doses listed in the table of British Journal of Radiology . The new formula has two parts in terms of log (A/P). The first part as a linear function with the depth in the range of 0.5 to 5 cm and the other one as a second order polynomial with the depth in the range of 6 to 30 cm. The average of - the differences between the tabulated and the calculated data using the formula (Δ) is equal to 0.3 152. Discussion and Conclusion: Therefore, the calculated percent depth dose data based on this formula has a better agreement with the published data for Cobalt-60 source. This formula could be used to calculate the percent depth dose for the depths and the field sizes not listed in the British Journal of Radiology table

  16. CT dose profiles and MSAD calculation in a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da

    2011-01-01

    For optimizing patient doses in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation has only established diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a quality control parameter for CT scanners. Compliance with the DRLs can be verified by measuring the Computed Tomography Air Kerma Index with a calibrated pencil ionization chamber or by obtaining the dose distribution in CT scans. An analysis of the quality of five CT scanners in Belo Horizonte was done in terms of dose profile of chest scans and MSAD determinations. Measurements were done with rod shape lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a polymethylmethacrylate chest phantom. The peripheral regions presented higher dose values. The longitudinal dose variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The MSAD results were in according to the DRL of 25 mGy established by Brazilian legislation. The results contribute to disseminate to hospitals and radiologists the proper procedure to use the thermoluminescent dosimeters for the calculation of the MSAD from the CT dose profiles and to notice the compliance with the DRLs. (author)

  17. Activities of the ICRP task group on dose calculations (DOCAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelli, Luiz

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The International Commission of Radiological Protection has been doing many efforts to improve dose calculations due to intake of radionuclides by workers and members of the public. More specifically, the biokinetic models have become more and more physiologically based and developed for age-groups ranging from the embryo to the adult. The dosimetric aspects have also been very carefully revised and a new series of phantoms encompassing all developing stages of embryo and fetus were also envisaged. In order to assure the quality of the calculations, dose coefficients have been derived by two different laboratories and the results and methods have been frequently compared and discussed. A CD-ROM has been prepared allowing the user to obtain dose coefficients for the several age-groups for ingestion and inhalation of all important radionuclides. Inhalation dose coefficients will be available for several AMADs. For the particular case of embryo and fetus, doses will be calculated when the intake occurred before and during gestation for single and chronic patterns of intake

  18. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liu, Xinming [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stingo, Francesco C. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  19. Approaches to reducing photon dose calculation errors near metal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kry, Stephen F.; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation errors near metal implants are caused by limitations of the dose calculation algorithm in modeling tissue/metal interface effects as well as density assignment errors caused by imaging artifacts. The purpose of this study was to investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation method and use of metal artifact reduction methods for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: Both error reduction strategies were investigated using a simple geometric slab phantom with a rectangular metal insert (composed of titanium or Cerrobend), as well as two anthropomorphic phantoms (one with spinal hardware and one with dental fillings), designed to mimic relevant clinical scenarios. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal kernels, the authors implemented titanium and silver kernels in a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. To assess the impact of CT metal artifact reduction methods, the authors performed dose calculations using baseline imaging techniques (uncorrected 120 kVp imaging) and three commercial metal artifact reduction methods: Philips Healthcare’s O-MAR, GE Healthcare’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI with metal artifact reduction software (MARS) applied. For the simple geometric phantom, radiochromic film was used to measure dose upstream and downstream of metal inserts. For the anthropomorphic phantoms, ion chambers and radiochromic film were used to quantify the benefit of the error reduction strategies. Results: Metal kernels did not universally improve accuracy but rather resulted in better accuracy upstream of metal implants and decreased accuracy directly downstream. For the clinical cases (spinal hardware and dental fillings), metal kernels had very little impact on the dose calculation accuracy (<1.0%). Of the commercial CT artifact

  20. Analytical probabilistic proton dose calculation and range uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Hennig, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the concept of analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) to calculate the mean and the standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions under the influence of range uncertainties in closed form. For APM, range uncertainties are modeled with a multivariate Normal distribution p(z) over the radiological depths z. A pencil beam algorithm that parameterizes the proton depth dose d(z) with a weighted superposition of ten Gaussians is used. Hence, the integrals ∫ dz p(z) d(z) and ∫ dz p(z) d(z)2 required for the calculation of the expected value and standard deviation of the dose remain analytically tractable and can be efficiently evaluated. The means μk, widths δk, and weights ωk of the Gaussian components parameterizing the depth dose curves are found with least squares fits for all available proton ranges. We observe less than 0.3% average deviation of the Gaussian parameterizations from the original proton depth dose curves. Consequently, APM yields high accuracy estimates for the expected value and standard deviation of intensity-modulated proton dose distributions for two dimensional test cases. APM can accommodate arbitrary correlation models and account for the different nature of random and systematic errors in fractionated radiation therapy. Beneficial applications of APM in robust planning are feasible.

  1. A formalism for independent checking of Gamma Knife dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Jensan; Engler, Mark J.; Rivard, Mark J.; Mahajan, Anita; Borden, Jonathan A.; Zheng Zhen

    2001-01-01

    For stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Knife system, it is important to perform a pre-treatment verification of the maximum dose calculated with the Leksell GammaPlan[reg] (D LGP ) stereotactic radiosurgery system. This verification can be incorporated as part of a routine quality assurance (QA) procedure to minimize the chance of a hazardous overdose. To implement this procedure, a formalism has been developed to calculate the dose D CAL (X,Y,Z,d av ,t) using the following parameters: average target depth (d av ), coordinates (X,Y,Z) of the maximum dose location or any other dose point(s) to be verified, 3-dimensional (3-dim) beam profiles or off-center-ratios (OCR) of the four helmets, helmet size i, output factor O i , plug factor P i , each shot j coordinates (x,y,z) i,j , and shot treatment time (t i,j ). The average depth of the target d av was obtained either from MRI/CT images or ruler measurements of the Gamma Knife Bubble Head Frame. D CAL and D LGP were then compared to evaluate the accuracy of this independent calculation. The proposed calculation for an independent check of D LGP has been demonstrated to be accurate and reliable, and thus serves as a QA tool for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

  2. Methods for calculating population dose from atmospheric dispersion of radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B L; Jow, H N; Lee, I S [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)

    1978-06-01

    Curves are computed from which population dose (man-rem) due to dispersal of radioactivity from a point source can be calculated in the gaussian plume model by simple multiplication, and methods of using them and their limitations are considered. Illustrative examples are presented.

  3. Touch screen man machine interfere for emergency dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodard, K.; Abrams, M.

    1987-01-01

    Emergency dose calculation systems generally use a keyboard to provide the interface between the user and the computer. This interface is preferred by users who work daily with computers; however, for many plant personnel who are not continuously involved with computer operations, the use of a keyboard can be cumbersome and time consuming. This is particularly true when the user is under pressure during a drill or an actual emergency. Experience in many applications of Pickard, Lowe and Garrick's PLG's Meteorological Information and Dose Assessment System (MIDAS) has shown that user friendliness is a key ingredient toward achieving acceptance of computerized systems. Hardware to support to touch screen interface is now available and has been implemented in MIDAS. Recent experience has demonstrated that selection times for dose calculations are reduced, data entry errors have been minimized, and confusion over appropriate entries has been avoided due to the built-in logic. A 10-yr search for an acceptable keyboard replacement has ended

  4. Calculation of midplane dose for total body irradiation from entrance and exit dose MOSFET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, P R

    2012-03-01

    This work is the development of a MOSFET based surface in vivo dosimetry system for total body irradiation patients treated with bilateral extended SSD beams using PMMA missing tissue compensators adjacent to the patient. An empirical formula to calculate midplane dose from MOSFET measured entrance and exit doses has been derived. The dependency of surface dose on the air-gap between the spoiler and the surface was investigated by suspending a spoiler above a water phantom, and taking percentage depth dose measurements (PDD). Exit and entrances doses were measured with MOSFETs in conjunction with midplane doses measured with an ion chamber. The entrance and exit doses were combined using an exponential attenuation formula to give an estimate of midplane dose and were compared to the midplane ion chamber measurement for a range of phantom thicknesses. Having a maximum PDD at the surface simplifies the prediction of midplane dose, which is achieved by ensuring that the air gap between the compensator and the surface is less than 10 cm. The comparison of estimated midplane dose and measured midplane dose showed no dependence on phantom thickness and an average correction factor of 0.88 was found. If the missing tissue compensators are kept within 10 cm of the patient then MOSFET measurements of entrance and exit dose can predict the midplane dose for the patient.

  5. Development of new methodology for dose calculation in photographic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daltro, T.F.L.; Campos, L.L.; Perez, H.E.B.

    1996-01-01

    The personal dosemeter system of IPEN is based on film dosimetry. Personal doses at IPEN are mainly due to X or gamma radiation. The use of personal photographic dosemeters involves two steps: firstly, data acquisition including their evaluation with respect to the calibration quantity and secondly, the interpretation of the data in terms of effective dose. The effective dose was calculated using artificial intelligence techniques by means of neural network. The learning of the neural network was performed by taking the readings of optical density as a function of incident energy and exposure from the calibration curve. The obtained output in the daily grind is the mean effective energy and the effective dose. (author)

  6. Calculations of dose distributions using a neural network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, R; Martin, E; Gschwind, R; Makovicka, L; Contassot-Vivier, S; Bahi, J

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of tumours, while sparing, as much as possible, surrounding healthy tissues. In order to master and optimize the dose distribution within the patient, dosimetric planning has to be carried out. Thus, for determining the most accurate dose distribution during treatment planning, a compromise must be found between the precision and the speed of calculation. Current techniques, using analytic methods, models and databases, are rapid but lack precision. Enhanced precision can be achieved by using calculation codes based, for example, on Monte Carlo methods. However, in spite of all efforts to optimize speed (methods and computer improvements), Monte Carlo based methods remain painfully slow. A newer way to handle all of these problems is to use a new approach in dosimetric calculation by employing neural networks. Neural networks (Wu and Zhu 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 913-22) provide the advantages of those various approaches while avoiding their main inconveniences, i.e., time-consumption calculations. This permits us to obtain quick and accurate results during clinical treatment planning. Currently, results obtained for a single depth-dose calculation using a Monte Carlo based code (such as BEAM (Rogers et al 2003 NRCC Report PIRS-0509(A) rev G)) require hours of computing. By contrast, the practical use of neural networks (Mathieu et al 2003 Proceedings Journees Scientifiques Francophones, SFRP) provides almost instant results and quite low errors (less than 2%) for a two-dimensional dosimetric map

  7. Effective dose calculation in CT using high sensitivity TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To determine the effective dose for common paediatric CT examinations using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) mea surements. High sensitivity TLD chips (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-IOOH, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) were calibrated on a linac at an energy of 6 MY. A calibration was also performed on a superricial X-ray unit at a kilovoltage energy to validate the megavoltage cali bration for the purpose of measuring doses in the diagnostic energy range. The dose variation across large organs was assessed and a methodology for TLD placement in a 10 year old anthropomorphic phantom developed. Effective dose was calculated from the TLD measured absorbed doses for typical CT examinations after correcting for the TLD energy response and taking into account differences in the mass energy absorption coefficients for different tissues and organs. Results Using new tissue weighting factors recommended in ICRP Publication 103, the effective dose for a CT brain examination on a 10 year old was 1.6 millisieverts (mSv), 4.9 mSv for a CT chest exa ination and 4.7 mSv for a CT abdomen/pelvis examination. These values are lower for the CT brain examination, higher for the CT chest examination and approximately the same for the CT abdomen/ pelvis examination when compared with effective doses calculated using ICRP Publication 60 tissue weighting factors. Conclusions High sensitivity TLDs calibrated with a radiotherapy linac are useful for measuring dose in the diagnostic energy range and overcome limitations of output reproducibility and uniformity asso ciated with traditional TLD calibration on CT scanners or beam quality matched diagnostic X-ray units.

  8. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae

  9. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min

  10. A convolution-superposition dose calculation engine for GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe [Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, CRCHUM-Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, 1560 rue Sherbrooke Est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Graphic processing units (GPUs) are increasingly used for scientific applications, where their parallel architecture and unprecedented computing power density can be exploited to accelerate calculations. In this paper, a new GPU implementation of a convolution/superposition (CS) algorithm is presented. Methods: This new GPU implementation has been designed from the ground-up to use the graphics card's strengths and to avoid its weaknesses. The CS GPU algorithm takes into account beam hardening, off-axis softening, kernel tilting, and relies heavily on raytracing through patient imaging data. Implementation details are reported as well as a multi-GPU solution. Results: An overall single-GPU acceleration factor of 908x was achieved when compared to a nonoptimized version of the CS algorithm implemented in PlanUNC in single threaded central processing unit (CPU) mode, resulting in approximatively 2.8 s per beam for a 3D dose computation on a 0.4 cm grid. A comparison to an established commercial system leads to an acceleration factor of approximately 29x or 0.58 versus 16.6 s per beam in single threaded mode. An acceleration factor of 46x has been obtained for the total energy released per mass (TERMA) calculation and a 943x acceleration factor for the CS calculation compared to PlanUNC. Dose distributions also have been obtained for a simple water-lung phantom to verify that the implementation gives accurate results. Conclusions: These results suggest that GPUs are an attractive solution for radiation therapy applications and that careful design, taking the GPU architecture into account, is critical in obtaining significant acceleration factors. These results potentially can have a significant impact on complex dose delivery techniques requiring intensive dose calculations such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and arc therapy. They also are relevant for adaptive radiation therapy where dose results must be obtained rapidly.

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, M; Verhaegen, F; Coolens, C; Childs, P; Cury, F; Beaulieu, L

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses

  12. Accumulated dose calculations in Indian PHWRs under DBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesaraj, David; Pradhan, A.S.; Bhardwaj, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Accumulated gamma dose inside reactor building due to release of fission products from equilibrium core of Indian PHWR under accident condition has been assessed. The assessment has been done for the radiation tolerance limit of the critical equipment inside reactor building. The basic source data has been generated using computer code ORIGEN2 written and developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA (ORNL). This paper discusses the details of the calculations done on the basis of certain assumption which are mentioned at relevant places. The results indicate accumulated gamma dose at a few typical locations inside reactor building under accident condition. (author). 1 ref., 1 tab., 1 fig

  13. Calculation of radiation dose received in computed tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abed Elseed, Eslam Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations play an important role in the health care of the population. These examination may involve significant irradiation of the patient and probably represent the largest man-made source of radiation exposure for the population. This study was performed to assess the effective dose (ED) received in brain CT examination ( base of skull and cerebrum) and to analyze effective dose distributions among radiological departments under study. The study was performed at Elnileen Medical Center, coverage one CT unit and a sample of 51 patients (25 cerebrum sample and 26 base of skull sample). The following parameters were recorded age, weight, height body mass index (BMI) derived from weight (kg) and height ( m) and exposure factor and CTDI voi , DLP value. The effective dose was measured for brain CT examination. The ED values were calculated from the obtained DLP values using AAPM report No 96 calculation methods. The results of ED values calculated showed that patient exposure were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were 0.35±0.15 for base of skull of brain CT examinations and 0.70±0.32 for cerebrum of brain CT examination, respectively. Further studies are recommended with more number of pa.(Author)

  14. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities

  15. Monte Carlo dose calculation of microbeam in a lung phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Mino, C.; Mino, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microplanar beams in radiotherapy. The proposed techniques takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. The lateral and depth doses of 100 keV microplanar beams are investigated for different beam dimensions and spacings in a tissue, lung and tissue/lung/tissue phantom. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depth and bundles of beams (up to 20x20cm square cross section). The maximum dose on the beam axis (peak) and the minimum interbeam dose (valley) are compared at different depths, bundles, heights, widths and beam spacings. Relatively high peak to valley ratios are observed in the lung region, suggesting an ideal environment for microbeam radiotherapy. For a single field, the ratio at the tissue/lung interface will set the maximum dose to the target volume. However, in clinical application, several fields would be involved allowing much greater doses to be applied for the elimination of cancer cells. We conclude therefore that multifield microbeam therapy has the potential to achieve useful therapeutic ratios for the treatment of lung cancer

  16. Comparison of different dose calculation methods for irregular photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, G.A.; Schuette, W.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, 4 calculation methods (Wrede method, Clarskon method of sector integration, beam-zone method of Quast and pencil-beam method of Ahnesjoe) are introduced to calculate point doses in different irregular photon fields. The calculations cover a typical mantle field, an inverted Y-field and different blocked fields for 4 and 10 MV photon energies. The results are compared to those of measurements in a water phantom. The Clarkson and the pencil-beam method have been proved to be the methods of equal standard in relation to accuracy. Both of these methods are being distinguished by minimum deviations and applied in our clinical routine work. The Wrede and beam-zone methods deliver useful results to central beam and yet provide larger deviations in calculating points beyond the central axis. (orig.) [de

  17. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Development of new methodology for dose calculation in photographic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daltro, T.F.L.

    1994-01-01

    A new methodology for equivalent dose calculations has been developed at IPEN-CNEN/SP to be applied at the Photographic Dosimetry Laboratory using artificial intelligence techniques by means of neutral network. The research was orientated towards the optimization of the whole set of parameters involves in the film processing going from the irradiation in order to obtain the calibration curve up to the optical density readings. The learning of the neutral network was performed by taking the readings of optical density from calibration curve as input and the effective energy and equivalent dose as output. The obtained results in the intercomparison show an excellent agreement with the actual values of dose and energy given by the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation. (author)

  19. Development of new methodology for dose calculation in photographic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daltro, T.F.L.; Campos, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    A new methodology for equivalent dose calculation has been developed at IPEN-CNEN/SP to be applied at the Photographic Dosimetry Laboratory using artificial intelligence techniques by means of neural network. The research was oriented towards the optimization of the whole set of parameters involved in the film processing going from the irradiation in order to obtain the calibration curve up to the optical density readings. The learning of the neural network was performed by taking readings of optical density from calibration curve as input and the effective energy and equivalent dose as output. The obtained results in the intercomparison show an excellent agreement with the actual values of dose and energy given by the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation

  20. Intravascular brachytherapy: a model for the calculation of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Cricco, Graciela; Cocca, Claudia; Gutierrez, Alicia; Nunez, Mariel; Bergoc, Rosa; Guzman, Luis; Belardi, Diego

    2002-01-01

    In this study we present the radiation dose distribution for a theoretical model with Montecarlo simulation, and based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental in vivo model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a 32P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries (Au)

  1. A unique manual method for emergency offsite dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildner, T.E.; Carson, B.H.; Shank, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a manual method developed for performance of emergency offsite dose calculations for PP and L's Susquehanna Steam Electric Station. The method is based on a three-part carbonless form. The front page guides the user through selection of the appropriate accident case and inclusion of meteorological and effluent data data. By circling the applicable accident descriptors, the user circles the dose factors on pages 2 and 3 which are then simply multiplied to yield the whole body and thyroid dose rates at the plant boundary, two, five, and ten miles. The process used to generate the worksheet is discussed, including the method used to incorporate the observed terrain effects on airflow patterns caused by the Susquehanna River Valley topography

  2. Dose calculation and isodose curves determination in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranhao, Frederico B.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Khoury, Helen J.

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of cancer treatment in which small radioactive sources are placed inside of, or close to small tumors, in order to cause tissue necrosis and, consequently, to interrupt the tumor growth process. A very important aspect to the planning of this therapy is the calculation of dose distributions in the tumor and nearby tissues, to avoid the unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissue. The objective of this work is to develop a computer program that will permit treatment planning for brachytherapy at low dose rates, minimizing the possible errors introduced when such calculations are done manually. Results obtained showed good agreement with those from programs such as BRA, which is widely used in medical practice. (author)

  3. Development of a computational methodology for internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoriyaz, Helio

    2000-01-01

    A new approach for calculating internal dose estimates was developed through the use of a more realistic computational model of the human body and a more precise tool for the radiation transport simulation. The present technique shows the capability to build a patient-specific phantom with tomography data (a voxel-based phantom) for the simulation of radiation transport and energy deposition using Monte Carlo methods such as in the MCNP-4B code. In order to utilize the segmented human anatomy as a computational model for the simulation of radiation transport, an interface program, SCMS, was developed to build the geometric configurations for the phantom through the use of tomographic images. This procedure allows to calculate not only average dose values but also spatial distribution of dose in regions of interest. With the present methodology absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in various organs of the Zubal segmented phantom were calculated and compared to those reported for the mathematical phantoms of Snyder and Cristy-Eckerman. Although the differences in the organ's geometry between the phantoms are quite evident, the results demonstrate small discrepancies, however, in some cases, considerable discrepancies were found due to two major causes: differences in the organ masses between the phantoms and the occurrence of organ overlap in the Zubal segmented phantom, which is not considered in the mathematical phantom. This effect was quite evident for organ cross-irradiation from electrons. With the determination of spatial dose distribution it was demonstrated the possibility of evaluation of more detailed doses data than those obtained in conventional methods, which will give important information for the clinical analysis in therapeutic procedures and in radiobiologic studies of the human body. (author)

  4. Internal radiation dose calculations with the INREM II computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Killough, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code, INREM II, was developed to calculate the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the Internal Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the gastrointestinal tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested, or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide in the decay chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of dosimetric S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of components of dose from cross-irradiations when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II has been utilized with current radioactive decay data and metabolic models to produce extensive tabulations of dose conversion factors for a reference adult for approximately 150 radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. These dose conversion factors represent the 50-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of a given radionuclide for 22target organs including contributions from specified source organs and surplus activity in the rest of the body. These tabulations are particularly significant in their consistent use of contemporary models and data and in the detail of documentation

  5. NAC-1 cask dose rate calculations for LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARLSON, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A Nuclear Assurance Corporation nuclear fuel transport cask, NAC-1, is being considered as a transport and storage option for spent nuclear fuel located in the B-Cell of the 324 Building. The loaded casks will be shipped to the 200 East Area Interim Storage Area for dry interim storage. Several calculations were performed to assess the photon and neutron dose rates. This report describes the analytical methods, models, and results of this investigation

  6. Data base for terrestrial food pathways dose commitment calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program is under development to allow calculation of the dose-to-man in Georgia and South Carolina from ingestion of radionuclides in terrestrial foods resulting from deposition of airborne radionuclides. This program is based on models described in Regulatory Guide 1.109 (USNRC, 1977). The data base describes the movement of radionuclides through the terrestrial food chain, growth and consumption factors for a variety of radionuclides

  7. [Evaluation of methods to calculate dialysis dose in daily hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduell, F; Gutiérrez, E; Navarro, V; Torregrosa, E; Martínez, A; Rius, A

    2003-01-01

    Daily dialysis has shown excellent clinical results because a higher frequency of dialysis is more physiological. Different methods have been described to calculate dialysis dose which take into consideration change in frequency. The aim of this study was to calculate all dialysis dose possibilities and evaluate the better and practical options. Eight patients, 6 males and 2 females, on standard 4 to 5 hours thrice weekly on-line hemodiafiltration (S-OL-HDF) were switched to daily on-line hemodiafiltration (D-OL-HDF) 2 to 2.5 hours six times per week. Dialysis parameters were identical during both periods and only frequency and dialysis time of each session were changed. Time average concentration (TAC), time average deviation (TAD), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), Kt/V, equilibrated Kt/V (eKt/V), equivalent renal urea clearance (EKR), standard Kt/V (stdKt/V), urea reduction ratio (URR), hemodialysis product and time off dialysis were measured. Daily on-line hemodiafiltration was well accepted and tolerated. Patients maintained the same TAC although TAD decreased from 9.7 +/- 2 in baseline to a 6.2 +/- 2 mg/dl after six months, p time off dialysis was reduced to half. Dialysis frequency is an important urea kinetic parameter which there are to take in consideration. It's necessary to use EKR, stdKt/V or weekly URR to calculate dialysis dose for an adequate comparison between different frequency dialysis schedules.

  8. Dose calculation for iridium-192 sources by a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Ishigaki, Hideyo; Udagawa, Kimio; Saito, Masami; Yamaguchi, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Recently Ir-192 sources have been used for interstitial radiotherapy instead of Ra-226 needles. One end of Ir-192 (single-pin) is formed with circlet and implanted Ir-192 sources are not always straight line. So the authors have developed a new dose calculation system, in which the authers employed conventional method considering oblique filteration for linear source and multi-point source method for curved source. Conventionally the positions of sources in three dimensions are determined from projections of the implanted sources on orthogonal or stereo radiographs. But it is frequentry impossible to define the end of sources on account of overlap. Then the authers have devised a method to determine the positions of sources from two radiographs which were taken with arbitrary directions. For tongue cancer injuries of mandibula so frequently occur after interstitial radiotherapy that the calculation of gingival dose is necessary. The positions of the gingival line are determined from two directional radiographs too. Further the three dimensional dose distributions can be displayed on the cathod ray tube. These calculations are performed by using a personal computer because of its distinctive features such as superiority in cost performance and flexibility for development and modification of programs. (author)

  9. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter bones). This study indicates that the decrease in absorbed dose is not dependent on the bone diameter with all types of bones. Thus

  10. COSANI-2, Gamma Doses from SABINE Calculation, Activity from ANISN Flux Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, C.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Retrieval of SABINE and/or ANISN results. Calculates in case of SABINE results the individual contributions of capture gamma rays in each region to the total gamma dose and to the total gamma heating may calculate in case of ANISN new activity rates starting from ANISN flux saved on tape and activity cross sections taken on an ANISN binary library tape. The program can draw on a BENSON plotter any of the following quantities: - group flux; - activity rates; - dose rates; - neutron spectra for SABINE; - neutron or gamma direct or adjoint spectra for ANISN; - gamma heating and dose rate for SABINE including individual contributions from each region. Several ANISN and/or SABINE cases can be drawn on the same graph for comparison purposes. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of: - tapes containing ANISN and/or SABINE results: 5; - curves per graph: 3; - regions: 40; - points per curve: 500; - energy groups: 200

  11. Determination of organ doses during radiological examinations and calculation of somatically significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    1980-01-01

    Examples are used to demonstrate that a shift in the point of emphasis is necessary with regard to radiation hazard in medicinal X-ray diagnosis. The parameters employed in this study to calculate somatic dose (SD) and somatically significant dose (SSD) may well be in need of modification; nevertheless the numerical estimation of SSD arrived at here appears to reflect the right order of magnitude for the estimation of somatic risk. The consideration of the threshold dose for somatic injury remains a problem. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Alber, Markus; Schreiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Helium ions ((4)He) may supplement current particle beam therapy strategies as they possess advantages in physical dose distribution over protons. To assess potential clinical advantages, a dose calculation module accounting for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was developed...... published so far. The advantage of (4)He seems to lie in the reduction of dose to surrounding tissue and to OARs. Nevertheless, additional biological experiments and treatment planning studies with larger patient numbers and more tumor indications are necessary to study the possible benefits of helium ion...

  13. Comparison of analytic source models for head scatter factor calculation and planar dose calculation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guanghua; Liu, Chihray; Lu Bo; Palta, Jatinder R; Li, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to choose an appropriate head scatter source model for the fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with MLC. The performance of three different head scatter source models regarding their ability to model head scatter and facilitate planar dose calculation was evaluated. A three-source model, a two-source model and a single-source model were compared in this study. In the planar dose calculation algorithm, in-air fluence distribution was derived from each of the head scatter source models while considering the combination of Jaw and MLC opening. Fluence perturbations due to tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf end and leaf transmission were taken into account explicitly. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving the in-air fluence distribution with an experimentally determined pencil-beam kernel. The results were compared with measurements using a diode array and passing rates with 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria were reported. It was found that the two-source model achieved the best agreement on head scatter factor calculation. The three-source model and single-source model underestimated head scatter factors for certain symmetric rectangular fields and asymmetric fields, but similar good agreement could be achieved when monitor back scatter effect was incorporated explicitly. All the three source models resulted in comparable average passing rates (>97%) when the 3%/3 mm criterion was selected. The calculation with the single-source model and two-source model was slightly faster than the three-source model due to their simplicity

  14. Comparison of analytic source models for head scatter factor calculation and planar dose calculation for IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Guanghua [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu, Chihray; Lu Bo; Palta, Jatinder R; Li, Jonathan G [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385 (United States)

    2008-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to choose an appropriate head scatter source model for the fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with MLC. The performance of three different head scatter source models regarding their ability to model head scatter and facilitate planar dose calculation was evaluated. A three-source model, a two-source model and a single-source model were compared in this study. In the planar dose calculation algorithm, in-air fluence distribution was derived from each of the head scatter source models while considering the combination of Jaw and MLC opening. Fluence perturbations due to tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf end and leaf transmission were taken into account explicitly. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving the in-air fluence distribution with an experimentally determined pencil-beam kernel. The results were compared with measurements using a diode array and passing rates with 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria were reported. It was found that the two-source model achieved the best agreement on head scatter factor calculation. The three-source model and single-source model underestimated head scatter factors for certain symmetric rectangular fields and asymmetric fields, but similar good agreement could be achieved when monitor back scatter effect was incorporated explicitly. All the three source models resulted in comparable average passing rates (>97%) when the 3%/3 mm criterion was selected. The calculation with the single-source model and two-source model was slightly faster than the three-source model due to their simplicity.

  15. Is it worth to calculate the dose of radioiodine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikalauskas, V.; Kuprionis, G.; Vajauskas, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Administration of empirical doses of radioiodine (RAI) has been preferred to calculated doses in many hospitals, because the need to measure the size and the iodine uptake in the thyroid involves considerable inconvenience to the patient and additional costs. The preparation of RAI of varying activities also means extra work. Today there is no general consensus on whether radioiodine should be given as a fixed dose or should be calculated. There is also no consensus regarding the question of which radiation burden should be administered to a given volume of thyroid if the activity is calculated. However, while it is possible to deliver a relatively precise dose of radiation to the thyroid gland, maybe it is worth doing this?The aim of this study was to investigate the results of different uptake and volume dependent target doses on clinical outcome of patients with hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, multi-nodular toxic goiter or toxic adenoma after radioiodine therapy. We reviewed the records of 428 patients (389 women and 39 men, mean age 56.8±12.9 years) who had received radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease and multinodular toxic goiter (n=312) or toxic adenoma (n=116) during the period of 2000-2004 in Kaunas Medical University Hospital. Most patients were given antithyroid drug therapy in order to achieve euthyroidism before treatment with RAI. Radioiodine uptake test with repeated measurements at 2, 6, 24, 48 and/or 72 and/or 96 hr to define the effective half-life was performed. In addition, all the patients underwent thyroid ultrasonography and scintigraphy to define the volume of the thyroid. The 131I activities were calculated according to the formula of Marinelli. In addition to the normal calculation individual target doses were adjusted to the thyroid volumes of each patient before therapy. For statistical evaluation, the patients were divided into four groups: group I included those with a thyroid volume 51 ml. Statistical analysis was

  16. Dose calculation on voxels phantoms using the GEANT4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P.; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    This work implemented an anthropomorphic phantom of voxels on the structure of Monte Carlo GEANT4, for utilization by professionals from the radioprotection, external dosimetry and medical physics. This phantom allows the source displacement that can be isotropic punctual, plain beam, linear or radioactive gas, in order to obtain diverse irradiation geometries. In them, the radioactive sources exposure is simulated viewing the determination of effective dose or the dose in each organ of the human body. The Zubal head and body trunk phantom was used, and we can differentiate the organs and tissues by the chemical constitution in soft tissue, lung tissue, bone tissue, water and air. The calculation method was validated through the comparison with other well established method, the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC). Besides, a comparison was done with the international recommendation for the evaluation of dose by exposure to punctual sources, described in the document TECDOC - 1162- Generic Procedures for Assessment and Response During a Radiological Emergency, where analytical expressions for this calculation are given. Considerations are made on the validity limits of these expressions for various irradiation geometries, including linear sources, immersion into clouds and contaminated soils

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of patient doses from dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program has been developed to calculate patient dose from diagnostic radiologic procedures. Input data include patient anatomy as serial CT scans at 1-cm intervals from a typical cadaver, beam spectrum, and projection geometry. The program tracks single photons, accounting for photoelectric effect, coherent (using atomic form factors) and incoherent (using scatter functions) scatter. Inhomogeneities (bone, teeth, muscle, fat, lung, air cavities, etc.) are accounted for as they are encountered. Dose is accumulated in a three-dimensional array of voxels, corresponding to the CT input. Output consists of isodose curves, doses to specific organs, and effective dose equivalent, H/sub E/, as defined by ICRP. Initial results, from dental bite-wing projections using 90-kVp, half-wave rectified dental spectra, have produced H/sub E/ values ranging from 3 to 17 microsieverts (0.3-1.7 mrem) per image, depending on image receptor and projection geometry. The probability of stochastic effect is estimated by ICRP as 10/sup -2//Sv, or about 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -8/ per image

  18. Measurements and calculations of doses from radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, J.B.; Herbaut, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) and Tchernobyl reactor accidents have revealed the importance of the skin exposure to beta radiation produced by small high activity sources, named 'hot particles'. In nuclear power reactors, they may arise as small fragments of irradiated fuel or material which have been neutron activated by passing through the reactor co. In recent years, skin exposure to hot particles has been subject to different limitation criteria, formulated by AIEA, ICRP, NCRP working groups. The present work is the contribution of CEA Grenoble to a contract of the Commission of the European communities in cooperation with several laboratories: University of Birmingham, University of Toulouse and University of Montpellier with the main goal to check experiments and calculations of tissue dose from 60 Co radioactive particles. This report is split up into two parts: hot particle dosimetry close to a 60 Co spherical sample with an approximately 200 μm diameter, using a PTW extrapolation chamber model 233991; dose calculations from two codes: the Varskin Mod 2 computer code and the Hot 25 S2 Monte Carlo algorithm. The two codes lead to similar results; nevertheless there is a large discrepancy (of about 2) between calculations and PTW measurements which are higher by a factor of 1.9. At a 70 μm skin depth and for 1 cm 2 irradiated area, the total (β + γ) tissue dose rate delivered by a spherical ( φ = 200 μm) 60 Co source, in contact with skin, is of the order of 6.1 10 -2 nGy s -1 Bq -1 . (author)

  19. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides ( 192 Ir, 198 Au, 137 Cs and 60 Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  20. Mathematical models for calculating radiation dose to the fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates of radiation dose from radionuclides inside the body are calculated on the basis of energy deposition in mathematical models representing the organs and tissues of the human body. Complex models may be used with radiation transport codes to calculate the fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed in a target tissue even at a distance from the source. Other models may be simple geometric shapes for which absorbed fractions of energy have already been calculated. Models of Reference Man, the 15-year-old (Reference Woman), the 10-year-old, the five-year-old, the one-year-old, and the newborn have been developed and used for calculating specific absorbed fractions (absorbed fractions of energy per unit mass) for several different photon energies and many different source-target combinations. The Reference woman model is adequate for calculating energy deposition in the uterus during the first few weeks of pregnancy. During the course of pregnancy, the embryo/fetus increases rapidly in size and thus requires several models for calculating absorbed fractions. In addition, the increases in size and changes in shape of the uterus and fetus result in the repositioning of the maternal organs and in different geometric relationships among the organs and the fetus. This is especially true of the excretory organs such as the urinary bladder and the various sections of the gastrointestinal tract. Several models have been developed for calculating absorbed fractions of energy in the fetus, including models of the uterus and fetus for each month of pregnancy and complete models of the pregnant woman at the end of each trimester. In this paper, the available models and the appropriate use of each will be discussed. (Author) 19 refs., 7 figs

  1. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; D R, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  2. Dose discrepancies in the buildup region and their impact on dose calculations for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Moran, Jean M.; Chen Yu; Kulasekere, Ravi; Roberson, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dose accuracy in the buildup region for radiotherapy treatment planning suffers from challenges in both measurement and calculation. This study investigates the dosimetry in the buildup region at normal and oblique incidences for open and IMRT fields and assesses the quality of the treatment planning calculations. Methods: This study was divided into three parts. First, percent depth doses and profiles (for 5x5, 10x10, 20x20, and 30x30 cm 2 field sizes at 0 deg., 45 deg., and 70 deg. incidences) were measured in the buildup region in Solid Water using an Attix parallel plate chamber and Kodak XV film, respectively. Second, the parameters in the empirical contamination (EC) term of the convolution/superposition (CVSP) calculation algorithm were fitted based on open field measurements. Finally, seven segmental head-and-neck IMRT fields were measured on a flat phantom geometry and compared to calculations using γ and dose-gradient compensation (C) indices to evaluate the impact of residual discrepancies and to assess the adequacy of the contamination term for IMRT fields. Results: Local deviations between measurements and calculations for open fields were within 1% and 4% in the buildup region for normal and oblique incidences, respectively. The C index with 5%/1 mm criteria for IMRT fields ranged from 89% to 99% and from 96% to 98% at 2 mm and 10 cm depths, respectively. The quality of agreement in the buildup region for open and IMRT fields is comparable to that in nonbuildup regions. Conclusions: The added EC term in CVSP was determined to be adequate for both open and IMRT fields. Due to the dependence of calculation accuracy on (1) EC modeling, (2) internal convolution and density grid sizes, (3) implementation details in the algorithm, and (4) the accuracy of measurements used for treatment planning system commissioning, the authors recommend an evaluation of the accuracy of near-surface dose calculations as a part of treatment planning commissioning.

  3. The internal radiation dose calculations based on Chinese mathematical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiyan; Li Junli; Cheng Jianping; Fan Jiajin

    2006-01-01

    The internal radiation dose calculations built on Chinese facts become more and more important according to the development of nuclear medicine. the MIRD method developed and consummated by the society of Nuclear Medicine (America) is based on the European and American mathematical phantom and can't fit Chinese well. The transport of γ-ray in the Chinese mathematical phantom was simulated with Monte Carlo method in programs as MCNP4C. the specific absorbed fraction (Φ) of Chinese were calculated and the Chinese Φ database was created. The results were compared with the recommended values by ORNL. the method was proved correct by the coherence when the target organ was the same with the source organ. Else, the difference was due to the different phantom and the choice of different physical model. (authors)

  4. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6 MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, − 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing

  5. Conceptual basis for calculations of absorbed-dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Rossi, H.H.; Alsmiller, R.G.; Berger, M.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Roesch, W.C.; Spencer, L.V.; Zaider, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of radiation on matter are initiated by processes in which atoms and molecules of the medium are ionized or excited. Over a wide range of conditions, it is an excellent approximation to assume that the average number of ionizations and excitations is proportional to the amount of energy imparted to the medium by ionizing radiation in the volume of interest. The absorbed dose, that is, the average amount of energy imparted to the medium per unit mass, is therefore of central importance for the production of radiation effects, and the calculation of absorbed-dose distributions in irradiated media is the focus of interest of the present report. It should be pointed out, however, that even though absorbed dose is useful as an index relating absorbed energy to radiation effects, it is almost never sufficient; it may have to be supplemented by other information, such as the distributions of the amounts of energy imparted to small sites, the correlation of the amounts of energy imparted to adjacent sites, and so on. Such quantities are termed stochastic quantities. Unless otherwise stated, all quantities considered in this report are non-stochastic. 266 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  7. Implementation of spot scanning dose optimization and dose calculation for helium ions in Hyperion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Hermann, E-mail: hermann.fuchs@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, Vienna 1090, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Alber, Markus [Department for Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Schreiner, Thomas [PEG MedAustron, Wiener Neustadt 2700 (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Helium ions ({sup 4}He) may supplement current particle beam therapy strategies as they possess advantages in physical dose distribution over protons. To assess potential clinical advantages, a dose calculation module accounting for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was developed and integrated into the treatment planning system Hyperion. Methods: Current knowledge on RBE of {sup 4}He together with linear energy transfer considerations motivated an empirical depth-dependent “zonal” RBE model. In the plateau region, a RBE of 1.0 was assumed, followed by an increasing RBE up to 2.8 at the Bragg-peak region, which was then kept constant over the fragmentation tail. To account for a variable proton RBE, the same model concept was also applied to protons with a maximum RBE of 1.6. Both RBE models were added to a previously developed pencil beam algorithm for physical dose calculation and included into the treatment planning system Hyperion. The implementation was validated against Monte Carlo simulations within a water phantom using γ-index evaluation. The potential benefits of {sup 4}He based treatment plans were explored in a preliminary treatment planning comparison (against protons) for four treatment sites, i.e., a prostate, a base-of-skull, a pediatric, and a head-and-neck tumor case. Separate treatment plans taking into account physical dose calculation only or using biological modeling were created for protons and {sup 4}He. Results: Comparison of Monte Carlo and Hyperion calculated doses resulted in a γ{sub mean} of 0.3, with 3.4% of the values above 1 and γ{sub 1%} of 1.5 and better. Treatment plan evaluation showed comparable planning target volume coverage for both particles, with slightly increased coverage for {sup 4}He. Organ at risk (OAR) doses were generally reduced using {sup 4}He, some by more than to 30%. Improvements of {sup 4}He over protons were more pronounced for treatment plans taking biological effects into account. All

  8. The models of internal dose calculation in ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    There are a lot discussions about internal dose calculation in ICRP. Many efforts are devoted to improvement in models and parameters. In this report, we discuss what kind of models and parameters are used in ICRP. Models are divided into two parts, the dosimetric model and biokinetic model. The former is a mathematical phantom model, and it is mainly developed in ORNL. The results are used in many researchers. The latter is a compartment model and it has a difficulty to decide the parameter values. They are not easy to estimate because of their age dependency. ICRP officially sets values at ages of 3 month, 1 year, 5 year, 10 year, 15 year and adult, and recommends to get values among ages by linear age interpolate. But it is very difficult to solve the basic equation with these values, so we calculate by use of computers. However, it has complex shame and needs long CPU time. We should make approximated equations. The parameter values include much uncertainty because of less experimental data, especially for a child. And these models and parameter values are for Caucasian. We should inquire whether they could correctly describe other than Caucasian. The body size affects the values of calculated SAF, and the differences of metabolism change the biokinetic pattern. (author)

  9. HADOC: a computer code for calculation of external and inhalation doses from acute radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1981-04-01

    The computer code HADOC (Hanford Acute Dose Calculations) is described and instructions for its use are presented. The code calculates external dose from air submersion and inhalation doses following acute radionuclide releases. Atmospheric dispersion is calculated using the Hanford model with options to determine maximum conditions. Building wake effects and terrain variation may also be considered. Doses are calculated using dose conversion factor supplied in a data library. Doses are reported for one and fifty year dose commitment periods for the maximum individual and the regional population (within 50 miles). The fractional contribution to dose by radionuclide and exposure mode are also printed if requested

  10. Development of internal dose calculation model and the data base updated IDES (Internal Dose Estimation System)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Shozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Iwai, Satoshi.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program named IDES is developed by BASIC language for a personal computer and translated to C language of engineering work station. The IDES carries out internal dose calculations described in ICRP Publication 30 and it installs the program of transformation method which is an empirical method to estimate absorbed fractions of different physiques from ICRP Referenceman. The program consists of three tasks: productions of SAF for Japanese including children, productions of SEE, Specific Effective Energy, and calculation of effective dose equivalents. Each task and corresponding data file appear as a module so as to meet future requirement for revisions of the related data. Usefulness of IDES is discussed by exemplifying the case that 5 age groups of Japanese intake orally Co-60 or Mn-54. (author)

  11. Calculation of radiation dose to infants from radioactive breast milk and suspensions necessary to constrain dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, J.; Shearer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For nuclear medicine patients who are breast feeding an infant, special radiation safety precautions may need to be taken. An estimate of the potential radiation dose to the child from ingested milk must be made, and breast-feeding may need to be suspended until levels of radioactivity in the breast-milk have fallen to acceptable levels. The risk of radiation to the child must be weighed against the benefits of breast-feeding and the possible trauma to both mother and child arising from interruption or cessation of the milk supply. In the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has already published regulations which will necessitate an estimate of the infant's dose from breast milk to be made, in principle, for every breast-feeding patient. There is obviously, therefore, a need to provide a rapid and reliable means of estimating such doses. A spreadsheet template which automatically calculates the cumulative dose to breast feeding infants based on any multi-exponential clearance of activity from the breast milk, and any pattern of feeding, has been developed by the authors. The time (post administration) for which breast-feeding should be interrupted in order to constrain the radiation dose to a selected limit is also calculated along with the concentration of activity in breast milk at which feeding can resume. The effect of changing dose limits, feeding patterns and using individually derived breast milk clearance rates may be readily modelled using this spreadsheet template. Data has been included for many of the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals and new data can readily be incorporated as it becomes available. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  12. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  13. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  14. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A ampersand M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document

  16. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs

  17. Simulation of lung cancer treatment with equivalent dose calculation and analysis of the dose distribution profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Marques L, J.; Da Silva, A. X.; Dos Reis J, J. P.; Da Silva J, W. F. R.; Arruda C, S. C.; Monteiro de S, E.; Santos B, D. V.

    2017-10-01

    Actually, lung cancer is one of the most lethal types, due to the disease in the majority of the cases asymptomatic in the early stages, being the detection of the pathology in advanced stage, with tumor considerable volume. Dosimetry analysis of healthy organs under real conditions is not feasible. Therefore, computational simulations are used to auxiliary in dose verification in organs of patients submitted to radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to calculate the equivalent dose, due to photons, in surrounding in healthy organs of a patient submitted to radiotherapy for lung cancer, through computational modeling. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX code (Version, 2006], Rex and Regina phantom [ICRP 110, 2008], radiotherapy room, Siemens Oncor Expression accelerator operating at 6 MV and treatment protocol adopted at the Inca (National Cancer Institute, Brazil). The results obtained, considering the dose due to photons for both phantom indicate that organs located inside the thoracic cavity received higher dose, being the bronchi, heart and esophagus more affected, due to the anatomical positioning. Clinical data describe the development of bronchiolitis, esophagitis, and cardiomyopathies with decreased cardiopulmonary function as one of the major effects of lung cancer treatment. In the Regina phantom, the second largest dose was in the region of the breasts with 615,73 mSv / Gy, while in the Rex 514,06 mSv / Gy, event related to the difference of anatomical structure of the organ. Through the t mesh command, a qualitative analysis was performed between the dose deposition profile of the planning system and the simulated treatment, with a similar profile of the dose distribution being verified along the patients body. (Author)

  18. Radiological Dose Calculations And Supplemental Dose Assessment Data For Neshap Compliance For SNL Nevada Facilities 1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    Operations of Sandia National Laboratories, Nevada (SNL/NV) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) resulted in no planned point radiological releases during 1996. Other releases from SNL/NV included diffuse transuranic sources consisting of the three Clean Slate sites. Air emissions from these sources result from wind resuspension of near-surface transuranic contaminated soil particulates. The total area of contamination has been estimated to exceed 20 million square meters. Soil contamination was documented in an aerial survey program in 1977 (EG&G 1979). Surface contamination levels were generally found to be below 400 pCi/g of combined plutonium-238, plutonium-239, plutonium-240, and americium-241 (i.e., transuranic) activity. Hot spot areas contain up to 43,000 pCi/g of transuranic activity. Recent measurements confirm the presence of significant levels of transuranic activity in the surface soil. An annual diffuse source term of 0.39 Ci of transuranic material was calculated for the cumulative release from all three Clean Slate sites. A maximally exposed individual dose of 1.1 mrem/yr at the TTR airport area was estimated based on the 1996 diffuse source release amounts and site-specific meteorological data. A population dose of 0.86 person-rem/yr was calculated for the local residents. Both dose values were attributable to inhalation of transuranic contaminated dust.

  19. Standardized dose factors for dose calculations - 1982 SRP reactor safety analysis report tritium, iodine, and noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillinger, W.L.; Marter, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    Standardized dose constants are recommended for calculation of offsite doses in the 1982 SRP Reactor Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Dose constants are proposed for inhalation of tritium and radioiodines and for submersion in a semi-infinite cloud of radioiodines and noble gases. The proposed constants, based on ICRP2 methodology for internal dose and methodology recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for external dose, are compatible with dose calculational methods used at the Savannah River Plant and Savannah River Laboratory for normal releases of radioactivity. 8 references

  20. Development of a program for calculation of second dose and securities in brachytherapy high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve Sanchez, S.; Martinez Albaladejo, M.; Garcia Fuentes, J. D.; Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Capuz Suarez, B.; Moris de Pablos, R.; Colmenares Fernandez, R.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the reliability of the program with 80 patients in the usual points of prescription of each pathology. The average error of the calculation points is less than 0.3% in 95% of cases, finding the major differences in the axes of the applicators (maximum error -0.798%). The program has proved effective previously testing him with erroneous dosimetry. Thanks to the implementation of this program is achieved by the calculation of the dose and part of the process of quality assurance program in a few minutes, highlighting the case of HDR prostate due to having a limited time. Having separate data sheet allows each institution to its protocols modify parameters. (Author)

  1. Monte Carlo calculation of ''skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS [Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin-Vasiri, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ''skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS: Sources of radiation; ALS modeling for skyshine calculations; MORSE Monte-Carlo; Implementation of MORSE; Results of skyshine calculations from storage ring; and Comparison of MORSE shielding calculations

  2. Exact comparison of dose rate measurements and calculation of TN12/2 packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniuchi, H.; Matsuda, F.

    1998-01-01

    Both of dose rate measurements of TN 12/2 package and calculations by Monte Carlo code MORSE in SCALE code system and MCNP were performed to evaluate the difference between the measurement and the calculation and finding out the cause of the difference. The calculated gamma-ray dose rates agreed well with measured ones, but calculated neutron dose rates overestimated more than a factor of 1.7. When considering the cause of the difference and applying the modification into the neutron calculation, the calculated neutron dose rates become to agree well, and the factor decreased to around 1.3. (authors)

  3. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The guide presents the definitions of equivalent dose and effective dose, the principles for calculating these doses, and instructions for applying their maximum values. The limits (Annual Limit on Intake and Derived Air Concentration) derived from dose limits are also presented for the purpose of monitoring exposure to internal radiation. The calculation of radiation doses caused to a patient from medical research and treatment involving exposure to ionizing radiation is beyond the scope of this ST Guide

  4. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  5. SU-F-T-441: Dose Calculation Accuracy in CT Images Reconstructed with Artifact Reduction Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C; Chan, S; Lee, F; Ngan, R [Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Hong Kong); Lee, V [University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, HK (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation in patients with surgical implants is complicated by two factors. First is the accuracy of CT number, second is the dose calculation accuracy. We compared measured dose with dose calculated on CT images reconstructed with FBP and an artifact reduction algorithm (OMAR, Philips) for a phantom with high density inserts. Dose calculation were done with Varian AAA and AcurosXB. Methods: A phantom was constructed with solid water in which 2 titanium or stainless steel rods could be inserted. The phantom was scanned with the Philips Brillance Big Bore CT. Image reconstruction was done with FBP and OMAR. Two 6 MV single field photon plans were constructed for each phantom. Radiochromic films were placed at different locations to measure the dose deposited. One plan has normal incidence on the titanium/steel rods. In the second plan, the beam is at almost glancing incidence on the metal rods. Measurements were then compared with dose calculated with AAA and AcurosXB. Results: The use of OMAR images slightly improved the dose calculation accuracy. The agreement between measured and calculated dose was best with AXB and image reconstructed with OMAR. Dose calculated on titanium phantom has better agreement with measurement. Large discrepancies were seen at points directly above and below the high density inserts. Both AAA and AXB underestimated the dose directly above the metal surface, while overestimated the dose below the metal surface. Doses measured downstream of metal were all within 3% of calculated values. Conclusion: When doing treatment planning for patients with metal implants, care must be taken to acquire correct CT images to improve dose calculation accuracy. Moreover, great discrepancies in measured and calculated dose were observed at metal/tissue interface. Care must be taken in estimating the dose in critical structures that come into contact with metals.

  6. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  7. Can medical students calculate drug doses? | Harries | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with calculations when the drug concentration was expressed either as a ratio or a percentage. Conclusion: Our findings support calls for the standardised labelling of drugs in solution and for dosage calculation training in the medical curriculum. Keywords: drug dosage calculations, clinical competence, medication errors

  8. A study of different dose calculation methods and the impact on the dose evaluation protocol in lung stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Takahiro; Furuya, Tomohisa; Ozawa, Shuichi; Ito, Kana; Kurokawa, Chie; Karasawa, Kumiko; Miura, Kohei

    2008-01-01

    AAA (analytical anisotropic algorithm) dose calculation, which shows a better performance for heterogeneity correction, was tested for lung stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT) in comparison to conventional PBC (pencil beam convolution method) to evaluate its impact on tumor dose parameters. Eleven lung SBRT patients who were treated with photon 4 MV beams in our department between April 2003 and February 2007 were reviewed. Clinical target volume (CTV) was delineated including the spicula region on planning CT images. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined by adding the internal target volume (ITV) and set-up margin (SM) of 5 mm from CTV, and then an multileaf collimator (MLC) penumbra margin of another 5 mm was also added. Six-port non-coplanar beams were employed, and a total prescribed dose of 48 Gy was defined at the isocenter point with four fractions. The entire treatment for an individual patient was completed within 8 days. Under the same prescribed dose, calculated dose distribution, dose volume histogram (DVH), and tumor dose parameters were compared between two dose calculation methods. In addition, the fractionated prescription dose was repeatedly scaled until the monitor units (MUs) calculated by AAA reached a level of MUs nearly identical to those achieved by PBC. AAA resulted in significantly less D95 (irradiation dose that included 95% volume of PTV) and minimal dose in PTV compared to PBC. After rescaling of each MU for each beam in the AAA plan, there was no revision of the isocenter of the prescribed dose required. However, when the PTV volume was less than 20 cc, a 4% lower prescription resulted in nearly identical MUs between AAA and PBC. The prescribed dose in AAA should be the same as that in PBC, if the dose is administered at the isocenter point. However, planners should compare DVHs and dose distributions between AAA and PBC for a small lung tumor with a PTV volume less than approximately 20 cc. (author)

  9. Applying the 'general principles of dose calculation' (ABG) in practice. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubelt, R.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation doses are to be calculated for the main exposure pathways such as gamma submersion, beta submersion, gamma radiation at ground level, inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides. After the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance to include the latest ICRP Recommendations, the dose to be determined now is the effective dose equivalent, replacing the former whole-body dose equivalent. (DG) [de

  10. A Method for Correcting IMRT Optimizer Heterogeneity Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning for volumes close to the patient's surface, in lung tissue and in the head and neck region, can be challenging for the planning system optimizer because of the complexity of the treatment and protected volumes, as well as striking heterogeneity corrections. Because it is often the goal of the planner to produce an isodose plan with uniform dose throughout the planning target volume (PTV), there is a need for improved planning optimization procedures for PTVs located in these anatomical regions. To illustrate such an improved procedure, we present a treatment planning case of a patient with a lung lesion located in the posterior right lung. The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan generated using standard optimization procedures produced substantial dose nonuniformity across the tumor caused by the effect of lung tissue surrounding the tumor. We demonstrate a novel iterative method of dose correction performed on the initial IMRT plan to produce a more uniform dose distribution within the PTV. This optimization method corrected for the dose missing on the periphery of the PTV and reduced the maximum dose on the PTV to 106% from 120% on the representative IMRT plan.

  11. The interpretation of animal data in the calculation of doses from new radiolabeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, G.P.L.; Ellender, M.; Harrison, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    At NRPB, dose calculations are performed for pharmaceutical companies wishing to obtain approval for human volunteer experiments. Animal data from one or more species are used to estimate the radiation doses to humans that would result from the administration of novel radiolabeled compounds. The calculations themselves are straightforward, but the animal data can be interpreted in different ways, leading to variations in the calculated dose. Doses to the gut compartments usually dominate the committed effective dose equivalent, but retention in other tissues may be important for some compounds. Long-term retention components in tissues can affect doses considerably, and the binding of many radiopharmaceuticals to melanin means that doses to the eye are particularly important. The effect of these considerations on calculating doses are considered, as well as the effect of changes in risk estimates and tissue weighting factors

  12. Analysis of offsite dose calculation methodology for a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    This technical study reviews the methodology for calculating offsite dose estimates as described in the offsite dose calculation manual (ODCM) for Pennsylvania Power and Light - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES). An evaluation of the SSES ODCM dose assessment methodology indicates that it conforms with methodology accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Using 1993 SSES effluent data, dose estimates are calculated according to SSES ODCM methodology and compared to the dose estimates calculated according to SSES ODCM and the computer model used to produce the reported 1993 dose estimates. The 1993 SSES dose estimates are based on the axioms of Publication 2 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). SSES Dose estimates based on the axioms of ICRP Publication 26 and 30 reveal the total body estimates to be the most affected

  13. Development of radiological concentrations and unit liter doses for TWRS FSAR radiological consequence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis described in this report develops the Unit Liter Doses for use in the TWRS FSAR. The Unit Liter Doses provide a practical way to calculate conservative radiological consequences for a variety of potential accidents for the tank farms

  14. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, A.; Tanigawa, N.; Kariya, Sh.; Yagi, R.; Nakatani, M.; Suzuki, S.; Sano, A.; Ikeda, K.; Utsunomiya, K.; Harima, Y.; Sawada, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution

  15. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.

    2016-01-01

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 ''Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site''.

  16. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-31

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 “Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site”.

  17. Study of dose calculation and beam parameters optimization with genetic algorithm in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chaomin; Tang Mutao; Zhou Linghong; Lv Qingwen; Wang Zhuoyu; Chen Guangjie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the construction of dose calculation model and the method of automatic beam parameters selection in IMRT. Methods: The three-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon was constructed with the methods of Fast Fourier Transform. The objective function based on dose constrain was used to evaluate the fitness of individuals. The beam weights were optimized with genetic algorithm. Results: After 100 iterative analyses, the treatment planning system produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distributions. Conclusion: the throe-dimension convolution dose calculation model of photon gave more accurate results than the conventional models; genetic algorithm is valid and efficient in IMRT beam parameters optimization. (authors)

  18. Calculation of dose point kernels for five radionuclides used in radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okigaki, S.; Ito, A.; Uchida, I.; Tomaru, T.

    1994-01-01

    With the recent interest in radioimmunotherapy, attention has been given to calculation of dose distribution from beta rays and monoenergetic electrons in tissue. Dose distribution around a point source of a beta ray emitting radioisotope is referred to as a beta dose point kernel. Beta dose point kernels for five radionuclides such as 131 I, 186 Re, 32 P, 188 Re, and 90 Y appropriate for radioimmunotherapy are calculated by Monte Carlo method using the EGS4 code system. Present results were compared with the published data of experiments and other calculations. Accuracy and precisions of beta dose point kernels are discussed. (author)

  19. Differentiated thyroid cancer treatment with therapeutic doses of 131I calculated by dosimetry: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, Ana M.; Chebel, G.M.; Valdivieso, C.M.; Degrossi, Osvaldo J.; Cabrejas, R.; Cabrejas, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The optimum dose for the differentiated thyroid cancer treatment is a motive of controversy. There exist two ways of deciding the dose to administer: the empirical method (fixed doses) and dosimetric calculation method. The use of fixed doses has demonstrated safety and effectiveness. Nevertheless there are cases in which the use of several small doses not resolves the metastases illness of the patients. Using the Benua-Leeper method for dosimetric calculation we have evaluated the maximum dose treatment that could be administered to 20 patients who showed persistent disease after several treatments with 131 I. (author) [es

  20. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriantsizafy, R D; Ramanandraibe, M J [Madagascar Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Raboanary, R [Institut of astro and High-Energy Physics Madagascar, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2007-07-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  1. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Raboanary, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  2. Calculation of dose distribution on Rhizophora spp soy protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the commercial solid phantoms were unable to provide a good simulation to water at low and high energy ranges. A potential phantom from Malaysian mangrove wood family, Rhizophoraspp was fabricated with addition of Soy Protein. An Electron Gamma Sho (EGSnrc) code was used to evaluate the dose ...

  3. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo calculations for organ dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Warner, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of validating estimates of absorbed dose due to photon energy deposition is examined. The computational approaches used for the estimation of the photon energy deposition is examined. The limited data for validation of these approaches is discussed and suggestions made as to how better validation information might be obtained

  4. Paradigm shift in LUNG SBRT dose calculation associated with Heterogeneity correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Pinto Monedero, M.; Marti Asensjo, J.; Alonso Iracheta, L.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of lung injury SBRT requires great dosimetric accuracy, the increasing clinical importance of dose calculation heterogeneities introducing algorithms that adequately model the transport of particles narrow beams in media of low density, as with Monte Carlo calculation. (Author)

  5. Probabilistic calculation of dose commitment from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The report discusses in a general way considerations of uncertainty in relation to probabilistic modelling. An example of a probabilistic calculation applied to the behaviour of uranium mill tailings is given

  6. Improvements in dose calculation accuracy for small off-axis targets in high dose per fraction tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Bayliss, Adam; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, 53792 (United States); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia) and Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Einstein Institute of Oncophysics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: A recent field safety notice from TomoTherapy detailed the underdosing of small, off-axis targets when receiving high doses per fraction. This is due to angular undersampling in the dose calculation gantry angles. This study evaluates a correction method to reduce the underdosing, to be implemented in the current version (v4.1) of the TomoTherapy treatment planning software. Methods: The correction method, termed 'Super Sampling' involved the tripling of the number of gantry angles from which the dose is calculated during optimization and dose calculation. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose to small targets at various off-axis distances receiving a minimum of 21 Gy in one fraction. Measurements were also performed for single small targets at the center of the Lucy phantom, using radiochromic film and the dose magnifying glass (DMG). Results: Without super sampling, the peak dose deficit increased from 0% to 18% for a 10 mm target and 0% to 30% for a 5 mm target as off-axis target distances increased from 0 to 16.5 cm. When super sampling was turned on, the dose deficit trend was removed and all peak doses were within 5% of the planned dose. For measurements in the Lucy phantom at 9.7 cm off-axis, the positional and dose magnitude accuracy using super sampling was verified using radiochromic film and the DMG. Conclusions: A correction method implemented in the TomoTherapy treatment planning system which triples the angular sampling of the gantry angles used during optimization and dose calculation removes the underdosing for targets as small as 5 mm diameter, up to 16.5 cm off-axis receiving up to 21 Gy.

  7. Improvements in dose calculation accuracy for small off-axis targets in high dose per fraction tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Bayliss, Adam; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A recent field safety notice from TomoTherapy detailed the underdosing of small, off-axis targets when receiving high doses per fraction. This is due to angular undersampling in the dose calculation gantry angles. This study evaluates a correction method to reduce the underdosing, to be implemented in the current version (v4.1) of the TomoTherapy treatment planning software. Methods: The correction method, termed “Super Sampling” involved the tripling of the number of gantry angles from which the dose is calculated during optimization and dose calculation. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose to small targets at various off-axis distances receiving a minimum of 21 Gy in one fraction. Measurements were also performed for single small targets at the center of the Lucy phantom, using radiochromic film and the dose magnifying glass (DMG). Results: Without super sampling, the peak dose deficit increased from 0% to 18% for a 10 mm target and 0% to 30% for a 5 mm target as off-axis target distances increased from 0 to 16.5 cm. When super sampling was turned on, the dose deficit trend was removed and all peak doses were within 5% of the planned dose. For measurements in the Lucy phantom at 9.7 cm off-axis, the positional and dose magnitude accuracy using super sampling was verified using radiochromic film and the DMG. Conclusions: A correction method implemented in the TomoTherapy treatment planning system which triples the angular sampling of the gantry angles used during optimization and dose calculation removes the underdosing for targets as small as 5 mm diameter, up to 16.5 cm off-axis receiving up to 21 Gy.

  8. Kinetics and dose calculations of amikacin in the newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardemann, H; Colding, H; Hendel, J

    1976-01-01

    compartment model. The absorption was evaluated in 8 of the infants after intramuscular injection of 7.5 mg amikacin per kilogram of body weight. The absorption rate, estimated by the tmax, was significantly faster than reported in adults. The total body clearance and apparent volume of distribution were...... studied in 22 infants after the same dose of amikacin intramuscularly. The body clearance expressed in relation to body surface or body weight was significantly less than in adults and correlated with the postnatal age. No correlation could be demonstrated between clearance and gestational age or birth...... weight. The volume of distribution per kilogram was significantly greater than in adults. On the basis of the derived kinetic parameters, a dose schedule is presented. In 5 children there was a reasonable agreement between the measured and predicted serum levels....

  9. Secondary standard dosimetry system with automatic dose/rate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.; Bernhart, J.; Stehno, G.; Klosch, W.

    1980-01-01

    A versatile and automated secondary standard instrument has been designed for quick and accurate dose/rate measurement in a wide range of radiation intensity and quality (between 1 μR and 100 kR; 0.2 nC/kg - 20C/kg) for protection and therapy level dosimetry. The system is based on a series of secondary standard ionization chambers connected to a precision digital current integrator with microprocessor circuitry for data evaluation and control. Input of measurement parameters and calibration factors stored in an exchangeable memory chip provide computation of dose/rate values in the desired units. The ionization chambers provide excellent long-term stability and energy response and can be used with internal check sources to test validity of calibration. The system is a useful tool particularly for daily measurements in a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory or radiation therapy center. (H.K.)

  10. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy; Metodo manual para o calculo de doses em braquiterapia ginecologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Biaggio, Maria F. de [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Davis, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document

  12. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, J.S. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  13. CARI NAIRAS: Calculating Flight Doses from NAIRAS Data using CARI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    S44 (1996). 5. O’Brien, K; Smart, DF; Shea, MA; et al. World-wide radiation dosage calculations for air crew members. Advan Space Res, 2003, 31(4...STEPMIN(I), STEPFEET(I) ENDDO WRITE(40,*) ‘RDBIGFLT RETURNS CRUISE TIME (MIN): ‘,CRUISEMIN WRITE(40,*) ‘RDBIGFLT RETURNS DESCENT TIME (MIN...USE ONE STEP PER MINUTE, CENTERED ON 1/2 STEP IF (DIAGNOSE.EQ.’YES’) WRITE(40,*) ‘CALCULATING DESCENT ’ CALL FT2KM(DALT,DEPTH(ALLSTEPS)) DT(J

  14. Independent Monte-Carlo dose calculation for MLC based CyberKnife radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Vuong, D.; Volken, W.; Henzen, D.; Schmidhalter, D.; Malthaner, M.; Mueller, S.; Frei, D.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.; Dal Pra, A.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2018-01-01

    This work aims to develop, implement and validate a Monte Carlo (MC)-based independent dose calculation (IDC) framework to perform patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for multi-leaf collimator (MLC)-based CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) treatment plans. The IDC framework uses an XML-format treatment plan as exported from the treatment planning system (TPS) and DICOM format patient CT data, an MC beam model using phase spaces, CyberKnife MLC beam modifier transport using the EGS++ class library, a beam sampling and coordinate transformation engine and dose scoring using DOSXYZnrc. The framework is validated against dose profiles and depth dose curves of single beams with varying field sizes in a water tank in units of cGy/Monitor Unit and against a 2D dose distribution of a full prostate treatment plan measured with Gafchromic EBT3 (Ashland Advanced Materials, Bridgewater, NJ) film in a homogeneous water-equivalent slab phantom. The film measurement is compared to IDC results by gamma analysis using 2% (global)/2 mm criteria. Further, the dose distribution of the clinical treatment plan in the patient CT is compared to TPS calculation by gamma analysis using the same criteria. Dose profiles from IDC calculation in a homogeneous water phantom agree within 2.3% of the global max dose or 1 mm distance to agreement to measurements for all except the smallest field size. Comparing the film measurement to calculated dose, 99.9% of all voxels pass gamma analysis, comparing dose calculated by the IDC framework to TPS calculated dose for the clinical prostate plan shows 99.0% passing rate. IDC calculated dose is found to be up to 5.6% lower than dose calculated by the TPS in this case near metal fiducial markers. An MC-based modular IDC framework was successfully developed, implemented and validated against measurements and is now available to perform patient-specific QA by IDC.

  15. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  16. Calculation of Dose Gamma Ray Build up Factor in Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gamma ray buildup factor was calculated by analyzing the narrow- beam and broad-beam geometry equations using Taylor's formula for isotropic sources and homogeneous materials. The buildup factor was programmed using MATLAB software to operate with any radiation energy (E), atomic number (Z) and the ...

  17. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Eric J; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; La Russa, Daniel J; Cygler, Joanna E

    2014-02-01

    In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm(2). Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm γ-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  18. Comparison of measured and calculated doses for narrow MLC defined fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydon, J.; Rozenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) has led to the use of narrow fields in the delivery of radiation doses to patients. Such fields are not well characterized by calculation methods commonly used in radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm must therefore be investigated prior to clinical use. This study looked at symmetrical and asymmetrical 0.1 to 3cm wide fields delivered with a Varian CL2100C 6MV photon beam. Measured doses were compared to doses calculated using Pinnacle, the ADAC radiotherapy treatment planning system. Two high resolution methods of measuring dose were used. A MOSFET detector in a water phantom and radiographic film in a solid water phantom with spatial resolutions of 10 and 89μm respectively. Dose calculations were performed using the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle with a 0.1cm dose calculation grid in the MLC direction. The effect of Pinnacle not taking into account the rounded leaf ends was simulated by offsetting the leaves by 0.1cm in the dose calculation. Agreement between measurement and calculation is good for fields of 1cm and wider. However, fields of less than 1cm width can show a significant difference between measurement and calculation

  19. Construction of voxel head phantom and application to BNCT dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Choon Ik; Lee, Jai Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    Voxel head phantom for overcoming the limitation of mathematical phantom in depicting anatomical details was constructed and example dose calculation for BNCT was performed. The repeated structure algorithm of the general purpose Monte Carlo code, MCNP4B was applied for voxel Monte Carlo calculation. Simple binary voxel phantom and combinatorial geometry phantom composed of two materials were constructed for validating the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system. The tomographic images of VHP man provided by NLM(National Library of Medicine) were segmented and indexed to construct voxel head phantom. Comparison od doses for broad parallel gamma and neutron beams in AP and PA directions showed decrease of brain dose due to the attenuation of neutron in eye balls in case of voxel head phantom. The spherical tumor volume with diameter, 5cm was defined in the center of brain for BNCT dose calculation in which accurate 3 dimensional dose calculation is essential. As a result of BNCT dose calculation for downward neutron beam of 10keV and 40keV, the tumor dose is about doubled when boron concentration ratio between the tumor to the normal tissue is 30{mu}g/g to 3 {mu}g/g. This study established the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system and suggested the feasibility of precise dose calculation in therapeutic radiology.

  20. The calculation of electron depth-dose distributions in multilayer medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuanshan; Xu Mengjie; Li Zhiliang; Feng Yongxiang; Li Panlin

    1989-01-01

    Energy deposition in multilayer medium and the depth dose distribution in the layers are studied. Based on semi-empirical calculation of electron energy absorption in matter with EDMULT program of Tabata and Ito, further work has been carried out to extend the computation to multilayer composite material. New program developed in this paper makes IBM-PC compatible with complicated electron dose calculations

  1. Dose calculation due to electrons interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, S; Orion, I; Shani, G [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Laster, B [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Experiments done with gadolinium loaded V79 Chinese Hamster cells, irradiated with thermal neutrons, showed that cells lethality increased by a factor of 1.8 compared to the case where the Gd atoms were located outside the cell.(l) It was obvious that the dramatic increase in cell lethality is due to the emission of Auger electrons following the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction. Electrons of various energies from about 40 keV (very few) to less than 1 keV, are emitted. In the present work, energy absorbed in DNA was calculated, due to interaction of electron of different energies: 30, 15, 10, 8, 5 and 2 keV. The Monte Carlo code EGS4(2) was used for the calculations. The DNA was modeled as a series of alternative layers of sugar (phosphate - C{sub 5}O{sub 5}H{sub 7}P p=1.39gr cm{sup -1}) and water. The sugar layer thickness was assumed 2.5nm and the water layer thickness 10nm. An isotropic electron source was assumed to be located in a water layer and the electrons interactions (absorption and scattering) were calculated in the forward hemisphere. The energy absorbed in a group of 8 layers, (4 sugar and 4 water) was calculated for each one of the electron energies. An interesting fact found in those calculations; when the source electrons energy is 10 keV or more, most of the electrons are absorbed in the DNA-water system, are at energy about 2keV. There is no good explanation for this phenomenon except for assuming that when the electron`s energy reaches a low point of about 2keV, it cannot escape absorption in the medium. 10% of the 10 keV electrons deposit their entire energy in the 8 layers range (authors).

  2. Calculation of absorbed dose in water by chemical Fricke dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Adenilson Paiva; Meireles, Ramiro Conceicao

    2016-01-01

    This work is the result of a laboratory activity performed in Radiological Sciences Laboratory (CRL), linked to the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ). This practice aimed to determine the absorbed dose to water, through the primary calibration method called dosimetry Fricke, which consists of ferrous ions (Fe + 2) to ferric (Fe + 3), generated by water radiolysis products which is the structural change of water molecule caused by ionizing radiation. A spectrophotometer was used to extract data for analysis at a wavelength (λ) 304 and 224 nm with function of measuring the absorbance using bottles with irradiated and nonirradiated Fricke solution. (author)

  3. Calculation of age-dependent effective doses for external exposure using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van

    2013-01-01

    Age-dependent effective dose for external exposure to photons uniformly distributed in air were calculated. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources with source energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years-old and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. From the calculated results, it is shown that the effective doses depend on the body size; the effective doses in younger phantoms are higher than those in the older phantoms, especially below 100 keV. (orig.)

  4. Calculation of age-dependent effective doses for external exposure using the MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Tran Van [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, ThuDuc, HoChiMinh City (VT)

    2013-07-15

    Age-dependent effective dose for external exposure to photons uniformly distributed in air were calculated. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources with source energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years-old and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. From the calculated results, it is shown that the effective doses depend on the body size; the effective doses in younger phantoms are higher than those in the older phantoms, especially below 100 keV. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of secondary cosmic radiation and calculation of associated dose conversion coefficients for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Due to secondary cosmic radiation (SCR), pilots and flight attendants receive elevated effective doses at flight altitudes. For this reason, since 2003 aircrew members are considered as occupationally exposed, in Germany. This work deals with the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCC) for protons, neutrons, electrons, positrons, photons and myons, which are crucial for estimation of effective dose from SCR. For the first time, calculations were performed combining Geant4 - a Monte Carlo code developed at CERN - with the voxel phantoms for the reference female and male published in 2008 by ICRP and ICRU. Furthermore, measurements of neutron fluence spectra - which contribute the major part to the effective dose of SCR - were carried out at the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) located at 2650 m above sea level nearby the Zugspitze mountain, Germany. These measured neutron spectra, and additionally available calculated spectra, were then folded with the DCC calculated in this work, and effective dose rates for different heights were calculated.

  6. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  7. Effect of Embolization Material in the Calculation of Dose Deposition in Arteriovenous Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cruz, O. O. Galvan; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work it is studied the impact of the incorporation of high Z materials (embolization material) in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment for arteriovenous malformations. A statistical analysis is done to establish the variables that may impact in the dose calculation. To perform the comparison pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms were used. The comparison between both dose calculations shows that PB overestimates the dose deposited. The statistical analysis, for the quantity of patients of the study (20), shows that the variable that may impact in the dose calculation is the volume of the high Z material in the arteriovenous malformation. Further studies have to be done to establish the clinical impact with the radiosurgery result.

  8. Oblique incidence of electron beams - comparisons between calculated and measured dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcher, J.; Paulsen, F.; Christ, G.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical applications of high-energy electron beams, for example for the irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes, can lead to oblique incidence of the beams. It is well known that oblique incidence of electron beams can alter the depth dose distribution as well as the specific dose per monitor unit. The dose per monitor unit is the absorbed dose in a point of interest of a beam, which is reached with a specific dose monitor value (DIN 6814-8[5]). Dose distribution and dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence were measured with a small-volume thimble chamber in a water phantom, and compared to both normal incidence and calculations of the Helax TMS 6.1 treatment planning system. At 4 MeV and 60 degrees, the maximum measured dose per monitor unit at oblique incidence was decreased up to 11%, whereas at 18MeV and 60 degrees this was increased up to 15% compared to normal incidence. Comparisons of measured and calculated dose distributions showed that the predicted dose at shallow depths is usually higher than the measured one, whereas it is smaller at depths beyond the depth of maximum dose. On the basis of the results of these comparisons, normalization depths and correction factors for the dose monitor value were suggested to correct the calculations of the dose per monitor unit. (orig.)

  9. Probabilistic approach to external cloud dose calculations using onsite meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Bander, T.J.; Kennedy, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for calculation of external total body and skin doses from accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides based on hourly onsite meteorological data. The method involves calculation of dose values from a finite size cloud for each hourly observation for a given radionuclide inventory. These values are then used to determine the probability of occurrence of dose levels for specified release times ranging from one hour to 30 days

  10. Calculation of the effective dose from natural radioactivity sources in soil using MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Effective dose delivered by photon emitted from natural radioactivity in soil was calculated in this report. Calculations have been done for the most common natural radionuclides in soil as 238 U, 232 Th series and 40 K. A ORNL age-dependent phantom and the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B were employed to calculate the energy deposited in all organs of phantom.The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP74 recommendations. Conversion coefficients of effective dose per air kerma were determined. Results obtained here were compared with other authors

  11. Calculation of the effective dose from natural radioactivity in soil using MCNP code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2010-01-01

    Effective dose delivered by photon emitted from natural radioactivity in soil was calculated in this work. Calculations have been done for the most common natural radionuclides in soil (238)U, (232)Th series and (40)K. A ORNL human phantoms and the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B were employed to calculate the energy deposited in all organs. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 74 recommendations. Conversion factors of effective dose per air kerma were determined. Results obtained here were compared with other authors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  13. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C., E-mail: research.photonics@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goiás, GO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  14. ALMA. Calculations of diffusion and radiation doses in connection with final storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelin, R.; Kjellbert, N.; Stenquist, C.

    1978-09-01

    Calculations of diffusion and radiation doses in connection with final storage of low-lavel and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The results show that the doses obtained with realistic values of parameters used in the calculations are very low. However, substantially simplified assumption have been applied in the calculations. Thus more detailed models for the description of the diffusion process have to be developed. (E.R.)

  15. Conservatism in effective dose calculations for accident events involving fuel reprocessing waste tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2011-07-01

    Conservatism in the calculation of the effective dose following an airborne release from an accident involving a fuel reprocessing waste tank is examined. Within the regulatory constraints at the Hanford Site, deterministic effective dose calculations are conservative by at least an order of magnitude. Deterministic calculations should be used with caution in reaching decisions associated with required safety systems and mitigation philosophy related to the accidental release of airborne radioactive material to the environment.

  16. Modeling of tube current modulation methods in computed tomography dose calculations for adult and pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George; Gu, Jianwei

    2011-01-01

    The comparatively high dose and increasing frequency of computed tomography (CT) examinations have spurred the development of techniques for reducing radiation dose to imaging patients. Among these is the application of tube current modulation (TCM), which can be applied either longitudinally along the body or rotationally along the body, or both. Existing computational models for calculating dose from CT examinations do not include TCM techniques. Dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods have been previously prepared for constant-current rotational exposures at various positions along the body and for the principle exposure projections for several sets of computational phantoms, including adult male and female and pregnant patients. Dose calculations from CT scans with TCM are prepared by appropriately weighting the existing dose data. Longitudinal TCM doses can be obtained by weighting the dose at the z-axis scan position by the relative tube current at that position. Rotational TCM doses are weighted using the relative organ doses from the principle projections as a function of the current at the rotational angle. Significant dose reductions of 15% to 25% to fetal tissues are found from simulations of longitudinal TCM schemes to pregnant patients of different gestational ages. Weighting factors for each organ in rotational TCM schemes applied to adult male and female patients have also been found. As the application of TCM techniques becomes more prevalent, the need for including TCM in CT dose estimates will necessarily increase. (author)

  17. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using a series of adult Japanese voxel phantoms against external photon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a complete set of conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses calculated for external photon exposure using five Japanese adult voxel phantoms developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). At the JAEA, high-resolution Japanese voxel phantoms have been developed to clarify the variation of organ doses due to the anatomical characteristics of Japanese, and three male phantoms (JM, JM2 and Otoko) and two female phantoms (JF and Onago) have been constructed up to now. The conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses for the five voxel phantoms have been calculated for six kinds of idealized irradiation geometries from monoenergetic photons ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV using EGS4, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport. The dose conversion coefficients are given as absorbed dose and effective dose per unit air-kerma free-in-air, and are presented in tables and figures. The calculated dose conversion coefficients are compared with those of voxel phantoms based on the Caucasian and the recommended values in ICRP74 in order to discuss (1) variation of organ dose due to the body size and individual anatomy, such as position and shape of organs, and (2) effect of posture on organ doses. The present report provides valuable data to study the influence of the body characteristics of Japanese upon the organ doses and to discuss developing reference Japanese and Asian phantoms. (author)

  18. Radioimmunotherapy. Dose calculation and radionuclides used in treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, S.

    1995-10-01

    In radioimmunotherapy (RIT) monoclonal antibodies to cancer-associated antigens can be utilized for the transport of therapeutic radioisotopes to cancer cells. Intravenous administration of radiolabelled antibody is a potentially curative form of therapy in hematological amignancies as circulating antibodies have easy access to tumour sites. Intravenous RIT is less effective in the treatment of solid tumours because of the low fractional uptake of the injected dose, particularly in the central parts of tumours. In solid tumours more promising results have been achieved by local RIT applications. The choice of radiation - α, β or γ - will depend of the characteristics of the tumour. The importance of radiation delivered by Auger electrons has been largely underestimated in the past, but recent research has resulted in a remarkable reassessment of this issue significantly influencing the selection of radioisotopes for RIT. Research is now being focused on the therapeutic aspects of different isotopes and microdosimetric problems. There are now good prospects of RIT becoming an important form of cancer treatment before year 2000. (orig.) (78 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.)

  19. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  20. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  1. Tensit - a simulation tool for migration, risk and dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.; Kautsky, U.; Vahlund, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    During the next years the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) performs site investigations for a future repository of spent nuclear fuel. The repository will be situated in crystalline rock at a depth of approximately 500 m. Novel methods based on systems and landscape ecology are developed to understand the interacting mechanisms and finally, to model radionuclide migration in the biosphere using site specific data. These models and methods are later used as part of the overall safety assessment for the repository where also migration in the near field and in the bedrock is considered. In the present paper, a newly developed probabilistic simulation package, TENSIT, is presented. The package is based on pre-existing codes (Matlab, Simulink and the probabilistic engine-at-risk) and is capable of performing radionuclide migration calculations both for the repository and the biosphere. Hence, a platform independent, transparent (well documented and intuitive on a model scale), thoroughly supported, efficient and user friendly (graphical interface for the modeler) code can be developed at a fairly low cost. Comparisons with other codes used for compartment based biosphere modelling and the PSACOIN Level 1B exercise shows on a good agreement on the application scale. Moreover, by basing the package on continuously maintained, pre-existing codes, potential risks associated with a less spread software may be avoided. In addition to the compartment based models based on transfer factors, TENSIT is also able to handle the more complex ecosystem models (based on flow of carbon and nutrients) either separately or in combination with the compartment models. Within the project, biosphere migration calculations have been performed using TENSIT for a watershed in the Forsmark area (one of the studied sites). In this simulation, data from the ongoing site investigation program has been used to define the based model. (author)

  2. SUBDOSA: a computer program for calculating external doses from accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Houston, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    A computer program, SUBDOSA, was developed for calculating external γ and β doses to individuals from the accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Characteristics of SUBDOSA are: doses from both γ and β radiation are calculated as a function of depth in tissue, summed and reported as skin, eye, gonadal, and total body dose; doses are calculated for releases within each of several release time intervals and nuclide inventories and atmospheric dispersion conditions are considered for each time interval; radioactive decay is considered during the release and/or transit using a chain decay scheme with branching to account for transitions to and from isomeric states; the dose from gamma radiation is calculated using a numerical integration technique to account for the finite size of the plume; and the program computes and lists the normalized air concentrations at ground level as a function of distance from the point of release. (auth)

  3. Comparison of EGS4 and MCNP Monte Carlo codes when calculating radiotherapy depth doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, P A; Lewis, D G; Al-Affan, I A; Smith, C W

    1998-05-01

    The Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and MCNP have been compared when calculating radiotherapy depth doses in water. The aims of the work were to study (i) the differences between calculated depth doses in water for a range of monoenergetic photon energies and (ii) the relative efficiency of the two codes for different electron transport energy cut-offs. The depth doses from the two codes agree with each other within the statistical uncertainties of the calculations (1-2%). The relative depth doses also agree with data tabulated in the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25. A discrepancy in the dose build-up region may by attributed to the different electron transport algorithims used by EGS4 and MCNP. This discrepancy is considerably reduced when the improved electron transport routines are used in the latest (4B) version of MCNP. Timing calculations show that EGS4 is at least 50% faster than MCNP for the geometries used in the simulations.

  4. Effects of secondary interactions on the dose calculation in treatments with Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, E.

    2004-01-01

    The aimed of this work consists of evaluating the influence of the secondary contributions of dose (thermal neutrons dose, epithermal neutrons dose, fast neutrons dose and photon dose) in treatment planning with BNCT. MCNP4B Code was used to calculate RBE-Gy doses through the irradiation of the modified Snyder head head phantom.A reduction of the therapeutical gain of monoenergetic neutron beans was observed in non invasive treatments, provoked for the predominance of the fast neutron dose component in the skin, showing that the secondary contributions of dose can contribute more in the direction to raise the dose in the fabric healthy that in the tumor, thus reducing the treatment efficiency. (author)

  5. Calculation of age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides uniformly distributed in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tran Van; Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Tsuda, Shuichi; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2005-02-01

    Age-dependent dose conversion coefficients for external exposure to photons emitted by radionuclides uniformly distributed in air were calculated. The size of the source region in the calculation was assumed to be effectively semi-infinite in extent. Firstly, organ doses were calculated with a series of age-specific MIRD-5 type phantoms using MCNP code, a Monte Carlo transport code. The calculations were performed for mono-energetic photon sources of twelve energies from 10 keV to 5 MeV and for phantoms of newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and adult. Then, the effective doses to the different age-phantoms from the mono-energetic photon sources were estimated based on the obtained organ doses. The calculated effective doses were used to interpolate the conversion coefficients of the effective doses for 160 radionuclides, which are important for dose assessment of nuclear facilities. In the calculation, energies and intensities of emitted photons from radionuclides were taken from DECDC, a recent compilation of decay data for radiation dosimetry developed at JAERI. The results are tabulated in the form of effective dose per unit concentration and time (Sv per Bq s m -3 ). (author)

  6. Dose calculation method with 60-cobalt gamma rays in total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaff, Luiz Alberto Malaguti

    2001-01-01

    Physical factors associated to total body irradiation using 60 Co gamma rays beams, were studied in order to develop a calculation method of the dose distribution that could be reproduced in any radiotherapy center with good precision. The method is based on considering total body irradiation as a large and irregular field with heterogeneities. To calculate doses, or doses rates, of each area of interest (head, thorax, thigh, etc.), scattered radiation is determined. It was observed that if dismagnified fields were considered to calculate the scattered radiation, the resulting values could be applied on a projection to the real size to obtain the values for dose rate calculations. In a parallel work it was determined the variation of the dose rate in the air, for the distance of treatment, and for points out of the central axis. This confirm that the use of the inverse square law is not valid. An attenuation curve for a broad beam was also determined in order to allow the use of absorbers. In this work all the adapted formulas for dose rate calculations in several areas of the body are described, as well time/dose templates sheets for total body irradiation. The in vivo dosimetry, proved that either experimental or calculated dose rate values (achieved by the proposed method), did not have significant discrepancies. (author)

  7. Hot particle dose calculations using the computer code VARSKIN Mod 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The only calculational model recognised by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for hot particle dosimetry is VARSKIN Mod 1. Because the code was designed to calculate skin dose from distributed skin contamination and not hot particles, it is assumed that the particle has no thickness and, therefore, that no self-absorption occurs within the source material. For low energy beta particles such as those emitted from 60 Co, a significant amount of self-shielding occurs in hot particles and VARSKIN Mod 1 overestimates the skin dose. In addition, the presence of protective clothing, which will reduce the calculated skin dose for both high and low energy beta emitters, is not modelled in VARSKIN Mod 1. Finally, there is no provision in VARSKIN Mod 1 to calculate the gamma contribution to skin dose from radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma radiation. The computer code VARSKIN Mod 1 has been modified to model three-dimensional sources, insertion of layers of protective clothing between the source and skin, and gamma dose from appropriate radionuclides. The new code, VARSKIN Mod 2, is described and the sensitivity of the calculated dose to source geometry, diameter, thickness, density, and protective clothing thickness are discussed. Finally, doses calculated using VARSKIN Mod 2 are compared to doses measured from hot particles found in nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. [Comparison of dose calculation algorithms in stereotactic radiation therapy in lung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Yuki; Araki, Fujio; Kanetake, Nagisa; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Tominaga, Hirofumi; Sakata, Jyunichi; Oono, Takeshi; Kouno, Tomohiro; Hioki, Kazunari

    2013-06-01

    Dose calculation algorithms in radiation treatment planning systems (RTPSs) play a crucial role in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the lung with heterogeneous media. This study investigated the performance and accuracy of dose calculation for three algorithms: analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), pencil beam convolution (PBC) and Acuros XB (AXB) in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems), by comparison against the Voxel Monte Carlo algorithm (VMC) in iPlan (BrainLab). The dose calculations were performed with clinical lung treatments under identical planning conditions, and the dose distributions and the dose volume histogram (DVH) were compared among algorithms. AAA underestimated the dose in the planning target volume (PTV) compared to VMC and AXB in most clinical plans. In contrast, PBC overestimated the PTV dose. AXB tended to slightly overestimate the PTV dose compared to VMC but the discrepancy was within 3%. The discrepancy in the PTV dose between VMC and AXB appears to be due to differences in physical material assignments, material voxelization methods, and an energy cut-off for electron interactions. The dose distributions in lung treatments varied significantly according to the calculation accuracy of the algorithms. VMC and AXB are better algorithms than AAA for SBRT.

  9. A fast dose calculation method based on table lookup for IMRT optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Lauterbach, Marc; Wu Yan; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-01-01

    This note describes a fast dose calculation method that can be used to speed up the optimization process in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Most iterative optimization algorithms in IMRT require a large number of dose calculations to achieve convergence and therefore the total amount of time needed for the IMRT planning can be substantially reduced by using a faster dose calculation method. The method that is described in this note relies on an accurate dose calculation engine that is used to calculate an approximate dose kernel for each beam used in the treatment plan. Once the kernel is computed and saved, subsequent dose calculations can be done rapidly by looking up this kernel. Inaccuracies due to the approximate nature of the kernel in this method can be reduced by performing scheduled kernel updates. This fast dose calculation method can be performed more than two orders of magnitude faster than the typical superposition/convolution methods and therefore is suitable for applications in which speed is critical, e.g., in an IMRT optimization that requires a simulated annealing optimization algorithm or in a practical IMRT beam-angle optimization system. (note)

  10. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance

  11. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  12. Dose and dose commitment calculations from groundwaterborne radio-active elements released from a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.

    1983-05-01

    The turnover of radioactive matter entering the biosphere with groundwater has been studied with regard to exposure and doses to critical groups and populations. Two main recipients, a well and a lake, have been considered for the inflow of groundwaterborne nuclides. Mathematical models of a set of coupled ecosystems on regional, intermediate and global levels have been used for calculations of doses. The intermediate system refers to the Baltic Sea. The mathematical treatment of the model is based upon compartment theory with first order kinetics and also includes products in decay chains. The time-dependent exposures have been studied for certain long-lived nuclides of radiological interest in waste from disposed fuel. Dose and dose commitment have been calculated for different episodes for inflow to the biosphere. (author)

  13. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Tien Thinh; Nguyen Hao Quang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  14. A simple formula for depth dose calculation for Co-60 teletherapy beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, U.B.; Kelkar, N.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Knowledge of dose at all points of interest in the plane of tumour is essential for treatment planning. A very simple formula for scatter dose calculation along the central axis of a Co-60 beam has been derived. This formula uses primary dose at depth d, scatter air ratio at the depth of maximum ionisation and the effective depth of the volume, irradiating the medium. The method for calculation of percentage depth dose at any point in the principal plane has been explained in detail. The simple form of the formulation will help in improving the treatment plans for treatments of lesions using Co-60 teletherapy machines. (orig.) [de

  15. Calculation of the radial dose distribution around the trajectory of an ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, G.

    1979-01-01

    The dose caused in polyester by incoming protons, alpha beams, 127 I ions, and 16 O ions has been calculated as a function of the distance perpendicularly to their trajectory. Based on simplified assumptions regarding the binding state of target electrons, emission of secondary electrons and their propagation in matter, it has been found that the dose depends on the distance to the ion trajectory (R) in the form Rsup(-l), l being about 2. The calculated radial dose distributions agree well with values calculated or measured by other authors

  16. Method for calculating individual equivalent doses and cumulative dose of population in the vicinity of nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namestek, L.; Khorvat, D; Shvets, J.; Kunz, Eh.

    1976-01-01

    A method of calculating the doses of external and internal person irradiation in the nuclear power plant vicinity under conditions of normal operation and accident situations has been described. The main difference between the above method and methods used up to now is the use of a new antropomorphous representation of a human body model together with all the organs. The antropomorphous model of human body and its organs is determined as a set of simple solids, coordinates of disposistion of the solids, sizes, masses, densities and composition corresponding the genuine organs. The use of the Monte-Carlo method is the second difference. The results of the calculations according to the model suggested can be used for determination: a critical group of inhabitans under conditions of normal plant operation; groups of inhabitants most subjected to irradiation in the case of possible accident; a critical sector with a maximum collective dose in the case of an accident; a critical radioisotope favouring the greatest contribution to an individual equivalent dose; critical irradiation ways promoting a maximum contribution to individual equivalent doses; cumulative collective doses for the whole region or for a chosen part of the region permitting to estimate a population dose. The consequent method evoluation suggests the development of separate units of the calculationg program, critical application and the selection of input data of physical, plysiological and ecological character and improvement of the calculated program for the separate concrete events [ru

  17. Effects of microdistribution of tritium on dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, W.V.; Kwok, C.S.; Nunes, J.

    1992-06-01

    Literature and data pertaining to the microdosimetry, relative biological effectiveness, subcellular distribution, organ uptake and retention for organically-bound tritium are reviewed. The quality factor for the electron degradation spectrum associated with the radiation field of tritium β-rays in water was calculated. The value was found to be 1.9 ± .2. A related experimental measure of quality with value 1.6 ± .2 and an estimate of 1.3 based on simulation studies are cited. The average value for relative biological effectiveness for a data base of 55 values was found to be 1.8 ± .1. The influence of reference radiation, in vivo versus in vitro methodologies, and the use of tritiated thymidine or tritiated water are discussed. A methodology designed to estimate the effects of subcellular distribution is described and a suitable parameter, the localization factor defined. Estimates of this factor are made for both nuclear-bound and organically-bound tritium. Values of 4 and 1.5 respectively are suggested. Organ uptake studies in rodents following long-term feeding of organically-bound tritium are compared. The tritium is found to be unequally distributed among the tissues studied. The highest specific activity occurs in liver, with the lowest in femur. The specific activity of tritium in tissue-free water slightly exceeds that of organically-bound tritium in liver. Retention studies reveal a three-component exponential decrease of organically-bound tritium. No discernible trends of the periods of the three components with specific organs could be established. Average values of the periods are 1.2 ± .2, 10 ± 2, and 65 ± 8 days. It is concluded that specific enhancement of radiobiological effectiveness due to incorporation of tritium in DNA does probably not occur. The radiotoxicological impact of organically-bound tritium could warrant the use of a radiation weighing factor between 2 and 3

  18. Calculation of cobalt-60 primary and scatter dose in layered heterogeneous phantoms using primary and scatter dose spread arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Akira

    1993-01-01

    A method of making 60 Co γ-ray primary and scatter dose spread arrays in water is described. The primary dose spread array is made using forward and backward primary dose spread equations (h 1 and h 2 ), where both equations contain a laterally spread primary dose equation (G), made from measured dose data in a cork phantom. The scatter dose spread array is made using differential scatter-maximum ratio (dSMR) and differential backscatter factor (dBSF) equations (k 1 and k 2 ), where both equations are made to be continuous on the boundary. Primary and scatter dose calculations are performed along the beam axis in layered cork heterogeneous phantoms. It is found, even for 60 Co γ-rays, that when a small tumor in the lung is irradiated with a field that just surrounds the tumor, the beam entrance surface and lateral side of the tumor may obtain no therapeutic dose, because of loss of longitudinal and lateral electronic equilibrium, and when a large tumor in the lung is irradiated with a field just surrounding the tumor, the lateral side of the tumor may obtain no therapeutic dose due to loss of lateral electronic equilibrium. (author)

  19. Conceptual design considerations for providing hook-up type schemes for tracking beyond design basis events (BDBE) for 700 MWe PHWR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vhora, S.F.; Inder Jit; Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    A broad review of major nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl reveals that provision of access to the reactor core for cooling purpose had to be made from outside the reactor building by tunneling. Also the NAPS fire incident could be mitigated once the fire water injection to the steam generators could be ensured. In this case the boiler room which was outside the primary containment was accessible relatively easily for mitigation after the initial period. Both of the above had accident scenarios which can be termed Beyond Design Basis (BDBE) since the accident initiation/scenario did not fit into the events under postulated initiating events (PIES) or Design Basis Events (DBEs). These accidents or events reveal that some sort of access to the core or the components inside the Reactor building becomes necessary. It is also to be noted that manual intervention beyond the initial period of half an hour or earlier in the Emergency operating procedure (EOP) is inevitably called for as a recovery action in order to mitigate the severity and minimize long term consequences. This paper attempts to discuss the type of concepts which can give access to the core or associated systems which can then provide continued heat sink. The discussions would include the criteria for design of such concepts and give examples of such concepts already implemented and proposes schemes to be implemented in the 700 MWe Project. (author)

  20. Point kernels and superposition methods for scatter dose calculations in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Point kernels have been generated and applied for calculation of scatter dose distributions around monoenergetic point sources for photon energies ranging from 28 to 662 keV. Three different approaches for dose calculations have been compared: a single-kernel superposition method, a single-kernel superposition method where the point kernels are approximated as isotropic and a novel 'successive-scattering' superposition method for improved modelling of the dose from multiply scattered photons. An extended version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used for generating the kernels and for benchmarking the absorbed dose distributions calculated with the superposition methods. It is shown that dose calculation by superposition at and below 100 keV can be simplified by using isotropic point kernels. Compared to the assumption of full in-scattering made by algorithms currently in clinical use, the single-kernel superposition method improves dose calculations in a half-phantom consisting of air and water. Further improvements are obtained using the successive-scattering superposition method, which reduces the overestimates of dose close to the phantom surface usually associated with kernel superposition methods at brachytherapy photon energies. It is also shown that scatter dose point kernels can be parametrized to biexponential functions, making them suitable for use with an effective implementation of the collapsed cone superposition algorithm. (author)

  1. Independent dose calculation in IMRT for the Tps Iplan using the Clarkson modified integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrada, A.; Tello, Z.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.

    2014-08-01

    Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatments require a quality assurance (Q A) specific patient before delivery. These controls include the experimental verification in dose phantom of the total plan as well as dose distributions. The use of independent dose calculation (IDC) is used in 3D-Crt treatments; however its application in IMRT requires the implementation of an algorithm that allows considering a non-uniform intensity beam. The purpose of this work was to develop IDC software in IMRT with MLC using the algorithm proposed by Kung (Kung et al. 2000). The software was done using Matlab programming. The Clarkson modified integral was implemented on each flowing, applying concentric rings for the dose determination. From the integral of each field was calculated the dose anywhere. One time finished a planning; all data are exported to a phantom where a Q A plan is generated. On this is calculated the half dose in a representative volume of the ionization chamber and the dose at the center of it. Until now 230 IMRT planning were analyzed carried out ??in the treatment planning system (Tps) Iplan. For each one of them Q A plan was generated, were calculated and compared calculated dose with the Tps, IDC system and measurement with ionization chamber. The average difference between measured and calculated dose with the IDC system was 0.4% ± 2.2% [-6.8%, 6.4%]. The difference between the measured and the calculated doses by the pencil-beam algorithm (Pb) of Tps was 2.6% ± 1.41% [-2.0%, 5.6%] and with the Monte Carlo algorithm was 0.4% ± 1.5% [-4.9%, 3.7%]. The differences of the carried out software are comparable to the obtained with the ionization chamber and Tps in Monte Carlo mode. (author)

  2. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  3. Validation of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy using cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppaelae, Tiina; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Merimaa, Katja; Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, POB 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, POB 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kortesniemi, Mika, E-mail: hanna.koivunoro@helsinki.f [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki, POB 340, FI-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2010-06-21

    In this paper, the accuracy of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain and head and neck cancer was studied at the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. A cylindrical water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were applied with two beam aperture-to-surface distances (ASD). The calculations using the simulation environment for radiation application (SERA) treatment planning system were compared to neutron activation measurements with Au and Mn foils, photon dose measurements with an ionization chamber and the reference simulations with the MCNP5 code. Photon dose calculations using SERA differ from the ionization chamber measurements by 2-13% (disagreement increased along the depth in the phantom), but are in agreement with the MCNP5 calculations within 2%. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) and {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) reaction rates calculated using SERA agree within 10% and 8%, respectively, with the measurements and within 5% with the MCNP5 calculations at depths >0.5 cm from the phantom surface. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) reaction rate represents the nitrogen and boron depth dose within 1%. Discrepancy in the SERA fast neutron dose calculation (of up to 37%) is corrected if the biased fast neutron dose calculation option is not applied. Reduced voxel cell size ({<=}0.5 cm) improves the SERA calculation accuracy on the phantom surface. Despite the slight overestimation of the epithermal neutrons and underestimation of the thermal neutrons in the beam model, neutron calculation accuracy with the SERA system is sufficient for reliable BNCT treatment planning with the two studied treatment distances. The discrepancy between measured and calculated photon dose remains unsatisfactorily high for depths >6 cm from the phantom surface. Increasing discrepancy along the phantom depth is expected to be caused by the inaccurately determined effective point of the ionization chamber.

  4. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  5. Dose calculation with respiration-averaged CT processed from cine CT without a respiratory surrogate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegel, Adam C.; Ahmad, Moiz; Sun Xiaojun; Pan Tinsu

    2008-01-01

    Dose calculation for thoracic radiotherapy is commonly performed on a free-breathing helical CT despite artifacts caused by respiratory motion. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is one method to incorporate motion information into the treatment planning process. Some centers now use the respiration-averaged CT (RACT), the pixel-by-pixel average of the ten phases of 4D-CT, for dose calculation. This method, while sparing the tedious task of 4D dose calculation, still requires 4D-CT technology. The authors have recently developed a means to reconstruct RACT directly from unsorted cine CT data from which 4D-CT is formed, bypassing the need for a respiratory surrogate. Using RACT from cine CT for dose calculation may be a means to incorporate motion information into dose calculation without performing 4D-CT. The purpose of this study was to determine if RACT from cine CT can be substituted for RACT from 4D-CT for the purposes of dose calculation, and if increasing the cine duration can decrease differences between the dose distributions. Cine CT data and corresponding 4D-CT simulations for 23 patients with at least two breathing cycles per cine duration were retrieved. RACT was generated four ways: First from ten phases of 4D-CT, second, from 1 breathing cycle of images, third, from 1.5 breathing cycles of images, and fourth, from 2 breathing cycles of images. The clinical treatment plan was transferred to each RACT and dose was recalculated. Dose planes were exported at orthogonal planes through the isocenter (coronal, sagittal, and transverse orientations). The resulting dose distributions were compared using the gamma (γ) index within the planning target volume (PTV). Failure criteria were set to 2%/1 mm. A follow-up study with 50 additional lung cancer patients was performed to increase sample size. The same dose recalculation and analysis was performed. In the primary patient group, 22 of 23 patients had 100% of points within the PTV pass γ criteria

  6. A GPU implementation of a track-repeating algorithm for proton radiotherapy dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes, Pablo P; Mirkovic, Dragan; Taddei, Phillip J

    2010-01-01

    An essential component in proton radiotherapy is the algorithm to calculate the radiation dose to be delivered to the patient. The most common dose algorithms are fast but they are approximate analytical approaches. However their level of accuracy is not always satisfactory, especially for heterogeneous anatomical areas, like the thorax. Monte Carlo techniques provide superior accuracy; however, they often require large computation resources, which render them impractical for routine clinical use. Track-repeating algorithms, for example the fast dose calculator, have shown promise for achieving the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations for proton radiotherapy dose calculations in a fraction of the computation time. We report on the implementation of the fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy on a card equipped with graphics processor units (GPUs) rather than on a central processing unit architecture. This implementation reproduces the full Monte Carlo and CPU-based track-repeating dose calculations within 2%, while achieving a statistical uncertainty of 2% in less than 1 min utilizing one single GPU card, which should allow real-time accurate dose calculations.

  7. Evaluation of heterogeneity dose distributions for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT: comparison of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation with other algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Wataru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from three different algorithms with the x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC calculations, in actual computed tomography (CT scans for use in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT of small lung cancers. Methods Slow CT scan of 20 patients was performed and the internal target volume (ITV was delineated on Pinnacle3. All plans were first calculated with a scatter homogeneous mode (SHM which is compatible with Clarkson algorithm using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS. The planned dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In a second step, the CT images, structures and beam data were exported to other treatment planning systems (TPSs. Collapsed cone convolution (CCC from Pinnacle3, superposition (SP from XiO, and XVMC from Monaco were used for recalculating. The dose distributions and the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs were compared with each other. Results The phantom test revealed that all algorithms could reproduce the measured data within 1% except for the SHM with inhomogeneous phantom. For the patient study, the SHM greatly overestimated the isocenter (IC doses and the minimal dose received by 95% of the PTV (PTV95 compared to XVMC. The differences in mean doses were 2.96 Gy (6.17% for IC and 5.02 Gy (11.18% for PTV95. The DVH's and dose distributions with CCC and SP were in agreement with those obtained by XVMC. The average differences in IC doses between CCC and XVMC, and SP and XVMC were -1.14% (p = 0.17, and -2.67% (p = 0.0036, respectively. Conclusions Our work clearly confirms that the actual practice of relying solely on a Clarkson algorithm may be inappropriate for SRT planning. Meanwhile, CCC and SP were close to XVMC simulations and actual dose distributions obtained in lung SRT.

  8. CT-based dose calculations and in vivo dosimetry for lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essers, M.; Lanson, J.H.; Leunens, G.; Schnabel, T.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable CT-based dose calculations and dosimetric quality control are essential for the introduction of new conformal techniques for the treatment of lung cancer. The first aim of this study was therefore to check the accuracy of dose calculations based on CT-densities, using a simple inhomogeneity correction model, for lung cancer patients irradiated with an AP-PA treatment technique. Second, the use of diodes for absolute exit dose measurements and an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for relative transmission dose verification was investigated for 22 and 12 patients, respectively. The measured dose values were compared with calculations performed using our 3-dimensional treatment planning system, using CT-densities or assuming the patient to be water-equivalent. Using water-equivalent calculations, the actual exit dose value under lung was, on average, underestimated by 30%, with an overall spread of 10% (1 SD). Using inhomogeneity corrections, the exit dose was, on average, overestimated by 4%, with an overall spread of 6% (1 SD). Only 2% of the average deviation was due to the inhomogeneity correction model. An uncertainty in exit dose calculation of 2.5% (1 SD) could be explained by organ motion, resulting from the ventilatory or cardiac cycle. The most important reason for the large overall spread was, however, the uncertainty involved in performing point measurements: about 4% (1 SD). This difference resulted from the systematic and random deviation in patient set-up and therefore in diode position with respect to patient anatomy. Transmission and exit dose values agreed with an average difference of 1.1%. Transmission dose profiles also showed good agreement with calculated exit dose profiles. Our study shows that, for this treatment technique, the dose in the thorax region is quite accurately predicted using CT-based dose calculations, even if a simple inhomogeneity correction model is used. Point detectors such as diodes are not suitable for exit

  9. Modification and validation of an analytical source model for external beam radiotherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Scott E., E-mail: sedavids@utmb.edu [Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 (United States); Cui, Jing [Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033 (United States); Kry, Stephen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Vicic, Milos [Department of Applied Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); White, R. Allen [Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A dose calculation tool, which combines the accuracy of the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo code and the versatility of a practical analytical multisource model, which was previously reported has been improved and validated for the Varian 6 and 10 MV linear accelerators (linacs). The calculation tool can be used to calculate doses in advanced clinical application studies. One shortcoming of current clinical trials that report dose from patient plans is the lack of a standardized dose calculation methodology. Because commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) have their own dose calculation algorithms and the clinical trial participant who uses these systems is responsible for commissioning the beam model, variation exists in the reported calculated dose distributions. Today’s modern linac is manufactured to tight specifications so that variability within a linac model is quite low. The expectation is that a single dose calculation tool for a specific linac model can be used to accurately recalculate dose from patient plans that have been submitted to the clinical trial community from any institution. The calculation tool would provide for a more meaningful outcome analysis. Methods: The analytical source model was described by a primary point source, a secondary extra-focal source, and a contaminant electron source. Off-axis energy softening and fluence effects were also included. The additions of hyperbolic functions have been incorporated into the model to correct for the changes in output and in electron contamination with field size. A multileaf collimator (MLC) model is included to facilitate phantom and patient dose calculations. An offset to the MLC leaf positions was used to correct for the rudimentary assumed primary point source. Results: Dose calculations of the depth dose and profiles for field sizes 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm agree with measurement within 2% of the maximum dose or 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) for 95% of the data

  10. An evaluation of calculation parameters in the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo codes and their effect on surface dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has proven invaluable for radiation transport simulations to accurately determine radiation doses and is widely considered a reliable computational measure that can substitute a physical experiment where direct measurements are not possible or feasible. In the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC codes, there are several user-specified parameters and customized transport algorithms, which may affect the calculation results. In order to fully utilize the MC methods available in these codes, it is essential to understand all these options and to use them appropriately. In this study, the effects of the electron transport algorithms in EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, which are often a trade-off between calculation accuracy and efficiency, were investigated in the buildup region of a homogeneous water phantom and also in a heterogeneous phantom using the DOSRZnrc user code. The algorithms and parameters investigated include: boundary crossing algorithm (BCA), skin depth, electron step algorithm (ESA), global electron cutoff energy (ECUT) and electron production cutoff energy (AE). The variations in calculated buildup doses were found to be larger than 10% for different user-specified transport parameters. We found that using BCA = EXACT gave the best results in terms of accuracy and efficiency in calculating buildup doses using DOSRZnrc. In addition, using the ESA = PRESTA-I option was found to be the best way of reducing the total calculation time without losing accuracy in the results at high energies (few keV ∼ MeV). We also found that although choosing a higher ECUT/AE value in the beam modelling can dramatically improve computation efficiency, there is a significant trade-off in surface dose uncertainty. Our study demonstrates that a careful choice of user-specified transport parameters is required when conducting similar MC calculations. (note)

  11. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows

  12. Sub-second pencil beam dose calculation on GPU for adaptive proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-06-21

    Although proton therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams has the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, the created dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of adaptive treatment techniques where the dose can be monitored as it is being delivered is highly desirable. We present a GPU-based dose calculation engine relying on the widely used pencil beam algorithm, developed for on-line dose calculation. The calculation engine was implemented from scratch, with each step of the algorithm parallelized and adapted to run efficiently on the GPU architecture. To ensure fast calculation, it employs several application-specific modifications and simplifications, and a fast scatter-based implementation of the computationally expensive kernel superposition step. The calculation time for a skull base treatment plan using two beam directions was 0.22 s on an Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU, whereas a test case of a cubic target in water from the literature took 0.14 s to calculate. The accuracy of the patient dose distributions was assessed by calculating the γ-index with respect to a gold standard Monte Carlo simulation. The passing rates were 99.2% and 96.7%, respectively, for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria, matching those produced by a clinical treatment planning system.

  13. Influence on dose calculation by difference of dose calculation algorithms in stereotactic lung irradiation. Comparison of pencil beam convolution (inhomogeneity correction: batho power law) and analytical anisotropic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Masayuki; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Fukunaga, Jyunichi; Hirano, Naomi; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Hirose, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    The monitor unit (MU) was calculated by pencil beam convolution (inhomogeneity correction algorithm: batho power law) [PBC (BPL)] which is the dose calculation algorithm based on measurement in the past in the stereotactic lung irradiation study. The recalculation was done by analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), which is the dose calculation algorithm based on theory data. The MU calculated by PBC (BPL) and AAA was compared for each field. In the result of the comparison of 1031 fields in 136 cases, the MU calculated by PBC (BPL) was about 2% smaller than that calculated by AAA. This depends on whether one does the calculation concerning the extension of the second electrons. In particular, the difference in the MU is influenced by the X-ray energy. With the same X-ray energy, when the irradiation field size is small, the lung pass length is long, the lung pass length percentage is large, and the CT value of the lung is low, and the difference of MU is increased. (author)

  14. High-speed radiation dose calculations for severe accidents using INDOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, G.R.; Godin-Jacqmin, L.J.; Raines, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The computer code INDOS (in-plant dose) has been developed for the high-speed calculation of in-plant radiation dose rates and doses during and/or due to a severe accident at a nuclear power plant. This paper describes the current capabilities of the code and presents the results of calculations for several severe-accident scenarios. The INDOS code can be run either as a module of MAAP, a code widely used in the nuclear industry for simulating the response of a light water reactor system during severe accidents, or as a stand-alone code using output from an alternative companion code. INDOS calculates gamma dose rates and doses in major plant compartments caused by airborne and deposited fission products released during an accident. The fission product concentrations are determined by the companion code

  15. Accurate convolution/superposition for multi-resolution dose calculation using cumulative tabulated kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H; Chen Mingli; Reckwerdt, Paul J; Mackie, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Convolution/superposition (C/S) is regarded as the standard dose calculation method in most modern radiotherapy treatment planning systems. Different implementations of C/S could result in significantly different dose distributions. This paper addresses two major implementation issues associated with collapsed cone C/S: one is how to utilize the tabulated kernels instead of analytical parametrizations and the other is how to deal with voxel size effects. Three methods that utilize the tabulated kernels are presented in this paper. These methods differ in the effective kernels used: the differential kernel (DK), the cumulative kernel (CK) or the cumulative-cumulative kernel (CCK). They result in slightly different computation times but significantly different voxel size effects. Both simulated and real multi-resolution dose calculations are presented. For simulation tests, we use arbitrary kernels and various voxel sizes with a homogeneous phantom, and assume forward energy transportation only. Simulations with voxel size up to 1 cm show that the CCK algorithm has errors within 0.1% of the maximum gold standard dose. Real dose calculations use a heterogeneous slab phantom, both the 'broad' (5 x 5 cm 2 ) and the 'narrow' (1.2 x 1.2 cm 2 ) tomotherapy beams. Various voxel sizes (0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm) are used for dose calculations. The results show that all three algorithms have negligible difference (0.1%) for the dose calculation in the fine resolution (0.5 mm voxels). But differences become significant when the voxel size increases. As for the DK or CK algorithm in the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 10% (7%) of the maximum dose. As for the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation using the CCK algorithm, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 1% of the maximum dose. Among all three methods, the CCK algorithm

  16. Technical basis for beta skin dose calculations at the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Bogard, R.S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the methods for determining shallow dose equivalent to workers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant from skin contamination detected by survey instrumentation. Included is a discussion of how the computer code VARSKIN is used to calculate beta skin dose and how the code input parameters affect skin dose calculation results. A summary of Y-12 Plant specific assumptions used in performing VARSKIN calculations is presented. Derivations of contamination levels that trigger the need for skin dose assessment are given for both enriched and depleted uranium with the use of Y-12 Plant site-specific survey instruments. Department of Energy recording requirements for nonuniform exposure of the skin are illustrated with sample calculations

  17. Dose calculation at distance of irradiation beams: case of women treated for the Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupon, E.; Alziar, I.; Vathaire, F. de; Diallo, I.; Bridier, A.; Bonniaud, G.; Lefkopoulos, D.; Ruaud, J.B.; Rousseau, V.; Kafrouni, H.

    2007-01-01

    The interest of precise calculation of radiation doses distributions remote areas of irradiation is to open new prospects in the knowledge of the contribution of radiotherapy in the occurrence of iatrogenic early and delayed effects. (N.C.)

  18. Modeling for Dose Rate Calculation of the External Exposure to Gamma Emitters in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, K. A.; El-Mongy, S. A.; El-Tahawy, M. S.; Mohsen, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the model proposed and developed in Ph.D thesis of the first author of this work, the dose rate conversion factors (absorbed dose rate in air per specific activity of soil in nGy.hr - 1 per Bq.kg - 1) are calculated 1 m above the ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. This new and simple dose rate calculation software was used for calculation of the dose rate in air 1 m above the ground. Then the results were compared with those obtained by five different groups. Although the developed model is extremely simple, the obtained results of calculations, based on this model, show excellent agreement with those obtained by the above-mentioned models specially that one adopted by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  19. Calculating patient specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. When estimating the radiation dose of an individual patient, patient specific calculation methods must be used. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3 % with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients

  20. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, P [Univ New Mexico Radiology Dept., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heintz, B [Texas Oncology, PA, Southlake, TX (United States); Sandoval, D [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  1. THIDA: code system for calculation of the exposure dose rate around a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiromasa; Igarashi, Masahito.

    1978-12-01

    A code system THIDA has been developed for calculation of the exposure dose rates around a fusion device. It consists of the following: one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport codes; induced activity calculation code; activation chain, activation cross section, radionuclide gamma-ray energy/intensity and gamma-ray group constant files; and gamma ray flux to exposure dose rate conversion coefficients. (author)

  2. Calculations of received dose for different points in the enrichment uranium oxide warehouse at 4%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso V, G.

    1990-06-01

    In order to verifying that the received dose so much inside as outside of the warehouse of enriched uranium dioxide to 4% it doesn't represent risk to the personnel, the modelling of this and the corresponding calculations for the extreme case of dose at contact are made. (Author)

  3. Monte Carlo calculation of received dose from ingestion and inhalation of natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trobok, M.; Zupunski, Lj.; Spasic-Jokic, V.; Gordanic, V.; Sovilj, P.

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of this study eighty samples are taken from the area Bela Crkva and Vrsac. The activity of radionuclide in the soil is determined by gamma- ray spectrometry. Monte Carlo method is used to calculate effective dose received by population resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of natural uranium. The estimated doses were compared with the legally prescribed levels. (author) [sr

  4. Calculations of individual doses for Techa River Cohort members exposed to atmospheric radioiodine from Mayak releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Vorobiova, Marina I.; Tokareva, Elena E.; Akhramenko, Boris N.; Krivoschapov, Victor A.; Degteva, Marina O.

    2017-11-01

    Time-dependent thyroid doses were reconstructed for Techa River Cohort members living near the Mayak production facilities from 131I released to the atmosphere for all relevant exposure pathways. The calculational approach uses four general steps: 1) construct estimates of releases of 131I to the air from production facilities; 2) model the transport of 131I in the air and subsequent deposition on the ground and vegetation; 3) model the accumulation of 131I in soil, water, and food products (environmental media); and 4) calculate individual doses by matching appropriate lifestyle and consumption data for the individual to concentrations of 131I in environmental media. The dose calculations are implemented in a Monte Carlo framework that produces best estimates and confidence intervals of dose time-histories. The 131I contribution was 75-99% of the thyroid dose. The mean total thyroid dose for cohort members was 193 mGy and the median was 53 mGy. Thyroid doses for about 3% of cohort members were larger than 1 Gy. About 7% of children born in 1940-1950 had doses larger than 1 Gy. The uncertainty in the 131I dose estimates is low enough for this approach to be used in regional epidemiological studies.

  5. EFFDOS - a FORTRAN-77-code for the calculation of the effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.; Honcu, S.; Huebschmann, W.

    1984-01-01

    The FORTRAN-77-code EFFDOS calculates the effective dose equivalent according to ICRP 26 due to the longterm emission of radionuclides into the atmosphere for the following exposure pathways: inhalation, ingestion, γ-ground irradiation (γ-irradiation by radionuclides deposited on the ground) and β- or γ-submersion (irradiation by the passing radioactive cloud). For calculating the effective dose equivalent at a single spot it is necessary to put in the diffusion factor and - if need be - the washout factor; otherwise EFFDOS calculates the input data for the computer codes ISOLA III and WOLGA-1, which then are enabled to compute the atmospheric diffusion, ground deposition and local dose equivalent distribution for the requested exposure pathway. Atmospheric diffusion, deposition and radionuclide transfer are calculated according to the ''Allgemeine Berechnungsgrundlage ....'' recommended by the German Fed. Ministry of Interior. A sample calculated is added. (orig.) [de

  6. Target dose study of effects of changes in the AAA calculation resolution on lung SABR plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Il; Son, Sang Jun; Ahn, Bum Seok; Jung, Chi Hoon; Yoo, Suk Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Changing the calculation grid of AAA in Lung SABR plan and to analyze the changes in target dose, and investigated the effects associated with it, and considered a suitable method of application. 4D CT image that was used to plan all been taken with Brilliance Big Bore CT (Philips, Netherlands) and in Lung SABR plan(Eclipse TM ver10.0.42, Varian, the USA), use anisotropic analytic algorithm(AAA, ver.10, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and, was calculated by the calculation grid 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mm in each Lung SABR plan. Lung SABR plan of 10 cases are using each of 1.0 mm, 3.0 mm, 5.0 mm calculation grid, and in case of use a 1.0 mm calculation grid V98 of the prescribed dose is about 99.5%±1.5%, Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 92.5±1.5% and Homogeneity Index(HI) is 1.0489±0.0025. In the case of use a 3.0 mm calculation grid V98 dose of the prescribed dose is about 90±4.5% , Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 87.5±3% and HI is about 1.07±1. In the case of use a 5.0 mm calculation grid V98 dose of the prescribed dose is about 63±15%, Dmin of the prescribed dose is about 83±4% and HI is about 1.13±0.2, respectively. The calculation grid of 1.0 mm is better improves the accuracy of dose calculation than using 3.0 mm and 5.mm, although calculation times increase in the case of smaller PTV relatively. As lung, spread relatively large and low density and small PTV, it is considered and good to use a calculation grid of 1.0 mm

  7. Accuracy of internal dose calculations with special consideration of radiopharmaceutical biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    The individual steps of internal dose calculation, including the models and data used, as well as error considerations, are analysed following a short synopsis on the formalism of absorbed dose calculation. The mean dose in a target tissue depends on the administered activity, the residence time of the activity in the source tissues and the mean absorbed dose in the target tissue per transformation in a source tissue. Usually, a standard dosage is applied in radionuclide studies except in children. Actually administered and nomial activities generally differ by less than 10%. For the purpose of internal dose calculation, the biokinetics of a radiopharmaceutical are reflected in the residence times for the individual source tissues. The methods and the evaluation of measurements of biodistribution and retention data are discussed. The extrapolation of animal data to man is treated in some detail, including a survey of the methods used, as well as an attempt for validating these methods. None of these seem to yield more convincing results than the direct transfer of the residence times from animal to man, at least for the two radiopharmaceuticals discussed. The minimum period of measurement to derive residence times for the purpose of dose calculation has been determined as about one physical half-time. Some problems of the dose per transformation to a phantom are presented, including the age- or size-dependence of the internal dose. Organ doses to the phantom, calculated from different apparently reliable sets of biokinetic data, are generally compatible within a factor of 2 to 3, and somatically effective doses are generally compatible within a factor of less than 2

  8. Sensitivity of NTCP parameter values against a change of dose calculation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, Carsten; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Optimization of radiation treatment planning requires estimations of the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). A number of models exist that estimate NTCP from a calculated dose distribution. Since different dose calculation algorithms use different approximations the dose distributions predicted for a given treatment will in general depend on the algorithm. The purpose of this work is to test whether the optimal NTCP parameter values change significantly when the dose calculation algorithm is changed. The treatment plans for 17 breast cancer patients have retrospectively been recalculated with a collapsed cone algorithm (CC) to compare the NTCP estimates for radiation pneumonitis with those obtained from the clinically used pencil beam algorithm (PB). For the PB calculations the NTCP parameters were taken from previously published values for three different models. For the CC calculations the parameters were fitted to give the same NTCP as for the PB calculations. This paper demonstrates that significant shifts of the NTCP parameter values are observed for three models, comparable in magnitude to the uncertainties of the published parameter values. Thus, it is important to quote the applied dose calculation algorithm when reporting estimates of NTCP parameters in order to ensure correct use of the models

  9. JISCARD GUI, a graphical interface application for simple and quick calculation of aviation route doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Ryufuku, Susumu; Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Pilots, flight attendants, and passengers aboard jet aircrafts are subjected to higher cosmic radiation levels at high altitude than on the ground. Additional dose, received during flight is called 'aviation route dose'. Addressing the needs for precise and easy determination of aviation route doses (Sv), the authors have developed a new application 'JISCARD GUI' with a graphical user interface which provides dose rate (Sv/h) distribution along a flight route and aviation route dose. The graphical interface made with Adobe Flash provide functions to select airports on dynamic map or to search by airport/city names, and to report resulting aviation route doses and graphs of dose rate change through a flight. Dose rate data at several cut off rigidity, Rc and force field potential, FFP were calculated in advance using a PHITS-based analytical model and stored in the server as matrix data. Upon user's request of departure/arrival airports and flight date, interpolation using matrix data substantiates derivation of dose rate distribution in a simple and quick manner with sufficient accuracy. Precision of the dose calculation was verified by comparison with JISCARD EX (MS-Excel version) released in September 2008. This advanced application will be open to public through the website of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in the near future. (author)

  10. Dose rates from a C-14 source using extrapolation chamber and MC calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.

    1996-05-01

    The extrapolation chamber technique and the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation technique based on the EGS4 system have been studied for application for determination of dose rates in a low-energy β radiation field e.g., that from a 14 C source. The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for determination of dose rates in β radiation fields. Applying a number of correction factors and the stopping power ratio, tissue to air, the measured dose rate in an air volume surrounded by tissue equivalent material is converted into dose to tissue. Various details of the extrapolation chamber measurement method and evaluation procedure have been studied and further developed, and a complete procedure for the experimental determination of dose rates from a 14 C source is presented. A number of correction factors and other parameters used in the evaluation procedure for the measured data have been obtained by MC calculations. The whole extrapolation chamber measurement procedure was simulated using the MC method. The measured dose rates showed an increasing deviation from the MC calculated dose rates as the absorber thickness increased. This indicates that the EGS4 code may have some limitations for transport of very low-energy electrons. i.e., electrons with estimated energies less than 10 - 20 keV. MC calculations of dose to tissue were performed using two models: a cylindrical tissue phantom and a computer model of the extrapolation chamber. The dose to tissue in the extrapolation chamber model showed an additional buildup dose compared to the dose in the tissue model. (au) 10 tabs., 11 ills., 18 refs

  11. The impact of dose calculation algorithms on partial and whole breast radiation treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basran, Parminder S; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Berrang, Tanya; Olivotto, Ivo A; Beckham, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the calculated dose to target and normal tissues when using pencil beam (PBC), superposition/convolution (AAA) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for whole breast (WBI) and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) treatment plans. Plans for 10 patients who met all dosimetry constraints on a prospective APBI protocol when using PBC calculations were recomputed with AAA and MC, keeping the monitor units and beam angles fixed. Similar calculations were performed for WBI plans on the same patients. Doses to target and normal tissue volumes were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test. For WBI plans the average dose to target volumes when using PBC calculations was not significantly different than AAA calculations, the average PBC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 10.5% higher than the AAA calculations and the average MC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 11.8% lower than the PBC calculations. For ABPI plans there were no differences in dose to the planning target volume, ipsilateral breast, heart, ipsilateral lung, or contra-lateral lung. Although not significant, the maximum PBC dose to the contra-lateral breast was 1.9% higher than AAA and the PBC dose to the clinical target volume was 2.1% higher than AAA. When WBI technique is switched to APBI, there was significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast when using PBC, a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral lung when using AAA, and a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung and contra-lateral lung when using MC. There is very good agreement between PBC, AAA and MC for all target and most normal tissues when treating with APBI and WBI and most of the differences in doses to target and normal tissues are not clinically significant. However, a commonly used dosimetry constraint, as recommended by the ASTRO consensus document for APBI, that no point in the contra-lateral breast volume should receive >3% of the prescribed dose needs

  12. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-12-16

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm(3), the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  13. Independent procedure of checking dose calculations using an independent calculus algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Rozos, A.; Jerez Sainz, I.; Carrasco Rodriguez, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy it is recommended the use of an independent procedure of checking dose calculations, in order to verify the main treatment planning system and double check every patient dosimetry. In this work we present and automatic spreadsheet that import data from planning system using IMPAC/RTP format and verify monitor unit calculation using an independent calculus algorithm. Additionally, it perform a personalized analysis of dose volume histograms and several radiobiological parameters like TCP and NTCP. Finally, the application automatically generate a clinical dosimetry report for every patient, including treatment fields, fractionation, independent check results, dose volume analysis, and first day forms. (Author)

  14. Review of calculational models and computer codes for environmental dose assessment of radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Droppo, J.G.

    1976-06-01

    The development of technological bases for siting nuclear fuel cycle facilities requires calculational models and computer codes for the evaluation of risks and the assessment of environmental impact of radioactive effluents. A literature search and review of available computer programs revealed that no one program was capable of performing all of the great variety of calculations (i.e., external dose, internal dose, population dose, chronic release, accidental release, etc.). Available literature on existing computer programs has been reviewed and a description of each program reviewed is given

  15. Analysis of Radiation Treatment Planning by Dose Calculation and Optimization Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Sup; Yoon, In Ha; Lee, Woo Seok; Baek, Geum Mun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Analyze the Effectiveness of Radiation Treatment Planning by dose calculation and optimization algorithm, apply consideration of actual treatment planning, and then suggest the best way to treatment planning protocol. The treatment planning system use Eclipse 10.0. (Varian, USA). PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution) and AAA (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm) Apply to Dose calculation, DVO (Dose Volume Optimizer 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), PRO II (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 8.9.17) and PRO III (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of VAMT. A phantom for experiment virtually created at treatment planning system, 30x30x30 cm sized, homogeneous density (HU: 0) and heterogeneous density that inserted air assumed material (HU: -1,000). Apply to clinical treatment planning on the basis of general treatment planning feature analyzed with Phantom planning. In homogeneous density phantom, PBC and AAA show 65.2% PDD (6 MV, 10 cm) both, In heterogeneous density phantom, also show similar PDD value before meet with low density material, but they show different dose curve in air territory, PDD 10 cm showed 75%, 73% each after penetrate phantom. 3D treatment plan in same MU, AAA treatment planning shows low dose at Lung included area. 2D POP treatment plan with 15 MV of cervical vertebral region include trachea and lung area, Conformity Index (ICRU 62) is 0.95 in PBC calculation and 0.93 in AAA. DVO DVH and Dose calculation DVH are showed equal value in IMRT treatment plan. But AAA calculation shows lack of dose compared with DVO result which is satisfactory condition. Optimizing VMAT treatment plans using PRO II obtained results were satisfactory, but lower density area showed lack of dose in dose calculations. PRO III, but optimizing the dose calculation results were similar with optimized the same conditions once more. In this study, do not judge the rightness of the dose

  16. Review of calculational models and computer codes for environmental dose assessment of radioactive releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strenge, D.L.; Watson, E.C.; Droppo, J.G.

    1976-06-01

    The development of technological bases for siting nuclear fuel cycle facilities requires calculational models and computer codes for the evaluation of risks and the assessment of environmental impact of radioactive effluents. A literature search and review of available computer programs revealed that no one program was capable of performing all of the great variety of calculations (i.e., external dose, internal dose, population dose, chronic release, accidental release, etc.). Available literature on existing computer programs has been reviewed and a description of each program reviewed is given.

  17. Dose calculation for 40K ingestion in samples of beans using spectrometry and MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcez, R.W.D.; Lopes, J.M.; Silva, A.X.; Domingues, A.M.; Lima, M.A.F.

    2014-01-01

    A method based on gamma spectroscopy and on the use of voxel phantoms to calculate dose due to ingestion of 40 K contained in bean samples are presented in this work. To quantify the activity of radionuclide, HPGe detector was used and the data entered in the input file of MCNP code. The highest value of equivalent dose was 7.83 μSv.y -1 in the stomach for white beans, whose activity 452.4 Bq.Kg -1 was the highest of the five analyzed. The tool proved to be appropriate when you want to calculate the dose in organs due to ingestion of food. (author)

  18. Analysis of Radiation Treatment Planning by Dose Calculation and Optimization Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Sup; Yoon, In Ha; Lee, Woo Seok; Baek, Geum Mun

    2012-01-01

    Analyze the Effectiveness of Radiation Treatment Planning by dose calculation and optimization algorithm, apply consideration of actual treatment planning, and then suggest the best way to treatment planning protocol. The treatment planning system use Eclipse 10.0. (Varian, USA). PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution) and AAA (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm) Apply to Dose calculation, DVO (Dose Volume Optimizer 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), PRO II (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 8.9.17) and PRO III (Progressive Resolution Optimizer V 10.0.28) used for optimized algorithm of VAMT. A phantom for experiment virtually created at treatment planning system, 30x30x30 cm sized, homogeneous density (HU: 0) and heterogeneous density that inserted air assumed material (HU: -1,000). Apply to clinical treatment planning on the basis of general treatment planning feature analyzed with Phantom planning. In homogeneous density phantom, PBC and AAA show 65.2% PDD (6 MV, 10 cm) both, In heterogeneous density phantom, also show similar PDD value before meet with low density material, but they show different dose curve in air territory, PDD 10 cm showed 75%, 73% each after penetrate phantom. 3D treatment plan in same MU, AAA treatment planning shows low dose at Lung included area. 2D POP treatment plan with 15 MV of cervical vertebral region include trachea and lung area, Conformity Index (ICRU 62) is 0.95 in PBC calculation and 0.93 in AAA. DVO DVH and Dose calculation DVH are showed equal value in IMRT treatment plan. But AAA calculation shows lack of dose compared with DVO result which is satisfactory condition. Optimizing VMAT treatment plans using PRO II obtained results were satisfactory, but lower density area showed lack of dose in dose calculations. PRO III, but optimizing the dose calculation results were similar with optimized the same conditions once more. In this study, do not judge the rightness of the dose

  19. TH-A-19A-09: Towards Sub-Second Proton Dose Calculation On GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J da [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To achieve sub-second dose calculation for clinically relevant proton therapy treatment plans. Rapid dose calculation is a key component of adaptive radiotherapy, necessary to take advantage of the better dose conformity offered by hadron therapy. Methods: To speed up proton dose calculation, the pencil beam algorithm (PBA; clinical standard) was parallelised and implemented to run on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The implementation constitutes the first PBA to run all steps on GPU, and each part of the algorithm was carefully adapted for efficiency. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations obtained using Fluka of individual beams of energies representative of the clinical range impinging on simple geometries were used to tune the PBA. For benchmarking, a typical skull base case with a spot scanning plan consisting of a total of 8872 spots divided between two beam directions of 49 energy layers each was provided by CNAO (Pavia, Italy). The calculations were carried out on an Nvidia Geforce GTX680 desktop GPU with 1536 cores running at 1006 MHz. Results: The PBA reproduced within ±3% of maximum dose results obtained from MC simulations for a range of pencil beams impinging on a water tank. Additional analysis of more complex slab geometries is currently under way to fine-tune the algorithm. Full calculation of the clinical test case took 0.9 seconds in total, with the majority of the time spent in the kernel superposition step. Conclusion: The PBA lends itself well to implementation on many-core systems such as GPUs. Using the presented implementation and current hardware, sub-second dose calculation for a clinical proton therapy plan was achieved, opening the door for adaptive treatment. The successful parallelisation of all steps of the calculation indicates that further speedups can be expected with new hardware, brightening the prospects for real-time dose calculation. This work was funded by ENTERVISION, European Commission FP7 grant 264552.

  20. TH-A-19A-09: Towards Sub-Second Proton Dose Calculation On GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J da

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve sub-second dose calculation for clinically relevant proton therapy treatment plans. Rapid dose calculation is a key component of adaptive radiotherapy, necessary to take advantage of the better dose conformity offered by hadron therapy. Methods: To speed up proton dose calculation, the pencil beam algorithm (PBA; clinical standard) was parallelised and implemented to run on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The implementation constitutes the first PBA to run all steps on GPU, and each part of the algorithm was carefully adapted for efficiency. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations obtained using Fluka of individual beams of energies representative of the clinical range impinging on simple geometries were used to tune the PBA. For benchmarking, a typical skull base case with a spot scanning plan consisting of a total of 8872 spots divided between two beam directions of 49 energy layers each was provided by CNAO (Pavia, Italy). The calculations were carried out on an Nvidia Geforce GTX680 desktop GPU with 1536 cores running at 1006 MHz. Results: The PBA reproduced within ±3% of maximum dose results obtained from MC simulations for a range of pencil beams impinging on a water tank. Additional analysis of more complex slab geometries is currently under way to fine-tune the algorithm. Full calculation of the clinical test case took 0.9 seconds in total, with the majority of the time spent in the kernel superposition step. Conclusion: The PBA lends itself well to implementation on many-core systems such as GPUs. Using the presented implementation and current hardware, sub-second dose calculation for a clinical proton therapy plan was achieved, opening the door for adaptive treatment. The successful parallelisation of all steps of the calculation indicates that further speedups can be expected with new hardware, brightening the prospects for real-time dose calculation. This work was funded by ENTERVISION, European Commission FP7 grant 264552

  1. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  2. Real-time dose calculation and visualization for the proton therapy of ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, Karsten [Medizinische Physik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany). E-mail: k.pfeiffer at dkfz.de; Bendl, Rolf [Medizinische Physik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, INF 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany). E-mail: r.bendl at dkfz.de

    2001-03-01

    A new real-time dose calculation and visualization was developed as part of the new 3D treatment planning tool OCTOPUS for proton therapy of ocular tumours within a national research project together with the Hahn-Meitner Institut Berlin. The implementation resolves the common separation between parameter definition, dose calculation and evaluation and allows a direct examination of the expected dose distribution while adjusting the treatment parameters. The new tool allows the therapist to move the desired dose distribution under visual control in 3D to the appropriate place. The visualization of the resulting dose distribution as a 3D surface model, on any 2D slice or on the surface of specified ocular structures is done automatically when adapting parameters during the planning process. In addition, approximate dose volume histograms may be calculated with little extra time. The dose distribution is calculated and visualized in 200 ms with an accuracy of 6% for the 3D isodose surfaces and 8% for other objects. This paper discusses the advantages and limitations of this new approach. (author)

  3. GTV-based prescription in SBRT for lung lesions using advanced dose calculation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacornerie, Thomas; Lisbona, Albert; Mirabel, Xavier; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The aim of current study was to investigate the way dose is prescribed to lung lesions during SBRT using advanced dose calculation algorithms that take into account electron transport (type B algorithms). As type A algorithms do not take into account secondary electron transport, they overestimate the dose to lung lesions. Type B algorithms are more accurate but still no consensus is reached regarding dose prescription. The positive clinical results obtained using type A algorithms should be used as a starting point. In current work a dose-calculation experiment is performed, presenting different prescription methods. Three cases with three different sizes of peripheral lung lesions were planned using three different treatment platforms. For each individual case 60 Gy to the PTV was prescribed using a type A algorithm and the dose distribution was recalculated using a type B algorithm in order to evaluate the impact of the secondary electron transport. Secondly, for each case a type B algorithm was used to prescribe 48 Gy to the PTV, and the resulting doses to the GTV were analyzed. Finally, prescriptions based on specific GTV dose volumes were evaluated. When using a type A algorithm to prescribe the same dose to the PTV, the differences regarding median GTV doses among platforms and cases were always less than 10% of the prescription dose. The prescription to the PTV based on type B algorithms, leads to a more important variability of the median GTV dose among cases and among platforms, (respectively 24%, and 28%). However, when 54 Gy was prescribed as median GTV dose, using a type B algorithm, the variability observed was minimal. Normalizing the prescription dose to the median GTV dose for lung lesions avoids variability among different cases and treatment platforms of SBRT when type B algorithms are used to calculate the dose. The combination of using a type A algorithm to optimize a homogeneous dose in the PTV and using a type B algorithm to prescribe the

  4. Advanced local dose rate calculations with the Monte Carlo code MCNP for plutonium nitrate storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron- und Gamma dose rate calculations were performed for the storage containers filled with plutonium nitrate of the MOX fabrication facility of Siemens. For the particle transport calculations the Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4.2 was used. The calculated results were compared with experimental dose rate measurements. It can be stated that the choice of the code system was appropriate since all aspects of the many facettes of the problem were well reproduced in the calculations. The position dependency as well as the influence of the shieldings, the reflections and the mutual influences of the sources were well described by the calculations for the gamma and for the neutron dose rates. However, good agreement with the experimental results on the gamma dose rates could only be reached when the lead shielding of the detector was integrated into the geometry modelling of the calculations. For some few cases of thick shieldings and soft gamma ray sources the statistics of the calculational results were not sufficient. In such cases more elaborate variance reduction methods must be applied in future calculations. Thus the MCNP code in connection with NGSRC has been proven as an effective tool for the solution of this type of problems. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Incorporating partial shining effects in proton pencil-beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Lii Mingfwu; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ron X; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-01-01

    A range modulator wheel (RMW) is an essential component in passively scattered proton therapy. We have observed that a proton beam spot may shine on multiple steps of the RMW. Proton dose calculation algorithms normally do not consider the partial shining effect, and thus overestimate the dose at the proximal shoulder of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) compared with the measurement. If the SOBP is adjusted to better fit the plateau region, the entrance dose is likely to be underestimated. In this work, we developed an algorithm that can be used to model this effect and to allow for dose calculations that better fit the measured SOBP. First, a set of apparent modulator weights was calculated without considering partial shining. Next, protons spilled from the accelerator reaching the modulator wheel were simplified as a circular spot of uniform intensity. A weight-splitting process was then performed to generate a set of effective modulator weights with the partial shining effect incorporated. The SOBPs of eight options, which are used to label different combinations of proton-beam energy and scattering devices, were calculated with the generated effective weights. Our algorithm fitted the measured SOBP at the proximal and entrance regions much better than the ones without considering partial shining effect for all SOBPs of the eight options. In a prostate patient, we found that dose calculation without considering partial shining effect underestimated the femoral head and skin dose

  6. SU-E-T-67: Clinical Implementation and Evaluation of the Acuros Dose Calculation Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, C; Combine, T; Dickens, K; Wynn, R; Pavord, D; Huq, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of the current study is to present a detailed description of the implementation of the Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm, and subsequently evaluate its clinical impacts by comparing it with AAA algorithm. Methods: The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were evaluated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6cm × 6cm to 40cm × 40cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. Similarly, wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60 degree were used. In addition, variable field sizes for a heterogeneous phantom were used to evaluate the Acuros algorithm. Finally, both Acuros and AAA were tested on VMAT patient plans for various sites. Does distributions and calculation time were compared. Results: On average, computation time is reduced by at least 50% by Acuros XB compared with AAA on single fields and VMAT plans. When used for open 6MV photon beams on homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculated doses were within 1% of measurement. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. When heterogeneous phantom was used, Acuros XB also improved on accuracy. Conclusion: Compared with AAA, Acuros XB can improve accuracy while significantly reduce computation time for VMAT plans

  7. An independent dose calculation algorithm for MLC-based stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Friedlieb; Killoran, Joseph H.; Wenz, Frederik; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm to calculate dose in a homogeneous phantom for radiotherapy fields defined by multi-leaf collimator (MLC) for both static and dynamic MLC delivery. The algorithm was developed to supplement the dose algorithms of the commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). The motivation for this work is to provide an independent dose calculation primarily for quality assurance (QA) and secondarily for the development of static MLC field based inverse planning. The dose calculation utilizes a pencil-beam kernel. However, an explicit analytical integration results in a closed form for rectangular-shaped beamlets, defined by single leaf pairs. This approach reduces spatial integration to summation, and leads to a simple method of determination of model parameters. The total dose for any static or dynamic MLC field is obtained by summing over all individual rectangles from each segment which offers faster speed to calculate two-dimensional dose distributions at any depth in the phantom. Standard beam data used in the commissioning of the TPS was used as input data for the algorithm. The calculated results were compared with the TPS and measurements for static and dynamic MLC. The agreement was very good (<2.5%) for all tested cases except for very small static MLC sizes of 0.6 cmx0.6 cm (<6%) and some ion chamber measurements in a high gradient region (<4.4%). This finding enables us to use the algorithm for routine QA as well as for research developments

  8. Development of a method to calculate organ doses for the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed to quantitatively measure the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination in order to calculate organ doses. The dynamic examination was approximated with a set of discrete x-ray fields. Once the examination was segmented into discrete x-ray fields appropriate organ dose tables were generated using an existing computer program for organ dose calculations. This, along with knowledge of the radiation exposures associated with each of the fields, enabled the calculation of organ doses for the entire dynamic examination. The protocol involves videotaping the examination while fluoroscopic technique factors, tube current and tube potential, are simultaneously recorded on the audio tracks of the videotape. Subsequent analysis allows the dynamic examination to be segmented into a series of discrete x-ray fields uniquely defined by field size, projection, and anatomical region. The anatomical regions associated with the upper gastrointestinal examination were observed to be the upper, middle, and lower esophagus, the gastroesophageal junction, the stomach, and the duodenum

  9. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1992-01-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system use relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the code Electron Gamma Shower (EGS4). Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessel sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was or cross fire between blood vessels was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the doses to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures

  10. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W.

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Calculation of photon dose for Dalat research reactor in case of loss of reactor tank water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2007-01-01

    Photon sources of actinides and fission products were estimated by ORIGEN2 code with the modified cross-section library for Dalat research reactor (DRR) using new cross-section generated by WIMS-ANL code. Photon sources of reactor tank water calculated from the experimental data. MCNP4C2 with available non-analog Monte Carlo model and ANSI/ANL-6.1.1-1977 flux-to-dose factors were used for dose estimation. The agreement between calculation results and those of measurements showed that the methods and models used to get photon sources and dose were acceptable. In case the reactor water totally leaks out from the reactor tank, the calculated dose is very high at the top of reactor tank while still low in control room. In the reactor hall, the operation staffs can access for emergency works but with time limits. (author)

  12. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  13. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klüter, Sebastian; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  14. Calculation of radiation dose rates from a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation doses from a spent nuclear fuel cask are usually from various phases of operations during handling, shipping, and storage of the casks. Assessment of such doses requires knowledge of external radiation dose rates at various locations surrounding a cask. Under current practices, dose rates from gamma photons are usually estimated by means of point- or line-source approaches incorporating the conventional buildup factors. Although such simplified approaches may at times be easy to use, their accuracy has not been verified. For example, those simplified methods have not taken into account influencing factors such as the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface, and the effects of these factors on the calculated dose rates are largely unknown. Moreover, similar empirical equations for buildup factors currently do not exist for neutrons. The objective of this study is to use a more accurate approach in calculating radiation dose rates for both neutrons and gamma photons from a spent fuel cask. The calculation utilizes the more sophisticated transport method and takes into account the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface. The results of a detailed study of dose rates in the near field (within 20 meters) are presented and, for easy application, the cask centerline dose rates are fitted into empirical equations at cask centerline distances up to 2000 meters from the surface of the cask

  15. Dose variations with varying calculation grid size in head and neck IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Heeteak [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-8300 (United States); Jin, Hosang [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-8300 (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32610-0385 (United States); Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Siyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32610-0385 (United States)

    2006-10-07

    Ever since the advent and development of treatment planning systems, the uncertainty associated with calculation grid size has been an issue. Even to this day, with highly sophisticated 3D conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems (TPS), dose uncertainty due to grid size is still a concern. A phantom simulating head and neck treatment was prepared from two semi-cylindrical solid water slabs and a radiochromic film was inserted between the two slabs for measurement. Plans were generated for a 5400 cGy prescribed dose using Philips Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS for two targets, one shallow ({approx}0.5 cm depth) and one deep ({approx}6 cm depth). Calculation grid sizes of 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 mm were considered. Three clinical cases were also evaluated. The dose differences for the varying grid sizes (2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm from 1.5 mm) in the phantom study were 126 cGy (2.3% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), 248.2 cGy (4.6% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) and 301.8 cGy (5.6% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), respectively for the shallow target case. It was found that the dose could be varied to about 100 cGy (1.9% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), 148.9 cGy (2.8% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) and 202.9 cGy (3.8% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) for 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm grid sizes, respectively, simply by shifting the calculation grid origin. Dose difference with a different range of the relative dose gradient was evaluated and we found that the relative dose difference increased with an increase in the range of the relative dose gradient. When comparing varying calculation grid sizes and measurements, the variation of the dose difference histogram was insignificant, but a local effect was observed in the dose difference map. Similar results were observed in the case of the deep target and the three clinical cases also showed results comparable to those from the phantom study.

  16. Dose variations with varying calculation grid size in head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Heeteak; Jin, Hosang; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the advent and development of treatment planning systems, the uncertainty associated with calculation grid size has been an issue. Even to this day, with highly sophisticated 3D conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems (TPS), dose uncertainty due to grid size is still a concern. A phantom simulating head and neck treatment was prepared from two semi-cylindrical solid water slabs and a radiochromic film was inserted between the two slabs for measurement. Plans were generated for a 5400 cGy prescribed dose using Philips Pinnacle 3 TPS for two targets, one shallow (∼0.5 cm depth) and one deep (∼6 cm depth). Calculation grid sizes of 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 mm were considered. Three clinical cases were also evaluated. The dose differences for the varying grid sizes (2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm from 1.5 mm) in the phantom study were 126 cGy (2.3% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), 248.2 cGy (4.6% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) and 301.8 cGy (5.6% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), respectively for the shallow target case. It was found that the dose could be varied to about 100 cGy (1.9% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription), 148.9 cGy (2.8% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) and 202.9 cGy (3.8% of the 5400 cGy dose prescription) for 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm grid sizes, respectively, simply by shifting the calculation grid origin. Dose difference with a different range of the relative dose gradient was evaluated and we found that the relative dose difference increased with an increase in the range of the relative dose gradient. When comparing varying calculation grid sizes and measurements, the variation of the dose difference histogram was insignificant, but a local effect was observed in the dose difference map. Similar results were observed in the case of the deep target and the three clinical cases also showed results comparable to those from the phantom study

  17. submitter Dose prescription in carbon ion radiotherapy: How to compare two different RBE-weighted dose calculation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Molinelli, Silvia; Mairani, Andrea; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Mirandola, Alfredo; Russo, Stefania; Mastella, Edoardo; Hasegawa, Azusa; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Vischioni, Barbara; Vitolo, Viviana; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ciocca, Mario; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: In carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT), the use of different relative biological effectiveness (RBE) models in the RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ calculation can lead to deviations in the physical dose $(D_{phy})$ delivered to the patient. Our aim is to reduce target $D_{phy}$ deviations by converting prescription dose values. Material and methods: Planning data of patients treated at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) were collected, with prescribed doses per fraction ranging from 3.6 Gy (RBE) to 4.6 Gy (RBE), according to the Japanese semi-empirical model. The $D_{phy}$ was Monte Carlo (MC) re-calculated simulating the NIRS beamline. The local effect model (LEM)_I was then applied to estimate $D_{RBE}$. Target median $D_{RBE}$ ratios between MC + LEM_I and NIRS plans determined correction factors for the conversion of prescription doses. Plans were re-optimized in a LEM_I-based commercial system, prescribing the NIRS uncorrected and corrected $D_{RBE}$. Results: The MC ...

  18. Calculation of individual and population doses on Danish territory resulting from hypothetical core-melt accidents at the Barsebaeck reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Individual and population doses within Danish territory are calculated from hypothetical, severe core-melt accidents at the Swedish nuclear plant at Barsebaeck. The fission product inventory of the Barsebaeck reactor is calculated. The release fractions for the accidents are taken from WASH-1400. Based on parametric studies, doses are calculated for very unfavourable, but not incredible weather conditions. The probability of such conditions in combination with wind direction towards Danish territory is estimated. Doses to bone marrow, lungs, GI-tract and thyroid are calculated based on dose models developed at Risoe. These doses are found to be consistent with doses calculated with the models used in WASH-1400. (author)

  19. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Improved method for calculation of population doses from nuclear complexes over large geographical areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, J.P.; Baker, D.A.; Hill, E.R.; Wendell, L.L.

    1977-09-01

    To simplify the calculation of potential long-distance environmental impacts, an overall average population exposure coefficient (P.E.C.) for the entire contiguous United States was calculated for releases to the atmosphere from Hanford facilities. The method, requiring machine computation, combines Bureau of Census population data by census enumeration district and an annual average atmospheric dilution factor (anti chi/Q') derived from 12-hourly gridded wind analyses provided by the NOAA's National Meteorological Center. A variable-trajectory puff-advection model was used to calculate an hourly anti chi/Q' for each grid square, assuming uniform hourly releases; seasonal and annual averages were then calculated. For Hanford, using 1970 census data, a P.E.C. of 2 x 10 -3 man-seconds per cubic meter was calculated. The P.E.C. is useful for both radioactive and nonradioactive releases. To calculate population doses for the entire contiguous United States, the P.E.C. is multiplied by the annual average release rate and then by the dose factor (rem/yr per Ci/m 3 ) for each radionuclide, and the dose contribution in man-rem is summed for all radionuclides. For multiple pathways, the P.E.C. is still useful, provided that doses from a unit release can be obtained from a set of atmospheric dose factors. The methodology is applicable to any point source, any set of population data by map grid coordinates, and any geographical area covered by equivalent meteorological data

  1. UNIDOSE - a computer program for the calculation of individual and collective doses from airborne radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, O.; Schwartz, H.; Forssen, B.-H.; Marklund, J.-E.

    1979-01-01

    UNIDOSE is a program system for calculating the consequences of a radioactive release to the atmosphere. The program is applicable for computation of dispersion in a rnage of 0 - 50 km from the release point. The Gaussion plume model is used for calculating the external dose from activity in the atmosphere, on the ground and the internal dose via inhalation. Radioactive decay, as well as growth and decay of daughter products are accounted for. The influence of dry deposition and wash-out are also considered. It is possible to treat time-dependent release-rates of 1 - 24 hours duration and constant release-rates for up to one year. The program system also contains routines for the calculation of collective dose and health effects. The system operates in a statistical manner. Many weather-situations, based on measured data, can be analysed and statistical properties, such as cumulative frequences, can be calculated. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose to Medium and Dose to Water for Carbon Ion Beams in Various Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Jäkel, Oliver

    treatment plans. Here, we quantisize the effect of dose to water vs. dose to medium for a series of typical target materials found in medical physics. 2     Material and Methods The Monte Carlo code FLUKA [Battistioni et al. 2007] is used to simulate the particle fluence spectrum in a series of target...... for water. This represents the case that our “detector” is an infinitesimal small non-perturbing entity made of water, where charged particle equilibrium can be assumed following the Bragg-Gray cavity theory. Dw and Dm are calculated for typical materials such as bone, brain, lung and soft-tissues using...

  3. Evaluation of an electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Eve; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm included in a commercial treatment planning system and compare its performance against an electron pencil beam algorithm. Several tests were performed to explore the system's behavior in simple geometries and in configurations encountered in clinical practice. The first series of tests were executed in a homogeneous water phantom, where experimental measurements and eMC-calculated dose distributions were compared for various combinations of energy and applicator. More specifically, we compared beam profiles and depth-dose curves at different source-to-surface distances (SSDs) and gantry angles, by using dose difference and distance to agreement. Also, we compared output factors, we studied the effects of algorithm input parameters, which are the random number generator seed, as well as the calculation grid size, and we performed a calculation time evaluation. Three different inhomogeneous solid phantoms were built, using high- and low-density materials inserts, to clinically simulate relevant heterogeneity conditions: a small air cylinder within a homogeneous phantom, a lung phantom, and a chest wall phantom. We also used an anthropomorphic phantom to perform comparison of eMC calculations to measurements. Finally, we proceeded with an evaluation of the eMC algorithm on a clinical case of nose cancer. In all mentioned cases, measurements, carried out by means of XV-2 films, radiographic films or EBT2 Gafchromic films. were used to compare eMC calculations with dose distributions obtained from an electron pencil beam algorithm. eMC calculations in the water phantom were accurate. Discrepancies for depth-dose curves and beam profiles were under 2.5% and 2 mm. Dose calculations with eMC for the small air cylinder and the lung phantom agreed within 2% and 4%, respectively. eMC calculations for the chest wall phantom and the anthropomorphic phantom also

  4. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org; Kaufman, Robert A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Mirro, Amy E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  5. Calculation of fast neutron dose in plastic-coated optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Henschel, H.

    1998-01-01

    The dose of fast neutrons in optical fibers with hydrogen-containing coating materials is considerably increased by energetic recoil protons. Their contribution to the dose in a SiO 2 fiber core is calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different fiber geometries and a fiber optic cable. With 14 MeV neutrons the dose in a single fiber is increased by about 21%, whereas in fiber bundles the dose increase can reach about 170%. Maximum dose enhancement in fiber bundles (about 610%) occurs at neutron energies around 5.5 MeV. The dose increase caused by 14 MeV neutrons in the fiber of a typical laboratory cable is about 124%

  6. The calculation of the surface dose in examinations following cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewen, K.

    1995-01-01

    It is inevitable in examinations requiring patient exposure to high doses that the investigators and medical assistants receive high wholebody doses on account of fray radiation and, occasionally, also high partial body doses (hands) on account of the useful beam range. A number of different circumstances are adding up to create this extreme situation. In this connection, a mathematical method for the calculation of the surface dose (cutaneous dose rate) is described that is based on sets of parameters commonly used in diagnostic radiology: Set I of parameters: Tube voltage - current strength of tube - distance between focus and skin; - set II of parameters: Incidence dose rate of image intensifier - distance between focus and skin -distance between image intensifier and plane of ray incidence (skin). (orig./VHE) [de

  7. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois; D'Amours, Michel; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future

  8. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  9. Poster - 08: Preliminary Investigation into Collapsed-Cone based Dose Calculations for COMS Eye Plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Hali; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of model-based dose calculations using a collapsed-cone algorithm for COMS eye plaques loaded with I-125 seeds. Methods: The Nucletron SelectSeed 130.002 I-125 seed and the 12 mm COMS eye plaque were incorporated into a research version of the Oncentra® Brachy v4.5 treatment planning system which uses the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) algorithm. Comparisons of TG-43 and high-accuracy ACE doses were performed for a single seed in a 30×30×30 cm 3 water box, as well as with one seed in the central slot of the 12 mm COMS eye plaque. The doses along the plaque central axis (CAX) were used to calculate the carrier correction factor, T(r), and were compared to tabulated and MCNP6 simulated doses for both the SelectSeed and IsoAid IAI-125A seeds. Results: The ACE calculated dose for the single seed in water was on average within 0.62 ± 2.2% of the TG-43 dose, with the largest differences occurring near the end-welds. The ratio of ACE to TG-43 calculated doses along the CAX (T(r)) of the 12 mm COMS plaque for the SelectSeed was on average within 3.0% of previously tabulated data, and within 2.9% of the MCNP6 simulated values. The IsoAid and SelectSeed T(r) values agreed within 0.3%. Conclusions: Initial comparisons show good agreement between ACE and MC doses for a single seed in a 12 mm COMS eye plaque; more complicated scenarios are being investigated to determine the accuracy of this calculation method.

  10. Poster - 08: Preliminary Investigation into Collapsed-Cone based Dose Calculations for COMS Eye Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Hali; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, and University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, and University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, and University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of model-based dose calculations using a collapsed-cone algorithm for COMS eye plaques loaded with I-125 seeds. Methods: The Nucletron SelectSeed 130.002 I-125 seed and the 12 mm COMS eye plaque were incorporated into a research version of the Oncentra® Brachy v4.5 treatment planning system which uses the Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine (ACE) algorithm. Comparisons of TG-43 and high-accuracy ACE doses were performed for a single seed in a 30×30×30 cm{sup 3} water box, as well as with one seed in the central slot of the 12 mm COMS eye plaque. The doses along the plaque central axis (CAX) were used to calculate the carrier correction factor, T(r), and were compared to tabulated and MCNP6 simulated doses for both the SelectSeed and IsoAid IAI-125A seeds. Results: The ACE calculated dose for the single seed in water was on average within 0.62 ± 2.2% of the TG-43 dose, with the largest differences occurring near the end-welds. The ratio of ACE to TG-43 calculated doses along the CAX (T(r)) of the 12 mm COMS plaque for the SelectSeed was on average within 3.0% of previously tabulated data, and within 2.9% of the MCNP6 simulated values. The IsoAid and SelectSeed T(r) values agreed within 0.3%. Conclusions: Initial comparisons show good agreement between ACE and MC doses for a single seed in a 12 mm COMS eye plaque; more complicated scenarios are being investigated to determine the accuracy of this calculation method.

  11. Investigation of bulk electron densities for dose calculations on cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.; Parker, J.; Gupta, S.; Hatton, J.; Tang, C.; Capp, A.; Denham, J.W.; Wright, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: If cone-beam CT images are to be used for dose calculations, then the images must be able to provide accurate electron density information. Twelve patients underwent twice weekly cone-beam CT scans in addition to the planning CT scan. A standardised 5-field treatment plan was applied to 169 of the CBCT images. Doses were calculated using the original electron density values in the CBCT and with bulk electron densities applied. Bone was assigned a density of 288 HU, and all other tissue was assigned to be water equivalent (0 HU). The doses were compared to the dose calculated on the original planning CT image. Using the original HU values in the cone-beam images, the average dose del i vered by the plans from all 12 patients was I. I % lower than the intended 200 cOy delivered on the original CT plans (standard devia tion 0.7%, maximum difference -2.93%). When bulk electron densities were applied to the cone-beam images, the average dose was 0.3% lower than the original CT plans (standard deviation 0.8%, maximum difference -2.22%). Compared to using the original HU values, applying bulk electron densities to the CBCT images improved the dose calculations by almost I %. Some variation due to natural changes in anatomy should be expected. The application of bulk elec tron densities to cone beam CT images has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations due to inaccurate H U values. Acknowledgements This work was partially funded by Cancer Council NSW Grant Number RG 07-06.

  12. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy

  13. Calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are presented for the calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radioactive decay. A dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the dose-equivalent rate per unit radionuclide concentration. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each radiation type and exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors are derived for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. In addition, photon dose-rate conversion factors are estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations are based on the assumption that the exposure medium is infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. The dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water then follow from the requirement that all of the energy emitted in the radioactive decay is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated at a reference location above a smooth, infinite plane using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air

  14. Comparison of CT number calibration techniques for CBCT-based dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, Alex; McQuaid, Dualta; Nill, Simeon; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Oelfke, Uwe; Murray, Julia; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin; Poludniowski, Gavin; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare and validate various computed tomography (CT) number calibration techniques with respect to cone beam CT (CBCT) dose calculation accuracy. CBCT dose calculation accuracy was assessed for pelvic, lung, and head and neck (H and N) treatment sites for two approaches: (1) physics-based scatter correction methods (CBCT r ); (2) density override approaches including assigning water density to the entire CBCT (W), assignment of either water or bone density (WB), and assignment of either water or lung density (WL). Methods for CBCT density assignment within a commercially available treatment planning system (RS auto ), where CBCT voxels are binned into six density levels, were assessed and validated. Dose-difference maps and dose-volume statistics were used to compare the CBCT dose distributions with the ground truth of a planning CT acquired the same day as the CBCT. For pelvic cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume deviations below 1.5 %. RS auto provided larger than average errors for pelvic treatments for patients with large amounts of adipose tissue. For H and N cases, all CTN calibration methods resulted in average dose-volume differences below 1.0 % with CBCT r (0.5 %) and RS auto (0.6 %) performing best. For lung cases, WL and RS auto methods generated dose distributions most similar to the ground truth. The RS auto density override approach is an attractive option for CTN adjustments for a variety of anatomical sites. RS auto methods were validated, resulting in dose calculations that were consistent with those calculated on diagnostic-quality CT images, for CBCT images acquired of the lung, for patients receiving pelvic RT in cases without excess adipose tissue, and for H and N cases. (orig.) [de

  15. TU-AB-BRC-12: Optimized Parallel MonteCarlo Dose Calculations for Secondary MU Checks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, S; Nazareth, D [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Bellor, M [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary MU checks are an important tool used during a physics review of a treatment plan. Commercial software packages offer varying degrees of theoretical dose calculation accuracy, depending on the modality involved. Dose calculations of VMAT plans are especially prone to error due to the large approximations involved. Monte Carlo (MC) methods are not commonly used due to their long run times. We investigated two methods to increase the computational efficiency of MC dose simulations with the BEAMnrc code. Distributed computing resources, along with optimized code compilation, will allow for accurate and efficient VMAT dose calculations. Methods: The BEAMnrc package was installed on a high performance computing cluster accessible to our clinic. MATLAB and PYTHON scripts were developed to convert a clinical VMAT DICOM plan into BEAMnrc input files. The BEAMnrc installation was optimized by running the VMAT simulations through profiling tools which indicated the behavior of the constituent routines in the code, e.g. the bremsstrahlung splitting routine, and the specified random number generator. This information aided in determining the most efficient compiling parallel configuration for the specific CPU’s available on our cluster, resulting in the fastest VMAT simulation times. Our method was evaluated with calculations involving 10{sup 8} – 10{sup 9} particle histories which are sufficient to verify patient dose using VMAT. Results: Parallelization allowed the calculation of patient dose on the order of 10 – 15 hours with 100 parallel jobs. Due to the compiler optimization process, further speed increases of 23% were achieved when compared with the open-source compiler BEAMnrc packages. Conclusion: Analysis of the BEAMnrc code allowed us to optimize the compiler configuration for VMAT dose calculations. In future work, the optimized MC code, in conjunction with the parallel processing capabilities of BEAMnrc, will be applied to provide accurate

  16. SU-F-T-60: A Quick Dose Calculation Check for Accuboost Breast Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Cancer Treatment Center of America, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuboost treatment planning uses dwell times from a nomogram designed with Monte Carlo calculations for round and D-shaped applicators. A quick dose calculation method has been developed for verification of the HDR Brachytherapy dose as a second check. Methods: Accuboost breast treatment uses several round and D-shaped applicators to be used non-invasively with an Ir-192 source from a HDR Brachytherapy afterloader after the breast is compressed in a mammographic unit for localization. The breast thickness, source activity, the prescription dose and the applicator size are entered into a nomogram spreadsheet which gives the dwell times to be manually entered into the delivery computer. Approximating the HDR Ir-192 as a point source, and knowing the geometry of the round and D-applicators, the distances from the source positions to the midpoint of the central plane are calculated. Using the exposure constant of Ir-192 and medium as human tissue, the dose at a point is calculated as: D(cGy) = 1.254 × A × t/R2, where A is the activity in Ci, t is the dwell time in sec and R is the distance in cm. The dose from each dwell position is added to get the total dose. Results: Each fraction is delivered in two compressions: cranio-caudally and medial-laterally. A typical APBI treatment in 10 fractions requires 20 compressions. For a patient treated with D45 applicators and an average of 5.22 cm thickness, this calculation was 1.63 % higher than the prescription. For another patient using D53 applicators in the CC direction and 7 cm SDO applicators in the ML direction, this calculation was 1.31 % lower than the prescription. Conclusion: This is a simple and quick method to double check the dose on the central plane for Accuboost treatment.

  17. The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, I; Cui, J; Lindsay, P; Olivera, G; Deasy, J O

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction. (note)

  18. NOTE: The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Cui, J.; Lindsay, P.; Olivera, G.; Deasy, J. O.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction.

  19. Consolidating duodenal and small bowel toxicity data via isoeffective dose calculations based on compiled clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phillip; Tai, An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-01-01

    To consolidate duodenum and small bowel toxicity data from clinical studies with different dose fractionation schedules using the modified linear quadratic (MLQ) model. A methodology of adjusting the dose-volume (D,v) parameters to different levels of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was presented. A set of NTCP model parameters for duodenum toxicity were estimated by the χ(2) fitting method using literature-based tolerance dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) data. These model parameters were then used to convert (D,v) data into the isoeffective dose in 2 Gy per fraction, (D(MLQED2),v) and convert these parameters to an isoeffective dose at another NTCP (D(MLQED2'),v). The literature search yielded 5 reports useful in making estimates of duodenum and small bowel toxicity. The NTCP model parameters were found to be TD50(1)(model) = 60.9 ± 7.9 Gy, m = 0.21 ± 0.05, and δ = 0.09 ± 0.03 Gy(-1). Isoeffective dose calculations and toxicity rates associated with hypofractionated radiation therapy reports were found to be consistent with clinical data having different fractionation schedules. Values of (D(MLQED2'),v) between different NTCP levels remain consistent over a range of 5%-20%. MLQ-based isoeffective calculations of dose-response data corresponding to grade ≥2 duodenum toxicity were found to be consistent with one another within the calculation uncertainty. The (D(MLQED2),v) data could be used to determine duodenum and small bowel dose-volume constraints for new dose escalation strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent developments in biokinetic models and the calculation of internal dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, T.P.; Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Stradling, G.N.

    1997-01-01

    In most cases the measurement of radioactivity in an environmental or biological sample will be followed by some estimation of dose and possibly risk, either to a population or an individual. This will normally involve the use of a dose coefficient (dose per unit intake value) taken from a compendium. In recent years the calculation of dose coefficients has seen many developments in both biokinetic modelling and computational capabilities. ICRP has recommended new models for the respiratory tract and for the systemic behavior of many of the more important elements. As well as this, a general age-dependent calculation method has been developed which involves an effectively continuous variation of both biokinetic and dosimetric parameters, facilitating more realistic estimation of doses to young people. These new developments were used in work for recent ICRP, IAEA and CEC compendia of dose coefficients for both members of the public (including children) and workers. This paper presents a general overview of the method of calculation of internal doses with particular reference to the actinides. Some of the implications for dose coefficients of the new models are discussed. For example it is shown that compared with data in ICRP Publications 30 and 54: the new respiratory tract model generally predicts lower deposition in systemic tissues per unit intake; the new biokinetic models for actinides allow for burial of material deposited on bone surfaces; age-dependent models generally feature faster turnover of material in young people. All of these factors can lead to substantially different estimates of dose and examples of the new dose coefficients are given to illustrate these differences. During the development of the new models for actinides, human bioassay data were used to validate the model. Thus, one would expect the new models to give reasonable predictions of bioassay quantities. Some examples of the bioassay applications, e.g., excretion data for the

  1. The accuracy of dose calculations by anisotropic analytical algorithms for stereotactic radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M W K; Cheung, J Y C; Leung, L H T; Lau, B M F; Yu, P K N

    2011-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal tumors are commonly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques. For photon dose calculations, problems related to loss of lateral electronic equilibrium exist when small fields are used. The anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) implemented in Varian Eclipse was developed to replace the pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm for more accurate dose prediction in an inhomogeneous medium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the AAA for predicting interface doses for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy boost of nasopharyngeal tumors. The central axis depth dose data and dose profiles of phantoms with rectangular air cavities for small fields were measured using a 6 MV beam. In addition, the air-tissue interface doses from six different intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy plans were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. The nasopharyngeal region of the phantom was especially modified to simulate the air cavities of a typical patient. The measured data were compared to the data calculated by both the AAA and the PBC algorithm. When using single small fields in rectangular air cavity phantoms, both AAA and PBC overestimated the central axis dose at and beyond the first few millimeters of the air-water interface. Although the AAA performs better than the PBC algorithm, its calculated interface dose could still be more than three times that of the measured dose when a 2 x 2 cm 2 field was used. Testing of the algorithms using the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the maximum overestimation by the PBC algorithm was 20.7%, while that by the AAA was 8.3%. When multiple fields were used in a patient geometry, the dose prediction errors of the AAA would be substantially reduced compared with those from a single field. However, overestimation of more than 3% could still be found at some points at the air-tissue interface.

  2. Influence of metallic dental implants and metal artefacts on dose calculation accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerz, Manuel; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artefacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which inhibit the correct representation of shape and density of the metal and the surrounding tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of dental implants on the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy planning and the benefit of metal artefact reduction (MAR). A second aim was to determine the treatment technique which is less sensitive to the presence of metallic implants in terms of dose calculation accuracy. Phantoms consisting of homogeneous water equivalent material surrounding dental implants were designed. Artefact-containing CT data were corrected using the correct density information. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to 2-dimensional dose measurements using GafChromic™ EBT2 films. For all plans the accuracy of dose calculations is significantly higher if performed on corrected CT data (p = 0.015). The agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions is significantly higher for VMAT than for IMRT plans for calculations on uncorrected CT data (p = 0.011) as well as on corrected CT data (p = 0.029). For IMRT and VMAT the application of metal artefact reduction significantly increases the agreement of dose calculations with film measurements. VMAT was found to provide the highest accuracy on corrected as well as on uncorrected CT data. VMAT is therefore preferable over IMRT for patients with metallic implants, if plan quality is comparable for the two techniques.

  3. Influence of metallic dental implants and metal artefacts on dose calculation accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, Manuel; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Metallic dental implants cause severe streaking artefacts in computed tomography (CT) data, which inhibit the correct representation of shape and density of the metal and the surrounding tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of dental implants on the accuracy of dose calculations in radiation therapy planning and the benefit of metal artefact reduction (MAR). A second aim was to determine the treatment technique which is less sensitive to the presence of metallic implants in terms of dose calculation accuracy. Phantoms consisting of homogeneous water equivalent material surrounding dental implants were designed. Artefact-containing CT data were corrected using the correct density information. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were calculated on corrected and uncorrected CT data and compared to 2-dimensional dose measurements using GafChromic trademark EBT2 films. For all plans the accuracy of dose calculations is significantly higher if performed on corrected CT data (p = 0.015). The agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions is significantly higher for VMAT than for IMRT plans for calculations on uncorrected CT data (p = 0.011) as well as on corrected CT data (p = 0.029). For IMRT and VMAT the application of metal artefact reduction significantly increases the agreement of dose calculations with film measurements. VMAT was found to provide the highest accuracy on corrected as well as on uncorrected CT data. VMAT is therefore preferable over IMRT for patients with metallic implants, if plan quality is comparable for the two techniques. (orig.) [de

  4. Dose Distribution Calculation Using MCNPX Code in the Gamma-ray Irradiation Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    1991-02-01

    60 Co-gamma irradiators have long been used for foods sterilization, plant mutation and development of radio-protective agents, radio-sensitizers and other purposes. The Applied Radiological Science Research Institute of Cheju National University has a multipurpose gamma irradiation facility loaded with a MDS Nordin standard 60 Co source (C188), of which the initial activity was 400 TBq (10,800 Ci) on February 19, 2004. This panoramic gamma irradiator is designed to irradiate in all directions various samples such as plants, cultured cells and mice to administer given radiation doses. In order to give accurate doses to irradiation samples, appropriate methods of evaluating, both by calculation and measurement, the radiation doses delivered to the samples should be set up. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the radiation dose distributions inside the irradiation chamber and the radiation doses delivered to typical biolological samples which are frequently irradiated in the facility. The computational models are based on using the MCNPX code. The horizontal and vertical dose distributions has been calculated inside the irradiation chamber and compared the calculated results with measured data obtained with radiation dosimeters to verify the computational models. The radiation dosimeters employed are a Famer's type ion chamber and MOSFET dosimeters. Radiation doses were calculated by computational models, which were delivered to cultured cell samples contained in test tubes and to a mouse fixed in a irradiation cage, and compared the calculated results with the measured data. The computation models are also tested to see if they can accurately simulate the case where a thick lead shield is placed between the source and detector. Three tally options of the MCNPX code, F4, F5 and F6, are alternately used to see which option produces optimum results. The computation models are also used to calculate gamma ray energy spectra of a BGO scintillator at

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, D.; Markovic, V.M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Milenkovic, B.; Nikezic, D.; Atanackovic, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. The difference in evaluated dose in cancer and normal lung tissue suggests that BNCT could be applied for the treatment of cancers. The difference in exposure of cancer and healthy tissue can be observed, so the healthy tissue can be spared from damage. An absorbed dose ratio of metastatic tissue-to-the healthy tissue was ∼5. Absorbed dose to all other organs was low when compared with the lung dose. Absorbed dose depth distribution shows that BNC therapy can be very useful in the treatments for tumour. The ratio of the tumour absorbed dose and irradiated healthy tissue absorbed dose was also ∼5. It was seen that an elliptical neutron field was better irradiation choice. (authors)

  6. A calculation of dose distribution around 32P spherical sources and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Kunihide; Maekoshi, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    In order to avoid the radiation hazard in radiation therapy of craniopharyngioma by using 32 P, it is helpful to prepare a detailed dose distribution in the vicinity of the source in the tissue. Valley's method is used for calculations. A problem of the method is pointed out and the method itself is refined numerically: it extends a region of xi where an approximate polynomial is available, and it determines an optimum degree of the polynomial as 9. Usefulness of the polynomial is examined by comparing with Berger's scaled absorbed dose distribution F(xi) and the Valley's result. The dose and dose rate distributions around uniformly distributed spherical sources are computed from the termwise integration of our polynomial of degree 9 over the range of xi from 0 to 1.7. The dose distributions calculated from the spherical surface to a point at 0.5 cm outside the source, are given, when the radii of sources are 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 cm respectively. The therapeutic dose for a craniopharyngioma which has a spherically shaped cyst, and the absorbed dose to the normal tissue, (oculomotor nerve), are obtained from these dose rate distributions. (auth.)

  7. Potential formula for the calculation of starting and incremental insulin glargine doses: ALOHA subanalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadowaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pragmatic methods for dose optimization are required for the successful basal management in daily clinical practice. To derive a useful formula for calculating recommended glargine doses, we analyzed data from the Add-on Lantus® to Oral Hypoglycemic Agents (ALOHA study, a 24-week observation of Japanese type 2 diabetes patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The patients who initiated insulin glargine in basal-supported oral therapy (BOT regimen (n = 3506 were analyzed. The correlations between average changes in glargine dose and HbA1c were calculated, and its regression formula was estimated from grouped data categorized by baseline HbA1c levels. Starting doses of the background-subgroup achieving the HbA1c target with a last-observed dose above the average were compared to an assumed optimal starting dose of 0.15 U/kg/day. The difference in regression lines between background-subgroups was examined. A formula for determining the optimal starting and titration doses was thereby derived. The correlation coefficient between changes in dose and HbA1c was -0.9043. The estimated regression line formula was -0.964 × change in HbA1c+2.000. A starting dose of 0.15 U/kg/day was applicable to all background-subgroups except for patients with retinopathy (0.120 U/kg/day and/or with eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m(2 (0.114 U/kg/day. Additionally, women (0.135 U/kg/day and patients with sulfonylureas (0.132 U/kg/day received a slightly decreased starting dose. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest a simplified and pragmatic dose calculation formula for type 2 diabetes patients starting glargine BOT optimal daily dose at 24 weeks  =  starting dose (0.15×weight + incremental dose (baseline HbA1c - target HbA1c+2. This formula should be further validated using other samples in a prospective follow-up, especially since several patient groups required lower starting doses.

  8. TU-AB-BRC-09: Fast Dose-Averaged LET and Biological Dose Calculations for Proton Therapy Using Graphics Cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, H; Tseung, Chan; Beltran, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of proton dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and biological dose (BD) on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) card. Methods: A previously validated GPU-based MC simulation of proton transport was used to rapidly generate LETd distributions for proton treatment plans. Since this MC handles proton-nuclei interactions on an event-by-event using a Bertini intranuclear cascade-evaporation model, secondary protons were taken into account. The smaller contributions of secondary neutrons and recoil nuclei were ignored. Recent work has shown that LETd values are sensitive to the scoring method. The GPU-based LETd calculations were verified by comparing with a TOPAS custom scorer that uses tabulated stopping powers, following recommendations by other authors. Comparisons were made for prostate and head-and-neck patients. A python script is used to convert the MC-generated LETd distributions to BD using a variety of published linear quadratic models, and to export the BD in DICOM format for subsequent evaluation. Results: Very good agreement is obtained between TOPAS and our GPU MC. Given a complex head-and-neck plan with 1 mm voxel spacing, the physical dose, LETd and BD calculations for 10"8 proton histories can be completed in ∼5 minutes using a NVIDIA Titan X card. The rapid turnover means that MC feedback can be obtained on dosimetric plan accuracy as well as BD hotspot locations, particularly in regards to their proximity to critical structures. In our institution the GPU MC-generated dose, LETd and BD maps are used to assess plan quality for all patients undergoing treatment. Conclusion: Fast and accurate MC-based LETd calculations can be performed on the GPU. The resulting BD maps provide valuable feedback during treatment plan review. Partially funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  9. TU-AB-BRC-09: Fast Dose-Averaged LET and Biological Dose Calculations for Proton Therapy Using Graphics Cards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, H; Tseung, Chan; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC) calculations of proton dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and biological dose (BD) on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) card. Methods: A previously validated GPU-based MC simulation of proton transport was used to rapidly generate LETd distributions for proton treatment plans. Since this MC handles proton-nuclei interactions on an event-by-event using a Bertini intranuclear cascade-evaporation model, secondary protons were taken into account. The smaller contributions of secondary neutrons and recoil nuclei were ignored. Recent work has shown that LETd values are sensitive to the scoring method. The GPU-based LETd calculations were verified by comparing with a TOPAS custom scorer that uses tabulated stopping powers, following recommendations by other authors. Comparisons were made for prostate and head-and-neck patients. A python script is used to convert the MC-generated LETd distributions to BD using a variety of published linear quadratic models, and to export the BD in DICOM format for subsequent evaluation. Results: Very good agreement is obtained between TOPAS and our GPU MC. Given a complex head-and-neck plan with 1 mm voxel spacing, the physical dose, LETd and BD calculations for 10{sup 8} proton histories can be completed in ∼5 minutes using a NVIDIA Titan X card. The rapid turnover means that MC feedback can be obtained on dosimetric plan accuracy as well as BD hotspot locations, particularly in regards to their proximity to critical structures. In our institution the GPU MC-generated dose, LETd and BD maps are used to assess plan quality for all patients undergoing treatment. Conclusion: Fast and accurate MC-based LETd calculations can be performed on the GPU. The resulting BD maps provide valuable feedback during treatment plan review. Partially funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  10. Independent dose calculation of the Tps Iplan in radiotherapy conformed with MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrada, A.; Tello, Z.; Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.

    2014-08-01

    The systems utilization of independent dose calculation in three dimensional-Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-Crt) treatments allows a direct verification of the treatments times. The utilization of these systems allows diminishing the probability of errors occurrence generated by the treatment planning system (Tps), allowing a detailed analysis of the dose to delivering and review of the normalization point (Np) or prescription. The independent dose calculation is realized across the knowledge of dosimetric parameters of the treatment machine and particular characteristics of every individual field. The aim of this work is develops a calculation system of punctual doses for isocentric fields conformed with multi-leaf collimation systems (MLC), where the dose calculation is in conformity with the suggested ones by ICRU Report No. 42, 1987. Calculation software was realized in C ++ under a free platform of programming (Code::Blocks). The system uses files in format Rtp, exported from the Tps to systems of record and verification (Lantis). This file contains detailed information of the dose, Um, position of the MLC sheets and collimators for every field of treatment. The size of equivalent field is obtained from the positions of every sheet; the effective depth of calculation can be introduced from the dosimetric report of the Tps or automatically from the DFS of the field. The 3D coordinates of the isocenter and the Np for the treatment plan must be introduced manually. From this information the system looks the dosimetric parameters and calculates the Um. The calculations were realized in two accelerators a NOVALIS Tx (Varian) with 120 sheets of high definition (hd-MLC) and a PRIMUS Optifocus (Siemens) with 82 sheets. 705 patients were analyzed for a total of 1082, in plans made for both equipment s, the average uncertainty with regard to the calculation of the Tps is-0.43% ± 2.42% in a range between [-7.90 %, 7.50 %]. The major uncertainty was in Np near of the

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter; Neuenschwander, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm 2 of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d max and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm 2 at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose calculation

  12. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  13. SU-E-T-202: Impact of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Algorithm On Prostate SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Garrigo, E; Cardenas, J; Castro Pena, P [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of using Monte Carlo algorithm on pre calculated SBRT prostate treatment with pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: A 6MV photon beam produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) linear accelerator equipped with HDMLC was used. Treatment plans were done using 9 fields with Iplanv4.5 (BrainLAB) and dynamic IMRT modality. Institutional SBRT protocol uses a total dose to the prostate of 40Gy in 5 fractions, every other day. Dose calculation is done by pencil beam (2mm dose resolution), heterogeneity correction and dose volume constraint (UCLA) for PTV D95%=40Gy and D98%>39.2Gy, Rectum V20Gy<50%, V32Gy<20%, V36Gy<10% and V40Gy<5%, Bladder V20Gy<40% and V40Gy<10%, femoral heads V16Gy<5%, penile bulb V25Gy<3cc, urethra and overlap region between PTV and PRV Rectum Dmax<42Gy. 10 SBRT treatments plans were selected and recalculated using Monte Carlo with 2mm spatial resolution and mean variance of 2%. DVH comparisons between plans were done. Results: The average difference between PTV doses constraints were within 2%. However 3 plans have differences higher than 3% which does not meet the D98% criteria (>39.2Gy) and should have been renormalized. Dose volume constraint differences for rectum, bladder, femoral heads and penile bulb were les than 2% and within tolerances. Urethra region and overlapping between PTV and PRV Rectum shows increment of dose in all plans. The average difference for urethra region was 2.1% with a maximum of 7.8% and for the overlapping region 2.5% with a maximum of 8.7%. Conclusion: Monte Carlo dose calculation on dynamic IMRT treatments could affects on plan normalization. Dose increment in critical region of urethra and PTV overlapping region with PTV could have clinical consequences which need to be studied. The use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm is limited because inverse planning dose optimization use only pencil beam.

  14. Calculation of electron contamination doses produced using blocking trays for 6 MV X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    Calculation of electron contamination doses whilst using blocking trays in radiotherapy is achieved by comparison of measured absorbed dose within the first few centimeters of a water phantom. Electron contamination of up to 28% of maximum dose is produced at the central axis of the beam whilst using a 6 mm Perspex blocking tray for a 30 cmx30 cm field. The electron contamination is spread over the entire field reducing slightly towards the edge of the beam. Electron contamination from block trays is also present outside the primary collimated X-ray beam with more than 20% of the maximum dose deposited at the surface, 5 cm outside the primary collimated beam at a field size of 40 cmx40 cm. The electron contamination spectrum has been calculated from measured results.

  15. SKYSHIN: A computer code for calculating radiation dose over a barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.; Boland, J.R.; Dickman, P.T.

    1986-11-01

    SKYSHIN is a computer code for calculating the radioactive dose (mrem), when there is a barrier between the point source and the receptor. The two geometrical configurations considered are: the source and receptor separated by a rectangular wall, and the source at the bottom of a cylindrical hole in the ground. Each gamma ray traveling over the barrier is assumed to be scattered at a single point. The dose to a receptor from such paths is numerically integrated for the total dose, with symmetry used to reduce the triple integral to a double integral. The buildup factor used along a straight line through air is based on published data, and extrapolated in a stable way to low energy levels. This buildup factor was validated by comparing calculated and experimental line-of-sight doses. The entire code shows good agreement to limited field data. The code runs on a CDC or on a Vax computer, and could be modified easily for others

  16. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams. Either the Klein-Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source-surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  17. Calculational methods for estimating skin dose from electrons in Co-60 gamma-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; Sibata, C.H.; Attix, F.H.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods have been employed to calculate the relative contribution to skin dose due to scattered electrons in Co-60 γ-ray beams. Either the Klein--Nishina differential scattering probability is employed to determine the number and initial energy of electrons scattered into the direction of a detector, or a Gaussian approximation is used to specify the surface distribution of initial pencil electron beams created by parallel or diverging photon fields. Results of these calculations are compared with experimental data. In addition, that fraction of relative surface dose resulting from photon interactions in air alone is estimated and compared with data extrapolated from measurements at large source--surface distance (SSD). The contribution to surface dose from electrons generated in air is 50% or more of the total skin dose for SSDs greater than 80 cm

  18. Development of Japanese voxel models and their application to organ dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Three Japanese voxel (volume pixel) phantoms in supine and upright postures, which are consisted of about 1 mm 3 size voxels, have been developed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) images of healthy Japanese adult male and female volunteers. Their body structures are reproduced more realistically in comparison with most existing voxel phantoms. Organ doses due to internal or external exposures were calculated using the developed phantoms. In estimation of radiation dose from radionuclides incorporated into body, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for low energy photon were significantly influenced by the changes in postures. In estimation of organ doses due to external exposures, the doses of some organs of the developed phantom were calculated and were compared with those of a previous Japanese voxel phantom (voxel size: 0.98x0.98x10 mm 3 ) and the reference values of ICRP Publication 74. (author)

  19. Dose-volume histograms based on serial intravascular ultrasound: a calculation model for radioactive stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, Christian; Wexberg, Paul; Gottsauner-Wolf, Michael; Pokrajac, Boris; Ortmann, Elisabeth; Aiginger, Hannes; Glogar, Dietmar; Poetter, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radioactive stents are under investigation for reduction of coronary restenosis. However, the actual dose delivered to specific parts of the coronary artery wall based on the individual vessel anatomy has not been determined so far. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) permit an estimation of the actual dose absorbed by the target volume. We present a method to calculate DVHs based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements to determine the dose distribution within the vessel wall. Materials and methods: Ten patients were studied by intravascular ultrasound after radioactive stenting (BX Stent, P-32, 15-mm length) to obtain tomographic cross-sections of the treated segments. We developed a computer algorithm using the actual dose distribution of the stent to calculate differential and cumulative DVHs. The minimal target dose, the mean target dose, the minimal doses delivered to 10 and 90% of the adventitia (DV10, DV90), and the percentage of volume receiving a reference dose at 0.5 mm from the stent surface cumulated over 28 days were derived from the DVH plots. Results were expressed as mean±SD. Results: The mean activity of the stents was 438±140 kBq at implantation. The mean reference dose was 111±35 Gy, whereas the calculated mean target dose within the adventitia along the stent was 68±20 Gy. On average, DV90 and DV10 were 33±9 Gy and 117±41 Gy, respectively. Expanding the target volume to include 2.5-mm-long segments at the proximal and distal ends of the stent, the calculated mean target dose decreased to 55±17 Gy, and DV 90 and DV 10 were 6.4±2.4 Gy and 107±36 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of DVHs seems in principle to be a valuable tool for both prospective and retrospective analysis of dose-distribution of radioactive stents. It may provide the basis to adapt treatment planning in coronary brachytherapy to the common standards of radiotherapy

  20. 3D calculation of absorbed dose for 131I-targeted radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedzadeh, E.; Sarkar, S.; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, A.; Ay, M. R.; Khosravi, H. R.; Loudos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various methods, such as those developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or employing dose point kernels, have been applied to the radiation dosimetry of 131 I radionuclide therapy. However, studies have not shown a strong relationship between tumour absorbed dose and its overall therapeutic response, probably due in part to inaccuracies in activity and dose estimation. In the current study, the GATE Monte Carlo computer code was used to facilitate voxel-level radiation dosimetry for organ activities measured in an. 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patient. This approach allows incorporation of the size, shape and composition of organs (in the current study, in the Zubal anthropomorphic phantom) and intra-organ and intra-tumour inhomogeneities in the activity distributions. The total activities of the tumours and their heterogeneous distributions were measured from the SPECT images to calculate the dose maps. For investigating the effect of activity distribution on dose distribution, a hypothetical homogeneous distribution of the same total activity was considered in the tumours. It was observed that the tumour mean absorbed dose rates per unit cumulated activity were 0.65 E-5 and 0.61 E-5 mGY MBq -1 s -1 for the uniform and non-uniform distributions in the tumour, respectively, which do not differ considerably. However, the dose-volume histograms (DVH) show that the tumour non-uniform activity distribution decreases the absorbed dose to portions of the tumour volume. In such a case, it can be misleading to quote the mean or maximum absorbed dose, because overall response is likely limited by the tumour volume that receives low (i.e. non-cytocidal) doses. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry, and calculation of tumour DVHs, may lead to the derivation of clinically reliable dose-response relationships and therefore may ultimately improve treatment planning as well as response assessment for radionuclide

  1. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M; Thomson, R M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with(125)I, (103)Pd, or (131)Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20-30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%-10% and 13%-14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%-17% and 29%-34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model

  2. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with 125 I, 103 Pd, or 131 Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up

  3. Interpretation of animal data in the calculation of doses from new radiolabelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellender, M.; Naylor, G.P.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Radionuclide Biokinetics Group of the Biomedical Effects Department at NRPB provides a dose calculation service for pharmaceutical companies and associated laboratories which plan to administer radiolabelled drugs to human volunteers as part of their research and development programmes for new compounds. Animal data provided by these companies are used to estimate the likely doses to humans from administration of the compound. The dose estimate then accompanies the pharmaceutical company's application for approval from the UK Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC). The method of calculation, the interpretation of the animal data and the range of results obtained are discussed. In addition, the effect of the use of the new ICRP tissue weighting factors in the calculations is considered. (Author)

  4. Validation of a model for calculating environmental doses caused by gamma emitters in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, X.; Rosell, J.R.; Dies, X.

    1991-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the absorbed dose rates caused by gamma emitters of both natural and artificial origin distributed in the soil. The model divides the soil into five compartments corresponding to layers situated at different depths, and assumes that the concentration of radionuclides is constant in each one of them. The calculations, following the model developed, are undertaken through a program which, based on the concentrations of the radionuclides in the different compartments, gives as a result the dose rate at a height of one metre above the ground caused by each radionuclide and the percentage this represents with respect to the total absorbed dose rate originating from this soil. The validity of the model has been checked in the case of sandy soils by comparing the exposure rates calculated for five sites with the experimental values obtained with an ionisation chamber. (author)

  5. Calculation of the gamma-dose rate from a continuously emitted plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1975-06-01

    A computer model is presented which calculates the long term gamma dose rate caused by the radioactive off-gas continuously emitted from a stack. The statistical distribution of the wind direction and velocity and of the stability categories is taken into account. The emitted activity, distributed in the atmosphere according to this statistics, is assumed to be concentrated at the mesh points of a three-dimensional grid. The grid spacing and the integration limits determine the accuracy as well as the computer time needed. When calculating the dose rate in a given wind direction, the contribution of the activity emitted into the neighbouring sectors is evaluated. This influence is demonstrated in the results, which are calculated with a error below 3% and compared to the dose rate distribution curves of the submersion model and the model developed by K.J. Vogt. (orig.) [de

  6. A comparison of the calculation methods of the maze shielding dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenqian; Li Junli; Li Pengyu; Tao Yinghua

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a theoretical calculating method for the dose rate of the maze of the low-energy accelerators or high-energy accelerators, based on the NCRP report Nos.49, 51 and 151. The multi-legged maze of the Miyun CT workshop of the NUCTECH Company Limited and the arc maze of the radiation laboratory of the Academy of Military Medical Sciences were calculated using this method. The calculating results were compared with the MCNP simulating results and the measured results. For the commonly estimation of the maze dose rate, as long as the parameters chosen properly, this method can give a conservative result, and save time from simulation. It's hoped that this work could offer a reference for the maze design and the dose estimation method in the aftertime. (authors)

  7. Magnetic resonance only workflow and validation of dose calculations for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Jensen, Henrik R.; Brink, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current state of the art radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer utilises magnetic resonance (MR) for soft tissue delineation and computed tomography (CT) to provide an electron density map for dose calculation. This dual scan workflow is prone to setup and registration error....... This study evaluates the feasibility of an MR-only workflow and the validity of dose calculation from an MR derived pseudo CT. Material and methods: Thirty prostate cancer patients were CT and MR scanned. Clinical treatment plans were generated on CT using a single 18 MV arc volumetric modulated arc therapy...... was successfully delivered to one patient, including manually performed daily IGRT. Conclusions: Median gamma pass rates were high for pseudo CT and proved superior to uniform density. Local differences in dose calculations were concluded not to have clinical relevance. Feasibility of the MR-only workflow...

  8. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  9. Accurate heterogeneous dose calculation for lung cancer patients without high‐resolution CT densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Dempsey, James F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative accuracy of megavoltage photon‐beam dose calculations employing either five bulk densities or independent voxel densities determined by calibration of the CT Houndsfield number. Full‐resolution CT and bulk density treatment plans were generated for 70 lung or esophageal cancer tumors (66 cases) using a commercial treatment planning system with an adaptive convolution dose calculation algorithm (Pinnacle3, Philips Medicals Systems). Bulk densities were applied to segmented regions. Individual and population average densities were compared to the full‐resolution plan for each case. Monitor units were kept constant and no normalizations were employed. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and dose difference distributions were examined for all cases. The average densities of the segmented air, lung, fat, soft tissue, and bone for the entire set were found to be 0.14, 0.26, 0.89, 1.02, and 1.12 g/cm3, respectively. In all cases, the normal tissue DVH agreed to better than 2% in dose. In 62 of 70 DVHs of the planning target volume (PTV), agreement to better than 3% in dose was observed. Six cases demonstrated emphysema, one with bullous formations and one with a hiatus hernia having a large volume of gas. These required the additional assignment of density to the emphysemic lung and inflammatory changes to the lung, the regions of collapsed lung, the bullous formations, and the hernia gas. Bulk tissue density dose calculation provides an accurate method of heterogeneous dose calculation. However, patients with advanced emphysema may require high‐resolution CT studies for accurate treatment planning. PACS number: 87.53.Tf

  10. Calculation of nuclide inventory, decay power, activity and dose rates for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, Rune

    2000-03-01

    The nuclide inventory was calculated for a BWR and a PWR fuel element, with burnups of 38 and 55 MWd/kg uranium for the BWR fuel, and 42 and 60 MWd/kg uranium for the PWR fuel. The calculations were performed for decay times of up to 300,000 years. Gamma and neutron dose rates have been calculated at a distance of 1 m from a bare fuel element and outside the spent fuel canister. The calculations were performed using the CASMO-4 code

  11. Two examples of indication specific radiation dose calculations in dental CBCT and Multidetector CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Politis, Constantinus; Hermans, Robert; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Shaheen, Eman; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    To calculate organ doses and estimate the effective dose for justification purposes in patients undergoing orthognathic treatment planning purposes and temporal bone imaging in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners. The radiation dose to the ICRP reference male voxel phantom was calculated for dedicated orthognathic treatment planning acquisitions via Monte Carlo simulations in two dental CBCT scanners, Promax 3D Max (Planmeca, FI) and NewTom VGi evo (QR s.r.l, IT) and in Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens, DE) MDCT scanner. For temporal bone imaging, radiation doses were calculated via MC simulations for a CBCT protocol in NewTom 5G (QR s.r.l, IT) and with the use of a software tool (CT-expo) for Somatom Force (Siemens, DE). All procedures had been optimized at the acceptance tests of the devices. For orthognathic protocols, dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses compared to MDCT scanners. The estimated effective dose (ED) was 0.32mSv for a normal resolution operation mode in Promax 3D Max, 0.27mSv in VGi-evo and 1.18mSv in the Somatom Definition Flash. For temporal bone protocols, the Somatom Force resulted in an estimated ED of 0.28mSv while for NewTom 5G the ED was 0.31 and 0.22mSv for monolateral and bilateral imaging respectively. Two clinical exams which are carried out with both a CBCT or a MDCT scanner were compared in terms of radiation dose. Dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses for orthognathic patients whereas for temporal bone procedures the doses were similar. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy of small lung lesions using accurate dose calculation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobler, Barbara; Walter, Cornelia; Knopf, Antje; Fabri, Daniella; Loeschel, Rainer; Polednik, Martin; Schneider, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and to validate different dose calculation algorithms for the use in radiation therapy of small lung lesions and to optimize the treatment planning using accurate dose calculation algorithms. A 9-field conformal treatment plan was generated on an inhomogeneous phantom with lung mimics and a soft tissue equivalent insert, mimicking a lung tumor. The dose distribution was calculated with the Pencil Beam and Collapsed Cone algorithms implemented in Masterplan (Nucletron) and the Monte Carlo system XVMC and validated using Gafchromic EBT films. Differences in dose distribution were evaluated. The plans were then optimized by adding segments to the outer shell of the target in order to increase the dose near the interface to the lung. The Pencil Beam algorithm overestimated the dose by up to 15% compared to the measurements. Collapsed Cone and Monte Carlo predicted the dose more accurately with a maximum difference of -8% and -3% respectively compared to the film. Plan optimization by adding small segments to the peripheral parts of the target, creating a 2-step fluence modulation, allowed to increase target coverage and homogeneity as compared to the uncorrected 9 field plan. The use of forward 2-step fluence modulation in radiotherapy of small lung lesions allows the improvement of tumor coverage and dose homogeneity as compared to non-modulated treatment plans and may thus help to increase the local tumor control probability. While the Collapsed Cone algorithm is closer to measurements than the Pencil Beam algorithm, both algorithms are limited at tissue/lung interfaces, leaving Monte-Carlo the most accurate algorithm for dose prediction

  13. Effective Dose Calculation Program (EDCP) for the usage of NORM-added consumer product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Lee, Jaekook; Min, Chul Hee

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study is to develop the Effective Dose Calculation Program (EDCP) for the usage of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) added consumer products. The EDCP was developed based on a database of effective dose conversion coefficient and the Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB) program to incorporate a Graphic User Interface (GUI) for ease of use. To validate EDCP, the effective dose calculated with EDCP by manually determining the source region by using the GUI and that by using the reference mathematical algorithm were compared for pillow, waist supporter, eye-patch and sleeping mattress. The results show that the annual effective dose calculated with EDCP was almost identical to that calculated using the reference mathematical algorithm in most of the assessment cases. With the assumption of the gamma energy of 1 MeV and activity of 1 MBq, the annual effective doses of pillow, waist supporter, sleeping mattress, and eye-patch determined using the reference algorithm were 3.444 mSv year -1 , 2.770 mSv year -1 , 4.629 mSv year -1 , and 3.567 mSv year -1 , respectively, while those calculated using EDCP were 3.561 mSv year -1 , 2.630 mSv year -1 , 4.740 mSv year -1 , and 3.780 mSv year -1 , respectively. The differences in the annual effective doses were less than 5%, despite the different calculation methods employed. The EDCP can therefore be effectively used for radiation protection management in the context of the usage of NORM-added consumer products. Additionally, EDCP can be used by members of the public through the GUI for various studies in the field of radiation protection, thus facilitating easy access to the program. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Clinical implementation of full Monte Carlo dose calculation in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Hongyu; Parodi, Katia; Slopsema, Roelf; Engelsman, Martijn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to facilitate the clinical use of Monte Carlo proton dose calculation to support routine treatment planning and delivery. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to simulate the treatment head setup, including a time-dependent simulation of modulator wheels (for broad beam modulation) and magnetic field settings (for beam scanning). Any patient-field-specific setup can be modeled according to the treatment control system of the facility. The code was benchmarked against phantom measurements. Using a simulation of the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the Monte Carlo dose to be specified in absolute units (Gy per ionization chamber reading). Next, the capability of reading CT data information was implemented into the Monte Carlo code to model patient anatomy. To allow time-efficient dose calculation, the standard Geant4 tracking algorithm was modified. Finally, a software link of the Monte Carlo dose engine to the patient database and the commercial planning system was established to allow data exchange, thus completing the implementation of the proton Monte Carlo dose calculation engine ('DoC++'). Monte Carlo re-calculated plans are a valuable tool to revisit decisions in the planning process. Identification of clinically significant differences between Monte Carlo and pencil-beam-based dose calculations may also drive improvements of current pencil-beam methods. As an example, four patients (29 fields in total) with tumors in the head and neck regions were analyzed. Differences between the pencil-beam algorithm and Monte Carlo were identified in particular near the end of range, both due to dose degradation and overall differences in range prediction due to bony anatomy in the beam path. Further, the Monte Carlo reports dose-to-tissue as compared to dose-to-water by the planning system. Our implementation is tailored to a specific Monte Carlo code and the treatment planning system XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc

  15. Modelling of an industrial environment, part 2.: External dose calculation with relevant countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eged, K.; Kis, Z.; Alvarez-Farizo, B.; Gil, J.; Voigt, G.

    2002-01-01

    The calculation of the collective dose and averted collective dose after applying countermeasures in an industrial environment has been divided in two parts. In the first part (Kis et al. 2002) separate Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport resulted in the air kermas per photon per unit area due to the industrial surfaces contaminated by 1 37C s at specific points using the so-called local approach. In the local approach the air kerma rates due to specific intervention elements at the evaluation locations in the whole environment are determined (Gutierrez et al. 2000). In this way the collective and averted collective dose due to the radiation from a particular intervention element (e.g. the roof of a building) can be obtained. It can, therefore, provide a ranking of the specific intervention elements based on their contribution to collective dose as well. The deposition pattern and the long-term behaviour of deposited radionuclides vary widely in natural circumstances; therefore the number of the photons emitted from the various surfaces per unit area and time can differ significantly. This means the results of the Monte Carlo simulations have to be weighted according to the number of emitted photons so that the actual radiation field can be set up. For this purpose, a dose calculation code has been developed in the framework of the TEMAS project (Gutierrez et al. 2000) which allows to calculate collective doses for different environments. This code has been applied in the present work

  16. Calculate the maximum expected dose for technical radio physicists a cobalt machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila Avila, Rafael; Perez Velasquez, Reytel; Gonzalez Lapez, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    Considering the daily operations carried out by technicians Radiophysics Medical Service Department of Radiation Oncology Hospital V. General Teaching I. Lenin in the city of Holguin, during a working week (Between Monday and Friday) as an important element in calculating the maximum expected dose (MDE). From the exponential decay law which is subject the source activity, we propose corrections to the cumulative doses in the weekly period, leading to obtaining a formula which takes into a cumulative dose during working days and sees no dose accumulation of rest days (Saturday and Sunday). The estimate factor correction is made from a power series expansion convergent is truncated at the n-th term coincides with the week period for which you want to calculate the dose. As initial condition is adopted ambient dose equivalent rate as a given, which allows estimate MDE in the moments after or before this. Calculations were proposed use of an Excel spreadsheet that allows simple and accessible processing the formula obtained. (author)

  17. Feasibility of CBCT-based dose calculation: Comparative analysis of HU adjustment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotina, Irina; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Stock, Markus; Steininger, Thomas; Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the accuracy of different HU adjustments for CBCT-based dose calculation. Methods and materials: Dose calculation was performed on CBCT images of 30 patients. In the first two approaches phantom-based (Pha-CC) and population-based (Pop-CC) conversion curves were used. The third method (WAB) represents override of the structures with standard densities for water, air and bone. In ROI mapping approach all structures were overridden with average HUs from planning CT. All techniques were benchmarked to the Pop-CC and CT-based plans by DVH comparison and γ-index analysis. Results: For prostate plans, WAB and ROI mapping compared to Pop-CC showed differences in PTV D median below 2%. The WAB and Pha-CC methods underestimated the bladder dose in IMRT plans. In lung cases PTV coverage was underestimated by Pha-CC method by 2.3% and slightly overestimated by the WAB and ROI techniques. The use of the Pha-CC method for head–neck IMRT plans resulted in difference in PTV coverage up to 5%. Dose calculation with WAB and ROI techniques showed better agreement with pCT than conversion curve-based approaches. Conclusions: Density override techniques provide an accurate alternative to the conversion curve-based methods for dose calculation on CBCT images.

  18. Application of the mathematical modelling and human phantoms for calculation of the organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Cechak, T.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing power of the computers hardware and new versions of the software for the radiation transport simulation and modelling of the complex experimental setups and geometrical arrangement enable to dramatically improve calculation of organ or target volume doses ( dose distributions) in the wide field of medical physics and radiation protection applications. Increase of computers memory and new software features makes it possible to use not only analytical (mathematical) phantoms but also allow constructing the voxel models of human or phantoms with voxels fine enough (e.g. 1·1·1 mm) to represent all required details. CT data can be used for the description of such voxel model geometry .Advanced scoring methods are available in the new software versions. Contribution gives the overview of such new possibilities in the modelling and doses calculations, discusses the simulation/approximation of the dosimetric quantities ( especially dose ) and calculated data interpretation. Some examples of application and demonstrations will be shown, compared and discussed. Present computational tools enables to calculate organ or target volumes doses with new quality of large voxel models/phantoms (including CT based patient specific model ), approximating the human body with high precision. Due to these features has more and more importance and use in the fields of medical and radiological physics, radiation protection, etc. (authors)

  19. Neptun: an interactive code for calculating doses to man due to radionuclides in acquatic food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, Reto.

    1980-07-01

    A flexible and interactive code, NEPTUN, has been written in FORTRAN IV for the PDP-10 computer to assess the impact on man of radionuclides in aquatic food chains. NEPTUN is based on an equilibrium model of the linear-chain type, and calculates aquatic food concentrations and doses to man. A decay term is included for the holdup time of the various food types. A total of seven food types can be selected, which include drinking water, freshwater and salt-water plants, inverebrates and fish. Thirty different diets can be implemented and five different dose factor files can be chosen. These include dose conversion factors for infants and adults based on ICRP 2 and ICRP 26 methodologies. All dose factors involve a dose commitment of 50 years, or equivalently, 50 years of chronic exposure. To date, only stochastic ICRP 26 dose caluclations have been implemented. The basic concentration factor file contains data for 211 different radionuclides; the dose factor files are less comprehensive. However, all files can be readily expanded. The output includes tables of concentrations and doses for individual radionuclides, as well as summaries for groups of radionuclides. Existing aquatic food chain models and the sources of currently-used generic concentration factors are briefly reviewed, and dose factors based on ICRP 2 and ICRP 26 methodologies are contrasted. (auth)

  20. The Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): implementation of the dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, A.; Vostrotin, V.; Efimov, A.; Birchall, A.; Puncher, M.

    2017-01-01

    The calculation of internal doses for the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013) involved extensive computational resources due to the complexity and sheer number of calculations required. The required output consisted of a set of 1000 hyper-realizations: each hyper-realization consists of a set (1 for each worker) of probability distributions of organ doses. This report describes the hardware components and computational approaches required to make the calculation tractable. Together with the software, this system is referred to here as the 'PANDORA system'. It is based on a commercial SQL server database in a series of six work stations. A complete run of the entire Mayak worker cohort entailed a huge amount of calculations in PANDORA and due to the relatively slow speed of writing the data into the SQL server, each run took about 47 days. Quality control was monitored by comparing doses calculated in PANDORA with those in a specially modified version of the commercial software 'IMBA Professional Plus'. Suggestions are also made for increasing calculation and storage efficiency for future dosimetry calculations using PANDORA. (authors)

  1. Simplified calculation method for radiation dose under normal condition of transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, N.; Ozaki, S.; Sato, K.; Sugahara, A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to estimate radiation dose during transportation of radioactive materials, the following computer codes are available: RADTRAN, INTERTRAN, J-TRAN. Because these codes consist of functions for estimating doses not only under normal conditions but also in the case of accidents, when nuclei may leak and spread into the environment by air diffusion, the user needs to have special knowledge and experience. In this presentation, we describe how, with a view to preparing a method by which a person in charge of transportation can calculate doses in normal conditions, the main parameters upon which the value of doses depends were extracted and the dose for a unit of transportation was estimated. (J.P.N.)

  2. Simple experimentally derived algorithm for computer calculated dose rates associated with /sup 137/Cs gynecologic insertions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrede, D E; Dawalibi, H [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Medical Physics. Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1980-01-01

    A simple mathematical algorithm is derived from experimental data for dose rates from /sup 137/Cs sources in a finite tissue equivalent medium corresponding to the female pelvis. An analytical expression for a point source of /sup 137/Cs along with a simple numerical integration routine allows for rapid as well as accurate dose rate calculations at points of interest for gynecologic insertions. When compared with theoretical models assuming an infinite unit density medium, the measured dose rates are found to be systematically lower at distances away from a single source; 5 per cent at 2 cm and 10 per cent at 7 cm along the transverse axis. Allowance in the program for print out of dose rates from individual sources to a given point and the feature of source strength modification allows for optimization in terms of increasing the difference in dose rate between reference treatment points and sensitive structures such as the bladder, rectum and colon.

  3. Simple experimentally derived algorithm for computer calculated dose rates associated with 137Cs gynecologic insertions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrede, D.E.; Dawalibi, H.

    1980-01-01

    A simple mathematical algorithm is derived from experimental data for dose rates from 137 Cs sources in a finite tissue equivalent medium corresponding to the female pelvis. An analytical expression for a point source of 137 Cs along with a simple numerical integration routine allows for rapid as well as accurate dose rate calculations at points of interest for gynecologic insertions. When compared with theoretical models assuming an infinite unit density medium, the measured dose rates are found to be systematically lower at distances away from a single source; 5 per cent at 2 cm and 10 per cent at 7 cm along the transverse axis. Allowance in the program for print out of dose rates from individual sources to a given point and the feature of source strength modification allows for optimization in terms of increasing the difference in dose rate between reference treatment points and sensitive structures such as the bladder, rectum and colon. (Auth.)

  4. Monte Carlo Calculated Effective Dose to Teenage Girls from Computed Tomography Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; Bibbo, G.; Pattison, J.

    2000-01-01

    Effective doses from CT to paediatric patients are not common in the literature. This article reports some effective doses to teenage girls from CT examinations. The voxel computational model ADELAIDE, representative of a 14-year-old girl, was scaled in size by ±5% to represent also 11-12-year-old and 16-year-old girls. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the effective dose from chest, abdomen and whole torso CT examinations to the three version of ADELAIDE using a 120 kV spectrum. For the whole torso CT examination, in order of increasing model size, the effective doses were 9.0, 8.2 and 7.8 mSv per 100 mA.s. Data are presented that allow the estimation of effective dose from CT examinations of the torso for girls between the ages of 11 and 16. (author)

  5. Preliminary results on food consumption rates for off-site dose calculation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Bock; Chung, Yang Geun; Bang, Sun Young; Kang, Duk Won

    2005-01-01

    The Internal dose by food consumption mostly account for radiological dose of public around nuclear power plants(NPP). But, food consumption rate applied to off-site dose calculation in Korea which is the result of field investigation around Kori NPP by the KAERI in 1988. is not reflected of the latest dietary characteristics. The Ministry of Health and Welfare Affairs has investigated the food and nutrition of nations every 3 years based on the Law of National Health Improvement. To update the food consumption rates of the maximum individual, the analysis of the national food investigation results and field surveys around nuclear power plant sites have been carried out

  6. Calculations of the photon dose behind concrete shielding of high energy proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworak, D.; Tesch, K.; Zazula, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    The photon dose per primary beam proton behind lateral concrete shieldings was calculated by using an extension of the Monte Carlo particle shower code FLUKA. The following photon-producing processes were taken into account: capture of thermal neutrons, deexcitation of nuclei after nuclear evaporation, inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear reactions below 140 MeV, as well as photons from electromagnetic cascades. The obtained ratio of the photon dose to the neutron dose equivalent varies from 8% to 20% and it well compares with measurements performed recently at DESY giving a mean ratio of 14%. (orig.)

  7. SU-E-J-60: Efficient Monte Carlo Dose Calculation On CPU-GPU Heterogeneous Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, K; Chen, D. Z; Hu, X. S [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Zhou, B [Altera Corp., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well-known that the performance of GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation implementations is bounded by memory bandwidth. One major cause of this bottleneck is the random memory writing patterns in dose deposition, which leads to several memory efficiency issues on GPU such as un-coalesced writing and atomic operations. We propose a new method to alleviate such issues on CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, which achieves overall performance improvement for Monte Carlo dose calculation. Methods: Dose deposition is to accumulate dose into the voxels of a dose volume along the trajectories of radiation rays. Our idea is to partition this procedure into the following three steps, which are fine-tuned for CPU or GPU: (1) each GPU thread writes dose results with location information to a buffer on GPU memory, which achieves fully-coalesced and atomic-free memory transactions; (2) the dose results in the buffer are transferred to CPU memory; (3) the dose volume is constructed from the dose buffer on CPU. We organize the processing of all radiation rays into streams. Since the steps within a stream use different hardware resources (i.e., GPU, DMA, CPU), we can overlap the execution of these steps for different streams by pipelining. Results: We evaluated our method using a Monte Carlo Convolution Superposition (MCCS) program and tested our implementation for various clinical cases on a heterogeneous system containing an Intel i7 quad-core CPU and an NVIDIA TITAN GPU. Comparing with a straightforward MCCS implementation on the same system (using both CPU and GPU for radiation ray tracing), our method gained 2-5X speedup without losing dose calculation accuracy. Conclusion: The results show that our new method improves the effective memory bandwidth and overall performance for MCCS on the CPU-GPU systems. Our proposed method can also be applied to accelerate other Monte Carlo dose calculation approaches. This research was supported in part by NSF under Grants CCF

  8. Isodose distributions and dose uniformity in the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility calculated using the MCNP code

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C

    2001-01-01

    A systematic study of isodose distributions and dose uniformity in sample carriers of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility was carried out using the MCNP code. The absorbed dose rate, gamma flux per energy interval and average gamma energy were calculated. For comparison purposes, boxes filled with air and 'dummy' boxes loaded with layers of folded and crumpled newspapers to achieve a given value of density were used. The magnitude of various contributions to the total photon spectra, including source-dependent factors, irradiator structures, sample material and other origins were also calculated.

  9. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  10. Calculation of doses of fast electrons in formation of the beam with the aid of grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A P; Telesh, L V; Chifonenko, V V; Shishov, V A

    1976-04-01

    The authors describe the method of finding dose distributions of electron beams formed with the aid of grids. Calculation of fields for different grids is made with the help of the mentioned method. The authors analyzed the relation between the depth of location, extension of the homogeneous area, and the engagement factor and size of the grid holes. The effect of electron scattering on the hole edges on the shape of the dose field is considered. The comparison of calculated and experimental results shows that the method is sufficiently accurate to be used for practical radiation therapy.

  11. A single-source photon source model of a linear accelerator for Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Obioma; Glatting, Gerhard; Wenz, Frederik; Fleckenstein, Jens

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new method of deriving a virtual source model (VSM) of a linear accelerator photon beam from a phase space file (PSF) for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. A PSF of a 6 MV photon beam was generated by simulating the interactions of primary electrons with the relevant geometries of a Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and recording the particles that reach a plane 16 cm downstream the electron source. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) for particle positions and energies were derived from the analysis of the PSF. These PDFs were implemented in the VSM using inverse transform sampling. To model particle directions, the phase space plane was divided into a regular square grid. Each element of the grid corresponds to an area of 1 mm2 in the phase space plane. The average direction cosines, Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) between photon energies and their direction cosines, as well as the PCC between the direction cosines were calculated for each grid element. Weighted polynomial surfaces were then fitted to these 2D data. The weights are used to correct for heteroscedasticity across the phase space bins. The directions of the particles created by the VSM were calculated from these fitted functions. The VSM was validated against the PSF by comparing the doses calculated by the two methods for different square field sizes. The comparisons were performed with profile and gamma analyses. The doses calculated with the PSF and VSM agree to within 3% /1 mm (>95% pixel pass rate) for the evaluated fields. A new method of deriving a virtual photon source model of a linear accelerator from a PSF file for MC dose calculation was developed. Validation results show that the doses calculated with the VSM and the PSF agree to within 3% /1 mm.

  12. A single-source photon source model of a linear accelerator for Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obioma Nwankwo

    Full Text Available To introduce a new method of deriving a virtual source model (VSM of a linear accelerator photon beam from a phase space file (PSF for Monte Carlo (MC dose calculation.A PSF of a 6 MV photon beam was generated by simulating the interactions of primary electrons with the relevant geometries of a Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden and recording the particles that reach a plane 16 cm downstream the electron source. Probability distribution functions (PDFs for particle positions and energies were derived from the analysis of the PSF. These PDFs were implemented in the VSM using inverse transform sampling. To model particle directions, the phase space plane was divided into a regular square grid. Each element of the grid corresponds to an area of 1 mm2 in the phase space plane. The average direction cosines, Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC between photon energies and their direction cosines, as well as the PCC between the direction cosines were calculated for each grid element. Weighted polynomial surfaces were then fitted to these 2D data. The weights are used to correct for heteroscedasticity across the phase space bins. The directions of the particles created by the VSM were calculated from these fitted functions. The VSM was validated against the PSF by comparing the doses calculated by the two methods for different square field sizes. The comparisons were performed with profile and gamma analyses.The doses calculated with the PSF and VSM agree to within 3% /1 mm (>95% pixel pass rate for the evaluated fields.A new method of deriving a virtual photon source model of a linear accelerator from a PSF file for MC dose calculation was developed. Validation results show that the doses calculated with the VSM and the PSF agree to within 3% /1 mm.

  13. Improved Patient Size Estimates for Accurate Dose Calculations in Abdomen Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Lae [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The radiation dose of CT (computed tomography) is generally represented by the CTDI (CT dose index). CTDI, however, does not accurately predict the actual patient doses for different human body sizes because it relies on a cylinder-shaped head (diameter : 16 cm) and body (diameter : 32 cm) phantom. The purpose of this study was to eliminate the drawbacks of the conventional CTDI and to provide more accurate radiation dose information. Projection radiographs were obtained from water cylinder phantoms of various sizes, and the sizes of the water cylinder phantoms were calculated and verified using attenuation profiles. The effective diameter was also calculated using the attenuation of the abdominal projection radiographs of 10 patients. When the results of the attenuation-based method and the geometry-based method shown were compared with the results of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, the effective diameter of the attenuation-based method was found to be similar to the effective diameter of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, with a difference of less than 3.8%, but the geometry-based method showed a difference of less than 11.4%. This paper proposes a new method of accurately computing the radiation dose of CT based on the patient sizes. This method computes and provides the exact patient dose before the CT scan, and can therefore be effectively used for imaging and dose control.

  14. Development of mathematical pediatric phantoms for internal dose calculations: designs, limitations, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms of the human body at various ages are employed with Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for calculation of photon specific absorbed fractions. The author has developed a pediatric phantom series based on the design of the adult phantom, but with explicit equations for each organ so that organ sizes and marrow distributions could be assigned properly. Since the phantoms comprise simple geometric shapes, predictive dose capability is limited when geometry is critical to the calculation. Hence, there is a demand for better phantom design in situations where geometry is critical, such as for external irradiation or for internal emitters with low energy photons. Recent advances in computerized axial tomography (CAT) present the potential for derivation of anatomical information, which is so critical to development of phantoms, and ongoing developmental work on compuer architecture to handle large arrays for Monte Carlo calculations should make complex-geometry dose calculations economically feasible within this decade

  15. Dose Measurement and Calculation of Asymmetric X-Ray Fields from Therapeutic Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Attar, A. L.; Abdel-Wanees, M. E.; Hashem, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Linear accelerators with x-ray collimators that move independently are becoming increasingly common for treatment with asymmetric fields. In this paper we present a simplified approach to the calculation of dose for asymmetric fields. A method is described for calculating the beam profiles, depth doses and output factors for asymmetric fields of radiation produced by linear accelerators (siemens mevatron M2) with independent jaws. Values are calculated from data measured for symmetric fields. Symmetric field data are modified using opened off-axis factors (OAFs) and primary off-centre ratios (POCRs) which are obtained from in air measurements of the largest possible opened field. Beam hardening occurring within the flattening filter is taken into account using of attenuation coefficients for opened field and used to generate the opened POCR at different depths. A full investigation to compare measured and calculated profiles demonstrates favorable agreement.

  16. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  17. Calculation of the ingestion critical dose rate for the Goiania radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, E.M. dos; Martin Alves, A.S. De

    1994-01-01

    The calculation results of the critical distance for the ingestion dose rate due to a hypothetical Cs-137 release from the Abadia de Goias repository are shown. The work is based on the pathway repository-aquifer-well food chain. The calculations were based upon analytical models for the migration of radioisotopes through the aquifer and for its transfer from well water to food. (author)

  18. Case study: Findings and lessons learned from investigating a uranium intake and the corresponding dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeslaar, Frik; Niekerk, Santie van; Steenkamp, Harry; Visagie, Abrie

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To discuss the findings of an investigation into uranium intake and to discuss the lessons learned from the subsequent bioassay monitoring and dose calculations. Method: An investigation was held to determine direct and root causes after elevated air concentration levels were reported during the execution of an ad-hoc task. A programme of bioassay monitoring (urine sampling and lung counts) was implemented for the involved staff and committed effective doses were calculated. Major findings of the investigation: a) Inadequate pre-task assessment led to hazards not being identified and subsequently proper control measures were not implemented; b) Inadequate localised control of contamination led to contamination of worker's clothes and faces and contamination of rest of area; c) Workers were complacent which led to a lapse in safety awareness and subsequently they removed their face masks during the task. Problems experienced with bioassay monitoring and dose calculations: a) Some bioassay samples were not taken or were given incorrectly; b) Calculating doses were difficult due to lack of information regarding date of intake; whether there were other possible intakes; and the physiochemical nature of the uranium; c) Weak correlation between predicted and actual bioassay data; d) Period between starting bioassay monitoring and the actual event was too long. Conclusions: a) Shortcomings in the control of contamination with protective clothing and during the execution of ad-hoc tasks; b) Identifying hazards and assessing it is extremely dependant on the skill and capabilities if the Radiation Protection Officers; c) Instructions to workers regarding sampling of urine and arrangements around the sampling should be very specific with only one person responsible for managing the process; d) Be aware of the psychological impact on the affected workers; e) 2 nd Independent dose calculation important for verifying doses; f) Detection capabilities and

  19. Calculating of radiation doses in rutinary unloads of liquid wastes from Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, G.

    1985-01-01

    Utilization of nuclear energy to produce or generate electricity is a growing practice in the world, since it represent an economic and safe option to replace fossil fuels. During operation of nuclear power plants, radioactive materials are produced. A small fraction of these material are released to environment in the form of liquid or gaseous effluents. Estimation of radiation doses causing by effluents release has three purposes. During design phase of a nuclear station it is useful to adapt the wastes treatment systems to acceptable limits. During licensing phase, the regulator organism verifies the design of nuclear station effectuating estimation of doses. Finally, during operation of a nuclear station, before every unload of radioactive effluents, radiation doses should be evaluate in order to fulfill technical specifications, which limit the release of radioactive materials to environment. 1. To perform calculations of individual doses due to liquid radioactive effluents unload in units 1 and 2 of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (In licensing phase). 2. To perform a parametric study of the effect of unload recirculation over individual dose, since recirculation has two principal effects: thermodynamical effects in nuclear station and radioactivity concentration, the last can affect the fullfilment of dose limits. 3. To perform the calculation of collective doses causes by unloads of liquid effluents within a radius of 80 Kms. of nuclear station caused by unload of liquid radioactive effluents during normal operation of nuclear power plant and does not include doses caused during accident conditions. In Mexico the organism in charge of regulation of peaceful uses of nuclear energy is Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) and for Laguna Verde licensing, the regulations of country who manufactured the reactor was adopted, it is to say United States of America. In Appendix 'C' units used along this work are explained. Unless another

  20. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  1. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport algorithm for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Tao; Followill, David; Repchak, Roman; Molineu, Andrea; Howell, Rebecca; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mikell, Justin; Mourtada, Firas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The novel deterministic radiation transport algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), has shown great potential for accurate heterogeneous dose calculation. However, the clinical impact between AXB and other currently used algorithms still needs to be elucidated for translation between these algorithms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AXB for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The thorax phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was used for this study. IMRT and VMAT plans were created for the phantom in the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system. Each plan was delivered to the phantom three times using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator to ensure reproducibility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 film were placed inside the phantom to measure delivered doses. The measurements were compared with dose calculations from AXB 11.0.21 and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 11.0.21. Two dose reporting modes of AXB, dose-to-medium in medium (D m,m ) and dose-to-water in medium (D w,m ), were studied. Point doses, dose profiles, and gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: For the RPC lung phantom, AAA and AXB dose predictions were found in good agreement to TLD and film measurements for both IMRT and VMAT plans. TLD dose predictions were within 0.4%–4.4% to AXB doses (both D m,m and D w,m ); and within 2.5%–6.4% to AAA doses, respectively. For the film comparisons, the gamma indexes (±3%/3 mm criteria) were 94%, 97%, and 98% for AAA, AXB Dm,m , and AXB Dw,m , respectively. The differences between AXB and AAA in dose–volume histogram mean doses were within 2% in the planning target volume, lung, heart, and within 5% in the spinal cord. However

  2. Calculation of primary and secondary dose in proton therapy of brain tumors using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghbel Esfahani, F.; Alamatsaz, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy beams of protons offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum - Bragg peak - near the end of range with a sharp falloff at the distal edge. Therefore, research must be done to investigate the possible negative and positive effects of using proton therapy as a treatment modality. In proton therapy, protons do account for the vast majority of dose. However, when protons travel through matter, secondary particles are created by the interactions of protons and matter en route to and within the patient. It is believed that secondary dose can lead to secondary cancer, especially in pediatric cases. Therefore, the focus of this work is determining both primary and secondary dose. Dose calculations were performed by MCNPX in tumoral and healthy parts of brain. The brain tumor has a 10 mm diameter and is located 16 cm under the skin surface. The brain was simulated by a cylindrical water phantom with the dimensions of 19 x 19cm 2 (length x diameter), with 0.5 cm thickness of plexiglass (C 4 H 6 O 2 ). Then beam characteristics were investigated to ensure the accuracy of the model. Simulations were initially validated with against packages such as SRIM/TRIM. Dose calculations were performed using different configurations to evaluate depth-dose profiles and dose 2D distributions.The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the brain tumor, is from 152 to 154 MeV. (authors)

  3. Dose-calculation algorithms in the context of inhomogeneity corrections for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy has witnessed a plethora of innovations and developments in the past 15 years. Since the introduction of computed tomography for treatment planning there has been a steady introduction of new methods to refine treatment delivery. Imaging continues to be an integral part of the planning, but also the delivery, of modern radiotherapy. However, all the efforts of image guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated planning and delivery, adaptive radiotherapy, and everything else that we pride ourselves in having in the armamentarium can fall short, unless there is an accurate dose-calculation algorithm. The agreement between the calculated and delivered doses is of great significance in radiation therapy since the accuracy of the absorbed dose as prescribed determines the clinical outcome. Dose-calculation algorithms have evolved greatly over the years in an effort to be more inclusive of the effects that govern the true radiation transport through the human body. In this Vision 20/20 paper, we look back to see how it all started and where things are now in terms of dose algorithms for photon beams and the inclusion of tissue heterogeneities. Convolution-superposition algorithms have dominated the treatment planning industry for the past few years. Monte Carlo techniques have an inherent accuracy that is superior to any other algorithm and as such will continue to be the gold standard, along with measurements, and maybe one day will be the algorithm of choice for all particle treatment planning in radiation therapy.

  4. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model

  5. Investigations on the necessity of dose calculations for several planes of the target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.

    1987-01-01

    In radiotherapy planning, the shape of a target volume can at present be exactly delimited by means of computed tomography. A method often applied is to project the largest target volume scan on the plane of the central ray and to calculate the dose in this plane. This method does not allow to take into account any change of the target volume scan which will be mainly due to the body contours of the patient. The results of dose calculations made in several planes for pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors are presented. With this procedure, 33 out of 60 irradiation techniques for nine tumor sites meet the requirements with regard to the central ray plane. If several planes are regarded, this is only true for ten irradiation plans. If is therefore absolutely necessary to calculate the doses of several planes if the target volume has an irregular shape or if the body contours vary considerably. This is the only way to prevent a false treatment caused by possibly severe dose excesses or dose insufficiencies in radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  6. Fetal doses to pregnant patients from CT with tube current modulation calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and realistic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J.; George Xu, X.; Caracappa, P. F.; Liu, B.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the radiation dose to the fetus using retrospective tube current modulation (TCM) data selected from archived clinical records. This paper describes the calculation of fetal doses using retrospective TCM data and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Three TCM schemes were adopted for use with three pregnant patient phantoms. MC simulations were used to model CT scanners, TCM schemes and pregnant patients. Comparisons between organ doses from TCM schemes and those from non-TCM schemes show that these three TCM schemes reduced fetal doses by 14, 18 and 25 %, respectively. These organ doses were also compared with those from ImPACT calculation. It is found that the difference between the calculated fetal dose and the ImPACT reported dose is as high as 46 %. This work demonstrates methods to study organ doses from various TCM protocols and potential ways to improve the accuracy of CT dose calculation for pregnant patients. (authors)

  7. FORTRAN Code for Glandular Dose Calculation in Mammography Using Sobol-Wu Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowlavi A A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accurate computation of the radiation dose to the breast is essential to mammography. Various the thicknesses of breast, the composition of the breast tissue and other variables affect the optimal breast dose. Furthermore, the glandular fraction, which refers to the composition of the breasts, as partitioned between radiation-sensitive glandular tissue and the adipose tissue, also has an effect on this calculation. Fatty or fibrous breasts would have a lower value for the glandular fraction than dense breasts. Breast tissue composed of half glandular and half adipose tissue would have a glandular fraction in between that of fatty and dense breasts. Therefore, the use of a computational code for average glandular dose calculation in mammography is a more effective means of estimating the dose of radiation, and is accurate and fast. Methods: In the present work, the Sobol-Wu beam quality parameters are used to write a FORTRAN code for glandular dose calculation in molybdenum anode-molybdenum filter (Mo-Mo, molybdenum anode-rhodium filter (Mo-Rh and rhodium anode-rhodium filter (Rh-Rh target-filter combinations in mammograms. The input parameters of code are: tube voltage in kV, half-value layer (HVL of the incident x-ray spectrum in mm, breast thickness in cm (d, and glandular tissue fraction (g. Results: The average glandular dose (AGD variation against the voltage of the mammogram X-ray tube for d = 4 cm, HVL = 0.34 mm Al and g=0.5 for the three filter-target combinations, as well as its variation against the glandular fraction of breast tissue for kV=25, HVL=0.34, and d=4 cm has been calculated. The results related to the average glandular absorbed dose variation against HVL for kV = 28, d=4 cm and g= 0.6 are also presented. The results of this code are in good agreement with those previously reported in the literature. Conclusion: The code developed in this study calculates the glandular dose quickly, and it is complete and

  8. Effect of the embolization material in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galván de la Cruz, Olga Olinca [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel, E-mail: jlarraga@innn.edu.mx [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico); Celis, Miguel Angel [Unidad de Radioneurocirugía, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    It is reported in the literature that the material used in an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can attenuate the radiation beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) up to 10% to 15%. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric impact of this attenuating material in the SRS treatment of embolized AVMs, using Monte Carlo simulations assuming clinical conditions. A commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation engine was used to recalculate the dose distribution of 20 AVMs previously planned with a pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Dose distributions were compared using the following metrics: average, minimal and maximum dose of AVM, and 2D gamma index. The effect in the obliteration rate was investigated using radiobiological models. It was found that the dosimetric impact of the embolization material is less than 1.0 Gy in the prescription dose to the AVM for the 20 cases studied. The impact in the obliteration rate is less than 4.0%. There is reported evidence in the literature that embolized AVMs treated with SRS have low obliteration rates. This work shows that there are dosimetric implications that should be considered in the final treatment decisions for embolized AVMs.

  9. Effect of the embolization material in the dose calculation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galván de la Cruz, Olga Olinca; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda; Celis, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    It is reported in the literature that the material used in an embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can attenuate the radiation beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) up to 10% to 15%. The purpose of this work is to assess the dosimetric impact of this attenuating material in the SRS treatment of embolized AVMs, using Monte Carlo simulations assuming clinical conditions. A commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation engine was used to recalculate the dose distribution of 20 AVMs previously planned with a pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Dose distributions were compared using the following metrics: average, minimal and maximum dose of AVM, and 2D gamma index. The effect in the obliteration rate was investigated using radiobiological models. It was found that the dosimetric impact of the embolization material is less than 1.0 Gy in the prescription dose to the AVM for the 20 cases studied. The impact in the obliteration rate is less than 4.0%. There is reported evidence in the literature that embolized AVMs treated with SRS have low obliteration rates. This work shows that there are dosimetric implications that should be considered in the final treatment decisions for embolized AVMs

  10. Optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning thanks to a fast dose calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mingchao

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the radiotherapy treatments planning issue which need a fast and reliable treatment planning system (TPS). The TPS is composed of a dose calculation algorithm and an optimization method. The objective is to design a plan to deliver the dose to the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy and sensitive tissues. The treatment planning aims to determine the best suited radiation parameters for each patient's treatment. In this thesis, the parameters of treatment with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) are the beam angle and the beam intensity. The objective function is multi-criteria with linear constraints. The main objective of this thesis is to demonstrate the feasibility of a treatment planning optimization method based on a fast dose-calculation technique developed by (Blanpain, 2009). This technique proposes to compute the dose by segmenting the patient's phantom into homogeneous meshes. The dose computation is divided into two steps. The first step impacts the meshes: projections and weights are set according to physical and geometrical criteria. The second step impacts the voxels: the dose is computed by evaluating the functions previously associated to their mesh. A reformulation of this technique makes possible to solve the optimization problem by the gradient descent algorithm. The main advantage of this method is that the beam angle parameters could be optimized continuously in 3 dimensions. The obtained results in this thesis offer many opportunities in the field of radiotherapy treatment planning optimization. (author) [fr

  11. Dose calculations for irregular fields using three-dimensional first-scatter integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Scharfenberg, H.; Schlegel, W.; Hartmann, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a method of dose calculations for irregular fields which requires only the mean energy of the incident photons, the geometrical properties of the irregular field and of the therapy unit, and the attenuation coefficient of tissue. The method goes back to an approach including spatial aspects of photon scattering for inhomogeneities for the calculation of dose reduction factors as proposed by Sontag and Cunningham (1978). It is based on the separation of dose into a primary component and a scattered component. The scattered component can generally be calculated for each field by integration over dose contributions from scattering in neighbouring volume elements. The quotient of this scattering contribution in the irregular field and the scattering contribution in the equivalent open field is then the correction factor for scattering in an irregular field. A correction factor for the primary component can be calculated if the attenuation of the photons in the shielding block is properly taken into account. The correction factor is simply given by the quotient of primary photons of the irregular field and the primary photons of the open field. (author)

  12. Point kernel technique for calculating dose rates due to cobalt-60 hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, M.J.; McCarthy, J.T.; Morrissette, R.R.; Leach, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a computer code called BETA that has been developed by health physicists at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station which accounts for the mass and size of hot particles of Cobalt-60, and therefore corrects the Loevinger-based dose calculation for self-absorption

  13. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose B Appendix B to Part 191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  14. A model for the calculation of the radiation dose from natural radionuclides in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackers, J.G.

    1986-02-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the radiation dose incurred from natural radioactivity indoors and outdoors, expressed in effective dose equivalence/year. The model is applied on a three rooms dwelling characterized by interconnecting air flows and on a dwelling with crawlspace. In this model the distinct parameters are variable in order to allow the investigation of the relative influence. The calculated effective dose equivalent for an adult in the dwelling was calculated to be about 1.7 mSv/year, composed of 15% from cosmic radiation, 35% from terrestrial radioactivity, 20% from radioactivity in the body and 30% from natural radionuclides in building materials. The calculations show an enhancement of about a factor of two in radon concentration in air in a room which is ventilated by air from an adjacent room. It is also shown that the attachment rate of radon products to aerosols and the plate-out effect are relatively important parameters influencing the magnitude of the dose rate. (Auth.)

  15. SU-E-T-196: Comparative Analysis of Surface Dose Measurements Using MOSFET Detector and Dose Predicted by Eclipse - AAA with Varying Dose Calculation Grid Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Nejaiman, S; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Kumar, P [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dose can be the limiting factor and fairly common reason to interrupt the treatment, especially for treating head-and-neck with Intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy(IMRT) or Volumetrically-modulated - arc-therapy (VMAT) and breast with tangentially-directed-beams. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy of near-surface dose predicted by Eclipse treatment-planning-system (TPS) using Anisotropic-Analytic Algorithm (AAA)with varying calculation grid-size and comparing with metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors(MOSFETs)measurements for a range of clinical-conditions (open-field,dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT,VMAT). Methods: QUASAR™-Body-Phantom was used in this study with oval curved-surfaces to mimic breast, chest wall and head-and-neck sites.A CT-scan was obtained with five radio-opaque markers(ROM) placed on the surface of phantom to mimic the range of incident angles for measurements and dose prediction using 2mm slice thickness.At each ROM, small structure(1mmx2mm) were contoured to obtain mean-doses from TPS.Calculations were performed for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT and VMAT using Varian-21EX,6&15MV photons using twogrid-sizes:2.5mm and 1mm.Calibration checks were performed to ensure that MOSFETs response were within ±5%.Surface-doses were measured at five locations and compared with TPS calculations. Results: For 6MV: 2.5mm grid-size,mean calculated doses(MCD)were higher by 10%(±7.6),10%(±7.6),20%(±8.5),40%(±7.5),30%(±6.9) and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 0%(±5.7),0%(±4.2),0%(±5.5),1.2%(±5.0),1.1% (±7.8) for open-field,dynamic-wedge,physical-wedge,IMRT,VMAT respectively.For 15MV: 2.5mm grid-size,MCD were higher by 30%(±14.6),30%(±14.6),30%(±14.0),40%(±11.0),30%(±3.5)and for 1mm grid-size MCD were higher by 10% (±10.6), 10%(±9.8),10%(±8.0),30%(±7.8),10%(±3.8) for open-field, dynamic-wedge, physical-wedge, IMRT, VMAT respectively.For 6MV, 86% and 56% of all measured values

  16. A new tissue segmentation method to calculate 3D dose in small animal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, C; Delpon, G; Supiot, S; Potiron, V; Paris, F; Chiavassa, S

    2018-02-26

    In pre-clinical animal experiments, radiation delivery is usually delivered with kV photon beams, in contrast to the MV beams used in clinical irradiation, because of the small size of the animals. At this medium energy range, however, the contribution of the photoelectric effect to absorbed dose is significant. Accurate dose calculation therefore requires a more detailed tissue definition because both density (ρ) and elemental composition (Z eff ) affect the dose distribution. Moreover, when applied to cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisitions, the stoichiometric calibration of HU becomes inefficient as it is designed for highly collimated fan beam CT acquisitions. In this study, we propose an automatic tissue segmentation method of CBCT imaging that assigns both density (ρ) and elemental composition (Z eff ) in small animal dose calculation. The method is based on the relationship found between CBCT number and ρ*Z eff product computed from known materials. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate the impact of ρZ eff variation on the absorbed dose in tissues. These results led to the creation of a tissue database composed of artificial tissues interpolated from tissue values published by the ICRU. The ρZ eff method was validated by measuring transmitted doses through tissue substitute cylinders and a mouse with EBT3 film. Measurements were compared to the results of the Monte Carlo calculations. The study of the impact of ρZ eff variation over the range of materials, from ρZ eff  = 2 g.cm - 3 (lung) to 27 g.cm - 3 (cortical bone) led to the creation of 125 artificial tissues. For tissue substitute cylinders, the use of ρZ eff method led to maximal and average relative differences between the Monte Carlo results and the EBT3 measurements of 3.6% and 1.6%. Equivalent comparison for the mouse gave maximal and average relative differences of 4.4% and 1.2%, inside the 80% isodose area. Gamma analysis led to a 94.9% success rate in the 10% isodose

  17. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J; Adams, E; Bidmead, M; Partridge, M; Verhaegen, F

    2005-01-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  18. Radiation therapy for stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma: peripheral dose calculations and risk assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theocharris; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to calculate the peripheral dose to critical structures and assess the radiation risks from modern radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB testicular seminoma. A Monte Carlo code was used for treatment simulation on a computational phantom representing an average adult. The initial treatment phase involved anteroposterior and posteroanaterior modified dog-leg fields exposing para-aortic and ipsilateral iliac lymph nodes followed by a cone-down phase for nodal mass irradiation. Peripheral doses were calculated using different modified dog-leg field dimensions and an extended conventional dog-leg portal. The risk models of the BEIR-VII report and ICRP-103 were combined with dosimetric calculations to estimate the probability of developing stochastic effects. Radiotherapy for stage IIA seminoma with a target dose of 30 Gy resulted in a range of 23.0-603.7 mGy to non-targeted peripheral tissues and organs. The corresponding range for treatment of stage IIB disease to a cumulative dose of 36 Gy was 24.2-633.9 mGy. A dose variation of less than 13% was found by altering the field dimensions. Radiotherapy with the conventional instead of the modern modified dog-leg field increased the peripheral dose up to 8.2 times. The calculated heart doses of 589.0-632.9 mGy may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases whereas the testicular dose of more than 231.9 mGy may lead to a temporary infertility. The probability of birth abnormalities in the offspring of cancer survivors was below 0.13% which is much lower than the spontaneous mutation rate. Abdominoplevic irradiation may increase the lifetime intrinsic risk for the induction of secondary malignancies by 0.6-3.9% depending upon the site of interest, patient’s age and tumor dose. Radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB seminoma with restricted fields and low doses is associated with an increased morbidity. These data may allow the definition of a risk-adapted follow-up scheme for long

  19. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: calculation and optimization of biologically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Scholz, M.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy based on the local effect model (LEM) which allows to calculate the biologically effective dose not only for the target region but for the entire irradiation volume. LEM is ideally suited to be used as an integral part of treatment planning code systems for active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. Thus, it has been incorporated into our standard treatment planning system for ion therapy (TRiP). Single intensity modulated fields can be optimized with respect to homogeneous biologically effective dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is calculated separately for each voxel of the patient CT. Our radiobiologically oriented code system is in use since 1995 for the planning of irradiation experiments with cell cultures and animals such as rats and minipigs. Since 1997 it is in regular and successful use for patient treatment planning. (orig.)

  20. Measurement with total scatter calibrate factor at different depths in the calculation of prescription dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lijun; Zhu Haijun; Zhang Xinzhong; Li Feizhou; Song Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the method of measurement of total scatter calibrate factor (Sc, p). Methods: To measure the Sc, p at different depths on central axis of 6MV, 15MV photon beams through different ways. Results: It was found that the measured data of Sc, p changed with the different depths to a range of 1% - 7%. Using the direct method, the Sc, p measured depth should be the same as the depth in dose normalization point of the prescription dose. If the Sc, p (fsz, d) was measured at the other depths, it could be obtained indirectly by the calculation formula. Conclusions: The Sc, p in the prescription dose can be obtained either by the direct measure method or the indirect calculation formula. But emphasis should be laid on the proper measure depth. (authors)

  1. The effect of different lung densities on the accuracy of various radiotherapy dose calculation methods: implications for tumour coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nahum, Alan E; Zacharatou, Christina

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate against Monte-Carlo the performance of various dose calculations algorithms regarding lung tumour coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dose distributions in virtual lung phantoms have been calculated using four commercial Treatm...... target dose, the AAA(Ecl) and CCC(OMP) algorithms appear to be adequate alternatives to MC....

  2. Reduced Variance using ADVANTG in Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose Coefficients to Stylized Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Mauritius; Bellamy, Michael; Eckerman, Keith; Hertel, Nolan

    2017-09-01

    The estimation of dose coefficients of external radiation sources to the organs in phantoms becomes increasingly difficult for lower photon source energies. This study focus on the estimation of photon emitters around the phantom. The computer time needed to calculate a result within a certain precision can be lowered by several orders of magnitude using ADVANTG compared to a standard run. Using ADVANTG which employs the DENOVO adjoint calculation package enables the user to create a fully populated set of weight windows and source biasing instructions for an MCNP calculation.

  3. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.; Zilken, H.; Niederbremer, A.; Friedrich, W.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%±18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%±6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach. (orig.)

  4. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, H; Zilken, H; Niederbremer, A; Friedrich, W; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%+/-18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%+/-6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach.

  5. Calculation of residence times and radiation doses using the standard PC software Excel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.; Zilken, H.; Niederbremer, A.; Friedrich, W. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    We developed a program which aims to facilitate the calculation of radiation doses to single organs and the whole body. IMEDOSE uses Excel to include calculations, graphical displays, and interactions with the user in a single general-purpose PC software tool. To start the procedure the input data are copied into a spreadsheet. They must represent percentage uptake values of several organs derived from measurements in animals or humans. To extrapolate these data up to seven half-lives of the radionuclide, fitting to one or two exponentional functions is included and can be checked by the user. By means of the approximate time-activity information the cumulated activity or residence times are calculated. Finally these data are combined with the absorbed fraction doses (S-values) given by MIRD pamphlet No. 11 to yield radiation doses, the effective dose equivalent and the effective dose. These results are presented in a final table. Interactions are realized with push-buttons and drop-down menus. Calculations use the Visual Basic tool of Excel. In order to test our program, biodistribution data of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose were taken from the literature (Meija et al., J Nucl Med 1991; 32:699-706). For a 70-kg adult the resulting radiation doses of all target organs listed in MIRD 11 were different from the ICRP 53 values by 1%{+-}18% on the average. When the residence times were introduced into MIRDOSE3 (Stabin, J Nucl Med 1996; 37:538-546) the mean difference between our results and those of MIRDOSE3 was -3%{+-}6%. Both outcomes indicate the validity of the present approach. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 18 refs.

  6. Individual Dose Calculations with Use of the Revised Techa River Dosimetry System TRDS-2009D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    An updated deterministic version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2009D) has been developed to estimate individual doses from external exposure and intake of radionuclides for residents living on the Techa River contaminated as a result of radioactive releases from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949–1956. The TRDS-2009D is designed as a flexible system that uses, depending on the input data for an individual, various elements of system databases to provide the dosimetric variables requested by the user. Several phases are included in the computation schedule. The first phase includes calculations with use of a common protocol for all cohort members based on village-average-intake functions and external dose rates; individual data on age, gender and history of residence are included in the first phase. This phase results in dose estimates similar to those obtained with system TRDS-2000 used previously to derive risks of health effects in the Techa River Cohort. The second phase includes refinement of individual internal doses for those persons who have had body-burden measurements or exposure parameters specific to the household where he/she lived on the Techa River. The third phase includes summation of individual doses from environmental exposure and from radiological examinations. The results of TRDS-2009D dose calculations have demonstrated for the ETRC members on average a moderate increase in RBM dose estimates (34%) and a minor increase (5%) in estimates of stomach dose. The calculations for the members of the ETROC indicated similar small changes for stomach, but significant increase in RBM doses (400%). Individual-dose assessments performed with use of TRDS-2009D have been provided to epidemiologists for exploratory risk analysis in the ETRC and ETROC. These data provide an opportunity to evaluate the possible impact on radiogenic risk of such factors as confounding exposure (environmental and medical), changes in the Techa River source

  7. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  8. Efficient and reliable 3D dose quality assurance for IMRT by combining independent dose calculations with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Godart, J.; Langendijk, J. A.; Veld, A. A. van't; Korevaar, E. W.; Groot, M. de

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy treatments require appropriate quality assurance (QA) to verify 3D dose distributions. Moreover, increase in patient numbers demand efficient QA-methods. In this study, a time efficient method that combines model-based QA and measurement-based QA was developed; i.e., the hybrid-QA. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the model-based QA and to evaluate time efficiency of the hybrid-QA method. Methods: Accuracy of the model-based QA was determined by comparison of COMPASS calculated dose with Monte Carlo calculations for heterogeneous media. In total, 330 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans were evaluated based on the mean gamma index (GI) with criteria of 3%/3mm and classification of PASS (GI ≤ 0.4), EVAL (0.4 0.6), and FAIL (GI ≥ 0.6). Agreement between model-based QA and measurement-based QA was determined for 48 treatment plans, and linac stability was verified for 15 months. Finally, time efficiency improvement of the hybrid-QA was quantified for four representative treatment plans. Results: COMPASS calculated dose was in agreement with Monte Carlo dose, with a maximum error of 3.2% in heterogeneous media with high density (2.4 g/cm 3 ). Hybrid-QA results for IMRT treatment plans showed an excellent PASS rate of 98% for all cases. Model-based QA was in agreement with measurement-based QA, as shown by a minimal difference in GI of 0.03 ± 0.08. Linac stability was high with an average GI of 0.28 ± 0.04. The hybrid-QA method resulted in a time efficiency improvement of 15 min per treatment plan QA compared to measurement-based QA. Conclusions: The hybrid-QA method is adequate for efficient and accurate 3D dose verification. It combines time efficiency of model-based QA with reliability of measurement-based QA and is suitable for implementation within any radiotherapy department.

  9. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Aurélien; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Éric; Sauget, Marc; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150×1×150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions.

  10. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Aurelien; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Eric; Sauget, Marc; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150x1x150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions

  11. Dose calculations using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study for photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Aurelien [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France)], E-mail: aurelien.vasseur@gmail.com; Makovicka, Libor; Martin, Eric [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); Sauget, Marc [University of Franche-Comte, IRMA/CREST Femto-ST, Portes du Jura, 4 place Tharradin, BP 71427, 25211 Montbeliard Cedex (France); University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France); Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Bahi, Jacques [University of Franche-Comte, AND/LIFC, rue Engel Gros, 90016 Belfort (France)

    2008-04-15

    Direct dose calculations are a crucial requirement for Treatment Planning Systems. Some methods, such as Monte Carlo, explicitly model particle transport, others depend upon tabulated data or analytic formulae. However, their computation time is too lengthy for clinical use, or accuracy is insufficient, especially for recent techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy. Based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), a new solution is proposed and this work extends the properties of such an algorithm and is called NeuRad. Prior to any calculations, a first phase known as the learning process is necessary. Monte Carlo dose distributions in homogeneous media are used, and the ANN is then acquired. According to the training base, it can be used as a dose engine for either heterogeneous media or for an unknown material. In this report, two networks were created in order to compute dose distribution within a homogeneous phantom made of an unknown material and within an inhomogeneous phantom made of water and TA6V4 (titanium alloy corresponding to hip prosthesis). All NeuRad results were compared to Monte Carlo distributions. The latter required about 7 h on a dedicated cluster (10 nodes). NeuRad learning requires between 8 and 18 h (depending upon the size of the training base) on a single low-end computer. However, the results of dose computation with the ANN are available in less than 2 s, again using a low-end computer, for a 150x1x150 voxels phantom. In the case of homogeneous medium, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 1.7%. With a TA6V4 hip prosthesis bathed in water, the mean deviation in the high dose region was less than 4.1%. Further improvements in NeuRad will have to include full 3D calculations, inhomogeneity management and input definitions.

  12. Potential Indoor Worker Exposure From Handling Area Leakage: Dose Calculation Methodology and Example Consequence Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nes, Razvan; Benke, Roland R.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently considering design options for preclosure facilities in a license application for a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) developed the PCSA Tool Version 3.0.0 software for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to aid in the regulatory review of a potential DOE license application. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate PCSA Tool modeling capabilities (i.e., a generic two-compartment, mass-balance model) for estimating radionuclide concentrations in air and radiological dose consequences to indoor workers in a control room from potential leakage of radioactively contaminated air from an adjacent handling area. The presented model computes internal and external worker doses from inhalation and submersion in a finite cloud of contaminated air in the control room and augments previous capabilities for assessing indoor worker dose. As a complement to the example event sequence frequency analysis in the companion paper, example consequence calculations are presented in this paper for the postulated event sequence. In conclusion: this paper presents a model for estimating radiological doses to indoor workers for the leakage of airborne radioactive material from handling areas. Sensitivity of model results to changes in various input parameters was investigated via illustrative example calculations. Indoor worker dose estimates were strongly dependent on the duration of worker exposure and the handling-area leakage flow rate. In contrast, doses were not very sensitive to handling-area exhaust ventilation flow rates. For the presented example, inhalation was the dominant radiological dose pathway. The two companion papers demonstrate independent analysis capabilities of the regulator for performing confirmatory calculations of frequency and consequence, which assist the assessment of worker

  13. Modelling lateral beam quality variations in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, T; Olofsson, J; Ahnesjoe, A; Karlsson, M

    2006-01-01

    Standard treatment machines for external radiotherapy are designed to yield flat dose distributions at a representative treatment depth. The common method to reach this goal is to use a flattening filter to decrease the fluence in the centre of the beam. A side effect of this filtering is that the average energy of the beam is generally lower at a distance from the central axis, a phenomenon commonly referred to as off-axis softening. The off-axis softening results in a relative change in beam quality that is almost independent of machine brand and model. Central axis dose calculations using pencil beam kernels show no drastic loss in accuracy when the off-axis beam quality variations are neglected. However, for dose calculated at off-axis positions the effect should be considered, otherwise errors of several per cent can be introduced. This work proposes a method to explicitly include the effect of off-axis softening in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations for arbitrary positions in a radiation field. Variations of pencil kernel values are modelled through a generic relation between half value layer (HVL) thickness and off-axis position for standard treatment machines. The pencil kernel integration for dose calculation is performed through sampling of energy fluence and beam quality in sectors of concentric circles around the calculation point. The method is fully based on generic data and therefore does not require any specific measurements for characterization of the off-axis softening effect, provided that the machine performance is in agreement with the assumed HVL variations. The model is verified versus profile measurements at different depths and through a model self-consistency check, using the dose calculation model to estimate HVL values at off-axis positions. A comparison between calculated and measured profiles at different depths showed a maximum relative error of 4% without explicit modelling of off-axis softening. The maximum relative error

  14. Monte Carlo dose calculations for BNCT treatment of diffuse human lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to test the possibility to apply BNCT in the core of diffuse lung tumours, dose distribution calculations were made. The simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP.4c2, using the male computational phantom Adam, version 07/94. Volumes of interest were voxelized for the tally requests, and results were obtained for tissues with and without Boron. Different collimated neutron sources were tested in order to establish the proper energies, as well as single and multiple beams to maximize neutron flux uniformity inside the target organs. Flux and dose distributions are reported. The use of two opposite epithermal neutron collimated beams insures good levels of dose homogeneity inside the lungs, with a substantially lower radiation dose delivered to surrounding structures. (author)

  15. Calculation of microplanar beam dose profiles in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated x-ray beams with a high fluence rate permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microplanar beams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesized repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. The lateral and depth doses of 100 keV microplanar beams are investigated for different beam dimensions and spacings in a tissue, lung and tissue/lung/tissue phantom. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depths and bundles of beams (up to 20x20cm square cross section). The maximum dose on the beam axis (peak) and the minimum interbeam dose (valley) are compared at different depths, bundles, heights, widths and beam spacings. (author)

  16. Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts

  17. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H p (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 , composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm 2 ). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  18. Calculation of dose for β point and sphere sources in soft tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Fuyin; Yuan Shuyu; Tan Jian

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To compare the results of the distribution of dose rate calculated by three typical methods for point source and sphere source of β nuclide. Methods: Calculating and comparing the distributions of dose rate from 32 P β point and sphere sources in soft tissue calculated by the three methods published in references, [1]. [2] and [3], respectively. Results: For the point source of 3.7 x 10 7 Bq (1mCi), the variations of the calculation results of the three formulas are within 10% if r≤0.35 g/cm 2 , r being the distance from source, and larger than 10% if r > 0.35 g/cm 2 . For the sphere source whose volume is 50 μl and activity is 3.7 x 10 7 Bq(1 mCi), the variations are within 10% if z≤0.15 g/cm 2 , z being the distance from the surface of the sphere source to a point outside the sphere. Conclusion: The agreement of the distributions of the dose rate calculated by the three methods mentioned above for point and sphere β source are good if the distances from point source or the surface of sphere source to the points observed are small, and poor if they are large

  19. CALDoseX: a software tool for absorbed dose calculations in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Khourya, H.J.; Vieira, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients (CCs) between absorbed dose to organs and tissues at risk and measurable quantities commonly used in X-ray diagnosis have been calculated for the last 30 years mostly with mathematical MIRD5-type phantoms, in which organs are represented by simple geometrical bodies, like ellipsoids, tori, truncated cylinders, etc. In contrast, voxel-based phantoms are true to nature representations of human bodies. The purpose of this study is therefore to calculate CCs for common examinations in X-ray diagnosis with the recently developed MAX06 (Male Adult voXel) and FAX06 (Female Adult voXel) phantoms for various projections and different X-ray spectra and to make these CCs available to the public through a software tool, called CALDose X (CALculation of Dose for X-ray diagnosis). (author)

  20. SU-F-J-133: Adaptive Radiation Therapy with a Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm That Optimizes Dose Distribution Considering Breathing Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Algan, O; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To model patient motion and produce four-dimensional (4D) optimized dose distributions that consider motion-artifacts in the dose calculation during the treatment planning process. Methods: An algorithm for dose calculation is developed where patient motion is considered in dose calculation at the stage of the treatment planning. First, optimal dose distributions are calculated for the stationary target volume where the dose distributions are optimized considering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Second, a convolution-kernel is produced from the best-fitting curve which matches the motion trajectory of the patient. Third, the motion kernel is deconvolved with the initial dose distribution optimized for the stationary target to produce a dose distribution that is optimized in four-dimensions. This algorithm is tested with measured doses using a mobile phantom that moves with controlled motion patterns. Results: A motion-optimized dose distribution is obtained from the initial dose distribution of the stationary target by deconvolution with the motion-kernel of the mobile target. This motion-optimized dose distribution is equivalent to that optimized for the stationary target using IMRT. The motion-optimized and measured dose distributions are tested with the gamma index with a passing rate of >95% considering 3% dose-difference and 3mm distance-to-agreement. If the dose delivery per beam takes place over several respiratory cycles, then the spread-out of the dose distributions is only dependent on the motion amplitude and not affected by motion frequency and phase. This algorithm is limited to motion amplitudes that are smaller than the length of the target along the direction of motion. Conclusion: An algorithm is developed to optimize dose in 4D. Besides IMRT that provides optimal dose coverage for a stationary target, it extends dose optimization to 4D considering target motion. This algorithm provides alternative to motion management

  1. A pencil beam dose calculation model for CyberKnife system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bin; Li, Yongbao; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Fugen [Image Processing Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xu, Shouping [Department of Radiation Oncology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Wu, Qiuwen, E-mail: Qiuwen.Wu@Duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife system is initially equipped with fixed circular cones for stereotactic radiosurgery. Two dose calculation algorithms, Ray-Tracing and Monte Carlo, are available in the supplied treatment planning system. A multileaf collimator system was recently introduced in the latest generation of system, capable of arbitrarily shaped treatment field. The purpose of this study is to develop a model based dose calculation algorithm to better handle the lateral scatter in an irregularly shaped small field for the CyberKnife system. Methods: A pencil beam dose calculation algorithm widely used in linac based treatment planning system was modified. The kernel parameters and intensity profile were systematically determined by fitting to the commissioning data. The model was tuned using only a subset of measured data (4 out of 12 cones) and applied to all fixed circular cones for evaluation. The root mean square (RMS) of the difference between the measured and calculated tissue-phantom-ratios (TPRs) and off-center-ratio (OCR) was compared. Three cone size correction techniques were developed to better fit the OCRs at the penumbra region, which are further evaluated by the output factors (OFs). The pencil beam model was further validated against measurement data on the variable dodecagon-shaped Iris collimators and a half-beam blocked field. Comparison with Ray-Tracing and Monte Carlo methods was also performed on a lung SBRT case. Results: The RMS between the measured and calculated TPRs is 0.7% averaged for all cones, with the descending region at 0.5%. The RMSs of OCR at infield and outfield regions are both at 0.5%. The distance to agreement (DTA) at the OCR penumbra region is 0.2 mm. All three cone size correction models achieve the same improvement in OCR agreement, with the effective source shift model (SSM) preferred, due to their ability to predict more accurately the OF variations with the source to axis distance (SAD). In noncircular field validation

  2. A Monte Carlo evaluation of RapidArc dose calculations for oropharynx radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, I M; Ansbacher, W; Zavgorodni, S; Popescu, C; Beckham, W A

    2008-01-01

    RapidArc(TM), recently released by Varian Medical Systems, is a novel extension of IMRT in which an optimized 3D dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation of 360 deg. or less. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), the sole algorithm for photon dose calculations of RapidArc(TM) treatment plans. The clinical site chosen was oropharynx and the associated nodes involved. The VIMC-Arc system, which utilizes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc for particle transport through the linac head and patient CT phantom, was used as a benchmarking tool. As part of this study, the dose for a single static aperture, typical for RapidArc(TM) delivery, was calculated by the AAA, MC and compared with the film. This film measurement confirmed MC modeling of the beam aperture in water. It also demonstrated that the AAA dosimetric error can be as high as 12% near isolated leaf edges and up to 5% at the leaf end. The composite effect of these errors in a full RapidArc(TM) calculation in water involving a C-shaped target and the associated organ at risk produced a 1.5% overprediction of the mean target dose. In our cohort of six patients, the AAA was found, on average, to overestimate the PTV60 coverage at the 95% level in the presence of air cavities by 1.0% (SD = 1.1%). Removing the air cavities from the target volumes reduced these differences by about a factor of 2. The dose to critical structures was also overestimated by the AAA. The mean dose to the spinal cord was higher by 1.8% (SD = 0.8%), while the effective maximum dose (D 2% ) was only 0.2% higher (SD = 0.6%). The mean dose to the parotid glands was overestimated by ∼9%. This study has shown that the accuracy of the AAA for RapidArc(TM) dose calculations, performed at a resolution of 2.5 mm or better, is adequate for clinical use.

  3. IMRT: Improvement in treatment planning efficiency using NTCP calculation independent of the dose-volume-histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorov, Grigor N.; Chow, James C.L.; Grigorov, Lenko; Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B.

    2006-01-01

    The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the dose-volume-histogram (DVH) which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Including the NTCP in the objective function for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization would make the planning more effective in reducing the postradiation effects. However, doing so would lengthen the total planning time. The purpose of this work is to establish a method for NTCP determination, independent of a DVH calculation, as a quality assurance check and also as a mean of improving the treatment planning efficiency. In the study, the CTs of ten randomly selected prostate patients were used. IMRT optimization was performed with a PINNACLE3 V 6.2b planning system, using planning target volume (PTV) with margins in the range of 2 to 10 mm. The DVH control points of the PTV and OAR were adapted from the prescriptions of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol P-0126 for an escalated prescribed dose of 82 Gy. This paper presents a new model for the determination of the rectal NTCP ( R NTCP). The method uses a special function, named GVN (from Gy, Volume, NTCP), which describes the R NTCP if 1 cm 3 of the volume of intersection of the PTV and rectum (R int ) is irradiated uniformly by a dose of 1 Gy. The function was 'geometrically' normalized using a prostate-prostate ratio (PPR) of the patients' prostates. A correction of the R NTCP for different prescribed doses, ranging from 70 to 82 Gy, was employed in our model. The argument of the normalized function is the R int , and parameters are the prescribed dose, prostate volume, PTV margin, and PPR. The R NTCPs of another group of patients were calculated by the new method and the resulting difference was <±5% in comparison to the NTCP calculated by the PINNACLE3 software where Kutcher's dose

  4. The ratio of ICRP103 to ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT: Monte Carlo calculations with the ADELAIDE voxel paediatric model and comparisons with published values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ADELAIDE voxel model of paediatric anatomy was used with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to compare effective dose from computed tomography (CT) calculated with both the ICRP103 and ICRP60 definitions which are different in their tissue weighting factors and in the included tissues. The new tissue weighting factors resulted in a lower effective dose for pelvis CT (than if calculated using ICRP60 tissue weighting factors), by 6.5 % but higher effective doses for all other examinations. ICRP103 calculated effective dose for CT abdomen + pelvis was higher by 4.6 %, for CT abdomen (by 9.5 %), for CT chest + abdomen + pelvis (by 6 %), for CT chest + abdomen (by 9.6 %), for CT chest (by 10.1 %) and for cardiac CT (by 11.5 %). These values, along with published values of effective dose from CT that were calculated for both sets of tissue weighting factors were used to determine single values for the ratio ICRP103:ICRP60 calculated effective doses from CT, for seven CT examinations. The following values for ICRP103:ICRP60 are suggested for use to convert ICRP60 calculated effective dose to ICRP103 calculated effective dose for the following CT examinations: Pelvis CT, 0.75; for abdomen CT, abdomen + pelvis CT, chest + abdomen + pelvis CT, 1.00; for chest + abdomen CT, and for chest CT. 1.15; for cardiac CT 1.25.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of photon dose calculation under jaw and MLC shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Nicolini, G.; Belosi, M. F.; Cozzi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of photon dose calculation algorithms in out-of-field regions is often neglected, despite its importance for organs at risk and peripheral dose evaluation. The present work has assessed this for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros-XB algorithms implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system. Specifically, the regions shielded by the jaw, or the MLC, or both MLC and jaw for flattened and unflattened beams have been studied.Methods: The accuracy in out-of-field dose under different conditions was studied for two different algorithms. Measured depth doses out of the field, for different field sizes and various distances from the beam edge were compared with the corresponding AAA and Acuros-XB calculations in water. Four volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (in the RapidArc form) were optimized in a water equivalent phantom, PTW Octavius, to obtain a region always shielded by the MLC (or MLC and jaw) during the delivery. Doses to different points located in the shielded region and in a target-like structure were measured with an ion chamber, and results were compared with the AAA and Acuros-XB calculations. Photon beams of 6 and 10 MV, flattened and unflattened were used for the tests.Results: Good agreement between calculated and measured depth doses was found using both algorithms for all points measured at depth greater than 3 cm. The mean dose differences (±1SD) were −8%± 16%, −3%± 15%, −16%± 18%, and −9%± 16% for measurements vs AAA calculations and −10%± 14%, −5%± 12%, −19%± 17%, and −13%± 14% for Acuros-XB, for 6X, 6 flattening-filter free (FFF), 10X, and 10FFF beams, respectively. The same figures for dose differences relative to the open beam central axis dose were: −0.1%± 0.3%, 0.0%± 0.4%, −0.3%± 0.3%, and −0.1%± 0.3% for AAA and −0.2%± 0.4%, −0.1%± 0.4%, −0.5%± 0.5%, and −0.3%± 0.4% for Acuros-XB. Buildup dose was overestimated with AAA, while Acuros-XB gave

  6. Results of dose calculations for NET accidental and normal operation releases of tritium and activation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.; Hasemann, I.

    1992-08-01

    This report documents conditions, data and results of dose calculations for accidental and normal operation releases of tritium and activation products, performed within the NET subtask SEP2.2 ('NET-Benchmark') of the European Fusion Technology Programme. For accidental releases, the computer codes UFOTRI and COSYMA for assessing the radiological consequences, have been applied for both deterministic and probabilistic calculations. The influence on dose estimates of different release times (2 minutes / 1 hour), two release heights (10 m / 150 m), two chemical forms of tritium (HT/HTO), and two different model approaches for the deposition velocity of HTO on soil was investigated. The dose calculations for normal operation effluents were performed using the tritium model of the German regulatory guidelines, parts of the advanced dose assessment model NORMTRI still under development, and the statistical atmospheric dispersion model ISOLA. Accidental and normal operation source terms were defined as follows: 10g (3.7 10 15 Bq) for accidental tritium releases, 10 Ci/day (3.7 10 11 Bq/day) for tritium releases during normal operation and unit releases of 10 9 Bq for accidental releases of activation products and fission products. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Evolution of calculation models for the proton-therapy dose planning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie Proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams. (author) [fr

  8. Evolution of dose calculation models for proton-therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams [fr

  9. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  10. Dose calculations for the concrete water tunnels at 190-C Area, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.

    1997-01-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD code was used to calculate the radiological dose from the contaminated concrete water tunnels at the 190-C Area at the Hanford Site. Two exposure scenarios, recreationist and maintenance worker, were considered. A residential scenario was not considered because the material was assumed to be left intact (i.e., the concrete would not be rubbleized because the location would not be suitable for construction of a house). The recreationist was assumed to use the tunnel for 8 hours per day for 1 week as an overnight shelter. The maintenance worker was assumed to spend 20 hours per year working in the tunnel. Six exposure pathways were considered in calculating the dose. Three external exposure pathways involved penetrating radiation emitted directly from the contaminated tunnel floor, emitted from radioactive particulates deposited on the tunnel floor, and resulting from submersion in airborne radioactive particulates. Three internal exposure pathways involved inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; inadvertent direct ingestion of removable, contaminated material on the tunnel floor; and inadvertent indirect ingestion of airborne particulates deposited on the tunnel floor. The gradual removal of surface contamination over time and the ingrowth of decay products were considered in calculating the dose at different times. The maximum doses were estimated to be 1.5 mrem/yr for the recreationist and 0.34 mrem/yr for the maintenance worker

  11. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  12. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  13. Calculating external doses from contaminated soil with the computer model SOILD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; LePoire, D.; Yu, C.

    1991-01-01

    The SOILD computer model was developed for calculating the effective dose equivalent from external exposure to distributed gamma sources in soil. It is designed to assess external doses under various exposure scenarios that may be encountered in environmental restoration programs. The model's four major functional features address (a) dose versus source depth in soil, (b) shielding of clean cover soil, (c) area of contamination, and (d) nonuniform distribution of sources. The model can also adjust doses when there are variations in soil densities for both source and cover soils. It is supported by a data base of ∼500 radionuclides. A sample calculation was performed by SOILD to determine the effective dose equivalent for a uniform source distribution in soil. The soil density was assumed to be 1.6 g/cm 3 , and the source strength was assumed to be 1 pCi/cm 3 . The following radionuclides were studied: 60 C, 131 I, 137+D Cs, 238+D U, and 226+D Ra ('+D' denotes the parent nuclide and daughters)

  14. Calculation of dose equivalents for photon skyshine production; Calculo da dose equivalente para fotons decorrente da producao de skyshine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frota, Marco A.; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Geral. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria (LARARA)]. E-mail: egbakel@vm.uff.br

    2005-07-01

    Some radiation facilities are designed with little shielding in the ceiling above the accelerator. A problem may then arise as a result of the radiation scattered by the atmosphere to points at ground level outside the treatment room. Stray radiation of this type is referred to as skyshine, and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 51 (NCRP 1977) gives methods for the calculation of skyshine for accelerator facilities. McGinley (1993) has compared skyshine measurements made at an 18 MeV medical accelerator facility with values calculated using the techniques presented in NCRP Report No. 51. Measurements were made of the photon levels outside a treatment room housing a Varian 2100 deg C. The roof above the accelerator was designed for weather protection only and offered little shielding for the primary beam and scattered radiation. The distance from the treatment room floor to the roof was 4.27 m, and the primary walls were constructed of concrete 2.0 m thick.The secondary walls were fabricated of concrete 0.99 m thick. The results for the photon skyshine rate dose as a function of distance from the isocenter using Monte Carlo code, are compared with those in NCRP publication 74 and measured obtained. The photon skyshine dose rates simulated for real clinic spectra transmitted through roof range from 4.7 to 14.6 nSv.s{sup -1}. (author)

  15. A Fourier analysis on the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete proton beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haisen S.; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We developed an analytical method for determining the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete dose calculation in proton therapy treatment plan optimization, so that the accuracy of the optimized dose distribution is guaranteed in the phase of dose sampling and the superfluous computational work is avoided. The accuracy of dose sampling was judged by the criterion that the continuous dose distribution could be reconstructed from the discrete dose within a 2% error limit. To keep the error caused by the discrete dose sampling under a 2% limit, the dose grid size cannot exceed a maximum acceptable value. The method was based on Fourier analysis and the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem as an extension of our previous analysis for photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy [J. F. Dempsey, H. E. Romeijn, J. G. Li, D. A. Low, and J. R. Palta, Med. Phys. 32, 380-388 (2005)]. The proton beam model used for the analysis was a near mono-energetic (of width about 1% the incident energy) and monodirectional infinitesimal (nonintegrated) pencil beam in water medium. By monodirection, we mean that the proton particles are in the same direction before entering the water medium and the various scattering prior to entrance to water is not taken into account. In intensity modulated proton therapy, the elementary intensity modulation entity for proton therapy is either an infinitesimal or finite sized beamlet. Since a finite sized beamlet is the superposition of infinitesimal pencil beams, the result of the maximum acceptable grid size obtained with infinitesimal pencil beam also applies to finite sized beamlet. The analytic Bragg curve function proposed by Bortfeld [T. Bortfeld, Med. Phys. 24, 2024-2033 (1997)] was employed. The lateral profile was approximated by a depth dependent Gaussian distribution. The model included the spreads of the Bragg peak and the lateral profiles due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The dependence of the maximum acceptable dose grid size on the

  16. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  17. Dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope and MCNPX simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Varon T, C.F.; Pedraza N, R.

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of the breast cancer at early stages is of vital importance. For that, most of the investigations are dedicated to the early detection of the suffering and their treatment. As investigation consequence and clinical practice, in 2002 it was developed in U.S.A. an irradiation system of high dose rate known as Mammosite. In this work we carry out dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code and MCNPX, varying the concentration of the contrast material that it is used in the one. (Author)

  18. The calculation of relative output factor and depth dose for irregular electron fields in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunscombe, Peter; McGhee, Peter; Chu, Terence

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A technique, based on sector integration and interpolation, has been developed for the computation of both relative output factor and depth dose of irregular electron fields in water. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimum experimental data set required for the technique to yield results within accepted dosimetric tolerances. Materials and Methods: PC based software has been written to perform the calculations necessary to dosimetrically characterize irregular shaped electron fields. The field outline is entered via digitiser and the SSD and energy via the keyboard. The irregular field is segmented into sectors of specified angle (2 deg. was used for this study) and the radius of each sector computed. The central ray depth dose is reconstructed by summing the contributions from each sector deduced from calibration depth doses measured for circular fields. Relative output factors and depth doses at SSDs at which calibrations were not performed are found by interpolation. Calibration data were measured for circular fields from 2 to 9 cm diameter at 100, 105, 110, and 115 cm SSD. A clinical cut out can be characterized in less than 2 minutes including entry of the outline using this software. The performance of the technique was evaluated by comparing calculated relative output factors, surface dose and the locations of d 80 , d 50 and d 20 with experimental measurements on a variety of cut out shapes at 9 and 18 MeV. The calibration data set (derived from circular cut outs) was systematically reduced to identify the minimum required to yield an accuracy consistent with current recommendations. Results: The figure illustrates the ability of the technique to calculate the depth dose for an irregular field (shown in the insert). It was found that to achieve an accuracy of 2% in relative output factor and 2% or 2 mm (our criterion) in percentage depth dose, calibration data from five circular fields at the four SSDs spanning the range 100-115 cm

  19. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  20. Application of a Monte Carlo linac model in routine verifications of dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Rosales, H. M.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Lara Mas, E.; Popescu, T.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of some parameters of interest in Radiotherapy Medical Physics based on an experimentally validated Monte Carlo model of an Elekta Precise lineal accelerator, was performed for 6 and 15 Mv photon beams. The simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code. As reference for simulations, the optimal beam parameters values (energy and FWHM) previously obtained were used. Deposited dose calculations in water phantoms were done, on typical complex geometries commonly are used in acceptance and quality control tests, such as irregular and asymmetric fields. Parameters such as MLC scatter, maximum opening or closing position, and the separation between them were analyzed from calculations in water. Similarly simulations were performed on phantoms obtained from CT studies of real patients, making comparisons of the dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc and the dose distribution obtained from the computerized treatment planning systems (TPS) used in routine clinical plans. All the results showed a great agreement with measurements, finding all of them within tolerance limits. These results allowed the possibility of using the developed model as a robust verification tool for validating calculations in very complex situation, where the accuracy of the available TPS could be questionable. (Author)

  1. Development of a Monte Carlo multiple source model for inclusion in a dose calculation auditing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Fontenot, Jonas; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of agreement in their anthropomorphic phantom audits. There is reason to believe one source of error in this observed disagreement is the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms and heterogeneity corrections used. To audit this component of the radiotherapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on measurement of central axis depth dose data for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open field measurements consisting of depth dose data and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 30 × 30 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against measurements in IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck and lung phantoms. Validation results showed 97.9% and 96.8% of depth dose data passed a ±2% Van Dyk criterion for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Dose profile comparisons showed an average agreement using a ±2%/2 mm criterion of 98.0% and 99.0% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Phantom plan comparisons were evaluated using ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and averaged passing rates between Monte Carlo and measurements were 87.4% and 89.9% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Accurate multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray beams have been developed for inclusion in an independent dose calculation tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of 125 I, 103 Pd, and 137 Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, Δ, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE preplan , in a 5x5x5 cm 3 volume for 125 I (Oncura 6711), 103 Pd (Theragenics 200), and 131 Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes (Δ=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. Results: As expected, RE preplan for our edema model

  3. SU-F-T-381: Fast Calculation of Three-Dimensional Dose Considering MLC Leaf Positional Errors for VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuta, Y [Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendal, Miyagi (Japan); Kadoya, N; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendal, Miyagi (Japan); Shimizu, E; Majima, K [Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu City, Fukushima (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we developed a system to calculate three dimensional (3D) dose that reflects dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration for head and neck and prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) without additional treatment planning system calculation on real time. Methods: An original system called clarkson dose calculation based dosimetric error calculation to calculate dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration was developed by MATLAB (Math Works, Natick, MA). Our program, first, calculates point doses at isocenter for baseline and modified VMAT plan, which generated by inducing MLC errors that enlarged aperture size of 1.0 mm with clarkson dose calculation. Second, error incuced 3D dose was generated with transforming TPS baseline 3D dose using calculated point doses. Results: Mean computing time was less than 5 seconds. For seven head and neck and prostate plans, between our method and TPS calculated error incuced 3D dose, the 3D gamma passing rates (0.5%/2 mm, global) are 97.6±0.6% and 98.0±0.4%. The dose percentage change with dose volume histogram parameter of mean dose on target volume were 0.1±0.5% and 0.4±0.3%, and with generalized equivalent uniform dose on target volume were −0.2±0.5% and 0.2±0.3%. Conclusion: The erroneous 3D dose calculated by our method is useful to check dosimetric error caused by leaf miscalibration before pre treatment patient QA dosimetry checks.

  4. Experimental validation of a deforming grid 4D dose calculation for PBS proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Miriam; Klimpki, Grischa; Fattori, Giovanni; Hrbacek, Jan; Oxley, David; Safai, Sairos; Weber, Damien C.; Lomax, Antony J.; Zhang, Ye

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the temporal accuracy of the estimated dose distribution by a 4D dose calculation (4DDC) in comparison to measurements. A single-field plan (0.6 Gy), optimised for a liver patient case (CTV volume: 403cc), was delivered to a homogeneous PMMA phantom and measured by a high resolution scintillating-CCD system at two water equivalent depths. Various motion scenarios (no motion and motions with amplitude of 10 mm and two periods: 3.7 s and 4.4 s) were simulated using a 4D Quasar phantom and logged by an optical tracking system in real-time. Three motion mitigation approaches (single delivery, 6× layered and volumetric rescanning) were applied, resulting in 10 individual measurements. 4D dose distributions were retrospectively calculated in water by taking into account the delivery log files (retrospective) containing information on the actually delivered spot positions, fluences, and time stamps. Moreover, in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the 4DDC inputs, the corresponding prospective 4DDCs were performed as a comparison, using the estimated time stamps of the spot delivery and repeated periodical motion patterns. 2D gamma analyses and dose-difference-histograms were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations for all pixels with > 5% of the maximum calculated dose. The results show that a mean gamma score of 99.2% with standard deviation 1.0% can be achieved for 3%/3 mm criteria and all scenarios can reach a score of more than 95%. The average area with more than 5% dose difference was 6.2%. Deviations due to input uncertainties were obvious for single scan deliveries but could be smeared out once rescanning was applied. Thus, the deforming grid 4DDC has been demonstrated to be able to predict the complex patterns of 4D dose distributions for PBS proton therapy with high dosimetric and geometric accuracy, and it can be used as a valid clinical tool for 4D treatment planning, motion mitigation

  5. SU-F-T-428: An Optimization-Based Commissioning Tool for Finite Size Pencil Beam Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Song, T; Jia, X; Gu, X; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithms are commonly used to pre-calculate the beamlet dose distribution for IMRT treatment planning. FSPB commissioning, which usually requires fine tuning of the FSPB kernel parameters, is crucial to the dose calculation accuracy and hence the plan quality. Yet due to the large number of beamlets, FSPB commissioning could be very tedious. This abstract reports an optimization-based FSPB commissioning tool we have developed in MatLab to facilitate the commissioning. Methods: A FSPB dose kernel generally contains two types of parameters: the profile parameters determining the dose kernel shape, and a 2D scaling factors accounting for the longitudinal and off-axis corrections. The former were fitted using the penumbra of a reference broad beam’s dose profile with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Since the dose distribution of a broad beam is simply a linear superposition of the dose kernel of each beamlet calculated with the fitted profile parameters and scaled using the scaling factors, these factors could be determined by solving an optimization problem which minimizes the discrepancies between the calculated dose of broad beams and the reference dose. Results: We have commissioned a FSPB algorithm for three linac photon beams (6MV, 15MV and 6MVFFF). Dose of four field sizes (6*6cm2, 10*10cm2, 15*15cm2 and 20*20cm2) were calculated and compared with the reference dose exported from Eclipse TPS system. For depth dose curves, the differences are less than 1% of maximum dose after maximum dose depth for most cases. For lateral dose profiles, the differences are less than 2% of central dose at inner-beam regions. The differences of the output factors are within 1% for all the three beams. Conclusion: We have developed an optimization-based commissioning tool for FSPB algorithms to facilitate the commissioning, providing sufficient accuracy of beamlet dose calculation for IMRT optimization.

  6. Calculated and measured dose distribution in electron and X-ray irradiated water phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaie, F; Bulka, S; Afarideh, H; Hadji-Saeid, S M

    2002-01-01

    The Bremsstrahlung yields produced by incident electrons on a tantalum converter have been calculated by using a Monte-Carlo computer code. The tantalum thickness as an X-ray converter was optimized for 2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 MeV electron beams. The dose distribution in scanning and conveyor direction for both 2 MeV electron and X-ray converted from 2 MeV electron beam have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The economical aspects of low energy electron conversion were discussed as well.

  7. An evaluation about the tools of doses calculation and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, A.; Merle-Szeremeta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to give an image of the situation in tools for doses calculation, and to look to the future. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety, with its mission of dosimetric impact evaluation of any radioactive release or radioactive contamination is led to use numerous calculation tools. It appeared useful to take the stock of the situation on tools used at the I.P.S.N. but also out of the I.P.S.N.. (N.C.)

  8. Regional and site-specific absolute humidity data for use in tritium dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etnier, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Due to the potential variability in average absolute humidity over the continental U.S., and the dependence of atmospheric 3 H specific activity on absolute humidity, availability of regional absolute humidity data is of value in estimating the radiological significance of 3 H releases. Most climatological data are in the form of relative humidity, which must be converted to absolute humidity for dose calculations. Absolute humidity was calculated for 218 points across the U.S., using the 1977 annual summary of U.S. Climatological Data, and is given in a table. Mean regional values are shown on a map. (author)

  9. Pencil kernel correction and residual error estimation for quality-index-based dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Olofsson, Joergen; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Georg, Dietmar; Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data from 593 photon beams were used to quantify the errors in dose calculations using a previously published pencil kernel model. A correction of the kernel was derived in order to remove the observed systematic errors. The remaining residual error for individual beams was modelled through uncertainty associated with the kernel model. The methods were tested against an independent set of measurements. No significant systematic error was observed in the calculations using the derived correction of the kernel and the remaining random errors were found to be adequately predicted by the proposed method

  10. Dosimetry in intrathecal radiogold therapy. 5. Principles of gonad dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hliscs, R; Doege, H [Medizinische Akademie, Dresden (German Democratic Republic). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    1980-10-01

    Basing on MIRD recommendations the absorbed dose per unit of accumulated activity in the ovaries and testes is calculated when radioactivity is accumulated in the spinal and cerebral liquor space as well as in the liver following instillation of /sup 198/Au colloid for intrathecal therapy of acute leukemia in childhood. The calculations were made for the IAEA standard man as well as for a 100 cm tall child. Besides that the maximum value of ovarian exposure for the child was determined which arises when the ovaries are close to the spinal column.

  11. Radiation doses from radiation sources of neutrons and photons by different computer calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, F.; Lippolis, G.; Bruno, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    In the present paper the calculation technique aspects of dose rate from neutron and photon radiation sources are covered with reference both to the basic theoretical modeling of the MERCURE-4, XSDRNPM-S and MCNP-3A codes and from practical point of view performing safety analyses of irradiation risk of two transportation casks. The input data set of these calculations -regarding the CEN 10/200 HLW container and dry PWR spent fuel assemblies shipping cask- is frequently commented as for as connecting points of input data and understanding theoric background are concerned

  12. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Graves, Yan Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of d max dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The

  13. Radiation dose calculations for bone scanning with 99mTc-phosphate compounds in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuemichen, C.; Wuest, H.; Hoffmann, G.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation dose after administration of 99m Tc-phosphate compounds for bone scanning will depend on age, the turnover rate and the complex inertness of 99m Tc-phosphate. The preconditions for bone scanning with 99m Tc-phosphate compounds are more favourable in both young and small individuals and hence the calculated soft tissue radiation doses in children are distinctly lower than those reported for adults. After administration of 1 mCi 99m Tc-EHDP or -MDP/kg body weight in children up to one year of age the total radiation dose delivered to bone will be 1 mrad and that to the gonads below 0.5 mrad [fr

  14. Calculation of absorbed dose of anchorage-dependent cells from internal beta-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianwei; Huang Gang; Li Shijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elicit the formula of internal dosimetry in anchorage-dependent cells by beta-emitting radionuclides from uniformly distributed volume sources. Methods: By means of the definition of absorbed dose and the MIRD (Medical International Radiation Dose) scheme the formula of internal dosimetry was reasonably deduced. Firstly, studying the systems of suspension culture cells. Then, taking account of the speciality of the systems of the anchorage-dependent cells and the directions of irradiation, the absorbed dose of anchorage -dependent cells was calculated by the accumulated radioactivity, beta-ray energy, and the volume of the cultured systems. Results: The formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells and anchorage-dependent cells were achieved. At the same time, the formula of internal dosimetry of suspension culture cells was compared with that of MIRD and was confirmed accurate. Conclusion: The formula of internal dosimetry is concise, reliable and accurate

  15. Comparison and application study on cosmic radiation dose calculation received by air crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qiang; Xu Cuihua; Ren Tianshan; Li Wenhong; Zhang Jing; Lu Xu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To facilitate evaluation on Cosmic radiation dose received by flight crew by developing a convenient and effective measuring method. Methods: In comparison with several commonly used evaluating methods, this research employs CARI-6 software issued by FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) to measure Cosmic radiation dose for flight crew members exposed to. Results: Compared with other methods, CARI-6 is capable of providing reliable calculating results on radiation dose and applicable to all flight crew of different airlines. Conclusion: Cosmic radiation received by flight crew is on the list of occupational radiation. For a smooth running of Standards for controlling exposure to cosmic radiation of air crew, CARI software may be a widely applied tool in radiation close estimation of for flight crew. (authors)

  16. X/Qs and unit dose calculations for Central Waste Complex interim safety basis effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective for this problem is to calculate the ground-level release dispersion factors (X/Q) and unit doses for onsite facility and offsite receptors at the site boundary and at Highway 240 for plume meander, building wake effect, plume rise, and the combined effect. The release location is at Central Waste Complex Building P4 in the 200 West Area. The onsite facility is located at Building P7. Acute ground level release 99.5 percentile dispersion factors (X/Q) were generated using the GXQ. The unit doses were calculated using the GENII code. The dimensions of Building P4 are 15 m in W x 24 m in L x 6 m in H

  17. Monte Carlo calculations for doses in organs and tissues to oral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, E.V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Using the MIRD 5 phantom and Monte Carlo technique, organ doses in patients undergoing external dental examination were calculated taking into account the different x-ray beam geometries and the various possible positions of x-ray source with regard to the head of the patient. It was necessary to introduce in the original computer program a new source description specific for dental examinations. To have a realistic evaluation of organ doses during dental examination it was necessary to introduce a new region in the phantom heat which characterizes the teeth and salivary glands. The attenuation of the x-ray beam by the lead shield of the radiographic film was also introduced in the calculation. (author)

  18. A method for calculation of dose per unit concentration values for aquatic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batlle, J Vives i; Jones, S R; Gomez-Ros, J M

    2004-01-01

    A dose per unit concentration database has been generated for application to ecosystem assessments within the FASSET framework. Organisms are represented by ellipsoids of appropriate dimensions, and the proportion of radiation absorbed within the organisms is calculated using a numerical method implemented in a series of spreadsheet-based programs. Energy-dependent absorbed fraction functions have been derived for calculating the total dose per unit concentration of radionuclides present in biota or in the media they inhabit. All radionuclides and reference organism dimensions defined within FASSET for marine and freshwater ecosystems are included. The methodology has been validated against more complex dosimetric models and compared with human dosimetry based on ICRP 72. Ecosystem assessments for aquatic biota within the FASSET framework can now be performed simply, once radionuclide concentrations in target organisms are known, either directly or indirectly by deduction from radionuclide concentrations in the surrounding medium

  19. Using GPU to calculate electron dose for hybrid pencil beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chengjun; Li Xia; Hou Qing; Wu Zhangwen

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid pencil beam model (HPBM) offers an efficient approach to calculate the three-dimension dose distribution from a clinical electron beam. Still, clinical radiation treatment activity desires faster treatment plan process. Our work presented the fast implementation of HPBM-based electron dose calculation using graphics processing unit (GPU). The HPBM algorithm was implemented in compute unified device architecture running on the GPU, and C running on the CPU, respectively. Several tests with various sizes of the field, beamlet and voxel were used to evaluate our implementation. On an NVIDIA GeForce GTX470 GPU card, we achieved speedup factors of 2.18- 98.23 with acceptable accuracy, compared with the results from a Pentium E5500 2.80 GHz Dual-core CPU. (authors)

  20. MCNPCX calculations of dose rates and spectra in experimental channels of the CTEx irradiating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Junior, Luis M.; Vital, Helio C.; Rusin, Tiago; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    MCNPX simulations have been performed in order to calculate dose rates as well as spectra along the four experimental channels of the gamma irradiating facility at the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx). Safety, operational and research requirements have led to the need to determine both the magnitude and spectra of the leaking gamma fluxes. The CTEx experimental facility is cavity type with a moveable set of 28 horizontally positioned rods, filled with Cesium-137 chloride and doubly encased in stainless steel that yields an approximately plane 42 kCi-source that provides a maximum dose rate of about 1.5 kG/h into two irradiating chambers. The channels are intended for irradiation tests outside facility. They would allow larger samples to be exposed to lower gamma dose rates under controlled conditions. Dose rates have been calculated for several positions inside the channels as well as at their exits. In addition, for purposes related to the safety of operators and personnel, the angles submitted by the exiting beams have also been evaluated as they spread when leaving the channels. All calculations have been performed by using a computational model of the CTEx facility that allows its characteristics and operation to be accurately simulated by using the Monte Carlo Method. Virtual dosimeters filled with Fricke (ferrous sulfate) were modeled and positioned throughout 2 vertical channels (top and bottom) and 2 horizontal ones (front and back) in order to map dose rates and gamma spectrum distributions. The calculations revealed exiting collimated beams in the order of tenths of Grays per minute as compared to the maximum 25 Gy / min dose rate in the irradiator chamber. In addition, the beams leaving the two vertical channels were found to exhibit a widespread cone-shaped distribution with aperture angle ranging around 85 deg. The data calculated in this work are intended for use in the design of optimized experiments (better positioning of samples and

  1. SU-F-BRD-09: A Random Walk Model Algorithm for Proton Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a random walk model algorithm for calculating proton dose with balanced computation burden and accuracy. Methods: Random walk (RW) model is sometimes referred to as a density Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In MC proton dose calculation, the use of Gaussian angular distribution of protons due to multiple Coulomb scatter (MCS) is convenient, but in RW the use of Gaussian angular distribution requires an extremely large computation and memory. Thus, our RW model adopts spatial distribution from the angular one to accelerate the computation and to decrease the memory usage. From the physics and comparison with the MC simulations, we have determined and analytically expressed those critical variables affecting the dose accuracy in our RW model. Results: Besides those variables such as MCS, stopping power, energy spectrum after energy absorption etc., which have been extensively discussed in literature, the following variables were found to be critical in our RW model: (1) inverse squared law that can significantly reduce the computation burden and memory, (2) non-Gaussian spatial distribution after MCS, and (3) the mean direction of scatters at each voxel. In comparison to MC results, taken as reference, for a water phantom irradiated by mono-energetic proton beams from 75 MeV to 221.28 MeV, the gamma test pass rate was 100% for the 2%/2mm/10% criterion. For a highly heterogeneous phantom consisting of water embedded by a 10 cm cortical bone and a 10 cm lung in the Bragg peak region of the proton beam, the gamma test pass rate was greater than 98% for the 3%/3mm/10% criterion. Conclusion: We have determined key variables in our RW model for proton dose calculation. Compared with commercial pencil beam algorithms, our RW model much improves the dose accuracy in heterogeneous regions, and is about 10 times faster than MC simulations

  2. Calculation of shielding and radiation doses for PET/CT nuclear medicine facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.; Muraduzzaman, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new modality that is gaining use in nuclear medicine. The use of PET and computed tomography (CT) has grown dramatically. Because of the high energy of the annihilation radiation (511 keV), shielding requirements are an important consideration in the design of a PET or PET/CT imaging facility. The goal of nuclear medicine and PET facility shielding design is to keep doses to workers and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Design involves: 1. Calculation of doses to occupants of the facility and adjacent regions based on projected layouts, protocols and workflows, and 2. Reduction of doses to ALARA through adjustment of the aforementioned parameters. The radiological evaluation of a PET/CT facility consists of the assessment of the annual effective dose both to workers occupationally exposed, and to members of the public. This assessment takes into account the radionuclides involved, the facility features, the working procedures, the expected number of patients per year, and so on. The objective of the study was to evaluate shielding requirements for a PET/CT to be installed in the department of nuclear medicine of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC). Minimizing shielding would result in a possible reduction of structural as well as financial burden. Formulas and attenuation coefficients following the basic AAPM guidelines were used to calculate un-attenuated radiation through shielding materials. Doses to all points on the floor plan are calculated based primarily on the AAPM guidelines and include consideration of broad beam attenuation and radionuclide energy and decay. The analysis presented is useful for both, facility designers and regulators. (author)

  3. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  4. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajaldeen, A [RMIT university, Docklands, Vic (Australia); Ramachandran, P [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bendigo (Australia); Geso, M [RMIT University, Bundoora, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  5. Calculation of the effective environmental dose rate for ESR and luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the age of a sample using luminescence and ESR dating techniques requires knowledge of the sample's average effective environmental dose rate due to natural radiation sources (alpha, beta, gamma, and cosmic), and age estimates can never be more accurate than the estimate of this dose rate. The estimation process is often complicated by spatial and temporal inhomogeneities in the distribution of natural radiation sources. This paper discusses applications of radiation physics in modelling the effects of these inhomogeneities to ensure accurate estimation of the average dose rate for the sample. For natural alpha, beta, and gamma sources, 'dose point kernels' are employed in calculations using an assumed model for the spatial and temporal dependence of source concentrations. These three types of radiation have rather different penetration properties, with their typical effective ranges being multiples of 10 micrometre, 1 mm, and 100 mm respectively. For each type of radiation, applications are discussed where spatial inhomogeneity in the distribution of sources around and in a sample has a serious effect on the average dose rate to the sample. In some cases, (e.g. gamma dose estimation in 'lumpy' environments) lack of detailed knowledge precludes accurate modelling of the site for a particular sample, but useful statistical information can still be obtained. Temporal variation of radioactive source concentrations is usually coupled with spatial effects and can arise from processes such as parent-daughter disequilibrium, uptake or leaching of sources, or variation in burial depth or water saturation. Again, calculations based non a known or assumed history can be employed to obtain a time-averaged dose rate for a sample. The accuracy with which these calculations can reflect the true environmental dose rate is limited principally by the reliability of the model assumed, which in turn depends on the state of knowledge of the site and its history

  6. SU-E-T-192: Commissioning of a Commercial 3D Dose Calculation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K; Guerrero, M; Xu, H; Zhou, J; Zhang, B; Chen, S; Killefer, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To commission a commercial software package (CSP) that is used as secondary dose calculation check. The CSP uses an independent golden data beam model. However, some parameters can be modified to generate a customer specific model. Plan comparisons and point dose measurements were performed to test if and to what extent the beam model needed adjustment to optimize results. Methods: Beam parameter configurations were compared between the CSP and both TPS. Twelve phantom test plans ranging from simple to complex were generated in two treatment planning systems (TPS). Tests included small field, off axis, EDW, IMRT and VMAT plans. For each plan a point dose was measured to establish ground truth. Lastly, patient plans were compared for both TPS systems and the CSP. Results: Beam parameters agreed within 2%. The output factors for small fields were changed for the 15 MV beam by 2 and 1.5 % for the 1 cm and 2 cm field sizes, respectively. For the 6 MV beam output factors were adjusted by 3−0.8% for field sizes ranging from 1 to 5 cm. The MLC dynamic leaf gap was adjusted by 1.5 mm for 18 MV beam. Differences between the CSP and the TPS were noted in the built-up region. These differences affected the gamma pass rate in the surface region, however this effect is reduced with increasing number of beam angles and does not affect point dose calculations at depth. All IMRT and VMAT plans agreed with the CSP using a gamma pass rate of 95% (3%, 3mm). Conclusion: The CSP is used to verify point doses for all 3D plans generated in our clinic for the last 6 months. No point dose mismatches were encountered since the CSP was implemented. Next, the CSP will be adapted for secondary checks of all IMRT plans. KL had a beta tester agreement with Mobius Medical for an in-kind equipment and software loan

  7. SU-E-T-192: Commissioning of a Commercial 3D Dose Calculation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langen, K; Guerrero, M; Xu, H; Zhou, J; Zhang, B; Chen, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Killefer, M [Hastings College, Hastings, Nebraska (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To commission a commercial software package (CSP) that is used as secondary dose calculation check. The CSP uses an independent golden data beam model. However, some parameters can be modified to generate a customer specific model. Plan comparisons and point dose measurements were performed to test if and to what extent the beam model needed adjustment to optimize results. Methods: Beam parameter configurations were compared between the CSP and both TPS. Twelve phantom test plans ranging from simple to complex were generated in two treatment planning systems (TPS). Tests included small field, off axis, EDW, IMRT and VMAT plans. For each plan a point dose was measured to establish ground truth. Lastly, patient plans were compared for both TPS systems and the CSP. Results: Beam parameters agreed within 2%. The output factors for small fields were changed for the 15 MV beam by 2 and 1.5 % for the 1 cm and 2 cm field sizes, respectively. For the 6 MV beam output factors were adjusted by 3−0.8% for field sizes ranging from 1 to 5 cm. The MLC dynamic leaf gap was adjusted by 1.5 mm for 18 MV beam. Differences between the CSP and the TPS were noted in the built-up region. These differences affected the gamma pass rate in the surface region, however this effect is reduced with increasing number of beam angles and does not affect point dose calculations at depth. All IMRT and VMAT plans agreed with the CSP using a gamma pass rate of 95% (3%, 3mm). Conclusion: The CSP is used to verify point doses for all 3D plans generated in our clinic for the last 6 months. No point dose mismatches were encountered since the CSP was implemented. Next, the CSP will be adapted for secondary checks of all IMRT plans. KL had a beta tester agreement with Mobius Medical for an in-kind equipment and software loan.

  8. Evaluation of dose calculation variations between manual 2D and 3D TPS for breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Pradeep; Oinam, A.S.; Kumar, Anup; Sharma, S.C.; Rana, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    The anatomy of breast varies in a complex shape. These gross variations of anatomy of intact breast and mastectomy breast pose a definite dose inhomogeniety in the chest wall being treated. 6MV photon energy from medium energy accelerator is a good choice for the treatment of lumpectomy breast (intact) as conservative management. Most of the centers use the manual 2D calculations for breast planning using the midline separation

  9. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in external photon beam therapy for clinical situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knöös, Tommy; Wieslander, Elinore; Cozzi, Luca

    2006-01-01

    to the fields. A Monte Carlo calculated algorithm input data set and a benchmark set for a virtual linear accelerator have been produced which have facilitated the analysis and interpretation of the results. The more sophisticated models in the type b group exhibit changes in both absorbed dose and its...... distribution which are congruent with the simulations performed by Monte Carlo-based virtual accelerator....

  10. Treatment planning usi