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Sample records for bcr-abl transcripts sensitize

  1. Frequency of BCR-ABL Transcript Types in Syrian CML Patients

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    Farhat-Maghribi, Sulaf; Habbal, Wafa; Monem, Fawza

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Syria, CML patients are started on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monitored until complete molecular response is achieved. BCR-ABL mRNA transcript type is not routinely identified, contrary to the recommendations. In this study we aimed to identify the frequency of different BCR-ABL transcripts in Syrian CML patients and highlight their significance on monitoring and treatment protocols. Methods. CML patients positive for BCR-ABL transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR were enrolled. BCR-ABL transcript types were investigated using a home-made PCR method that was adapted from published protocols and optimized. The transcript types were then confirmed using a commercially available research kit. Results. Twenty-four transcripts were found in 21 patients. The most common was b2a2, followed by b3a2, b3a3, and e1a3 present solely in 12 (57.1%), 3 (14.3%), 2 (9.5%), and 1 (4.8%), respectively. Three samples (14.3%) contained dual transcripts. While b3a2 transcript was apparently associated with warning molecular response to imatinib treatment, b2a2, b3a3, and e1a3 transcripts collectively proved otherwise (P = 0.047). Conclusion. It might be advisable to identify the BCR-ABL transcript type in CML patients at diagnosis, using an empirically verified method, in order to link the detected transcript with the clinical findings, possible resistance to treatment, and appropriate monitoring methods. PMID:27313614

  2. Association of HLA antigens and BCR-ABL transcripts in leukemia patients with the Philadelphia chromosome

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    Daiana Landenberger de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to verify the association between human leukocyte antigens and the bcr-abl fusion protein resulting from t(9;22(q34;q11 in chronic leukemia myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. METHODS: Forty-seven bcr-abl positive individuals were evaluated. Typing was performed bymicrolymphocytotoxicity and molecular biological methods (human leukocyte antigens Class I and Class II. A control group was obtained from the data of potential bone marrow donors registered in the Brazilian Bone Marrow Donor Registry (REDOME. RESULTS: Positive associations with HLA-A25 and HLA-B18 were found for the b2a2 transcript, as well as a tendency towards a positive association with HLA-B40 and a negative association with HLA-A68. The b3a2 transcript showed positive associations with HLA-B40 and HLA-DRB1*3. CONCLUSION: The negative association between human leukocyte antigens and the BCR-ABL transcript suggests that binding and presentation of peptides derived from the chimeric protein are effective to increase a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response appropriate for the destruction of leukemic cells.

  3. WT1-mediated repression of the proapoptotic transcription factor ZNF224 is triggered by the BCR-ABL oncogene

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    Montano, Giorgia; Vidovic, Karina; Palladino, Chiara; Cesaro, Elena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Quintarelli, Concetta; De Angelis, Biagio; Errichiello, Santa; Pane, Fabrizio; Izzo, Paola; Grosso, Michela; Gullberg, Urban; Costanzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The Kruppel-like protein ZNF224 is a co-factor of the Wilms’ tumor 1 protein, WT1. We have previously shown that ZNF224 exerts a specific proapoptotic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells and contributes to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, by modulating WT1-dependent transcription of apoptotic genes. Here we demonstrate that ZNF224 gene expression is down-regulated both in BCR-ABL positive cell lines and in primary CML samples and is restored after imatinib and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment. We also show that WT1, whose expression is positively regulated by BCR-ABL, represses transcription of the ZNF224 gene. Finally, we report that ZNF224 is significantly down-regulated in patients with BCR-ABL positive chronic phase-CML showing poor response or resistance to imatinib treatment as compared to high-responder patients. Taken as a whole, our data disclose a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL that leads to inhibition of apoptosis through the ZNF224 repression. ZNF224 could thus represent a novel promising therapeutic target in CML. PMID:26320177

  4. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22 (q34;q11

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    Cano Pedro

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22 (q34;q11, bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. Methods The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Results Significant negative associations (p Conclusions The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22 (q34;q11-positive leukemia.

  5. Association of HLA Class I and Class II genes with bcr-abl transcripts in leukemia patients with t(9;22) (q34;q11)

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    Based on the site of breakpoint in t(9;22) (q34;q11), bcr-abl fusion in leukemia patients is associated with different types of transcript proteins. In this study we have seen the association of HLA genes with different types of bcr-abl transcripts. The association could predict the bcr-abl peptide presentation by particular HLA molecules. The study included a total of 189 patients of mixed ethnicity with chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia who were being considered for bone marrow transplantation. Typing of bcr-abl transcripts was done by reverse transcriptase PCR method. HLA typing was performed by molecular methods. The bcr-abl and HLA association was studied by calculating the relative risks and chi-square test. Significant negative associations (p < 0.05) were observed with HLA-A*02 (b2a2, e1a2), -A*68 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*14 (b2a2, b3a2, e1a2), -B*15 (b2a2, b3a2), -B*40 (b2a2), -DQB1*0303 (b2a2, b3a2), -DQB1*0603 (b2a2), -DRB1*0401 (e1a2), -DRB1*0701 (b3a2), and -DRB1*1101 (b2a2). The negative associations of a particular bcr-abl transcript with specific HLA alleles suggests that these alleles play a critical role in presenting peptides derived from the chimeric proteins and eliciting a successful T-cell cytotoxic response. Knowledge of differential associations between HLA phenotypes and bcr-abl fusion transcript types would help in developing better strategies for immunization with the bcr-abl peptides against t(9;22) (q34;q11)-positive leukemia

  6. Extramedullary blast crisis as initial presentation in chronic myeloid leukemia with the e1a2 BCR-ABL1 transcript: A case report

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    AI, DI; LIU, WEI; LU, GARY; PATEL, KEYUR PRAVINCHANDRA; CHEN, ZI

    2015-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with enlarged right inguinal lymph nodes. The pathological examination of the nodes revealed infiltration by myeloid sarcoma. A bone marrow smear and biopsy revealed cytogenetic abnormalities, with 46,XX,t(9;22) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was diagnosed. The e1a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion transcript was detected. The patient received imatinib-based combined chemotherapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor lymphocyte infusions and dasatinib treatment. The patient achieved complete response and has remained leukemia-free for >48 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of CML with the e1a2 BCR-ABL1 transcript, with extramedullary blast crisis as the initial presentation. The aim of the present study was to discuss this special case with reference to the literature. PMID:26807241

  7. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

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    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  8. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL.

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    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  9. BCR-ABL fusion genes are inducible by X-irradiation in vitro

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    The Philadelphia chromosome consists of a reciprocal translocation between the ABL oncogene at chromosome 9q34 and the BCR gene at chromosome 22q resulting in the expression of chimeric BCR-ABL mRNAs specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The presence of the fusion genes can be detected with high specificity and sensitivity by means of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction. Using this assay, it was possible to detect BCR-ABL fusion genes induced among HL60 cells after 100 Gy of X-irradiation in vitro. A total of five fusion gene transcripts were obtained. These fusion genes contained not only CML-specific BCR-ABL rearrangements, but also other forms of BCR-ABL fusions. These latter genes had junctions of BCR exon 4/ABL exon 2 intervened by a segment of DNA of unknown origin, BCR exon 5/ABL exon 2, and BCR exon 4/ABL exon 2. The results appear to be the first evidence for the induction of the BCR-ABL fusion gene by X-irradiation. In terms of leukemogenesis, it is suggested that only those cells bearing certain CML-related BCR-ABL fusion genes are positively selected by virtue of a growth advantage in vivo. (author)

  10. Molecular Detection of BCR-ABL in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    All chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have the BCR-ABL fusion gene. The constitutively activated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase is a critical pathogenetic event in CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, are synthesized small molecules that primarily target BCR-ABL tyrosine kinases and have become a first-line treatment for CML. Detection of BCR-ABL transcript level by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) is a clinical routine for evaluating TKI treatment efficacy and predicting long-term response. Furthermore, because they are a main TKI resistance mechanism, the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) point mutations that are detected by Sanger sequencing can help clinicians make decisions on subsequent treatment selections. Here, we present protocols for the two abovementioned molecular methods for CML analysis. PMID:27581134

  11. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia = Determinação da lactate desidrogenase (LDH e do transcrito Bcr-Abl em pacientes com leucemia mielóide crônica

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    Roberto Iemitsu Tatakihara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease. Leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma desordem mieloproliferativa maligna que é originada de célula-tronco pluripotente caracterizada por expansão anormal, maligna de clones de células tronco da medula óssea na circulação. A grande maioria dos pacientes com LMC apresentam transcritos Bcr-Abl. Lactato desidrogenase (LDH,considerado um marcador bioquímico para crescimento tumoral, glicólise anaeróbica, e tem sido considerado um fator de pior prognóstico da LMC. Portanto, este estudo visa avaliar a concentraçãode LDH no plasma e a detecção do transcrito Bcr-Abl em 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 indivíduos saudáveis. Foram avaliados 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 doadores saudáveis. A

  12. A Requirement for SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 Phosphorylation in Bcr-Abl-Induced Tumorigenesis

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    Xiaoxue Qiu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 are inhibitors of the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT pathway and function in a negative feedback loop during cytokine signaling. Abl transformation is associated with constitutive activation of JAK/STAT-dependent signaling. However, the mechanism by which Abl oncoproteins bypass SOCS inhibitory regulation remains poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that coexpression of Bcr-Abl with SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 results in tyrosine phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins. Interestingly, SOCS-1 is highly tyrosine phosphorylated in one of five primary chronic myelogenous leukemia samples. Bcr-Abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 occurs mainly on Tyr 155 and Tyr 204 residues of SOCS-1 and on Tyr 221 residue of SOCS-3. We observed that phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins was associated with their binding to Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-dependent phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 diminished their inhibitory effects on the activation of JAK and STAT5 and thereby enhanced JAK/STAT5 signaling. Strikingly, disrupting the tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 impaired the expression of Bcl-XL protein and sensitized K562 leukemic cells to undergo apoptosis. Moreover, selective mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 significantly blocked Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenesis in nude mice and inhibited Bcr-Abl-mediated murine bone marrow transformation. Together, these results reveal a mechanism of how Bcr-Abl may overcome SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 inhibition to constitutively activate the JAK/STAT-dependent signaling, and suggest that Bcr-Abl may critically requires tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to mediate tumorigenesis when these SOCS proteins are present in cells.

  13. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

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    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  14. Next-generation sequencing for sensitive detection of BCR-ABL1 mutations relevant to tyrosine kinase inhibitor choice in imatinib-resistant patients

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    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Polakova, Katerina Machova; Linhartova, Jana; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Papayannidis, Cristina; Mancini, Manuela; Klamova, Hana; Salvucci, Marzia; Crugnola, Monica; Iurlo, Alessandra; Albano, Francesco; Russo, Domenico; Rosti, Gianantonio; Cavo, Michele; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who fail imatinib treatment, BCR-ABL1 mutation profiling by Sanger sequencing (SS) is recommended before changing therapy since detection of specific mutations influences second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (2GTKI) choice. We aimed to assess i) in how many patients who relapse on second-line 2GTKI therapy next generation sequencing (NGS) may track resistant mutations back to the sample collected at the time of imatinib resistance, before 2GTKI start (switchover sample) and ii) whether low level mutations identified by NGS always undergo clonal expansion. To this purpose, we used NGS to retrospectively analyze 60 imatinib-resistant patients (CML, n = 45; Ph+ ALL, n = 15) who had failed second-line 2GTKI therapy and had acquired BCR-ABL1 mutations (Group 1) and 25 imatinib-resistant patients (CML, n = 21; Ph+ ALL, n = 4) who had responded to second-line 2GTKI therapy, for comparison (Group 2). NGS uncovered that in 26 (43%) patients in Group 1, the 2GTKI-resistant mutations that triggered relapse were already detectable at low levels in the switchover sample (median mutation burden, 5%; range 1.1%–18.4%). Importantly, none of the low level mutations detected by NGS in switchover samples failed to expand whenever the patient received the 2GTKI to whom they were insensitive. In contrast, no low level mutation that was resistant to the 2GTKI the patients subsequently received was detected in the switchover samples from Group 2. NGS at the time of imatinib failure reliably identifies clinically relevant mutations, thus enabling a more effective therapeutic tailoring. PMID:26980736

  15. Regulation of hTERT by BCR-ABL at multiple levels in K562 cells

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    Chai Juin Hsien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytogenetic characteristic of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome gene product, BCR-ABL. Given that BCR-ABL is the specific target of Gleevec in CML treatment, we investigated the regulation of the catalytic component of telomerase, hTERT, by BCR-ABL at multiple levels in K562 cells. Methods Molecular techniques such as over expression, knockdown, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, western blotting, reporter assay, confocal microscopy, telomerase assays and microarray were used to suggest that hTERT expression and activity is modulated by BCR-ABL at multiple levels. Results Our results suggest that BCR-ABL plays an important role in regulating hTERT in K562 (BCR-ABL positive human leukemia cells. When Gleevec inhibited the tyrosine kinase activity of BCR-ABL, phosphorylation of hTERT was downregulated, therefore suggesting a positive correlation between BCR-ABL and hTERT. Gleevec treatment inhibited hTERT at mRNA level and significantly reduced telomerase activity (TA in K562 cells, but not in HL60 or Jurkat cells (BCR-ABL negative cells. We also demonstrated that the transcription factor STAT5a plays a critical role in hTERT gene regulation in K562 cells. Knockdown of STAT5a, but not STAT5b, resulted in a marked downregulation of hTERT mRNA level, TA and hTERT protein level in K562 cells. Furthermore, translocation of hTERT from nucleoli to nucleoplasm was observed in K562 cells induced by Gleevec. Conclusions Our data reveal that BCR-ABL can regulate TA at multiple levels, including transcription, post-translational level, and proper localization. Thus, suppression of cell growth and induction of apoptosis by Gleevec treatment may be partially due to TA inhibition. Additionally, we have identified STAT5a as critical mediator of the hTERT gene expression in BCR-ABL positive CML cells, suggesting that targeting STAT5a may be a promising therapeutic strategy for BCR-ABL positive

  16. Regulation of hTERT by BCR-ABL at multiple levels in K562 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytogenetic characteristic of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome gene product, BCR-ABL. Given that BCR-ABL is the specific target of Gleevec in CML treatment, we investigated the regulation of the catalytic component of telomerase, hTERT, by BCR-ABL at multiple levels in K562 cells. Molecular techniques such as over expression, knockdown, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, western blotting, reporter assay, confocal microscopy, telomerase assays and microarray were used to suggest that hTERT expression and activity is modulated by BCR-ABL at multiple levels. Our results suggest that BCR-ABL plays an important role in regulating hTERT in K562 (BCR-ABL positive human leukemia) cells. When Gleevec inhibited the tyrosine kinase activity of BCR-ABL, phosphorylation of hTERT was downregulated, therefore suggesting a positive correlation between BCR-ABL and hTERT. Gleevec treatment inhibited hTERT at mRNA level and significantly reduced telomerase activity (TA) in K562 cells, but not in HL60 or Jurkat cells (BCR-ABL negative cells). We also demonstrated that the transcription factor STAT5a plays a critical role in hTERT gene regulation in K562 cells. Knockdown of STAT5a, but not STAT5b, resulted in a marked downregulation of hTERT mRNA level, TA and hTERT protein level in K562 cells. Furthermore, translocation of hTERT from nucleoli to nucleoplasm was observed in K562 cells induced by Gleevec. Our data reveal that BCR-ABL can regulate TA at multiple levels, including transcription, post-translational level, and proper localization. Thus, suppression of cell growth and induction of apoptosis by Gleevec treatment may be partially due to TA inhibition. Additionally, we have identified STAT5a as critical mediator of the hTERT gene expression in BCR-ABL positive CML cells, suggesting that targeting STAT5a may be a promising therapeutic strategy for BCR-ABL positive CML patients

  17. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

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    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  18. RT-PCR ANALYSIS OF E2A-PBX1, TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL AND MLL-AF4 FUSION GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN B-LINEAGE ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

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    Iuliu-Cristian Ivanov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents a heterogeneous group of hematological malignancies, defined by clonal proliferation of lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and molecular analysis for the detection of genetic anomalies are clinical standard procedures for diagnosis, sub-classification and post-therapeutic evaluation. Samples from 105 patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were immunophenotyped at diagnosis and were investigated by molecular analysis in order to identify the occurrence of four fusion genes: MLL-AF4, TEL-AML-1, BCR-ABL-p190, E2A-PBX-1. There were no associations found between the immunophenotype and the presence of any fusion genes evaluated. Both methods in combination remain a prerequisite for an improved subclassification of hematological malignancies, therapeutic decision, and evaluation of treatment response.

  19. BCR-ABL Promotes PTEN Downregulation in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

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    Cristina Panuzzo; Sabrina Crivellaro; Giovanna Carrà; Angelo Guerrasio; Giuseppe Saglio; Alessandro Morotti

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the t(9;22) translocation coding for the chimeric protein p210 BCR-ABL. The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of CML chronic phase, through non genomic loss of function mechanisms, such as protein down-regulation and impaired nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling. Here we demonstrate that BCR-ABL promotes PTEN downregulation through a MEK dependent pathway. Furthermore, we describe a novel n...

  20. Targeting the SH2-Kinase Interface in Bcr-Abl Inhibits Leukemogenesis

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    Grebien, Florian; Hantschel, Oliver; Wojcik, John; Kaupe, Ines; Kovacic, Boris; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz M.; Gish, Gerald D.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Koide, Akiko; Beug, Hartmut; Pawson, Tony; Valent, Peter; Koide, Shohei; Superti-Furga, Giulio (AAS); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (Med U. Vienna); (UC); (IMP-CNRS)

    2012-10-25

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively active tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. However, emerging TKI resistance prevents complete cure. Therefore, alternative strategies targeting regulatory modules of Bcr-Abl in addition to the kinase active site are strongly desirable. Here, we show that an intramolecular interaction between the SH2 and kinase domains in Bcr-Abl is both necessary and sufficient for high catalytic activity of the enzyme. Disruption of this interface led to inhibition of downstream events critical for CML signaling and, importantly, completely abolished leukemia formation in mice. Furthermore, disruption of the SH2-kinase interface increased sensitivity of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl mutants to TKI inhibition. An engineered Abl SH2-binding fibronectin type III monobody inhibited Bcr-Abl kinase activity both in vitro and in primary CML cells, where it induced apoptosis. This work validates the SH2-kinase interface as an allosteric target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. A BCR/ABL-hIL-2 DNA Vaccine Enhances the Immune Responses in BALB/c Mice

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    Yanan Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of a DNA vaccine encoding the BCR/ABL fusion gene is thought to be a promising approach for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML to eradicate minimal residual disease after treatment with chemotherapy or targeted therapy. In this study, our strategy employs genetic technology to create a DNA vaccine encoding the BCR/ABL fusion and human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 genes. The successfully constructed plasmids BCR/ABL-pIRES-hIL-2, BCR/ABL-pIRES, and pIRES-hIL-2 were delivered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice at 14-day intervals for three cycles. The transcription and expression of the BCR/ABL and hIL-2 genes were found in the injected muscle tissues. The interferon-γ (IFN-γ serum levels were increased, and the splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio was significantly decreased in the BCR/ABL-pIRES-hIL-2-injected mice. Furthermore, specific antibodies against K562 cells could be detected by indirect immunofluorescence. These results indicate that a DNA vaccine containing BCR/ABL and hIL-2 together may elicit increased in vivo humoral and cellular immune responses in BALB/c mice.

  2. Susceptibility of Ph-positive all to TKI therapy associated with Bcr-Abl rearrangement patterns: a retrospective analysis.

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    Yu Jing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have demonstrated success in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in patients that express BCR-ABL rearrangements (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph]. The current study aimed to assess the efficacy of TKIs and prognostic factors in the treatment of adults with Ph+-ALL. METHODS: In this multicenter retrospective study, the relationship between Ph+-ALL and treatment outcomes among Chinese patients receiving TKI-containing induction/consolidation chemotherapy was examined. A total of 86 Ph+-ALL patients were included and followed for 3.85 (0.43-9.30 years. Overall survival (OS and event-free survival (EFS were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 86 Ph+-ALL patients (40 females and 46 males; median age: 34.0 years were enrolled, including those with BCR/ABL transcripts 190 (n = 52, 210 (n = 25, and 230 (n = 2; BCR/ABL isoform determination was not available for 7 patients. Mortality was influenced by variable BCR/ABL transcripts and TKI administration, and BCR/ABL transcripts, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and TKI administration were associated with the occurrence of events. The OS rate in the TKI administration group during steady state was significantly higher compared with those patients who did not receive TKI administration (P = 0.008, the EFS rate in the TKI administration group during steady state was significantly higher compared with those patients who did not receive TKIs (P = 0.012, and also higher than those with TKI salvage administration (P = 0.004. BCR/ABL transcripts 210 showed preferable OS and EFS compared with BCR/ABL transcripts 190 and 230 (P<0.05 for each. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility of Ph+-ALL to TKI associated with the patterns of BCR-ABL rearrangement is demonstrated for the first time, thus adding another risk-stratifying molecular prognostic tool for the management of patients with Ph+-ALL.

  3. Nilotinib treatment in mouse models of P190 Bcr/Abl lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Groffen John

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ph-positive leukemias are caused by the aberrant fusion of the BCR and ABL genes. Nilotinib is a selective Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor related to imatinib, which is widely used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia only responds transiently to imatinib therapy, we have used mouse models to test the efficacy of nilotinib against lymphoblastic leukemia caused by the P190 form of Bcr/Abl. Results After transplant of 10,000 highly malignant leukemic cells into compatible recipients, untreated mice succumbed to leukemia within 21 days, whereas mice treated with 75 mg/kg nilotinib survived significantly longer. We examined cells from mice that developed leukemia while under treatment for Bcr/Abl kinase domain point mutations but these were not detected. In addition, culture of such cells ex vivo showed that they were as sensitive as the parental cell line to nilotinib but that the presence of stromal support allowed resistant cells to grow out. Nilotinib also exhibited impressive anti-leukemia activity in P190 Bcr/Abl transgenic mice that had developed overt leukemia/lymphoma masses and that otherwise would have been expected to die within 7 days. Visible lymphoma masses disappeared within six days of treatment and leukemic cell numbers in peripheral blood were significantly reduced. Treated mice survived more than 30 days. Conclusion These results show that nilotinib has very impressive anti-leukemia activity but that lymphoblastic leukemia cells can become unresponsive to it both in vitro and in vivo through mechanisms that appear to be Bcr/Abl independent.

  4. A critical role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenesis.

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    Qinghuang Chen

    Full Text Available CDKN3 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3, a dual specificity protein phosphatase, dephosphorylates cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and thus functions as a key negative regulator of cell cycle progression. Deregulation or mutations of CDNK3 have been implicated in various cancers. However, the role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML remains unknown. Here we found that CDKN3 acts as a tumor suppressor in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis. Overexpression of CDKN3 sensitized the K562 leukemic cells to imanitib-induced apoptosis and dramatically inhibited K562 xenografted tumor growth in nude mouse model. Ectopic expression of CDKN3 significantly reduced the efficiency of Bcr-Abl-mediated transformation of FDCP1 cells to growth factor independence. In contrast, depletion of CDKN3 expression conferred resistance to imatinib-induced apoptosis in the leukemic cells and accelerated the growth of xenograph leukemia in mice. In addition, we found that CDKN3 mutant (CDKN3-C140S devoid of the phosphatase activity failed to affect the K562 leukemic cell survival and xenografted tumor growth, suggesting that the phosphatase of CDKN3 was required for its tumor suppressor function. Furthermore, we observed that overexpression of CDKN3 reduced the leukemic cell survival by dephosphorylating CDK2, thereby inhibiting CDK2-dependent XIAP expression. Moreover, overexpression of CDKN3 delayed G1/S transition in K562 leukemic cells. Our results highlight the importance of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis, and provide new insights into diagnostics and therapeutics of the leukemia.

  5. The Role of MEK Kinase 1 in Bcr-Abl-Induced Self-Renewal Activity of Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    NAKAMURA, Yukinori; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    BCR-ABL oncogene, the moecular hallmark of chronic mylogenous leukemia, arises in a promitive hematopoietic stem cell that has the capacity for both differentiation and self-renewal. Its product, Bcr-Abl protein, has been shown to sctivate signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) and to promote self-renewal in embryonic stem (ES)cells, even in the absencs of leukemia in hibitory factor (LIF). MEK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a 196-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase ...

  6. INHIBITION OF APOPTOSIS BY bcr-abl FUSION GENE IN K562 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-hong; SUN Bing-zhong; YUAN Yue-chuan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of bcr-abl fusion gene on CML cell apoptosis. Methods: Apoptosis of exvivo cultured K562 cells were observed after exposure to synthetic 18 mer antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the bcr-abl junction (b3a2). Results: Apoptosis of K562 cells was significantly increased associated with inhibition of bcr-abl expression. Conclusion: bcr-abl fusion gene formation due to chromosome translocation may be the major mechanism of CML via inhibition of apoptosis.

  7. Beneficial effects of combining nilotinib and imatinib in preclinical models of BCR-ABL+ leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Weisberg, Ellen; Catley, Laurie; Wright, Renee D.; Moreno, Daisy; Banerji, Lolita; Ray, Arghya; Manley, Paul W; Mestan, Juergen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Callahan, Linda; DellaGatta, Jamie L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Griffin, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from emergence of imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL point mutations is a significant problem in advanced-stage chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The BCR-ABL inhibitor, nilotinib (AMN107), is significantly more potent against BCR-ABL than imatinib, and is active against many imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants. Phase 1/2 clinical trials show that nilotinib can induce remissions in patients who have previously failed imatinib, indicating that sequential therapy with these 2 ...

  8. Detection of BCR-ABL Fusion mRNA Using Reverse Transcriptase Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, L C; Hall, S; Kohlgruber, A; Urbin, S; Torres, C; Wilson, P

    2011-12-08

    RT-PCR is commonly used for the detection of Bcr-Abl fusion transcripts in patients diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML. Two fusion transcripts predominate in CML, Br-Abl e13a2 and e14a2. They have developed reverse transcriptase isothermal loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assays to detect these two fusion transcripts along with the normal Bcr transcript.

  9. MEK kinase 1 is essential for Bcr-Abl-induced STAT3 and self-renewal activity in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukinori; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Nawata, Ryouhei; Tagami, Kozo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2005-11-17

    BCR-ABL oncogene, the molecular hallmark of chronic myelogenous leukemia, arises in a primitive hematopoietic stem cell that has the capacity for both differentiation and self-renewal. Its product, Bcr-Abl protein, has been shown to activate signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) and to promote self-renewal in embryonic stem (ES) cells, even in the absence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). MEK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a 196-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase kinase involved in Bcr-Abl signal transduction. To investigate the role of MEKK1 in Bcr-Abl-induced transformation of stem cells, p210 Bcr-Abl was stably transfected into wild-type (WT(p210)) and MEKK1-/- (MEKK1-/-(p210)) ES cells. Bcr-Abl enhanced MEKK1 expression in ES transfectants, as it does in other Bcr-Abl-transformed cells. In the absence of LIF, WT(p210) cells showed constitutive STAT3 activation and formed rounded, compact colonies having strong alkaline phosphatase activity, a characteristic phenotype of undifferentiated ES cells. MEKK1-/-(p210) cells, by contrast, showed less STAT3 activity than WT(p210) cells and formed large, flattened colonies having weak alkaline phosphatase activity, a phenotype of differentiated ES cells. These results indicate that MEKK1 plays a key role in Bcr-Abl-induced STAT3 activation and in ES cells' capacity for LIF-independent self-renewal, and may thus be involved in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis in stem cells. PMID:16044153

  10. BCR-ABL DERIVED PEPTIDE VACCINES FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKAEMIA

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    M. Bocchia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative pluripotent stem cell disorder characterized by the presence of a cytogenetic hallmark, the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, and accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. The disease progresses from a chronic phase through an accelerated phase to a blast phase and its natural course accounts for a median 4 years survival1. The Ph chromosome is derived by a reciprocal translocation termed t(9;22 in which the c-abl oncogene has moved from chromosome 9 into the breakpoint cluster region (bcr, within the bcr gene on chromosome 22, resulting in a chimeric bcr-abl fusion gene that encodes a 210 KD protein (p210 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Two major alternative chimeric p210 can result from this fusion gene: p210-b2a2 where the junction occurs between bcr exon 2 (b2 and abl exon 2 (a2 and p210-b3a2 where the the junction occurs between bcr exon 3 (b3 and abl exon 2 (a2. About 40% of CML patients harbor the p210-b2a2 and about 60% of them show the p210-b3a2.

  11. Chibby drives β catenin cytoplasmic accumulation leading to activation of the unfolded protein response in BCR-ABL1+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Manuela; Leo, Elisa; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Campi, Virginia; Borsi, Enrica; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease caused by the constitutive tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the BCR-ABL fusion protein. However, the phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC) is sustained by β catenin rather than by the BCR-ABL TK. β catenin activity in CML is contingent upon its stabilization proceeding from the BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation at critical residues for interaction with the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) destruction complex or GSK3 inactivating mutations. Here we studied the impact of β catenin antagonist Chibby (CBY) on β catenin signaling in BCR-ABL1+ cells. CBY is a small conserved protein which interacts with β catenin and impairs β catenin-mediated transcriptional activation through two distinct molecular mechanisms: 1) competition with T cell factor (TCF) or lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) for β catenin binding; and 2) nuclear export of β catenin via interaction with 14-3-3. We found that its enforced expression in K562 cell line promoted β catenin cytoplasmic translocation resulting in inhibition of target gene transcription. Moreover, cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR). CBY-driven cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin is also a component of BCR-ABL1+ cell response to the TK inhibitor Imatinib (IM). It evoked the UPR activation leading to the induction of BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) by UPR sensors. BIM, in turn, contributed to the execution phase of apoptosis in the activation of ER resident caspase 12 and mobilization of Ca(2+) stores. PMID:23707389

  12. A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM method to detect Bcr-Abl kinase activity in CML using a peptide biosensor.

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    Tzu-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The protein kinase Bcr-Abl plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, and is the target of the breakthrough drug imatinib (Gleevec™. While most patients respond well to imatinib, approximately 30% never achieve remission or develop resistance within 1-5 years of starting imatinib treatment. Evidence from clinical studies suggests that achieving at least 50% inhibition of a patient's Bcr-Abl kinase activity (relative to their level at diagnosis is associated with improved patient outcomes, including reduced occurrence of resistance and longer maintenance of remission. Accordingly, sensitive assays for detecting Bcr-Abl kinase activity compatible with small amounts of patient material are desirable as potential companion diagnostics for imatinib. Here we report the detection of Bcr-Abl activity and inhibition by imatinib in the human CML cell line K562 using a cell-penetrating peptide biosensor and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. MRM enabled reproducible, selective detection of the peptide biosensor at fmol levels from aliquots of cell lysate equivalent to ~15,000 cells. This degree of sensitivity will facilitate the miniaturization of the entire assay procedure down to cell numbers approaching 15,000, making it practical for translational applications in patient cells in which the limited amount of available patient material often presents a major challenge.

  13. Allosteric inhibition enhances the efficacy of ABL kinase inhibitors to target unmutated BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL-T315I

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    Mian Afsar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ acute lymphatic leukemia (Ph + ALL are caused by the t(9;22, which fuses BCR to ABL resulting in deregulated ABL-tyrosine kinase activity. The constitutively activated BCR/ABL-kinase “escapes” the auto-inhibition mechanisms of c-ABL, such as allosteric inhibition. The ABL-kinase inhibitors (AKIs Imatinib, Nilotinib or Dasatinib, which target the ATP-binding site, are effective in Ph + leukemia. Another molecular therapy approach targeting BCR/ABL restores allosteric inhibition. Given the fact that all AKIs fail to inhibit BCR/ABL harboring the ‘gatekeeper’ mutation T315I, we investigated the effects of AKIs in combination with the allosteric inhibitor GNF2 in Ph + leukemia. Methods The efficacy of this approach on the leukemogenic potential of BCR/ABL was studied in Ba/F3 cells, primary murine bone marrow cells, and untransformed Rat-1 fibroblasts expressing BCR/ABL or BCR/ABL-T315I as well as in patient-derived long-term cultures (PDLTC from Ph + ALL-patients. Results Here, we show that GNF-2 increased the effects of AKIs on unmutated BCR/ABL. Interestingly, the combination of Dasatinib and GNF-2 overcame resistance of BCR/ABL-T315I in all models used in a synergistic manner. Conclusions Our observations establish a new approach for the molecular targeting of BCR/ABL and its resistant mutants using a combination of AKIs and allosteric inhibitors.

  14. A clinical and laboratory study of chronic myeloid leukemia with atypical BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂晓敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical and laboratory features of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML)with atypical e14a3 and e19a2 BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes.Methods We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of CML patients with Ph chromosome positive confirmed by cytogenetic and FISH but classical e13a3(b2a2),e14a2(b3a2)and e1a2 fusion transcripts negative identified by

  15. Imatinib-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation profiling of Bcr-Abl-positive chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Preisinger, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Bleijerveld, O.B.; et al

    2012-01-01

    Bcr-Abl is the major cause and pathogenetic principle of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Bcr-Abl results from a chromosomal translocation that fuses the bcr and abl genes, thereby generating a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which stimulates several signaling networks required for proliferation and survival. peer-reviewed

  16. Role of p21 RAS in p210 bcr-abl transformation of murine myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandanas, R A; Leibowitz, D S; Gharehbaghi, K; Tauchi, T; Burgess, G S; Miyazawa, K; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1993-09-15

    The p21 RAS product has been implicated as part of the downstream signaling of certain nonreceptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes and several growth factor receptor-ligand interactions. We have reported that the chronic myelogenous leukemia oncogene p210 bcr-abl transforms a growth-factor-dependent myeloid cell line NFS/N1.H7 to interleukin-3 (IL-3) independence. In these p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells (H7 bcr-abl.A54) and in two other murine myeloid cell lines transformed to IL-3 independence by p210 bcr-abl, endogenous p21 RAS is activated as determined by an elevated ratio of associated guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP), assayed by thin-layer chromatography of the nucleotides eluted from p21 RAS after immunoprecipitation with the Y13-259 antibody. Treatment of p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells with a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A resulted in diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of p210 bcr-abl and associated proteins, without major reduction in expression of the p210 bcr-abl protein itself. Inhibition of p210 bcr-abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation resulted in a reduction of active p21RAS-GTP complexes in the transformed cells, in diminished expression of the nuclear early response genes c-jun and c-fos, and in lower cellular proliferation rate. To further implicate p21 RAS in these functional events downstream of p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation, we targeted G-protein function directly by limiting the availability of GTP with the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor, tiazofurin (TR). In p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells treated for 4 hours with TR, in which the levels of GTP were reduced by 50%, but GDP, guanosine monophosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were unaffected, p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation was at control levels. However, expression of c-fos and c-jun nuclear proto-oncogenes were strongly inhibited and p21 RAS activity was downregulated. These findings show that p210 bcr-abl transduces

  17. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  18. A certified plasmid reference material for the standardisation of BCR-ABL1 mRNA quantification by real-time quantitative PCR

    OpenAIRE

    White, Helen; DEPREZ LIESBET; Corbisier, Philippe; HALL Victoria; Lin, Feng; Mazoua, Stephane; TRAPMANN Stefanie; AGGERHOLM Annie; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; AKIKI Susanna; Barbany, Gisela; Boeckx, Nancy; Bench, Anthony; CATHERWOOD Mark; Cayuela, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Serial quantification of BCR-ABL1 mRNA is an important therapeutic indicator in chronic myeloid leukaemia, but there is a substantial variation in results reported by different laboratories. To improve comparability, an internationally accepted plasmid certified reference material (CRM) was developed according to ISO Guide 34:2009. Fragments of BCR-ABL1 (e14a2 mRNA fusion), BCR and GUSB transcripts were amplified and cloned into pUC18 to yield plasmid pIRMM0099. Six different linearised plasm...

  19. Essential role for telomerase in chronic myeloid leukemia induced by BCR-ABL in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The telomerase protein is constitutively activated in malignant cells from many patients with cancer, including the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but whether telomerase is essential for the pathogenesis of this disease is not known. Here, we used telomerase deficient mice to determine the requirement for telomerase in CML induced by BCR-ABL in mouse models of CML. Loss of one telomerase allele or complete deletion of telomerase prevented the development of leukemia induced by BCR-ABL. Howev...

  20. Gads (Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc) is required for BCR-ABL-mediated lymphoid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, LC; Berry, DM; Minden, MD; McGlade, CJ; Barber, DL

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), are driven by the oncogenic BCR-ABL fusion protein. Animal modeling experiments utilizing retroviral transduction and subsequent bone marrow transplantation have demonstrated that BCR-ABL generates both myeloid and lymphoid disease in mice receiving whole bone marrow transduced with BCR-ABL. Y177 of BCR-ABL is critical to the development of myeloid disease, and phosphorylation of Y177 has been shown to induce GRB2 binding to BCR-ABL, followed by activation of the Ras and phosphoinositide 3 kinase signaling pathways. We show that the GRB2-related adapter protein, GADS, also associates with BCR-ABL, specifically through Y177 and demonstrate that BCR-ABL-driven lymphoid disease requires Gads. BCR-ABL transduction of Gads(−/−) bone marrow results in short latency myeloid disease within 3–4 weeks of transplant, while wild-type mice succumb to both a longer latency lymphoid and myeloid diseases. We report that GADS mediates a unique BCR-ABL complex with SLP-76 in BCR-ABL-positive cell lines and B-ALL patient samples. These data suggest that GADS mediates lymphoid disease downstream of BCR-ABL through the recruitment of specific signaling intermediates. PMID:23399893

  1. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

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    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  2. Evaluation of Morpholino Antisense Oligos’ Role on BCR-ABL Gene Silencing in the K562 Cell Line

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    Bahman Delalat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML develops when a hematopoietic stem cellacquires the BCR/ABL fusion gene. This causes these transformed hematopoietic cellsto have a greater than normal proliferation rate. Scientists attempt to improve the CMLtreatment process by silencing the BCR/ABL oncogene. In this work, we used morpholinoantisense oligos to silence the BCR/ABL oncogene.Materials and Methods: In this study, the K562 was used as a BCR/ABL fusion-genepositive cell line and the Jurkat cell line as a control. We explored the inhibiting capacityof morpholino antisense oligos in the the expression of the BCR/ABL oncogene andstudied their p210 BCR/ABL suppression, inhibition of cell proliferation and stimulation ofapoptosis in the K562 cells after 24 and 48 hours. Endo-Porter was used for delivery ofmorpholino antisense oligos into cell cytosols. Meanwhile, flow cytometric analysis wasperformed in order to determine the appropriate concentration of morpholino antisenseoligos.Results: Prolonged exposure of the K562 cell line to the morpholino antisense oligostargeted against the BCR-ABL gene showed proliferation inhibition as its main feature.After western blotting, we found that complete silencing of BCR/ABL was achieved, butflow cytometric analysis showed no broad apoptosis.Conclusion: The results indicate that the Morpholino antisense oligo is able to inhibitp210 BCR/ABL; however, it cannot induce broad apoptosis due to co-silencing of BCR.

  3. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; ZHANG Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-ju; Kim, Yong-Mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase i...

  4. Molecular Detection of BCR/ ABL Fusion Gene in Saudi Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Molecular cytogenetics is becoming one of the most useful tools targeting some genes which are generally considered to lead to leukemic transformation (as well as for numerical abnormalities). A fraction of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases carry the translocation t(9;22) (q34;ql1.2) which juxtaposes the ABL proto-oncogene to the BCR gene generating a chimeric gene, BCR/ABL. This aberration is more frequent in adult ALL (20%-40%) than in pediatric ALL >)5%), and predicts poor clinical outcome. Aim of our Work: Is to study BCR/ A BL fusion gene in ALL cases using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Patients and Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed ALL patients, 16 adult and 4 paediatric cases, were included in the study, 11 cases (55%) were of precursor B phenotype, S cases (40%) belonged to T lineage, while one case was bi phenotypic expressing mainly precursor B cell markers tether with CD13, CD33, CD117, Detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene was done using interphase FISH technique and was confirmed molecularly using the RT-PCR technique. Results: BCR/ ABL fusion gene was negative in all the examined cases, yet abnormality involving 9q34, ABL gene, either by addition or deletion was detected in three cases (15%). Two of these cases were associated with BCR gene extra copies (three and four copies, respectively). Conclusion: This may reflect the frequency of association of ABL gene and BCR gene abnormality in our cases, and that absence of fusion gene BCR/ABL does not exclude their role in the leukomogenic process, yet a larger study is required to confirm and detect the prevalence of these gene disturbances in ALL and their association

  5. Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 Kinase Domain and Elsewhere in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; de Benedittis, Caterina; Mancini, Manuela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been the first human malignancy to be associated, more than 50 years ago, with a consistent chromosomal abnormality--the t(9;22)(q34;q11) chromosomal translocation. The resulting BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, encoding a tyrosine kinase with deregulated activity, has a central role in the pathogenesis of CML. Ancestral or additional genetic events necessary for CML to develop have long been hypothesized but never really demonstrated. CML can successfully be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain might arise, however, that confer resistance to 1 or more of the currently available TKIs. Hence, the critical role of BCR-ABL1 mutation screening for optimal therapeutic management, with the current gold standard technique, conventional sequencing, likely to be replaced soon by ultra-deep sequencing. Mutations in genes other than BCR-ABL1 include ASXL1, TET2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, EZH2, and TP53 in chronic phase patients and RUNX1, ASXL1, IKZF1, WT1, TET2, NPM1, IDH1, IDH2, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, TP53, CDKN2A, RB1, and GATA-2 mutations in advanced phase patients. The latter also display additional cytogenetic abnormalities, including submicroscopic regions of gain or loss that only single nucleotide polymorphism arrays or array comparative genomic hybridization can detect. Whether whole genome/exome sequencing studies will uncover novel mutations relevant for pathogenesis, progression, and risk-adapted therapy is still unclear. PMID:26297264

  6. Identification of drug combinations containing imatinib for treatment of BCR-ABL+ leukemias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyi Kang

    Full Text Available The BCR-ABL translocation is found in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients. Although imatinib and its analogues have been used as front-line therapy to target this mutation and control the disease for over a decade, resistance to the therapy is still observed and most patients are not cured but need to continue the therapy indefinitely. It is therefore of great importance to find new therapies, possibly as drug combinations, which can overcome drug resistance. In this study, we identified eleven candidate anti-leukemic drugs that might be combined with imatinib, using three approaches: a kinase inhibitor library screen, a gene expression correlation analysis, and literature analysis. We then used an experimental search algorithm to efficiently explore the large space of possible drug and dose combinations and identified drug combinations that selectively kill a BCR-ABL+ leukemic cell line (K562 over a normal fibroblast cell line (IMR-90. Only six iterations of the algorithm were needed to identify very selective drug combinations. The efficacy of the top forty-nine combinations was further confirmed using Ph+ and Ph- ALL patient cells, including imatinib-resistant cells. Collectively, the drug combinations and methods we describe might be a first step towards more effective interventions for leukemia patients, especially those with the BCR-ABL translocation.

  7. Cell sorting enables interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of low BCR-ABL1 producing stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients beyond deep molecular remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kooten Niekerk, Peter Buur; Petersen, Charlotte Christie; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg;

    2014-01-01

    The exact disease state of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission is unknown, because even the most sensitive quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods cannot identify patients prone to relapse after treatment withdrawal. To elucidate......) ), n = 11) using both sensitive qPCR and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). Despite evaluating fewer cells, iFISH proved superior to mRNA-based qPCR in detecting residual Ph(+) stem cells (P = 0·005), and detected Ph(+) stem- and progenitor cells in 9/10 patients at frequencies of 2......-14%. Moreover, while all qPCR(+) samples also were iFISH(+) , 9/33 samples were qPCR-/iFISH(+) , including all positive samples from MR(4) patients. Our findings show that residual Ph(+) cells are low BCR-ABL1 producers, and that DNA-based methods are required to assess the content of persisting Ph(+) stem...

  8. Harmonization of BCR-ABL mRNA quantification using a uniform multifunctional control plasmid in 37 international laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, M C; Erben, P; Saglio, G; Gottardi, E; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Schenk, T; Ernst, T; Lauber, S; Kruth, J; Hehlmann, R; Hochhaus, A

    2008-01-01

    Individualized PCR strategies hamper comparability of molecular results between different laboratories in several fields of medicine. To harmonize BCR-ABL mRNA quantification an international multicenter trial involving 37 laboratories in 14 countries was initiated using 10 samples, each containing...... various dilutions (10, 2, 1 and 0.1%) of b3a2 or b2a2 BCR-ABL positive in normal leukocytes and negative controls. A novel control plasmid (pME-2) was designed for external calibration containing BCR-ABL and glucuronidase-beta (GUS) sequences. Median BCR-ABL/ABL ratios were 9.1, 1.8, 0.85 and 0.11% in b3a...... participating laboratories (13%) detected low BCR-ABL copy numbers in negative control samples; one laboratory failed to detect BCR-ABL in a low-level sample. We conclude that the use of a common control plasmid does indeed improve comparability of BCR-ABL mRNA quantification results. However, further...

  9. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Wang, Li [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Department of Medical Laboratory, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center (Chongqing The Fourth Hospital), Chongqing, 400016 (China); Sheng, Shangchun [The No.2 Peoples' Hospital of Yibin, Sichuan, 644000 (China); Wang, Teng; Yang, Juan [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Xie, Guoming, E-mail: guomingxie@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Feng, Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China)

    2015-08-19

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application. - Highlights: • A transducer hairpin was designed to improve the versatility of DNA circuit. • GS/PANI/AuNPs were introduced to the DNA circuit for further signal amplification. • The established biosensor displayed high sensitivity and good specificity.

  10. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application. - Highlights: • A transducer hairpin was designed to improve the versatility of DNA circuit. • GS/PANI/AuNPs were introduced to the DNA circuit for further signal amplification. • The established biosensor displayed high sensitivity and good specificity

  11. p210 Bcr-Abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase : an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharehbaghi, K.; Burgess, G. S.; Collart, F. R.; Litz-Jackson, S.; Huberman, E.; Jayaram, H. N.; Boswell, H. S.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Lab. for Experimental Oncology; Indiana Univ. School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin.

  12. p210 bcr-abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehbaghi, K; Burgess, G S; Collart, F R; Litz-Jackson, S; Huberman, E; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1994-08-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin. PMID:7520100

  13. Molecular Imaging of Bcr-Abl Phosphokinase in a Xenograft Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ji Yuan; Yang, David J.; Angelo, Laura S.; Kohanim, Saady; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase can be assessed by gamma imaging using an 111Indium-labeled anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, and if the response to treatment with imatinib could be detected using this imaging technique. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibody (APT) was labeled with indium (111In) using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator. To determine if 111In-EC-APT could assess a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, xenografts of the human chronic myelogenous l...

  14. The human leukemia oncogene bcr-abl abrogates the anchorage requirement but not the growth factor requirement for proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    Renshaw, M W; McWhirter, J R; Wang, J Y

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of normal cells in a multicellular organism requires not only growth factors but also the proper attachment to the extracellular matrix. A hallmark of neoplastic transformation is the loss of anchorage dependence which usually accompanies the loss of growth factor requirement. The Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase of human leukemias is shown here to abrogate only the anchorage, not the growth factor, requirement. Bcr-Abl-transformed cells grow in soft agar but do not proliferate in serum-...

  15. An asymptomatic 61-year-old man with BCR-ABL-positive bone marrow following autologous transplantation for multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Roper, Nitin; DeAngelo, Daniel; Kuo, Frank; Cin, Paola Dal; Ghobrial, Irene; Aster, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A 61-year-old man treated with an autologous transplant for multiple myeloma was incidentally found to have a high level of BCR-ABL fusion gene-positive cells in his bone marrow. We describe the clinical decision-making process that led us to initiate therapy with imatinib, despite the absence of any clinical evidence of chronic myelogenous leukemia or other BCR-ABL associated hematologic malignancy.

  16. Autophagy induction by Bcr-Abl-expressing cells facilitates their recovery from a targeted or nontargeted treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowley, Lisa C

    2012-01-31

    Although Imatinib has transformed the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), it is not curative due to the persistence of resistant cells that can regenerate the disease. We have examined how Bcr-Abl-expressing cells respond to two mechanistically different therapeutic agents, etoposide and Imatinib. We also examined Bcr-Abl expression at low and high levels as elevated expression has been associated with treatment failure. Cells expressing low levels of Bcr-Abl undergo apoptosis in response to the DNA-targeting agent (etoposide), whereas high-Bcr-Abl-expressing cells primarily induce autophagy. Autophagic populations engage a delayed nonapoptotic death; however, sufficient cells evade this and repopulate following the withdrawal of the drug. Non-Bcr-Abl-expressing 32D or Ba\\/F3 cells induce both apoptosis and autophagy in response to etoposide and can recover. Imatinib treatment induces both apoptosis and autophagy in all Bcr-Abl-expressing cells and populations rapidly recover. Inhibition of autophagy with ATG7 and Beclin1 siRNA significantly reduced the recovery of Imatinib-treated K562 cells, indicating the importance of autophagy for the recovery of treated cells. Combination regimes incorporating agents that disrupt Imatinib-induced autophagy would remain primarily targeted and may improve response to the treatment in CML.

  17. Cytoprotective effect of imatinib mesylate in non-BCR-ABL-expressing cells along with autophagosome formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtomo, Tadashi [Department of Biochemistry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Miyazawa, Keisuke, E-mail: miyazawa@tokyo-med.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Naito, Munekazu [Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Moriya, Shota [Department of Biochemistry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kuroda, Masahiko [Department of Molecular Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Masahiro [Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Tomoda, Akio [Department of Biochemistry, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with imatinib mesylate (IM) results in an increased viable cell number of non-BCR-ABL-expressing cell lines by inhibiting spontaneous apoptosis. Electron microscopy revealed an increase of autophagosomes in response to IM. IM attenuated the cytotoxic effect of cytosine arabinoside, as well as inhibiting cell death with serum-deprived culture. Cytoprotection with autophagosome formation by IM was observed in various leukemia and cancer cell lines as well as normal murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Complete inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of atg5 in the Tet-off atg5{sup -/-} MEF system attenuated the cytoprotective effect of IM, indicating that the effect is partially dependent on autophagy. However, cytoprotection by IM was not mediated through suppression of ROS production via mitophagy, ER stress via ribophagy, or proapoptotic function of ABL kinase. Although the target tyrosine kinase(s) of IM remains unclear, our data provide novel therapeutic possibilities of using IM for cytoprotection.

  18. Down-regulation of Thanatos-associated protein 11 by BCR-ABL promotes CML cell proliferation through c-Myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Satoki; Yokota, Daisuke; Tan, Lin; Nagata, Yasuyuki; Takemura, Tomonari; Hirano, Isao; Shigeno, Kazuyuki; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Fujisawa, Shinya; Ohnishi, Kazunori

    2012-03-01

    Bcr-Abl activates various signaling pathways in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. The proliferation of Bcr-Abl transformed cells is promoted by c-Myc through the activation of Akt, JAK2 and NF-κB. However, the mechanism by which c-Myc regulates CML cell proliferation is unclear. In our study, we investigated the role of Thanatos-associated protein 11 (THAP11), which inhibits c-Myc transcription, in CML cell lines and in hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from CML patients. The induction of THAP11 expression by Abl kinase inhibitors in CML cell lines and in CML-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells resulted in the suppression of c-Myc. In addition, over-expression of THAP11 inhibited CML cell proliferation. In colony forming cells derived from CML-aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)(hi) /CD34(+) cells, treatment with Abl kinase inhibitors and siRNA depletion of Bcr-Abl induced THAP11 expression and reduced c-Myc expression, resulting in inhibited colony formation. Moreover, overexpression of THAP11 significantly decreased the colony numbers, and also inhibited the expression of c-myc target genes such as Cyclin D1, ODC and induced the expression of p21(Cip1) . The depletion of THAP11 inhibited JAK2 or STAT5 inactivation-mediated c-Myc reduction in ALDH(hi) /CD34(+) CML cells. Thus, the induced THAP11 might be one of transcriptional regulators of c-Myc expression in CML cell. Therefore, the induction of THAP11 has a potential possibility as a target for the inhibition of CML cell proliferation. PMID:21400515

  19. A report case of mixed phenotype acute leukemia with BCR - ABL positive and literature review%BCR - ABL 融合基因阳性的急性混合细胞白血病1例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符爽; 张男; 陈芳; 刘璇; 胡延平; 张旻昱; 张继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical characteristics,biological features,clinical curative effect and out-come of mixed PhenotyPe acute leukemia(MPAL). Methods:Results of clinical data,cell morPhology,immunoPheno-tyPe,cytogenetics and molecular genetics of the MPAL Patient with BCR - ABL Positive were analyzed with literature reviews. Results:The clinical and hematological findings were comPatible with the diagnosis of MPAL. LymPhoid and myeloid markers were Positive on the leukemia cells. KaryotyPe analysis showed that the Patient had t(9;22)(q34;q11)translocation. Quantitative reverse transcriPtion PCR results showed that BCR - ABL(P210)exPressed 100% . And no deletion,Point or insert mutation was found among C - Kit(8,17 exon),FLT3 - ITD/ TKD,NPM1 and CEBPα. Conclusion:Primary MPAL with BCR - ABL Positive is rarely rePorted which have a Poor Prognosis. Some of them are cases of chronic myeloid leukemia blast crisis. BCR - ABL gene exPression is closely related to Patients' Prognosis.%目的:探讨 BCR - ABL 融合基因阳性表达的急性混合细胞白血病(MPAL)的临床特点、生物学特性、临床疗效及预后。方法:对1例 BCR - ABL 融合基因阳性的急性混合细胞白血病患者的临床资料、细胞形态学、免疫分型、细胞遗传学及分子生物学的检测结果进行综合分析。结果:患者的临床表现和实验室检测结果均符合急性混合细胞白血病诊断标准,免疫表型分析白血病细胞同时表达髓系和淋系抗原,染色体核型为46,XX,t(9;22)(q34;q11),荧光定量 PCR 检测结果示 BCR - ABL(P210)融合基因表达100%,白血病预后基因检测结果示患者 C - Kit(8、17 exon)、FLT3- ITD/ TKD、NPM1和 CEBPα基因均为野生型。结论:初发的 BCR - ABL 融合基因阳性的急性混合细胞白血病病例罕见,部分病例由慢性粒细胞白血病急变而来,预后差。BCR - ABL 基因阳性与患者预后密切相关。

  20. Loss of the xeroderma pigmentosum group B protein binding site impairs p210 BCR/ABL1 leukemogenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that p210 BCR/ABL1 interacts directly with the xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) protein, and that XPB is phosphorylated on tyrosine in cells that express p210 BCR/ABL1. In the current study, we have constructed a p210 BCR/ABL1 mutant that can no longer bind to XPB. The mutant has normal kinase activity and interacts with GRB2, but can no longer phosphorylate XPB. Loss of XPB binding is associated with reduced expression of c-MYC and reduced transforming potential in ex-vivo clonogenicity assays, but does not affect nucleotide excision repair in lymphoid or myeloid cells. When examined in a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model for chronic myelogenous leukemia, mice that express the mutant exhibit attenuated myeloproliferation and lymphoproliferation when compared with mice that express unmodified p210 BCR/ABL1. Thus, the mutant-transplanted mice show predominantly neutrophilic expansion and altered progenitor expansion, and have significantly extended lifespans. This was confirmed in a BMT model for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, wherein the majority of the mutant-transplanted mice remain disease free. These results suggest that the interaction between p210 BCR/ABL1 and XPB can contribute to disease progression by influencing the lineage commitment of lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

  1. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  2. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F)+ HEL Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Borghouts, Corina; Brendel, Christian; Moriggl, Richard; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells, Stat5 is

  3. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML and Jak2(V617F in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL

  4. Distinct GAB2 signaling pathways are essential for myeloid and lymphoid transformation and leukemogenesis by BCR-ABL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shengqing; Chan, Wayne W; Mohi, Golam; Rosenbaum, Joel; Sayad, Azin; Lu, Zhibin; Virtanen, Carl; Li, Shaoguang; Neel, Benjamin G; Van Etten, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) directed against BCR-ABL1, the product of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, have revolutionized treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance to TKIs is a significant clinical problem in CML, and TKI therapy is much less effective against Ph(+)B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). BCR-ABL1, via phosphorylated Tyr177, recruits the adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) as part of a GRB2/GAB2 complex. We showed previously that GAB2 is essential for BCR-ABL1-evoked myeloid transformation in vitro. Using a genetic strategy and mouse models of CML and B-ALL, we show here that GAB2 is essential for myeloid and lymphoid leukemogenesis by BCR-ABL1. In the mouse model, recipients of BCR-ABL1-transducedGab2(-/-)bone marrow failed to develop CML-like myeloproliferative neoplasia. Leukemogenesis was restored by expression of GAB2 but not by GAB2 mutants lacking binding sites for its effectors phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or SRC homology 2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2). GAB2 deficiency also attenuated BCR-ABL1-induced B-ALL, but only the SHP2 binding site was required. The SHP2 and PI3K binding sites were differentially required for signaling downstream of GAB2. Hence, GAB2 transmits critical transforming signals from Tyr177 to PI3K and SHP2 for CML pathogenesis, whereas only the GAB2-SHP2 pathway is essential for lymphoid leukemogenesis. Given that GAB2 is dispensable for normal hematopoiesis, GAB2 and its effectors PI3K and SHP2 represent promising targets for therapy in Ph(+)hematologic neoplasms. PMID:26773044

  5. Functionally deregulated AML1/RUNX1 cooperates with BCR-ABL to induce a blastic phase-like phenotype of chronic myelogenous leukemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Patients in the chronic phase (CP of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML have been treated successfully following the advent of ABL kinase inhibitors, but once they progress to the blast crisis (BC phase the prognosis becomes dismal. Although mechanisms underlying the progression are largely unknown, recent studies revealed the presence of alterations of key molecules for hematopoiesis, such as AML1/RUNX1. Our analysis of 13 BC cases revealed that three cases had AML1 mutations and the transcript levels of wild-type (wt. AML1 were elevated in BC compared with CP. Functional analysis of representative AML1 mutants using mouse hematopoietic cells revealed the possible contribution of some, but not all, mutants for the BC-phenotype. Specifically, K83Q and R139G, but neither R80C nor D171N mutants, conferred upon BCR-ABL-expressing cells a growth advantage over BCR-ABL-alone control cells in cytokine-free culture, and the cells thus grown killed mice upon intravenous transfer. Unexpectedly, wt.AML1 behaved similarly to K83Q and R139G mutants. In a bone marrow transplantation assay, K83Q and wt.AML1s induced the emergence of blast-like cells. The overall findings suggest the roles of altered functions of AML1 imposed by some, but not all, mutants, and the elevated expression of wt.AML1 for the disease progression of CML.

  6. GENE THERAPY USING RETROVIRAL VECTOR OF bcr-abl SPECIFIC MULTI-UNIT RIBOZYMES COULD INHIBIT CML CELL GROWTH AND INDUCE APOPTOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯琦; 孙凯; 赵永同; 张涛; 尚振川; 王莎; 王玮; 赵宁; 颜真; 韩苇; 张英起; 孙秉中

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro cleavage ability and effects on apoptosis and cell growth of the bcr-abl fusion gene specific multi-unit ribozymes. Methods: Three fusion point specific ribozymes were designed and the multi-unit ribozymes' in vitro transcription vector and retroviral vector were constructed. The in vitro cleavage ability was tested. The retroviral vector was transfected into K562 cell and the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle and cell structure were observed. Results: Multi-unit ribozymes had in vitro cleavage efficiency of 70.8%, which was more efficient than single-unit and double-unit ribozymes. Transfection of the retroviral vector of the ribozyme into K562 cells, induced inhibition of cell growth and apoptosis. The incorporation rate of DNA in ribozymes transfected K562 cells was greatly decreased along with time passed, with an inhibition rate of more than 50% after 96 h of transfection. Under FCM, 18.4% of the cells underwent apoptosis 72 h after transfection and more cells were blocked in G phase, with the ratio in S phase greatly decreased (41.9%). Under electron microscope, compaction of nuclear chromatin and apoptosis bodies were observed.Conclusion: Multi-unit ribozymes specific to bcr-abl fusion gene can be used to treat CML and to purge bone marrow for self-grafting.

  7. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (ARIAD)

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  8. SGX393 inhibits the CML mutant Bcr-Abl[superscript T315I] and preempts in vitro resistance when combined with nilotinib or dasatinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hare, Thomas; Eide, Christopher A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wong, Matthew J.; Buchanan, Sean; Holme, Kevin; Jessen, Katayoun A.; Tang, Crystal; Lewis, Hal A.; Romero, Richard D.; Burley, Stephen K.; Deininger, Michael W. (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (SGX)

    2010-01-12

    Imatinib inhibits Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia. The second-line inhibitors nilotinib and dasatinib are effective in patients with imatinib resistance resulting from Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations. Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, however, is resistant to all Abl kinase inhibitors in clinical use and is emerging as the most frequent cause of salvage therapy failure. SGX393 is a potent inhibitor of native and T315I-mutant Bcr-Abl kinase that blocks the growth of leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells expressing Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, with minimal toxicity against Bcr-Abl-negative cell lines or normal bone marrow. A screen for Bcr-Abl mutants emerging in the presence of SGX393 revealed concentration-dependent reduction in the number and range of mutations. Combining SGX393 with nilotinib or dasatinib preempted emergence of resistant subclones, including Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}. These findings suggest that combination of a T315I inhibitor with the current clinically used inhibitors may be useful for reduction of Bcr-Abl mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia.

  9. Inhibitory Effects of Omacetaxine on Leukemic Stem Cells and BCR-ABL-Induced Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yaoyu; Hu, Yiguo; Michaels, Shawnya; Segal, David; Brown, Dennis; Li, Shaoguang

    2009-01-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate (formerly homoharringtonine) is a molecule with a mechanism of action that is different from tyrosine kinase inhibitors and its activity in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) seems to be independent of BCR-ABL mutation status. Using BCR-ABL-expressing myelogenous and lymphoid cell lines and mouse models of CML and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) induced by wild type BCR-ABL or T315I mutant-BCR-ABL, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of omacetaxine on CML and...

  10. Curcumin synergistically augments bcr/abl phosphorethieate antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit growth of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-zhong ZHANG; Jian-hua XU; Xiu-wang HUANG; Li-xian WU; Yu SU; Yuan-zhong CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the growth inhibition effect of the combination of bcr/abl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (PS-ASODN) and curcumin (cur), and the possible mechanisms of cur on the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. Methods: The K562 cell line was used as a P210bcr/abl-positive cell model in vitro and was exposed to different concentrations of PS-ASODN (0-20 μmol/L), cur (0-20 μmol/L), or a combination of both. Growth inhibition and apoptosis of K562 cells were assessed by MTT assay and AO/EB fluorescent staining, respec-tively. The expression levels of P210bct/abl, NF-κB and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were assessed by Western blot. Results: Exposure to cur (5-20 μmol/L) and PS-ASODN (5-20 μmol/L) resulted in a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth.Growth inhibition was associated with the inhibition of the proliferation and in-duction of apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that the drugs synergisti-cally downregulated the level of P210bcr/abl and NF-κB. Cur downregulated Hsp90,whereas no synergism was observed when cur was combined with PS-ASODN.Conclusion: PS-ASODN and cur exhibited a synergistic inhibitory effect on the cell growth of K562. The synergistic growth inhibition was mediated through different mechanisms that involved the inhibition of P210bcr/abl.

  11. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian (ARIAD)

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.

  12. Interferon-α Revisited: Individualized Treatment Management Eased the Selective Pressure of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on BCR-ABL1 Mutations Resulting in a Molecular Response in High-Risk CML Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivkova, Vaclava; Rohon, Peter; Klamova, Hana; Cerna, Olga; Divoka, Martina; Curik, Nikola; Zach, Jan; Novak, Martin; Marinov, Iuri; Soverini, Simona; Faber, Edgar; Machova Polakova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation or ponatinib treatment are currently recommended strategies for management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) harboring the T315I mutation and compound or polyclonal mutations. However, in some individual cases, these treatment scenarios cannot be applied. We used an alternative treatment strategy with interferon-α (IFN-α) given solo, sequentially or together with TKI in a group of 6 cases of high risk CML patients, assuming that the TKI-independent mechanism of action may lead to mutant clone repression. IFN-α based individualized therapy decreases of T315I or compound mutations to undetectable levels as assessed by next-generation deep sequencing, which was associated with a molecular response in 4/6 patients. Based on the observed results from immune profiling, we assumed that the principal mechanism leading to the success of the treatment was the immune activation induced with dasatinib pre-treatment followed by restoration of immunological surveillance after application of IFN-α therapy. Moreover, we showed that sensitive measurement of mutated BCR-ABL1 transcript levels augments the safety of this individualized treatment strategy. PMID:27214026

  13. Interferon-α Revisited: Individualized Treatment Management Eased the Selective Pressure of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on BCR-ABL1 Mutations Resulting in a Molecular Response in High-Risk CML Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclava Polivkova

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation or ponatinib treatment are currently recommended strategies for management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML harboring the T315I mutation and compound or polyclonal mutations. However, in some individual cases, these treatment scenarios cannot be applied. We used an alternative treatment strategy with interferon-α (IFN-α given solo, sequentially or together with TKI in a group of 6 cases of high risk CML patients, assuming that the TKI-independent mechanism of action may lead to mutant clone repression. IFN-α based individualized therapy decreases of T315I or compound mutations to undetectable levels as assessed by next-generation deep sequencing, which was associated with a molecular response in 4/6 patients. Based on the observed results from immune profiling, we assumed that the principal mechanism leading to the success of the treatment was the immune activation induced with dasatinib pre-treatment followed by restoration of immunological surveillance after application of IFN-α therapy. Moreover, we showed that sensitive measurement of mutated BCR-ABL1 transcript levels augments the safety of this individualized treatment strategy.

  14. Interferon-α Revisited: Individualized Treatment Management Eased the Selective Pressure of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on BCR-ABL1 Mutations Resulting in a Molecular Response in High-Risk CML Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivkova, Vaclava; Rohon, Peter; Klamova, Hana; Cerna, Olga; Divoka, Martina; Curik, Nikola; Zach, Jan; Novak, Martin; Marinov, Iuri; Soverini, Simona; Faber, Edgar; Machova Polakova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation or ponatinib treatment are currently recommended strategies for management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) harboring the T315I mutation and compound or polyclonal mutations. However, in some individual cases, these treatment scenarios cannot be applied. We used an alternative treatment strategy with interferon-α (IFN-α) given solo, sequentially or together with TKI in a group of 6 cases of high risk CML patients, assuming that the TKI-independent mechanism of action may lead to mutant clone repression. IFN-α based individualized therapy decreases of T315I or compound mutations to undetectable levels as assessed by next-generation deep sequencing, which was associated with a molecular response in 4/6 patients. Based on the observed results from immune profiling, we assumed that the principal mechanism leading to the success of the treatment was the immune activation induced with dasatinib pre-treatment followed by restoration of immunological surveillance after application of IFN-α therapy. Moreover, we showed that sensitive measurement of mutated BCR-ABL1 transcript levels augments the safety of this individualized treatment strategy. PMID:27214026

  15. 用COLD-PCR方法提高BCR-ABL1激酶区耐药突变检测灵敏度%Application of COLD-PCR for improved detection of BCR-ABL1 kinase domain drug-resistant mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆; 刘红星; 孙慧; 王倩; 张之芬; 武焕玲; 李元堂; 陈永金; 田文君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the co-amplification using a low denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) method in improving the detection of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene kinase domain drug-resistant mutation.Methods Conventional nested PCR (CN-PCR) and COLD-PCR protocol were designed to amplify full-length of BCR-ABL1 kinase domain.PCR products were purified and then Sanger sequenced to detect BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutation (KDM).20 newly diagnosed CML patients and 32 Imatinib (IM) resistant patients were chosen and peripheral blood or bone marrow samples were collected.PCR products of the clinical specimens were purified and then cloned to evaluate the proportion of the KDM allele.Standard samples with different proportion of KDMs were prepared using T-A vectors with KDM and wild type BCR-ABL1 kinase domain sequence,and then CN-PCR,COLD-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to compare the detection sensitivity.Results In the 32 IM-resistant patients,23 were identified KDM-positive using CN-PCR and 28 KDM-positive using COLD-PCR.In the 20 newly diagnosed CML patients,none was identified KDM-positive using CN-PCR and 1 was identified carrying a lower proportion of KDM using COLD-PCR.For 16 different types of KDMs,COLD-PCR method could improve the detection sensitivity 4-12 times.Conclusion Detection sensitivity of BCR-ABL1 drug-resistant kinase domain mutation can be effectively improved by using COLD-PCR method and may contribute to early detection of resistance KDMs.%目的 探讨用低变性温度共扩增PCR(COLD-PCR)方法提高BCR-ABL1融合基因激酶区耐药突变检测灵敏度的可行性.方法 本研究为实验诊断研究.设计常规巢式PCR(CN-PCR)和COLD-PCR方案扩增BCR-ABL1激酶区全长,扩增产物纯化后用Sanger测序法检测激酶区突变(KDM).采集32例经伊马替尼(IM)治疗并出现耐药的慢性粒细胞性白血病(CML)患者和20例初诊CML患者外周血或骨髓标本,用上述2种方案检测标本中的KDM.

  16. High risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with bcr-abl and INK4A/ARF mutations retain susceptibility to alloreactive T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Faith M.; Campbell, Andrew; Emo, Kris Lambert; Jansson, Johan; Wang, Pin-Yi; Jordan, Craig T.; Mullen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    INK4A/ARF mutations are acquired in bcr/abl+ lymphoid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and bcr/abl+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Donor lymphocyte infusion and graft versus leukemia are generally ineffective in such ALL’s, while GVL is highly active against bcr/abl+ CML that does not have a lesion in the INK4A/ARF locus. The mechanisms for the ineffectiveness of GVL are not fully known and it is possible that intrinsic resistance of acute lymphoid leukemias to immune effec...

  17. Allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutation in BCR-ABL negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Ran Kim

    Full Text Available The discovery of a single point mutation in the JAK2 gene in patients with BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs has not only brought new insights and pathogenesis, but also has made the diagnosis of MPNs much easier. Although, to date, several mechanisms for the contribution of single JAK2V617F point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs have been suggested in multiple studies, but it is not clear how a unique mutation can cause the phenotypic diversity of MPNs. In this study, our results show that allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant frequently occurs and contributes to phenotypic diversity of BCR-ABL-negative MPNs. The proportion of JAK2 V617F mutant allele was significantly augmented in RNA levels as compared with genomic DNA differently by distinct MPNs subtypes. In detail, preferential expression of JAK2 mutant allele showed threefold increase from the cDNA compared with the genomic DNA from patients with essential thrombocythemia and twofold increase in polycythemia vera. In conclusion, allelic expression imbalance of JAK2 V617F mutant proposes another plausible mechanism for the contribution of single JAK2 point mutation to phenotypic diversity of MPNs.

  18. NK cells are dysfunctional in human chronic myelogenous leukemia before and on imatinib treatment and in BCR-ABL-positive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C I-U; Koschmieder, S; Kerstiens, L; Schemionek, M; Altvater, B; Pscherer, S; Gerss, J; Maecker, H T; Berdel, W E; Juergens, H; Lee, P P; Rossig, C

    2012-03-01

    Although BCR-ABL+ stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) resist elimination by targeted pharmacotherapy in most patients, immunological graft-versus-leukemia effects can cure the disease. Besides cytotoxic T cells, natural killer (NK) cells may have a role in immune control of CML. Here, we explored the functionality of NK cells in CML patients and in a transgenic inducible BCR-ABL mouse model. Compared with controls, NK-cell proportions among lymphocytes were decreased at diagnosis of CML and did not recover during imatinib-induced remission for 10-34 months. Functional experiments revealed limited in vitro expansion of NK cells from CML patients and a reduced degranulation response to K562 target cells both at diagnosis and during imatinib therapy. Consistent with the results in human CML, relative numbers of NK1.1+ NK cells were reduced following induction of BCR-ABL expression in mice, and the defects persisted after BCR-ABL reversion. Moreover, target-induced degranulation by expanded BCR-ABL+ NK cells was compromised. We conclude that CML is associated with quantitative and functional defects within the NK-cell compartment, which is reproduced by induced BCR-ABL expression in mice. Further work will aim at identifying the mechanisms of NK-cell deficiency in CML and at developing strategies to exploit NK cells for immunotherapy. PMID:21904381

  19. Additive antileukemia effects by GFI1B- and BCR-ABL-specific siRNA in advanced phase chronic myeloid leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldehoff, M; Zakrzewski, J L; Beelen, D W; Elmaagacli, A H

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated selective inhibition of the BCR-ABL (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia oncogene) tyrosine kinase by RNA interference in leukemic cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BCR-ABL small interfering RNA (siRNA) and GFI1B siRNA silencing on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells in myeloid blast crises. The GFI1B gene was mapped to chromosome 9 and is, therefore, located downstream of the BCR-ABL translocation in CML cells. Co-transfection of BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA dramatically decreased cell viability and significantly induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in K562 cells (P<0.0001) and primary advanced phase CML cells (P<0.0001) versus controls. Furthermore, combining of BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA significantly modified the expression of several relevant genes including Myc, MDR1, MRP1 and tyrosyl-phosphoproteins in primary CML cells. Our data suggest that silencing of both BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA is associated with an additive antileukemic effect against K562 cells and primary advanced CML cells, further validating these genes as attractive therapeutic targets. PMID:23788109

  20. Perturbation of energy metabolism by fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib in BCR-ABL-harboring leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Haruka; Kumazaki, Minami; Minami, Yosuke; Ito, Yuko; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kuranaga, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kohei; Yamada, Nami; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    In Ph-positive leukemia, imatinib brought marked clinical improvement; however, further improvement is needed to prevent relapse. Cancer cells efficiently use limited energy sources, and drugs targeting cellular metabolism improve the efficacy of therapy. In this study, we characterized the effects of novel anti-cancer fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib, focusing on cancer-specific energy metabolism in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. AIC-47 and imatinib in combination exhibited a significant synergic cytotoxicity. Imatinib inhibited only the phosphorylation of BCR-ABL; whereas AIC-47 suppressed the expression of the protein itself. Both AIC-47 and imatinib modulated the expression of pyruvate kinase M (PKM) isoforms from PKM2 to PKM1 through the down-regulation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1). PTBP1 functions as alternative splicing repressor of PKM1, resulting in expression of PKM2, which is an inactive form of pyruvate kinase for the last step of glycolysis. Although inactivation of BCR-ABL by imatinib strongly suppressed glycolysis, compensatory fatty-acid oxidation (FAO) activation supported glucose-independent cell survival by up-regulating CPT1C, the rate-limiting FAO enzyme. In contrast, AIC-47 inhibited the expression of CPT1C and directly fatty-acid metabolism. These findings were also observed in the CD34(+) fraction of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. These results suggest that AIC-47 in combination with imatinib strengthened the attack on cancer energy metabolism, in terms of both glycolysis and compensatory activation of FAO. PMID:26607903

  1. Expression of p89c-Mybex9b, an alternatively spliced form of c-Myb, is required for proliferation and survival of p210BCR/ABL-expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The c-Myb gene encodes the p75c-Myb isoform and less-abundant proteins generated by alternatively spliced transcripts. Among these, the best known is pc-Mybex9b, which contains 121 additional amino acids between exon 9 and 10, in a domain involved in protein–protein interactions and negative regulation. In hematopoietic cells, expression of pc-Mybex9b accounts for 10–15% of total c-Myb; these levels may be biologically relevant because modest changes in c-Myb expression affects proliferation and survival of leukemic cells and lineage choice and frequency of normal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we assessed biochemical activities of pc-Mybex9b and the consequences of perturbing its expression in K562 and primary chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor cells. Compared with p75c-Myb, pc-Mybex9b is more stable and more effective in transactivating Myb-regulated promoters. Ectopic expression of pc-Mybex9b enhanced proliferation and colony formation and reduced imatinib (IM) sensitivity of K562 cells; conversely, specific downregulation of pc-Mybex9b reduced proliferation and colony formation, enhanced IM sensitivity of K562 cells and markedly suppressed colony formation of CML CD34+ cells, without affecting the levels of p75c-Myb. Together, these studies indicate that expression of the low-abundance pc-Mybex9b isoform has an important role for the overall biological effects of c-Myb in BCR/ABL-transformed cells

  2. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 and Jak2(V617F){sup +} HEL Leukemia Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Axel [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany); Borghouts, Corina [Ganymed Pharmaceuticals AG, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Brendel, Christian [Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Moriggl, Richard [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR), Vienna 1090 (Austria); Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd, E-mail: Groner@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany)

    2015-03-19

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells

  3. Involvement of primary mesenchymal precursors and hematopoietic bone marrow cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients by BCR-ABL1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandia, Mauricio; Sayagués, José-María; Gutiérrez, María-Laura; Chillón, María-Laura; Aristizábal, José-Alejandro; Corrales, Alejandro; Castellanos, Marta; Melón, Alberto; Sánchez, María-Luz; Bárcena, Paloma; Matarraz, Sergio; González-González, María; Barrena, Susana; López, Antonio; Cañizo, María-Consuelo; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    For decades now, it is well established that chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell(HPC) disorder. However, it remains to be determined whether BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement occurs in a HPC or at an earlier stem cell and whether the degree of involvement of hematopoiesis by the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene relates to the response to therapy. Here, we have investigated by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) the distribution of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in FACS-sorted bone marrow (BM) populations of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and other hematopoietic cell populations from 18 newly diagnosed CML patients. Overall, our results showed systematic involvement at relatively high percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (97%615%), basophils (95%612%), eosinophils (90%68%), CD341 precursors cells (90%67%),monocytes (84%630%), nucleated red blood cells (87%624%), and mast cells (77%633%). By contrast, MPC(30%634%), B-cells (15%627%), T-lymphocytes (50%626%), and NK-cells (35%634%) were involved at lower percentages. In 8/18 CML patients, 2 tumor BCR-ABL11 subclones were detected by iFISH. Of note, all tumor cell subclones were systematically detected in CD341 cells, whereas MPC were only involved by the ancestral tumor cell subclone. In summary, here we confirm the presence at diagnosis of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene inMPC, CD341 precursors, and other different BM hematopoietic myeloid cell lineages from CML patients,including also in a significant fraction of cases, a smaller percentage of T, B, and NK lymphocytes.Interestingly, involvement of MPC was restricted to the ancestral BCR-ABL11 subclone. PMID:24779036

  4. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (BCR-ABL1 negative) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms: current diagnostic principles and upcoming updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, J T; Orazi, A

    2016-05-01

    Since the publication of the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2008, there has been a significant effort for clarification of unresolved questions, especially with the help of the rapidly developing field of molecular genetic studies, next-generation sequencing in particular. Numerous entities within the WHO categories of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and myelodysplastic (MDS)/MPNs have been extensively studied, with large published series attempting to characterize and better define their morphologic and molecular genetic features. This emerging genetic landscape maintains a robust correlation with the various disease entities recognized by the WHO classification scheme based on a careful integration of detailed clinical information, bone marrow and peripheral blood morphology, immunohistology, and genomics. This brief review summarizes the current guidelines as they apply to diagnosing both the classical BCR-ABL1 negative MPN (polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis) and the more common subtypes of MDS/MPN overlap syndromes. The more important recent molecular updates as well as the upcoming changes to the current WHO classification, expected to be published in late 2016, will also be briefly reviewed. PMID:27161873

  5. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Mauro, Michael J; Martinelli, Giovanni;

    2009-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP), o...

  6. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with T315I BCR-ABL Mutated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lan-Ping; Xu, Zheng-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Chen, Yao; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is currently the only curative treatment option for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutations. We report the outcome of SCT in 22 patients with T315I(+) CML, most (n = 16) from haploidentical family donors (HID-SCT). At the time the mutation was detected, 8 patients were in the chronic phase (CP), 7 in the accelerated phase (AP), and 7 in the blast phase (BP). At the time of SCT 7 were in the CP, 8 in the AP or returning to the CP post-AP (AP/AP-CPn), and 7 in the BP or returning to CP post-BP (BP/BP-CPn). The cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease was 9.1%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was observed in 60.0% of patients, including 25.0% who suffered from severe disease. Four patients died of transplant-related complications at a median interval from SCT of 16.3 months. The estimated 2-year leukemia-free survival rate was 80.0%, 72.9%, and 0% in CP, AP/AP-CPn and BP/BP-CPn groups at the time of SCT, respectively. After a median follow-up of 17.3 months from SCT, 14 patients are alive, including 13 in complete molecular response and 1 with an extramedullary relapse. In conclusion, HID-SCT is a potentially curative treatment for T315I + CML patients. For patients in CP/AP, immediate SCT might result in promising survival. The outcome of patients in BP with T315I(+) mutation remains very poor. PMID:26995693

  7. miR-29b suppresses CML cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via regulation of BCR/ABL1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally and are critical for many cellular pathways. Recent evidence has shown that aberrant miRNA expression profiles and unique miRNA signaling pathways are present in many cancers. Here, we demonstrate that miR-29b is markedly lower expressed in CML patient samples. Bioinformatics analysis reveals a conserved target site for miR-29b in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of ABL1. miR-29b significantly suppresses the activity of a luciferase reporter containing ABL1-3′UTR and this activity is not observed in cells transfected with mutated ABL1-3′UTR. Enforced expression of miR-29b in K562 cells inhibits cell growth and colony formation ability thereby inducing apoptosis through cleavage of procaspase 3 and PARP. Furthermore, K562 cells transfected with a siRNA targeting ABL1 show similar growth and apoptosis phenotypes as cells overexpression of miR-29b. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-29b may function as a tumor suppressor by targeting ABL1 and BCR/ABL1. - Highlights: ► miR-29b expression was downregulated in CML patients. ► ABL1 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-29b. ► Enforced expression of miR-29b inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. ► miR-29b might be a therapeutic target to CML

  8. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Yao Lin

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM, the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML.

  9. Location of CTP-OD1-HA and CTP-OD2-HA fusion peptide in K562 cells and its interaction with BCR-ABL protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng XIAO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the intracellular location of cytoplasmic transduction peptide-oligomerization domain 1-hemagglutinin (CTP-OD1-HA and cytoplasmic transduction peptide-oligomerization domain 2-hemagglutinin (CTP-OD2-HA fusion peptide and interaction with BCR-ABL protein in chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML K562 cells. Methods The prepared CTP-OD1-HA and CTP-OD2-HA fusion peptide were transduced into K562 cells, and the cytoplasmic transduction peptideoligomerization domain-hemagglutinin (CTP-OD-HA peptide was used as positive control, and cytoplasmic transduction peptidehemagglutinin (CTP-HA and PBS were used as negative control. The intracellular location of the fusion peptide was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The interactions between the fusion peptides and BCR-ABL protein were detected by His-pull down and CoIP test. Results Immunofluorescence assay showed that both fusion peptides CTP-OD1-HA and CTP-OD2-HA could penetrate the cell membrane, and they were mainly localized in cytoplasm. Western blotting also confirmed the existence of the two fusion peptides in the cytoplasm. His-pull down showed that CTP-OD1-HA and CTP-OD2-HA could directly bind BCRABL protein outside the cells, and CoIP experiment showed that both fusion peptides could interact with BCR-ABL protein and form complex in the K562 cells. The negative control CTP-HA fusion peptide and PBS showed no such effects. Conclusion CTPOD1-HA and CTP-OD2-HA fusion peptides can successfully target into CML K562 cells and locate in cytoplasm, and it interacts with BCR-ABL protein. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.11.006

  10. Low expression of miR-196b enhances the expression of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 oncogenes in chronic myeloid leukemogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs can function as tumor suppressors or oncogene promoters during tumor development. In this study, low levels of expression of miR-196b were detected in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Bisulfite genomic sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR were used to examine the methylation status of the CpG islands in the miR-196b promoter in K562 cells, patients with leukemia and healthy individuals. The CpG islands showed more methylation in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared with healthy individuals (P<0.05, which indicated that low expression of miR-196b may be associated with an increase in the methylation of CpG islands. The dual-luciferase reporter assay system demonstrated that BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 are the target genes of miR-196b, which was consistent with predictions from bioinformatics software analyses. Further examination of cell function indicated that miR-196b acts to reduce BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 protein levels, decrease cell proliferation rate and retard the cell cycle. A low level of expression of miR-196b can cause up-regulation of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 expression, which leads to the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. MiR-196b may represent an effective target for chronic myeloid leukemia therapy.

  11. In-silico identification of inhibitors against mutated BCR-ABL protein of chronic myeloid leukemia: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Himansu; Raj, Utkarsh; Gupta, Saurabh; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant and proliferative expression of the oncogene BCR-ABL in the bone marrow cells had been proven as the prime cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). It has been established that tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL protein is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CML. Imatinib is considered as a first-generation drug that can inhibit the enzymatic action by inhibiting the ATP binding with BCR-ABL protein. Later on, insensitivity of CML cells towards Imatinib has been observed may be due to mutation in tyrosine kinase domain of the ABL receptor. Subsequently, some other second-generation drugs have also been reported viz. Baustinib, Nilotinib, Dasatinib, Ponatinib, Bafetinib, etc., which can able to combat against mutated domain of ABL tyrosine kinase protein. By taking into account of bioavailability and resistance developed, there is an utmost need to find some more inhibitors for the mutated ABL tyrosine kinase protein. For virtual screening, a data-set has been generated by collecting the all available drug like natural compounds from ZINC and Drug Bank databases. Comparative docking analysis was also carried out on the active site of ABL tyrosine kinase receptor with reported reference inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulation of the best screened interacting complex was done for 50 ns to validate the stability of the system. These selected inhibitors were further validated and analyzed through pharmacokinetics properties and series of ADMET parameters by in silico methods. Considering the above said parameters proposed molecules are concluded as potential leads for drug designing pipeline against CML. PMID:26479578

  12. The diagnosis of BCR/ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative diseases (CMPD): a comprehensive approach based on morphology, cytogenetics, and molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferlach, Torsten; Bacher, Ulrike; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Recent years showed significant progress in the molecular characterization of the chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) which are classified according to the WHO classification of 2001 as polycythemia vera (PV), chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF), essential thrombocythemia (ET), CMPD/unclassifiable (CMPD-U), chronic neutrophilic leukemia, and chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)/hypereosinophilic syndrome, all to be delineated from BCR/ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). After 2001, the detection of the high frequency of the JAK2V617F mutation in PV, CIMF, and ET, and of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene in CEL further added important information in the diagnosis of CMPD. These findings also enhanced the importance of tyrosine kinase mutations in CMPD and paved the way to a more detailed classification and to an improved definition of prognosis using also novel minimal residual disease (MRD) markers. Simultaneously, the broadening of therapeutic strategies in the CMPD, e.g., due to reduced intensity conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in CML, in CEL, and in other ABL and PDGRFB rearrangements, increased the demands to diagnostics. Therefore, today, a multimodal diagnostic approach combining cytomorphology, cytogenetics, and individual molecular methods is needed in BCR/ABL-negative CMPD. A stringent diagnostic algorithm for characterization, choice of treatment, and monitoring of MRD will be proposed in this review. PMID:17938925

  13. Expression of p190 BCR-ABL fusion gene in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia Expressão do rearranjo gênico BCR-ABL com ponto de quebra na região menor do gene BCR em um paciente com leucemia mielóide crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. B. Carvalho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukemia cases have breakpoints in the minor cluster region (m-bcr of the BCR-ABL gene. We report on a patient with Ph-positive and m-bcr breakpoint at diagnosis. She was treated with hydroxyurea and interferon-alpha. Two years later, she developed a lymphoid blast crisis and died shortly after. We discuss herein the different forms of the BCR-ABL oncogene, its products, and the possible influence of them on the clinical outcome of patients with the disease.A leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC é uma doença mieloproliferativa clonal e caracteriza-se pela presença da translocação cromossômica entre os braços longos dos cromossomos 9 e 22, o denominado cromossomo Ph. Esta translocação determina a fusão dos genes BCR e ABL. Os diferentes pontos de quebra no gene BCR determinam a síntese de proteínas com diferentes pesos moleculares pelo gene BCR-ABL. Nós relatamos o caso de uma paciente portadora de LMC com ponto de quebra cromossômico na região menor do gene BCR. Foi tratada com hidroxiuréia e interferon alfa. Dois anos após o diagnóstico desenvolveu crise blástica linfóide e evoluiu rapidamente para o óbito. Nós discutimos nesta apresentação as diferentes formas do gene BCR-ABL e seus produtos e a possível influência dos mesmos na evolução clínica dos pacientes com a doença.

  14. Conventional and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of three-way complex BCR-ABL rearrangement in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguly Bani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal analysis was carried out in bone marrow sample of an 11-year-old girl suspected of myeloproliferative disorder. Conventional G-banding study detected a complex three-way translocation involving 7, 9 and 22, which has resulted in the formation of a variant Philadelphia chromosome causing rearrangement of abl and bcr genes in 87% cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH confirmed the fusion of bcr-abl oncogene. Thus the bone marrow karyotype was observed as 46,XX (13% / 46,XX,t(7;9;22(q11;q34;q11 (87%. Hyperdiploidy was present in two cells. In this study, both conventional cytogenetic and FISH diagnosis proved to be significant to identify the variant nature of the Philadelphia chromosome and hyperdiploid condition for introduction of a suitable treatment regimen and estimation of life expectancy of the young girl.

  15. miR-146b-5p within BCR-ABL1-Positive Microvesicles Promotes Leukemic Transformation of Hematopoietic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Li, Qing; Zhu, Xiaojian; Liu, Wei; Hu, Hui; Liu, Teng; Cheng, Fanjun; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Zou, Ping; Li, Qiubai; Chen, Zhichao; Guo, An-Yuan

    2016-05-15

    Evidence is accumulating that extracellular microvesicles (MV) facilitate progression and relapse in cancer. Using a model in which MVs derived from K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells transform normal hematopoietic transplants into leukemia-like cells, we defined the underlying mechanisms of this process through gene-expression studies and network analyses of transcription factors (TF) and miRNAs. We found that antitumor miRNAs were increased and several defense pathways were initiated during the early phases of oncogenic transformation. Later, oncomiRs and genes involved in cell cycle, DNA repair, and energy metabolism pathways were upregulated. Regulatory network analyses revealed that a number of TFs and miRNAs were responsible for the pathway dysregulation and the oncogenic transformation. In particular, we found that miR-146b-5p, which was highly expressed in MVs, coordinated the regulation of cancer-related genes to promote cell-transforming processes. Notably, treatment of recipient cells with MV derived from K562 cells expressing mimics of miR-146b-5p revealed that it accelerated the transformation process in large part by silencing the tumor-suppressor NUMB High levels of miR-146b-5p also enhanced reactive oxygen species levels and genome instability of recipient cells. Taken together, our finding showed how upregulation of oncogenic miRNAs in MVs promote hematopoetic cells to a leukemic state, as well as a demonstration for TF and miRNA coregulatory analysis in exploring the dysregulation of cancers and discovering key factors. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2901-11. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013199

  16. BCR-ABL1: Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complete Blood Count ; Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy ; Blood Smear ; WBC Differential At a Glance Test Sample The ... are often evaluated as part of the initial diagnosis, but the majority of follow-up monitoring is performed on blood samples. There is significant test variability among laboratories ...

  17. Standardization of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for detection of the JAK2V617F mutation in BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: A tertiary care centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathagat Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of JAK2V617F mutations has led to a significant development in our understanding of the pathogenesis and therapy of BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. However, not all cases of BCR-ABL1 negative MPNs carry JAK2V617F mutations. The present study was undertaken with an aim to standardize the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection of JAK2V617F mutations and to find the prevalence of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 mutations in MPNs in the Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect the JAK2V617F mutation. Standardization of the detection procedure was carried out using recommended guidelines to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of results. Forty-nine patients of BCR-ABL1 negative MPNs were included in the study. Results: The JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 63.3% patients of BCR-ABL1 negative MPNs. On classification of these BCR-ABL1 negative MPNs, JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 78.3% patients with polycythemia vera (PV, 62.5% patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET, and 44.4% patients with Primary myelofibrosis (PMF. Conclusion: Role of detection of JAK2 mutations in BCR-ABL1 negative MPN has begun to be described and can be used in the diagnosis of PV, ET, and PMF along with other criterias. In future, it may be suitable for treatment monitoring and prognostication.

  18. Increased acetylation of lysine 317/320 of p53 caused by BCR-ABL protects from cytoplasmic translocation of p53 and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusio-Kobialka, Monika; Wolanin, Kamila; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Sikora, Ewa; Skowronek, Krzysztof; McKenna, Sharon L.; Ghizzoni, Massimo; Dekker, Frank J.; Piwocka, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disorder of hematopoietic stem cells caused by the expression of BCR-ABL. Loss of p53 has not been implicated as important for the development of CML. Mutations in p53 protein are infrequent, however they correlate with the disease progression. The absence of p53

  19. Nilotinib (formerly AMN107), a highly selective BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is effective in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase following imatinib resistance and intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Giles, Francis; Gattermann, Norbert; Bhalla, Kapil; Alimena, Giuliana; Palandri, Francesca; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; O'Brien, Stephen G; Litzow, Mark; Bhatia, Ravi; Cervantes, Francisco; Haque, Ariful; Shou, Yaping; Resta, Debra J; Weitzman, Aaron; Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp

    2007-11-15

    Nilotinib, an orally bioavailable, selective Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is 30-fold more potent than imatinib in pre-clinical models, and overcomes most imatinib resistant BCR-ABL mutations. In this phase 2 open-label study, 400 mg nilotinib was administered orally twice daily to 280 patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) after imatinib failure or intolerance. Patients had at least 6 months of follow-up and were evaluated for hematologic and cytogenetic responses, as well as for safety and overall survival. At 6 months, the rate of major cytogenetic response (Ph < or = 35%) was 48%: complete (Ph = 0%) in 31%, and partial (Ph = 1%-35%) in 16%. The estimated survival at 12 months was 95%. Nilotinib was effective in patients harboring BCR-ABL mutations associated with imatinib resistance (except T315I), and also in patients with a resistance mechanism independent of BCR-ABL mutations. Adverse events were mostly mild to moderate, and there was minimal cross-intolerance with imatinib. Grades 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 29% of patients; pleural or pericardial effusions were observed in 1% (none were severe). In summary, nilotinib is highly active and safe in patients with CML-CP after imatinib failure or intolerance. This clinical trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as ID no. NCT00109707. PMID:17715389

  20. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsishin, M J; Ushenin, Iu V; Rachkov, A E; Solatkin, A P

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C). PMID:26759355

  1. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  2. Biodegradable charged polyester-based vectors (BCPVs) as an efficient non-viral transfection nanoagent for gene knockdown of the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengbin; Panwar, Nishtha; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Butian; Liu, Maixian; Toh, Huiting; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-04-28

    First-line therapy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has always involved the use of BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase inhibitors which is associated with an abnormal chromosome called Philadelphia chromosome. Although the overall survival rate has been improved by the current therapeutic regime, the presence of resistance has resulted in limited efficacy. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutic regime is proposed with the aim to knockdown the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA transfection rates have usually been limited due to the declining contact probability among polyplexes and the non-adherent nature of leukemic cells. Our work aims at addressing this limitation by using a biodegradable charged polyester-based vector (BCPV) as a nanocarrier for the delivery of BCR-ABL-specific siRNA to the suspension culture of a K562 CML cell line. BCR-ABL siRNAs were encapsulated in the BCPVs by electrostatic force. Cell internalization was facilitated by the BCPV and assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The regulation of the BCR-ABL level in K562 cells as a result of RNAi was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed that BCPV was able to form stable nanoplexes with siRNA molecules, even in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and successfully assisted in vitro siRNA transfection in the non-adherent K562 cells. As a consequence of downregulation of BCR-ABL, BCPV-siRNA nanoplexes inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. All results were compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine2000™, which served as a positive control. More importantly, this class of non-viral vector exhibits biodegradable features and negligible cytotoxicity, thus providing a versatile platform to deliver siRNA to non-adherent leukemia cells with high transfection efficiency by effectively overcoming extra- and intra-cellular barriers. Due to the excellent in vitro

  3. Biodegradable charged polyester-based vectors (BCPVs) as an efficient non-viral transfection nanoagent for gene knockdown of the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengbin; Panwar, Nishtha; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Butian; Liu, Maixian; Toh, Huiting; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-04-01

    First-line therapy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has always involved the use of BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase inhibitors which is associated with an abnormal chromosome called Philadelphia chromosome. Although the overall survival rate has been improved by the current therapeutic regime, the presence of resistance has resulted in limited efficacy. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutic regime is proposed with the aim to knockdown the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA transfection rates have usually been limited due to the declining contact probability among polyplexes and the non-adherent nature of leukemic cells. Our work aims at addressing this limitation by using a biodegradable charged polyester-based vector (BCPV) as a nanocarrier for the delivery of BCR-ABL-specific siRNA to the suspension culture of a K562 CML cell line. BCR-ABL siRNAs were encapsulated in the BCPVs by electrostatic force. Cell internalization was facilitated by the BCPV and assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The regulation of the BCR-ABL level in K562 cells as a result of RNAi was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed that BCPV was able to form stable nanoplexes with siRNA molecules, even in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and successfully assisted in vitro siRNA transfection in the non-adherent K562 cells. As a consequence of downregulation of BCR-ABL, BCPV-siRNA nanoplexes inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. All results were compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine2000™, which served as a positive control. More importantly, this class of non-viral vector exhibits biodegradable features and negligible cytotoxicity, thus providing a versatile platform to deliver siRNA to non-adherent leukemia cells with high transfection efficiency by effectively overcoming extra- and intra-cellular barriers. Due to the excellent in vitro

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a BODIPY conjugate of the BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor Tasigna® (Nilotinib): Evidence for transport of Tasigna® and its fluorescent derivative by ABC drug transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Suneet; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Walsh, Martin J.; Hartz, Anika M. S.; Fung, King Leung; Wu, Chung-pu; Gottesman, Michael M.; Bauer, Björn; Thomas, Craig J.; Suresh V Ambudkar

    2011-01-01

    Tasigna® (Nilotinib) is a recently approved BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor by the Food and Drug Administration, which is indicated for the treatment of drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The efflux of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters, which actively pump these drugs out of cells utilizing ATP as an energy source, has been linked to the development of drug resistance in CML patients. We report here synthesis and characterization of a fluoresc...

  5. Failure of CDKN2A/B (INK4A/B–ARF)-mediated tumor suppression and resistance to targeted therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia induced by BCR-ABL

    OpenAIRE

    Mullighan, Charles G.; Williams, Richard T.; Downing, James R.; Sherr, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Deletions of the CDKN2A/B tumor suppressor locus and of the IKAROS and PAX5 genes that promote B-lineage development occur frequently in lymphoid, but not myeloid leukemias initiated by the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase. Why is this the case, and how do these genetic lesions contribute to an aggressive disease that fails to durably respond to targeted kinase inhibitors?

  6. Kinasen der Src-Familie vermitteln die zytoplasmatische Retention von aktiviertem STAT5A in BCR-ABL positiven Leukämiezellen

    OpenAIRE

    Chatain, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 belongs to the family of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription and subdivides into STAT5A and STAT5B which share 96% sequence homology on the amino acid level. STAT5A is involved in hematopoiesis, immunity and mammary differentiation. The phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine is essential for the activation of STAT transcription factors leading to the dimerization of two STAT proteins through reciprocal SH2 domain-phosphotyrosine interactions. The p...

  7. Outcome of treatment in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and/or BCR-ABL--positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia-retrospective analysis of Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesień-Kuś, A; Robak, T; Pluta, A; Zwolińska, M; Wawrzyniak, E; Wierzbowska, A; Skotnicki, A; Jakubas, B; Hołowiecki, J; Nowak, K; Kuliczkowski, K; Mazur, G; Haus, O; Dmoszyńska, A; Adamczyk-Cioch, M; Jedrzejczak, W W; Paluszewska, M; Konopka, L; Pałynyczko, G

    2006-06-01

    Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) and/or BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have extremely poor prognoses. Most of these patients have additional, heterogenous karyotype abnormalities, the majority of which have uncertain clinical significance. In this study we analyzed the clinical characteristics, karyotype abnormalities, and outcome of 77 patients with Ph+ and/or BCR-ABL+ ALL registered in Poland in 1997-2004. In 31/55 patients with known karyotype, the sole t(9;22)(q34;q11) abnormality had been diagnosed; in one patient, variant translocation t(4;9;22)(q21q31.1;q34;q11), and additional abnormalities in 23 (42%) patients, had been diagnosed. The characteristics of the patients with Ph chromosome and additional abnormalities were not significantly different when compared with the entire analyzed group. Out of 77 patients, 54 (70%) achieved first complete remission (CR1) after one or more induction cycles. The overall survival (OS) probability of 2 years was 63, 43, and 17% for patients treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), autologous SCT, and chemotherapy, respectively (log rank p=0.002). Median OS from the time of alloSCT was significantly longer for patients transplanted in CR1 compared with alloSCT in CR >1 (p=0.032). There were no significant differences in CR rate, disease-free survival (DFS), and OS for patients with t(9;22) and additional abnormalities compared with the whole group. Only WBC >20 G/l at diagnosis adversely influenced OS probability (log rank p=0.0017). In conclusion, our data confirm poor outcome of Ph+ and/or BCR-ABL+ ALL. Only patients who received alloSCT in CR1 had longer DFS and OS. We have shown that additional karyotype abnormalities did not influence the clinical characteristics of the patients; however, their influence on treatment results needs to be further assessed. PMID:16523310

  8. MPT0B169, a New Antitubulin Agent, Inhibits Bcr-Abl Expression and Induces Mitochondrion-Mediated Apoptosis in Nonresistant and Imatinib-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuit-Mun Wong

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that is caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Clinical resistance to the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib is a critical problem in treating CML. This study investigated the antitumor effect and mechanism of MPT0B169, a new antitubulin agent, in K562 CML cells and their derived imatinib-resistant cells, IMR2 and IMR3. IMR2 and IMR3 cells showed complete resistance to imatinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Resistance involved ERK1/2 overactivation and MDR1 overexpression. MPT0B169 inhibited the growth of K562, IMR2, and IMR3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MPT0B169 substantially inhibited the mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl, followed by its downstream pathways including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in these cells. MPT0B169 treatment resulted in a decrease in the polymer form of tubulin according to Western blot analysis. It triggered cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase before apoptosis, which was related to the upregulation of the mitotic marker MPM2 and the cyclin B1 level, and a change in the phosphorylation of Cdk1. MPT0B169 induced apoptosis in nonresistant and imatinib-resistant cells via a mitochondrion-mediated caspase pathway. Further study showed that the agent led to a decrease in the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 and an increase in the apoptotic protein Bax. Taken together, our results suggest that MPT0B169 might be a promising agent for overcoming imatinib resistance in CML cells.

  9. Pharmacophore Modeling of Nilotinib as an Inhibitor of ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporters and BCR-ABL Kinase Using a Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T.; Suresh V Ambudkar

    2014-01-01

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with mi...

  10. BCR/ABL-negative primitive progenitors suitable for transplantation can be selected from the marrow of most early-chronic phase but not accelerated-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Verfaillie, Catherine; R Bhatia; Miller, W.; F. Mortari; Van Roy, V.; Burger, S.; Mccullough, J; Stieglbauer, K; Dewald, G; Heimfeld, S; Miller, J. S.; McGlave, P B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported that selection of marrow cells on the basis of the CD34+HLA-DR- phenotype (34+DR-) may result in the recovery of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)- and BCR/ABL-negative long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) in selected patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We now present data on 27 early chronic-phase ([ECP] studied within 1 year after diagnosis) and 23 advanced-phase ([AP] late chronic phase, ie, studied >1 year from diagnosis, or accelerated phase) C...

  11. A combination of STI571 and BCR-ABL1 siRNA with overexpressed p15INK4B induced enhanced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, D.Y.; Liu, L.; Hao, M.W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, R.A.; Liang, Y.M. [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-10-14

    p15INK4B, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, has been recognized as a tumor suppressor. Loss of or methylation of the p15INK4B gene in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells enhances myeloid progenitor formation from common myeloid progenitors. Therefore, we examined the effects of overexpressed p15INK4B on proliferation and apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of p15INK4B inhibited the growth of K562 cells by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B also induced apoptosis of K562 cells by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2 expression. Overexpression of p15INK4B together with STI571 (imatinib) or BCR-ABL1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) also enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of K562 cells. The enhanced effect was also mediated by reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 and regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. In conclusion, our study may provide new insights into the role of p15INK4B in CML and a potential therapeutic target for overcoming tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in CML.

  12. Nilotinib (formerly AMN107), a highly selective BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active in patients with imatinib-resistant or -intolerant accelerated-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Coutre, Philipp; Ottmann, Oliver G; Giles, Francis; Kim, Dong-Wook; Cortes, Jorge; Gattermann, Norbert; Apperley, Jane F; Larson, Richard A; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; O'Brien, Stephen G; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Hochhaus, Andreas; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Saglio, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Marco; Kwong, Yok-Lam; Baccarani, Michele; Hughes, Timothy; Martinelli, Giovanni; Radich, Jerald P; Zheng, Ming; Shou, Yaping; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2008-02-15

    Patients with imatinib-resistant or -intolerant accelerated-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-AP) have very limited therapeutic options. Nilotinib is a highly selective BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This phase 2 trial was designed to characterize the efficacy and safety of nilotinib (400 mg twice daily) in this patient population with hematologic response (HR) as primary efficacy endpoint. A total of 119 patients were enrolled and had a median duration of treatment of 202 days (range, 2-611 days). An HR was observed in 56 patients (47%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 38%-56%). Major cytogenetic response (MCyR) was observed in 35 patients (29%; 95% CI, 21%-39%). The median duration of HR has not been reached. Overall survival rate among the 119 patients after 12 months of follow-up was 79% (95% CI, 70%-87%). Nonhematologic adverse events were mostly mild to moderate. Severe peripheral edema and pleural effusions were not observed. The most common grade 3 or higher hematologic adverse events were thrombocytopenia (35%) and neutropenia (21%). Grade 3 or higher bilirubin and lipase elevations occurred in 9% and 18% of patients, respectively, resulting in treatment discontinuation in one patient. In conclusion, nilotinib is an effective and well-tolerated treatment in imatinib-resistant and -intolerant CML-AP. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00384228. PMID:18048643

  13. Estandarización de la TR-PCR para la detección de las fusiones génicas BCR-ABL en pacientes con leucemia Mieloide Crónica (LMC y Linfoide Aguda (LLA provenientes de HUSVP y Clíncia León XIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzálo Vásquez Palacio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La translocación recíproca t(9:22(q34;q11 involucra el proto-oncogen ABL y el gen BCR, originando un gen de fusión BCR-ABL, que codifica una proteína con elevada actividad tirosina quinasa, implicada en la leucemogénesis.

  14. Estandarización de la TR-PCR para la detección de las fusiones génicas BCR-ABL en pacientes con leucemia Mieloide Crónica (LMC) y Linfoide Aguda (LLA) provenientes de HUSVP y Clíncia León XIII

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzálo Vásquez Palacio; José Domingo Torres Hernández; Francisco Cuéllar Ambrossi; Carlos Enrique Muskus; Carlos Alberto Paya

    2006-01-01

    La translocación recíproca t(9:22)(q34;q11) involucra el proto-oncogen ABL y el gen BCR, originando un gen de fusión BCR-ABL, que codifica una proteína con elevada actividad tirosina quinasa, implicada en la leucemogénesis.

  15. A sensitive transcriptome analysis method that can detect unknown transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Ryutaro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Saito, Toshiyuki; Tsutsumi, Yoko; Fujimori, Akira; Sato, Shinji; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an AFLP-based gene expression profiling method called ‘high coverage expression profiling’ (HiCEP) analysis. By making improvements to the selective PCR technique we have reduced the rate of false positive peaks to ∼4% and consequently the number of peaks, including overlapping peaks, has been markedly decreased. As a result we can determine the relationship between peaks and original transcripts unequivocally. This will make it practical to prepare a database of all peaks, allowing gene assignment without having to isolate individual peaks. This precise selection also enables us to easily clone peaks of interest and predict the corresponding gene for each peak in some species. The procedure is highly reproducible and sensitive enough to detect even a 1.2-fold difference in gene expression. Most importantly, the low false positive rate enables us to analyze gene expression with wide coverage by means of four instead of six nucleotide recognition site restriction enzymes for fingerprinting mRNAs. Therefore, the method detects 70–80% of all transcripts, including non-coding transcripts, unknown and known genes. Moreover, the method requires no sequence information and so is applicable even to eukaryotes for which there is no genome information available. PMID:12907746

  16. Relationship between JAK2 gene V617F mutation and clinical characteristics in patients with BCR-ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms%BCR-ABL阴性的骨髓增殖性肿瘤JAK2基因V617F突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕香; 魏蓉

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨BCR-ABL阴性的骨髓增殖性肿瘤(myeloproliferative neoplasms,MPN)患者蛋白质酪氨酸激酶基因(JAK2)V617F突变的发生率及其与患者临床特征的关系.方法:抽提65例MPN患者骨髓细胞DNA(其中真性红细胞增多症28例,特发性血小板增多症30例,特发性骨髓纤维化7例),应用等位基因特异性PCR技术(allele specific PCR,AS-PCR)分析JAK2基因V617F突变的发生率,并分析此突变与外周血细胞计数及血栓发生率等临床特征的关系.结果:65例MPN患者的V617F突变阳性率为64.62% (42/65).其中真性红细胞增多症患者的阳性率为75.00% (21/28),其白细胞及血小板计数较非突变者均显著增高(P<0.001);特发性血小板增多症患者该突变的阳性率为56.67% (17/30),其白细胞计数和血红蛋白水平均较非突变者显著增高(P<0.05);而7例特发性骨髓纤维化患者中4例被检出此突变阳性,其白细胞、血小板计数及血红蛋白水平与非突变者比较,差异则无统计学意义.同时,携带V617F突变的MPN患者血栓发生率明显高于非突变者(P<0.05).结论:JAK2基因V617F突变是我国BCR-ABL阴性MPN患者主要的分子遗传标志,可作为临床诊断的指标之一,而此突变对临床特征有一定影响.%Objective:To investigate the relationship between V617F mutation in JAK2 gene and clinical characteristics in patients with BCR-ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN).Methods:Sixty-five patients with MPN,including 28 subjects with polycythemia vera (PV),30 subjects with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 7 subjects with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) were enrolled in this study.Bone marrow cell DNA was extracted from MPN patients,and V617F mutation in JAK2 gene was identified by allele specific PCR (AS-PCR).The correlation between V617F mutation and clinical characteristics such as peripheral blood cell count and incidence of thrombosis were analyzed.Results:Of the 65 patients

  17. Alk Is a Transcriptional Target of LMO4 and ERα that Promotes Cocaine Sensitization and Reward

    OpenAIRE

    Lasek, Amy W.; Gesch, Julie; Giorgetti, Francesco; Kharazia, Viktor; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the mouse LIM-domain only 4 (Lmo4) gene, which encodes a protein containing two zinc-finger LIM domains that interact with various DNA-binding transcription factors, attenuates behavioral sensitivity to repeated cocaine administration. Here we show that transcription of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is repressed by LMO4 in the striatum and that Alk promotes the development of cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference, a measure of cocaine reward. Sin...

  18. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivities of virus functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription; unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II). (U.K.)

  19. Transcriptional regulation of adipocyte hormone-sensitive lipase by glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe; Lucas, Stéphanie; Mairal, Aline; Sengenes, Coralie; Lafontan, Max; Vaulont, Sophie; Casado, Marta; Langin, Dominique

    2002-02-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue, thus determining the supply of energy substrates in the body. HSL mRNA was positively regulated by glucose in human adipocytes. Pools of stably transfected 3T3-F442A adipocytes were generated with human adipocyte HSL promoter fragments from -2,400/+38 to -31/+38 bp linked to the luciferase gene. A glucose-responsive region was mapped within the proximal promoter (-137 bp). Electromobility shift assays showed that upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF2 and Sp1 and Sp3 bound to a consensus E-box and two GC-boxes in the -137-bp region. Cotransfection of the -137/+38 construct with USF1 and USF2 expression vectors produced enhanced luciferase activity. Moreover, HSL mRNA levels were decreased in USF1- and USF2-deficient mice. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSL promoter showed that the GC-boxes, although contributing to basal promoter activity, were dispensable for glucose responsiveness. Mutation of the E-box led to decreased promoter activity and suppression of the glucose response. Analogs and metabolites were used to determine the signal metabolite of the glucose response. The signal is generated downstream of glucose-6-phosphate in the glycolytic pathway before the triose phosphate step. PMID:11812735

  20. Effect of protein kinase C inhibitor (PKCI) on radiation sensitivity and c-fos transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a multisystem disease characterized by extreme radiosensitivity. The recent identification of the gene mutated in AT, ATM, and the demonstration that it encodes a homologous domain of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), the catalytic subunit of an enzyme involved in transmitting signals from the cell surface to the nucleus, provide support for a role of this gene in signal transduction. Although ionizing radiation was known to induce c-fos transcription, nothing is known about how ATM or PKCI mediated signal transduction pathway modulates the c-fos gene transcription and gene expression. Here we have studied the effect of PKCI on radiation sensitivity and c-fos transcription in normal and AT cells. Normal (LM217) and AT (AT58IVA) cells were transfected with PKCI expression plasmid and the overexpression and integration of PKCI was evaluated by northern blotting and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. 5 Gy of radiation was exposed to LM and AT cells transfected with PKCI expression plasmid and cells were harvested 48 hours after radiation and investigated apoptosis with TUNEL method. The c-fos transcription activity was studied by performing CAT assay of reporter gene after transfection of c-fos CAT plasmid into AT and LM cells. Our results demonstrate for the first time a role of PKCI on. the radiation sensitivity and c-fos expression in LM and AT cells. PKCI increased radiation induced apoptosis in LM cells but reduced apoptosis in AT cells. The basal c-fos transcription activity is 70 times lower in AT cells than that in LM cells. The c-fos transcription activity was repressed by overexpression of PKCI in LM cells but not in AT cells. After induction of c-fos by Ras protein, overexpression of PKCI repressed c-fos transcription in LM cells but not in AT cells. Overexpression of PKCI increased radiation sensitivity and repressed c-fos transcription in LM cells but not in AT cells. The results may be a

  1. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples. PMID

  2. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino Acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  3. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Elf

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  4. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-06-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid. We

  5. Delaying Reverse Transcription Does Not Increase Sensitivity of HIV-1 to Human TRIM5α

    OpenAIRE

    Battivelli, Emilie; Lecossier, Denise; Clavel, François; Hance, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because uncoating of the capsid is linked to reverse transcription, modifications that delay this process lead to the persistence in the cytoplasm of capsids susceptible to recognition by the human restriction factor TRIM5α (hTRIM5α). It is unknown, however, if increasing the time available for capsid-hTRIM5α interactions would actually render viruses more sensitive to hTRIM5α. Results Viral sensitivity to hTRIM5α was evaluated by comparing their replication in human U373-X4 cells ...

  6. Recent advances in the bcr-abl negative chronic myeloproliferative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The chronic myeloproliferative disorders are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders of unknown etiology. In one of these (chronic myeloid leukemia, there is an associated pathognomonic chromosomal abnormality known as the Philadelphia chromosome. This leads to constitutive tyrosine kinase activity which is responsible for the disease and is used as a target for effective therapy. This review concentrates on the search in the other conditions (polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic mylofibrosis for a similar biological marker with therapeutic potential. There is no obvious chromosomal marker in these conditions and yet evidence of clonality can be obtained in females by the use of X-inactivation patterns. PRV-1mRNA over expression, raised vitamin B12 levels and raised neutrophil alkaline phosphatase scores are evidence that cells in these conditions have received excessive signals for proliferation, maturation and reduced apoptosis. The ability of erythroid colonies to grow spontaneously without added external erythropoietin in some cases, provided a useful marker and a clue to this abnormal signaling. In the past year several important discoveries have been made which go a long way in elucidating the involved pathways. The recently discovered JAK2 V617F mutation which occurs in the majority of cases of polycythemia vera and in about half of the cases with the two other conditions, enables constitutive tyrosine kinase activity without the need for ligand binding to hematopoietic receptors. This mutation has become the biological marker for these conditions and has spurred the development of a specific therapy to neutralize its effects. The realization that inherited mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor (c-Mpl can cause a phenotype of thrombocytosis such as in Mpl Baltimore (K39N and in a Japanese family with S505A, has prompted the search for acquired mutations in this receptor in chronic myeloproliferative disease. Recently, two mutations have been found; W515L and W515K. These mutations have been evident in patients with essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis but not in polycythemia vera. They presumably act by causing constitutional, activating conformational changes in the receptor. The discovery of JAK2 and Mpl mutations is leading to rapid advancements in understanding the pathophysiology and in the treatment of these diseases.

  7. Coexistance of JAK2V617F mutation and BCR/ABL translocation in one patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Albayrak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,The myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs constitute a subcategory of chronic myeloid disorders and include chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, essential thrombocytemia (ET, polycythemia vera (PV and myelofibrosis (MF. In 1960, the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph became a cornerstone in CML treatment and led to the development of moleculary targeted therapy. Recently, an acquired mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 gene has been discovered in nearly all patents with PV and approximately half of the patients with primary MF and ET. Subsequently, the mutation has been demonstrated in atypical MPDs (chronic neutrophilic leukemia, unclassified, de novo myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.1 It has been hoped that targeted inhibition of JAK2V617F should achieve similar disease control as thyrosine kinases has produced in CML.

  8. Molecular approach to diagnose BCR/ABL negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Maccarini Barcelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms arise from clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. According to the World Health Organization myeloproliferative neoplasms are classified as: chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, primary myelofibrosis, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, mast cell disease, and unclassifiable myeloproliferative neoplasms. In the revised 2008 WHO diagnostic criteria for myeloproliferative neoplasms, mutation screening for JAK2V617F is considered a major criterion for polycythemia vera diagnosis and also for essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, the presence of this mutation represents a clonal marker. There are currently two hypotheses explaining the role of the JAK2V617F mutation in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. According to these theories, the mutation plays either a primary or secondary role in disease development. The discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation has been essential in understanding the genetic basis of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, providing some idea on how a single mutation can result in three different chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm phenotypes. But there are still some issues to be clarified. Thus, studies are still needed to determine specific molecular markers for each subtype of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm.

  9. Sphingomyelin synthase 1 activity is regulated by the BCR-ABL oncogene[S

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Tara Ann; Subathra, Marimuthu; signorelli, Paola; Choi, Young; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yong; Villani, Maristella; Bhalla, Kapil; Zhou, Daohong; Luberto, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) produces sphingomyelin while consuming ceramide (a negative regulator of cell proliferation) and forming diacylglycerol (DAG) (a mitogenic factor). Therefore, enhanced SMS activity could favor cell proliferation. To examine if dysregulated SMS contributes to leukemogenesis, we measured SMS activity in several leukemic cell lines and found that it is highly elevated in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. The increased SMS in K562 cells was caused by the ...

  10. BCR-ABL negative myeloproliferative neoplasia: a review of involved molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Suzanne M; Schouten, Harry C; van Marion, Ariënne M W

    2015-02-01

    The clonal bone marrow stem cell disorders essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) belong to the group of Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasia (Ph- MPN). In 2005 the JAK2(V617F) mutation was discovered which has generated more insight in the pathogenetic mechanism of the MPNs. More mutations have been detected in MPN patients since. However, the underlying cause of MPN has not been discovered so far. The mechanism of increased angiogenesis in MPNs and the development of fibrosis in the bone marrow in PMF patients and in some ET and PV patients is still not known. This review will focus on the most important molecular pathogenetic mechanisms in MPN patients. PMID:25196073

  11. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    , still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic...

  12. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    , still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic...... myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011...

  13. Ethanol sensitivity: a central role for CREB transcription regulation in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswal Shyam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowered sensitivity to the effects of ethanol increases the risk of developing alcoholism. Inbred mouse strains have been useful for the study of the genetic basis of various drug addiction-related phenotypes. Inbred Long-Sleep (ILS and Inbred Short-Sleep (ISS mice differentially express a number of genes thought to be implicated in sensitivity to the effects of ethanol. Concomitantly, there is evidence for a mediating role of cAMP/PKA/CREB signalling in aspects of alcoholism modelled in animals. In this report, the extent to which CREB signalling impacts the differential expression of genes in ILS and ISS mouse cerebella is examined. Results A training dataset for Machine Learning (ML and Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA was generated from promoter region sequences of a set of genes known to be targets of CREB transcription regulation and a set of genes whose transcription regulations are potentially CREB-independent. For each promoter sequence, a vector of size 132, with elements characterizing nucleotide composition features was generated. Genes whose expressions have been previously determined to be increased in ILS or ISS cerebella were identified, and their CREB regulation status predicted using the ML scheme C4.5. The C4.5 learning scheme was used because, of four ML schemes evaluated, it had the lowest predicted error rate. On an independent evaluation set of 21 genes of known CREB regulation status, C4.5 correctly classified 81% of instances with F-measures of 0.87 and 0.67 respectively for the CREB-regulated and CREB-independent classes. Additionally, six out of eight genes previously determined by two independent microarray platforms to be up-regulated in the ILS or ISS cerebellum were predicted by C4.5 to be transcriptionally regulated by CREB. Furthermore, 64% and 52% of a cross-section of other up-regulated cerebellar genes in ILS and ISS mice, respectively, were deemed to be CREB-regulated. Conclusion These

  14. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of PRRSV by a Reverse Transcription-Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Ye-bing Liu; Lei Chen; Jian-huan Wang; Yi-bao Ning

    2011-01-01

    A real-time monitoring reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for the sensitive and specific detection of prototypic,prevalent North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)strains.As a higher sensitivity and specificity method than reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),the RT-LAMP method only used a turbidimeter,exhibited a detection limit corresponding to a 10-4 dilution of template RNA extracted from 250 μL of 105 of the 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of PRRSV containing cells,and no cross-reactivity was observed with other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 2,swine influenza virus,porcine rotavirus and classical swine fever virus.From forty-two field samples,33 samples in the RT-LAMP assay was detected positive,whereas three of which were not detected by RT-PCR.Furthermore,in 33 strains of PRRSV,an identical detection rate was observed with the RT-LAMP assay to what were isolated using porcine alveolar macrophages.These findings demonstrated that the RT-LAMP assay has potential clinical applications for the detection of highly pathogenic PRRSV isolates,especially in developing countries.

  15. Allergic skin inflammation induced by chemical sensitizers is controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ali, Zeina; Gerbeix, Cédric; Hemon, Patrice; Esser, Philipp R; Martin, Stefan F; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is induced by low-molecular weight electrophilic chemicals and metal ions. Chemical contact sensitizers trigger reactive oxygen species production and provoke electrophilic stress, leading to the accumulation of the transcription factor nuclear-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in innate immune cell types. The objective of this work was to identify the role of Nrf2 in the regulation of ACD. We used the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the mouse ear swelling test (MEST) to study the role of Nrf2 in both the sensitization and elicitation phase in nrf2 knockout (nrf2(-/-)) and wild-type (nrf2(+/+)) mice. Five chemicals were used: two compounds known to react with cysteine residues, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and cinnamaldehyde (CinA); one sensitizer known to exhibit mixed reactivity to cysteine and lysine residues, isophorone diisocyanate; and one reacting specifically with lysine residues, trimellitic anhydride and croton oil, a well-known irritant. In the MEST assay, DNCB (1 and 2%) induced a significant increase in ear thickness in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice, suggesting a role for Nrf2 in the control of the inflammatory process. When DNCB was used at 0.25 and 0.5% or when mice were treated with CinA, inflammation was found only in nrf2(-/-) mice. In the LLNA, all chemical sensitizers induced an increase of lymphocyte proliferation in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice for the same chemical concentration. These results reveal an important role for Nrf2 in controlling ACD and lymphocyte proliferation in response to sensitizers. PMID:23564646

  16. A DNA sequence directed mutual transcription regulation of HSF1 and NFIX involves novel heat sensitive protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umashankar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though the Nuclear factor 1 family member NFIX has been strongly implicated in PDGFB-induced glioblastoma, its molecular mechanisms of action remain unknown. HSF1, a heat shock-related transcription factor is also a powerful modifier of carcinogenesis by several factors, including PDGFB. How HSF1 transcription is controlled has remained largely elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining microarray expression profiling and a yeast-two-hybrid screen, we identified that NFIX and its interactions with CGGBP1 and HMGN1 regulate expression of HSF1. We found that CGGBP1 organizes a bifunctional transcriptional complex at small CGG repeats in the HSF1 promoter. Under chronic heat shock, NFIX uses CGGBP1 and HMGN1 to get recruited to this promoter and in turn affects their binding to DNA. Results show that the interactions of NFIX with CGGBP1 and HMGN1 in the soluble fraction are heat shock sensitive due to preferential localization of CGGBP1 to heterochromatin after heat shock. HSF1 in turn was found to bind to the NFIX promoter and repress its expression in a heat shock sensitive manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: NFIX and HSF1 exert a mutual transcriptional repressive effect on each other which requires CGG repeat in HSF1 promoter and HSF1 binding site in NFIX promoter. We unravel a unique mechanism of heat shock sensitive DNA sequence-directed reciprocal transcriptional regulation between NFIX and HSF1. Our findings provide new insights into mechanisms of transcription regulation under stress.

  17. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression

    OpenAIRE

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement...

  18. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  19. A novel first exon directs hormone-sensitive transcription of the pig prolactin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) to confer a wide range of biological functions, including its established role during lactation.We have identified a novel first exon of the porcine PRLR that gives rise to three different mRNA transcripts. Transcri...

  20. Regulation of viral transcription by the matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus probed by monoclonal antibodies and temperature-sensitive mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, R; Grinnell, B.W.; Snyder, R M; Wagner, R R

    1985-01-01

    The ability of the matrix (M) protein of wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to regulate viral transcription was studied with monoclonal antibodies and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants in complementation group III, the M proteins of which are restricted in transcription inhibition. The marked inhibition of transcription by VSV ribonucleoprotein (RNP) cores complexed with M protein (RNP/M) was reversed by antibody to epitope 1. Antibodies to epitopes 2 and 3 not only failed to reverse...

  1. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  2. Differential modulation of photosynthesis, signaling, and transcriptional regulation between tolerant and sensitive tomato genotypes under cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    Full Text Available The wild species Solanum habrochaites is more cold tolerant than the cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum. To explore the mechanisms underlying cold tolerance of S. habrochaites, seedlings of S. habrochaites LA1777 introgression lines (ILs, as well as the two parents, were evaluated under low temperature (4°C. The IL LA3969 and its donor parent LA1777 were found to be more cold tolerant than the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum LA4024. The differences in physiology and global gene expression between cold-tolerant (LA1777 and LA3969 and -sensitive (LA4024 genotypes under cold stress were further investigated. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified 1613, 1456, and 1523 cold-responsive genes in LA1777, LA3969, and LA4024, respectively. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis revealed that more GO biological process terms were significantly enriched among the up-regulated genes in the two tolerant genotypes, whereas more biological processes were significantly repressed by cold stress in the sensitive one. A total of 92 genes with significant differential expression between tolerant and sensitive genotypes under cold stress were identified. Among these, many stress-related GO terms were significantly enriched, such as 'response to stimulus' and 'response to stress'. Moreover, GO terms 'response to hormone stimulus', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS', and 'calcium-mediated signaling' were also overrepresented. Several transcripts involved in hormone or ROS homeostasis were also differentially expressed. ROS, hormones, and calcium as signaling molecules may play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to cold stress. Moreover, the expression of various transcription factors, post-translational proteins, metabolic enzymes, and photosynthesis-related genes was also specifically modulated. These specific modifications may play pivotal roles in conferring cold tolerance in tomato. These results not only provide new

  3. Optimization of novel combi-molecules: identification of balanced and mixed bcr-abl/DNA targeting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Zakaria; Katsoulas, Athanasia; Williams, Christopher; Larroque, Anne-Laure; McNamee, James; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J

    2007-08-01

    Steps toward the identification of combi-molecules with strong abl tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitory property and significant DNA damaging potential are described. The optimized combi-molecule 13a was shown to induce approximately twofold stronger abl TK inhibitory activity than Gleevec and high levels of DNA damage in chronic myelogenous leukemic cells. PMID:17572088

  4. Noisy transcription factor NF-κB oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangstad, Sirin W.; Feldager, Cilie W.; Juul, Jeppe; Trusina, Ala

    2013-02-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response—a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-κB is an important mediator of cellular communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-κB has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have evolved to increase robustness of the inflammatory response and the system's ability to return to a pre-stimulated state.

  5. eIF6 coordinates insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism by coupling translation to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brina, Daniela; Miluzio, Annarita; Ricciardi, Sara; Clarke, Kim; Davidsen, Peter K; Viero, Gabriella; Tebaldi, Toma; Offenhäuser, Nina; Rozman, Jan; Rathkolb, Birgit; Neschen, Susanne; Klingenspor, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Quattrone, Alessandro; Falciani, Francesco; Biffo, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Insulin regulates glycaemia, lipogenesis and increases mRNA translation. Cells with reduced eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6) do not increase translation in response to insulin. The role of insulin-regulated translation is unknown. Here we show that reduction of insulin-regulated translation in mice heterozygous for eIF6 results in normal glycaemia, but less blood cholesterol and triglycerides. eIF6 controls fatty acid synthesis and glycolysis in a cell autonomous fashion. eIF6 acts by exerting translational control of adipogenic transcription factors like C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ and ATF4 that have G/C rich or uORF sequences in their 5' UTR. The outcome of the translational activation by eIF6 is a reshaping of gene expression with increased levels of lipogenic and glycolytic enzymes. Finally, eIF6 levels modulate histone acetylation and amounts of rate-limiting fatty acid synthase (Fasn) mRNA. Since obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer require a Fasn-driven lipogenic state, we propose that eIF6 could be a therapeutic target for these diseases. PMID:26383020

  6. Influence of promoter/enhancer region haplotypes on MGMT transcriptional regulation: a potential biomarker for human sensitivity to alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2014-01-01

    The O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) encodes the direct reversal DNA repair protein that removes alkyl adducts from the O 6 position of guanine. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region. However, the haplotype structure encompassing these SNPs and their functional/biological significance are currently unknown. We hypothesized that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT transcription and can thus alter human sensitivity to alkylating agents. To identify the haplotype structure encompassing the MGMT P/E region SNPs, we sequenced 104 DNA samples from healthy individuals and inferred the haplotypes using the data generated. We identified eight SNPs in this region, namely T7C (rs180989103), T135G (rs1711646), G290A (rs61859810), C485A (rs1625649), C575A (rs113813075), G666A (rs34180180), C777A (rs34138162) and C1099T (rs16906252). Phylogenetics and Sequence Evolution analysis predicted 21 potential haplotypes that encompass these SNPs ranging in frequencies from 0.000048 to 0.39. Of these, 10 were identified in our study population as 20 paired haplotype combinations. To determine the functional significance of these haplotypes, luciferase reporter constructs representing these haplotypes were transfected into glioblastoma cells and their effect on MGMT promoter activity was determined. Compared with the most common (reference) haplotype 1, seven haplotypes significantly upregulated MGMT promoter activity (18–119% increase; P < 0.05), six significantly downregulated MGMT promoter activity (29–97% decrease; P < 0.05) and one haplotype had no effect. Mechanistic studies conducted support the conclusion that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, differentially regulate MGMT transcription and could thus play a significant role in human sensitivity to environmental and therapeutic alkylating agents. PMID:24163400

  7. Sensitivity and reproducibility of standardized-competitive RT-PCR for transcript quantification and its comparison with real time RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willey James

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probe based detection assays form the mainstay of transcript quantification. Problems with these assays include varying hybridization efficiencies of the probes used for transcript quantification and the expense involved. We examined the ability of a standardized competitive RT-PCR (StaRT PCR assay to quantify transcripts of 4 cell cycle associated genes (RB, E2F1, CDKN2A and PCNA in two cell lines (T24 & LD419 and compared its efficacy with the established Taqman real time quantitative RT-PCR assay. We also assessed the sensitivity, reproducibility and consistency of StaRT PCR. StaRT PCR assay is based on the incorporation of competitive templates (CT in precisely standardized quantities along with the native template (NT in a PCR reaction. This enables transcript quantification by comparing the NT and CT band intensities at the end of the PCR amplification. The CT serves as an ideal internal control. The transcript numbers are expressed as copies per million transcripts of a control gene such as β-actin (ACTB. Results The NT and CT were amplified at remarkably similar rates throughout the StaRT PCR amplification cycles, and the coefficient of variation was least (t-test. StaRT PCR correlated well with Taqman real time RT-PCR assay in terms of transcript quantification efficacy (p Conclusion StaRT PCR is thus a reliable and sensitive technique that can be applied to medium-high throughput quantitative transcript measurement. Further, it correlates well with Taqman real time PCR in terms of quantitative and discriminatory ability. This label-free, inexpensive technique may provide the ability to generate prognostically important molecular signatures unique to individual tumors and may enable identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Rapid and sensitive detection of Little cherry virus 2 using isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Tefera A; Zhang, Shulu; Eastwell, Kenneth C

    2014-09-01

    Little cherry virus 2 (LChV2) (genus Ampelovirus) is the primary causal agent of little cherry disease (LCD) in sweet cherry (Prunus avium) in North America and other parts of the world. This mealybug-transmitted virus does not induce significant foliar symptoms in most sweet cherry cultivars, but does cause virus-infected trees to yield unevenly ripened small fruits with poor flavor. Most fruits from infected trees are unmarketable. In the present study, an isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) technique was developed using LChV2 coat protein specific primers and probe. Detection of terminally labeled amplicons was achieved with a high affinity lateral flow strip. The RT-RPA is confirmed to be simple, fast, and specific. In comparison, although it retains the sensitivity of RT-PCR, it is a more cost-effective procedure. RT-RPA will be a very useful tool for detecting LChV2 from crude extracts in any growth stage of sweet cherry from field samples. PMID:24797461

  9. RosR (Cg1324), a Hydrogen Peroxide-sensitive MarR-type Transcriptional Regulator of Corynebacterium glutamicum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Michael; Baumgart, Meike; Bott, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The cg1324 gene (rosR) of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes a MarR-type transcriptional regulator. By a comparative transcriptome analysis with DNA microarrays of a ΔrosR mutant and the wild type and subsequent EMSAs with purified RosR protein, direct target genes of RosR were identified. The narKGHJI operon, which encodes a nitrate/nitrite transporter and the dissimilatory nitrate reductase complex, was activated by RosR. All other target genes were repressed by RosR. They encode four putative monooxygenases, two putative FMN reductases, a protein of the glutathione S-transferase family, a putative polyisoprenoid-binding protein, and RosR itself. The DNA binding site of RosR was characterized as an 18-bp inverted repeat with the consensus sequence TTGTTGAYRYRTCAACWA. The in vitro DNA binding activity of RosR was reversibly inhibited by the oxidant H2O2. Mutational analysis of the three cysteine residues present in RosR (Cys-64, Cys-92, and Cys-151) showed that these are responsible for the inhibition of DNA binding by H2O2. A deletion mutant (Δcg1322) lacking the putative polyisoprenoid-binding protein showed an increased sensitivity to H2O2, supporting the role of RosR in the oxidative stress response of C. glutamicum. PMID:20643656

  10. Sensitive detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in whole fry, blood, and other tissues of pacific salmon by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, L D; Nilsson, W B; Strom, M S

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, reproducible assay for detecting Renibacterium salmoninarum in a variety of tissues, including blood, has been developed. This assay, based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of 16S ribosomal RNA, exhibited sensitivity to sensitivity was increased 10-fold by Southern blotting. There was a strong association (p <.001) between blood and ovarian fluid for the presence of bacteria in spawning salmon, and in 17.9% of the infected fish, bacteria were detected in blood but not in ovarian fluid. The ability to analyze multiple tissues, the reproducibility, and sensitivity of 16S RT-PCR make it a useful tool for both research and husbandry applications. PMID:9892717

  11. Rapid and sensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of rotavirus by magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan Fangfang; Zhou Xiaoming [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Xing Da, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2013-01-25

    Graphical abstract: In this work, we have developed and demonstrated a magnetic primer based RT-PCR assay for ECL detection of rotavirus. In the presence of two functional primers (magnetic primer and TBR-primer) and PCR reagents, cDNA from RT was amplified directly onto MPs during PCR cycles of denaturation, annealing and extension. The resulting MPs-TBR complexes were easily loaded on the electrode surface and produced a concentrated ECL signal. The figure shows the schematic illustration of magnetic primer RT-PCR based ECL assay for rotavirus detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of magnetic primer, TBR-primer and PCR reagents, cDNA form RT was amplified directly onto MPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To obtain the best sensing and efficient performance, important parameters associated with the efficiency were investigated carefully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method will find numerous applications in food safety field and clinical diagnosis. - Abstract: A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed by integrating magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. This is realized by accomplishing RT of rotavirus RNA in traditional way and performing PCR of the resulting cDNA fragment on the surface of magnetic particles (MPs). In order to implement PCR on MPs and achieve rapid ECL detection, forward and reverse primers are bounded to MPs and tris-(2,2 Prime -bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR), respectively. After RT-PCR amplification, the TBR labels are directly enriched onto the surface of MPs. Then the MPs-TBR complexes can be loaded on the electrode surface and analyzed by magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation process. So some laborious manual operations can be avoided to achieve rapid yet sensitive detection

  12. Ubiquitous [Na+]i/[K+]i-sensitive transcriptome in mammalian cells: evidence for Ca(2+)i-independent excitation-transcription coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltsova, Svetlana V; Trushina, Yulia; Haloui, Mounsif; Akimova, Olga A; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) affects the expression of numerous genes--a phenomenon known as excitation-transcription coupling. Recently, we found that increases in [Na(+)](i) trigger c-Fos expression via a novel Ca(2+) (i)-independent pathway. In the present study, we identified ubiquitous and tissue-specific [Na(+)](i)/[K(+)](i)-sensitive transcriptomes by comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta (RVSMC), the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To augment [Na(+)](i) and reduce [K(+)](i), cells were treated for 3 hrs with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain or placed for the same time in the K(+)-free medium. Employing Affymetrix-based technology, we detected changes in expression levels of 684, 737 and 1839 transcripts in HeLa, HUVEC and RVSMC, respectively, that were highly correlated between two treatments (p0.62). Among these Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes, 80 transcripts were common for all three types of cells. To establish if changes in gene expression are dependent on increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we performed identical experiments in Ca(2+)-free media supplemented with extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) chelators. Surprisingly, this procedure elevated rather than decreased the number of ubiquitous and cell-type specific Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes. Among the ubiquitous Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes whose expression was regulated independently of the presence of Ca(2+) chelators by more than 3-fold, we discovered several transcription factors (Fos, Jun, Hes1, Nfkbia), interleukin-6, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit, dual specificity phosphatase (Dusp8), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, cyclin L1, whereas expression of metallopeptidase Adamts1, adrenomedulin, Dups1, Dusp10 and Dusp16 was detected exclusively in Ca(2+)-depleted cells. Overall, our findings indicate that Ca(2

  13. HYPER RECOMBINATION1 of the THO/TREX complex plays a role in controlling transcription of the REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 gene in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congyao Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1 represses ethylene hormone responses by promoting ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1 signaling, which negatively regulates ethylene responses. To investigate the regulation of RTE1, we performed a genetic screening for mutations that suppress ethylene insensitivity conferred by RTE1 overexpression in Arabidopsis. We isolated HYPER RECOMBINATION1 (HPR1, which is required for RTE1 overexpressor (RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity at the seedling but not adult stage. HPR1 is a component of the THO complex, which, with other proteins, forms the TRanscription EXport (TREX complex. In yeast, Drosophila, and humans, the THO/TREX complex is involved in transcription elongation and nucleocytoplasmic RNA export, but its role in plants is to be fully determined. We investigated how HPR1 is involved in RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity in Arabidopsis. The hpr1-5 mutation may affect nucleocytoplasmic mRNA export, as revealed by in vivo hybridization of fluorescein-labeled oligo(dT45 with unidentified mRNA in the nucleus. The hpr1-5 mutation reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 transcript levels to a similar extent, and RTE1 transcript reduction rate was not affected by hpr1-5 with cordycepin treatment, which prematurely terminates transcription. The defect in the THO-interacting TEX1 protein of TREX but not the mRNA export factor SAC3B also reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 levels. SERINE-ARGININE-RICH (SR proteins are involved mRNA splicing, and we found that SR protein SR33 co-localized with HPR1 in nuclear speckles, which agreed with the association of human TREX with the splicing machinery. We reveal a role for HPR1 in RTE1 expression during transcription elongation and less likely during export. Gene expression involved in ethylene signaling suppression was not reduced by the hpr1-5 mutation, which indicates selectivity of HPR1 for RTE1 expression affecting the consequent ethylene response. Thus

  14. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA protein...

  15. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of RNA Viruses Based on Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification, Magnetic Nanoparticles, and Chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiuhai; Lu, Peng; Yan, Jieni; Zhang, Yufan; Huang, Lanye; Ali, Zeeshan; Li, Zhiyang; He, Nongyue

    2016-04-01

    RNA viruses, particularly, the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, pose serious health concerns, and cause huge economic losses worldwide. Diagnostic tools for the early detection of these deadly RNA viruses are urgently needed to implement treatment and disease control strategies. Conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based chemiluminescent (RT-PCR-CL) detection is frequently used for the diagnosis of viral infections. However, the requirements for expensive PCR machines and longer thermocycling times are significant drawbacks. In this study, we propose a method based on reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) combined with chemiluminescence (CL) to detect H7N9 virus. The proposed method does not require any expensive instruments, and processing time is remarkably shortened compared to that of RT-PCR-CL. Since several factors including RT-LAMP temperature, probe concentration, hybridization temperature, and hybridization duration might affect the CL signal, each of these parameters was investigated and optimized. One thousand copies/mL of H7N9 RNA were detectable using the optimized RT-LAMP-CL method. The detection time was significantly reduced by using RT-LAMP, in comparison with conventional RT-PCR-CL. This technique holds great promise for viral detection and diagnosis, especially with regard to avian influenza virus. PMID:27301197

  16. Evaluation of Sensitivities and Specificities of SARS-CoV Detection by Real-time Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li XU; Zhi-hong HU; Hua-lin WANG; Xiao HAN; Fei DENG

    2009-01-01

    The etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was identified as a new coronavirus, termed SARS-CoV. Establishment of an efficient and sensitive diagnostic system of SARS-CoV genetic materials is crucial for SARS control. In this study, we quantified SARS-CoV mRNAs in both infected cell culture lysate and in supernatant by using Real-time quantitative revere transcription-PCR based on EvaGreen鈩?dye and Taqman-MGB probes. For extensive evaluation of sensitivities and specificities, 13 pairs of primers and 4 probes were designed based on different genes of SARS-CoV. Glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was selected as the internal control gene. Results showed that S-gene-specific PCR was the most sensitive for detection, but because of its sequence variability in the different viral strains, primers and a probe based on the N gene were suitable substitutions. Meanwhile, we found the mRNA concentrations in cell culture lysates were much higher than in cell supernatant and facilited more sensitive detection of the SARS-CoV.

  17. Heat shock transcription factor1gene silenced with RNAi to enhance radio-sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to suppress HSF1 gene expression using RNA interference technique and explore the changes of the radiation sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cells, HSF1-pSilencer2.1-U6neo for siRNA expression was transfected into cervical carcinoma cells by lipofectamine. HSF1mRNA expression was detected by real time poly- merase chain reaction and flow cytometry was employed to evaluate HSFlprotein expression. In addiction, the radiation sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cells was assessed by clone forming assay. The results show that HSF1mRNA expression of the cells transfected HSF1A-pSilencer2.1-U6neo descends obviously compared with control. Mean- while the radiation sensitivity of Hela cells increases with the descension of HSF1 gene expression. Experiment has been confirmed that siRNA plasmid expression vector HSF1A-pSilencer2.1-U6neo successfully suppresses HSF1gene expression. Plasmid expression vector of HSF1 gene siRNA can be use to enhance the radio-sensitivity of cervical carcinoma cells and may be used as a powerfully adjunct method for conventional radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Silencing of the transcription factor STAT3 sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging drugs, but not to TNFα- and NK cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcription factor STAT3 (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3) is persistently active in human tumors and may contribute to tumor progression. Inhibition of STAT3 expression/activity could be a good strategy to modulate tumor cell survival and responses to cancer chemotherapeutics or immune cytotoxicity. We silenced STAT3 expression in human A549 lung cancer cells to elucidate its role in cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics, TNFα and natural killer (NK)-mediated cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that STAT3 is not essential for basal survival and proliferation of A549 cancer cells. Stable silencing of STAT3 expression sensitized A549 cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics doxorubicin and cisplatin in a p53-independent manner. Sensitization to DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics could be due to down-regulation of the Bcl-xL expression in STAT3 depleted cells. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 in cancer cells did not modulate responses to TNFα and NK-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that STAT3 depletion increased the NFκB activity likely providing the compensatory, pro-survival signal. The treatment with TNFα, but not doxorubicin, enhanced this effect. We conclude that STAT3 is not crucial for the control of basal cell proliferation and survival of lung carcinoma cells but modulates susceptibility to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics by regulation of intrinsic pro-survival pathways. - Highlights: ► STAT3 silencing is negligent for basal lung cancer cell viability and proliferation. ► STAT3 depletion sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. ► STAT3 depletion has no effect on susceptibility to extrinsic apoptosis inducers. ► Increased pro-survival NFκB activity may compensate for STAT3 depletion

  19. Silencing of the transcription factor STAT3 sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging drugs, but not to TNFα- and NK cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesza, Dorota W. [Laboratory of Transcription Regulation, Department of Cell Biology, The Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Warsaw (Poland); Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Warsaw Medical University, Warsaw (Poland); Carré, Thibault; Chouaib, Salem [Unité INSERM U753, Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif Cedex (France); Kaminska, Bozena, E-mail: bozenakk@nencki.gov.pl [Laboratory of Transcription Regulation, Department of Cell Biology, The Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-02-15

    Transcription factor STAT3 (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3) is persistently active in human tumors and may contribute to tumor progression. Inhibition of STAT3 expression/activity could be a good strategy to modulate tumor cell survival and responses to cancer chemotherapeutics or immune cytotoxicity. We silenced STAT3 expression in human A549 lung cancer cells to elucidate its role in cell survival and resistance to chemotherapeutics, TNFα and natural killer (NK)-mediated cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that STAT3 is not essential for basal survival and proliferation of A549 cancer cells. Stable silencing of STAT3 expression sensitized A549 cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics doxorubicin and cisplatin in a p53-independent manner. Sensitization to DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics could be due to down-regulation of the Bcl-xL expression in STAT3 depleted cells. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 in cancer cells did not modulate responses to TNFα and NK-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that STAT3 depletion increased the NFκB activity likely providing the compensatory, pro-survival signal. The treatment with TNFα, but not doxorubicin, enhanced this effect. We conclude that STAT3 is not crucial for the control of basal cell proliferation and survival of lung carcinoma cells but modulates susceptibility to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics by regulation of intrinsic pro-survival pathways. - Highlights: ► STAT3 silencing is negligent for basal lung cancer cell viability and proliferation. ► STAT3 depletion sensitizes lung cancer cells to DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. ► STAT3 depletion has no effect on susceptibility to extrinsic apoptosis inducers. ► Increased pro-survival NFκB activity may compensate for STAT3 depletion.

  20. Suppression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, but not NF-kappa B sensitizes melanoma specific cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Sahoo, Binay K; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-08-01

    Mutation in B-Raf leads to gain of function in melanoma and causes aggressive behavior for proliferation. Most of the therapeutics are ineffective in this scenario. However, regulation of this aggressive behavior by targeting the key molecules would be viable strategy to develop novel and effective therapeutics. In this report we provide evidences that the resveratrol is potent to regulate melanoma cell growth than other inducers of apoptosis. Resveratrol inhibits pronounced cell proliferation in melanoma than other tumor cell types. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry shows that the treatment with resveratrol results in S phase arrest. Resveratrol inhibits microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its dependent genes without interfering the MITF DNA binding in vitro. Resveratrol-mediated cell death is protected in MITF overexpressed cells and it is aggravated in MITF knocked down cells. These suggest the resveratrol-mediated decrease in MITF is the possible cause of melanoma cell death. Though resveratrol-mediated downregulation of NF-κB is responsible for cell apoptosis, but the downregulation of MITF is the main reason for melanoma-specific cell death. Thus, resveratrol can be effective chemotherapeutic agent against rapid proliferative melanoma cells. PMID:27325430

  1. Sensitization of prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine induced by a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of cytosine deaminase adenoviral/5-fluorocytosine system on prostate cancer cell lines. METHODS: Cell culture, infectivity test and sensitivity test, observing the bystander effect and animal model experiment were carried out. RESULTS: All the established prostate cancer cell lines were eventually infectable, but ratio of vector/cell and time of exposed at which infection occurs was dependent on the cell lines. The expression of transfered cytosine deaminase gene peaked at different days, but persisted beyond 11 days. The prostate cell lines were sensitized to the 5-fluorocytosine by infection with the cytosine deaminase gene adenoviral vector, and only 5% of the LNCap and 10% of the RM-1 cells infected were required for 100% cell death. In the animal model, there was significant eradiation of tumor growth at the ratio of 400 vector particles/cell and with the systematic treatment of 5-fluorocytosine. CONCLUSION: The adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit can sensitize the prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine, and the system can significantly inhibit the growth of prostatic tumor in mice.

  2. Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL is a flavoprotein that modulates transcriptional activation of nitrogen-fixation genes via a redox-sensitive switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S; Austin, S; Eydmann, T; Jones, T; Dixon, R

    1996-03-01

    The NIFL regulatory protein controls transcriptional activation of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in Azotobacter vinelandii by direct interaction with the enhancer binding protein NIFA. Modulation of NIFA activity by NIFL, in vivo occurs in response to external oxygen concentration or the level of fixed nitrogen. Spectral features of purified NIFL and chromatographic analysis indicate that it is a flavoprotein with FAD as the prosthetic group, which undergoes reduction in the presence of sodium dithionite. Under anaerobic conditions, the oxidized form of NIFL inhibits transcriptional activation by NIFA in vitro, and this inhibition is reversed when NIFL is in the reduced form. Hence NIFL is a redox-sensitive regulatory protein and may represent a type of flavoprotein in which electron transfer is not coupled to an obvious catalytic activity. In addition to its ability to act as a redox sensor, the activity of NIFL is also responsive to adenosine nucleotides, particularly ADP. This response overrides the influence of redox status on NIFL and is also observed with refolded NIFL apoprotein, which lacks the flavin moiety. These observations suggest that both energy and redox status are important determinants of nif gene regulation in vivo. PMID:8700899

  3. Redox-Sensitive Regulation of Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor (MRTF-A Phosphorylation via Palladin in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation Marker Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyoung Lee

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs undergo a phenotypic switch from a differentiated to synthetic phenotype in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Our previous studies indicate that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β helps to maintain the differentiated phenotype by regulating expression of pro-differentiation genes such as smooth muscle α-actin (SMA and Calponin (CNN through reactive oxygen species (ROS derived from NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4 in VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Nox4 and myocardin-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A, a transcription factor known to be important in expression of smooth muscle marker genes. Previous work has shown that MRTF-A interacts with the actin-binding protein, palladin, although how this interaction affects MRTF-A function is unclear, as is the role of phosphorylation in MRTF-A activity. We found that Rho kinase (ROCK-mediated phosphorylation of MRTF-A is a key event in the regulation of SMA and CNN in VSMCs and that this phosphorylation depends upon Nox4-mediated palladin expression. Knockdown of Nox4 using siRNA decreases TGF-β -induced palladin expression and MRTF-A phosphorylation, suggesting redox-sensitive regulation of this signaling pathway. Knockdown of palladin also decreases MRTF-A phosphorylation. These data suggest that Nox4-dependent palladin expression and ROCK regulate phosphorylation of MRTF-A, a critical factor in the regulation of SRF responsive gene expression.

  4. Redox-Sensitive Regulation of Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor (MRTF-A) Phosphorylation via Palladin in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation Marker Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minyoung; San Martín, Alejandra; Valdivia, Alejandra; Martin-Garrido, Abel; Griendling, Kathy K

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergo a phenotypic switch from a differentiated to synthetic phenotype in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Our previous studies indicate that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) helps to maintain the differentiated phenotype by regulating expression of pro-differentiation genes such as smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) and Calponin (CNN) through reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) in VSMCs. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Nox4 and myocardin-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A), a transcription factor known to be important in expression of smooth muscle marker genes. Previous work has shown that MRTF-A interacts with the actin-binding protein, palladin, although how this interaction affects MRTF-A function is unclear, as is the role of phosphorylation in MRTF-A activity. We found that Rho kinase (ROCK)-mediated phosphorylation of MRTF-A is a key event in the regulation of SMA and CNN in VSMCs and that this phosphorylation depends upon Nox4-mediated palladin expression. Knockdown of Nox4 using siRNA decreases TGF-β -induced palladin expression and MRTF-A phosphorylation, suggesting redox-sensitive regulation of this signaling pathway. Knockdown of palladin also decreases MRTF-A phosphorylation. These data suggest that Nox4-dependent palladin expression and ROCK regulate phosphorylation of MRTF-A, a critical factor in the regulation of SRF responsive gene expression. PMID:27088725

  5. Characterization of three Arabidopsis AP2/EREBP family transcription factors involved in ABA sensitivity,freeze and salt tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI WenQian; LEI Juan; Xu Yu; WEI Gang; ZHU YuXian

    2007-01-01

    AP2/EREBP transcription factors (TFs) play very important roles in plant development,hormonal regulation and stress response. Upon genome-wide cDNA cloning,phylogenetic and expression pattern analyses of this plant specific TF family,we found that three of the members including At1g71450,At1g50680 and At5g13910,were likely involved in responses to ABA,cold and salt. Complementary DNAs containing putative full-length ORFs of these three TFs were obtained and fused individually to the GAL4 DNA-binding domains. All the 3 genes functioned effectively as trans-activators using yeast one-hybrid assays. RT-PCR experiments showed that the At1g71450 gene was induced by ABA and low temperature; the At1g50680 gene was responsive to quite a few stress conditions,but especially to freezing temperature; and the At5g13910 gene was induced by high salt treatment,drought and ethylene. By searching the ABRC T-DNA insertion mutant stocks,we obtained knockout lines for these TFs. Homozygous ko1 (At1g71450) plants showed a hypersensitive response to ABA during seed germination and also in stomata movement. Homozygous ko2 (At1g50680) plants showed a significant reduction in plant freezing tolerance compared to the wild type after chilling treatment. Homozygous ko3 (At5g13910) were less tolerant to high salinity than wild type plants. Our data suggest that At1g71450 is a negative regulator in ABA signaling,while At1g50680 and At5g13910 are positive regulators in cold and salt stress responses,respectively.

  6. Contact sensitizer nickel sulfate activates the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 and increases the expression of nitric oxide synthase in a skin dendritic cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, M. Teresa; Gonçalo, Margarida; Figueiredo, Américo; Carvalho, Arsélio P.; Duarte, Carlos B.; Lopes, M. Celeste

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors are ubiquitously expressed signaling molecules known to regulate the transcription of a large number of genes involved in immune responses, namely the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In this study, we demonstrate that a fetal skin-derived dendritic cell line (FSDC) produces nitric oxide (NO) in response to the contact sensitizer nickel sulfate (NiSO4) and increases the ...

  7. Breakpoint analysis of transcriptional and genomic profiles uncovers novel gene fusions spanning multiple human cancer types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig P Giacomini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions, like BCR/ABL1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia, have long been recognized in hematologic and mesenchymal malignancies. The recent finding of gene fusions in prostate and lung cancers has motivated the search for pathogenic gene fusions in other malignancies. Here, we developed a "breakpoint analysis" pipeline to discover candidate gene fusions by tell-tale transcript level or genomic DNA copy number transitions occurring within genes. Mining data from 974 diverse cancer samples, we identified 198 candidate fusions involving annotated cancer genes. From these, we validated and further characterized novel gene fusions involving ROS1 tyrosine kinase in angiosarcoma (CEP85L/ROS1, SLC1A2 glutamate transporter in colon cancer (APIP/SLC1A2, RAF1 kinase in pancreatic cancer (ATG7/RAF1 and anaplastic astrocytoma (BCL6/RAF1, EWSR1 in melanoma (EWSR1/CREM, CDK6 kinase in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (FAM133B/CDK6, and CLTC in breast cancer (CLTC/VMP1. Notably, while these fusions involved known cancer genes, all occurred with novel fusion partners and in previously unreported cancer types. Moreover, several constituted druggable targets (including kinases, with therapeutic implications for their respective malignancies. Lastly, breakpoint analysis identified new cell line models for known rearrangements, including EGFRvIII and FIP1L1/PDGFRA. Taken together, we provide a robust approach for gene fusion discovery, and our results highlight a more widespread role of fusion genes in cancer pathogenesis.

  8. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction for Simultaneous Screening of 29 Chromosomal Translocation in Hematologic Malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) has been proved to possess great clinical potential for simultaneous screening of 29 chromosomal translocations in acute leukemia. To evaluate the clinical value of M-RT-PCR in hematologic malignancies, bone marrow samples from 90 patients with various hematologic malignancies, including 25 acute myeloge nous leukemia (AML), 22 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 27 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), 4 myeloproliferative diseases (MPD), 3 chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL), 3 and 1 malignant histocytosis (MH) were subjected to both M-RT-PCR and chromosome karyotypic analysis. Some of cases were subjected to follow-up examination of M-RT-PCR during the period of ukemia. In our hand, 12 of 29chromosomal translocation transcripts including TEL/PDGFR, DEK/CAN, MLL/AF6, AML1/ETO,F9, BCR/ABL, MLL/MLL, PML/RARα, TLS/ERG, E2A/HLF, EVIl and HOXI1 were detected in 57 cases (63.3 %) of the 90 samples, which were in consistence with the results of karyore, M-RT-PCR had also shown good clinical relevance when used as an approach to detect minimal residual leukemia. We concluded that M-RT-PCR could be used as an effiy in the initial diagnosis of hematologic malignancies but also in subsequent monitor of minimal residual leukemia.

  9. Over-expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 in CD34+BCR-ABL+ cells from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, D.; Mayer, J.; Doubek, M.; Faitová, Jitka; Pacholíková, J.; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr

    Istanbul : Nature Publishing Group, 2003. s. 246. [Annual Meeting of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation /29./. 23.03.2003-26.03.2003, Istanbul] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA MŠk ME 198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 432100001; CEZ:MZd 00065269705; CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : leukemia * fibroblast Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. Accumulation of FGF-2 in CD34+ Bcr-Abl+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients: relationship with malignant phenotype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Faitová, Jitka; Dvořáková, D.; Hampl, Aleš; Mayer, J.

    Steamboat Springs, 2003. s. -. [From Stem Cells to Therapy (Keystone Symposia). 29.03.2003-03.04.2003, Steamboat Springs] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 432100001 Keywords : leukemia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. DNA methylation of the CpG island at the Pa promoter within the bcr-abl locus followed in CML patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajkusová, L.; Fajkus, Jiří; Dvořáková, D.; Krahulcová, E.; Fulneček, Jaroslav; Berková, K.; Mayer, J.

    1998, s. 90. [Meeting on dynamic organization of nuclear function. Cold Spring Harbor (US), 07.10.1998-11.10.1998] R&D Projects: GA MZd IZ3722; GA MŠk VS97032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A17/98:Z5-004-9-ii Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Increased expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 in CD34+ BCR-ABL+ cells from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Dvořáková, D.; Doubek, M.; Faitová, Jitka; Pacholíková, J.; Hampl, Aleš; Mayer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2003), s. 1-8. ISSN 0887-6924 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/03/1122; GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 00065269705; CEZ:VZ432100001 Keywords : CD34+cells, imatinib Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.116, year: 2003

  13. BCR-ABL isoforms associated with intrinsic or acquired resistance to imatinib : more heterogeneous than just ABL kinase domain point mutations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Franz X.; Lundan, Tuija; Goll, Rasmus; Silye, Aleksandra; Mikkola, Ingvild; Rekvig, Ole Petter; Knuutila, Sakari; Remes, Kari; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Porkka, Kimmo; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib, a small molecule inhibitor of ABL, PDGFR and C-KIT, has revolutionized treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). However, resistance to treatment is of increasing importance and often is due to point mutations in the Abl kinase domain (Abl KD). Here, we analysed clinical outcome and mu

  14. A non-radioactive assay for precise determination of intracellular levels of imatinib and its main metabolite in Bcr-Abl positive cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlejnek, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Doležel, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 5 (2011), s. 1466-1471. ISSN 0039-9140 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : K562 cells * P-glycoprotein * Multidrug resistance * N-desmethyl imatinib * CGP 74588 Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2011

  15. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E;

    2014-01-01

    achieved major hematologic response. The most common adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (50%). The most common grade 3/4 AEs were neutropenia (46%) and febrile neutropenia (35%). MK-0457 demonstrated minimal efficacy and only at higher, intolerable doses; lower doses were tolerated and no unexpected...

  16. Detection of Magnaporthe oryzae chrysovirus 1 in Japan and establishment of a rapid, sensitive and direct diagnostic method based on reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ken; Urayama, Syun-Ichi; Katoh, Yu; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hase, Shu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Arie, Tsutomu; Teraoka, Tohru; Moriyama, Hiromitsu

    2016-02-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae chrysovirus 1 (MoCV1) is a mycovirus with a dsRNA genome that infects the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and impairs its growth. To date, MoCV1 has only been found in Vietnamese isolates of M. oryzae, and the distribution of this virus in M. oryzae isolates from other parts of the world remains unknown. In this study, using a one-step reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assay, we detected a MoCV1-related virus in M. oryzae in Japan (named MoCV1-AK) whose sequence shares considerable similarity with that of the MoCV1 Vietnamese isolate. To establish a system for a comprehensive survey of MoCV1 infection in the field, we developed a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for direct detection of the virus. The sensitivity of the RT-LAMP assay was at least as high as that of the one-step RT-PCR assay. In addition, we detected MoCV1-AK in M. oryzae-infected oatmeal agar plates and lesions on rice leaves using the RT-LAMP assay without dsRNA extraction, by simple sampling with a toothpick. Preliminary screening of MoCV1 in Japanese M. oryzae isolates indicated that MoCV1 is currently distributed in rice fields in Japan. Our results provide a first example of the application of RT-LAMP for the detection of mycoviruses, which will accelerate surveys for mycovirus infection. PMID:26547578

  17. Interference with Activator Protein-2 transcription factors leads to induction of apoptosis and an increase in chemo- and radiation-sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activator Protein-2 (AP-2) transcription factors are critically involved in a variety of fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Expression of the family members AP-2α and AP-2γ is particularly well documented in malignancies of the female breast. Despite increasing evaluation of single AP-2 isoforms in mammary tumors the functional role of concerted expression of multiple AP-2 isoforms in breast cancer remains to be elucidated. AP-2 proteins can form homo- or heterodimers, and there is growing evidence that the net effect whether a cell will proliferate, undergo apoptosis or differentiate is partly dependent on the balance between different AP-2 isoforms. We simultaneously interfered with all AP-2 isoforms expressed in ErbB-2-positive murine N202.1A breast cancer cells by conditionally over-expressing a dominant-negative AP-2 mutant. We show that interference with AP-2 protein function lead to reduced cell number, induced apoptosis and increased chemo- and radiation-sensitivity. Analysis of global gene expression changes upon interference with AP-2 proteins identified 139 modulated genes (90 up-regulated, 49 down-regulated) compared with control cells. Gene Ontology (GO) investigations for these genes revealed Cell Death and Cell Adhesion and Migration as the main functional categories including 25 and 12 genes, respectively. By using information obtained from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Systems we were able to present proven or potential connections between AP-2 regulated genes involved in cell death and response to chemo- and radiation therapy, (i.e. Ctgf, Nrp1, Tnfaip3, Gsta3) and AP-2 and other main apoptosis players and to create a unique network. Expression of AP-2 transcription factors in breast cancer cells supports proliferation and contributes to chemo- and radiation-resistance of tumor cells by impairing the ability to induce apoptosis. Therefore, interference

  18. Interference with Activator Protein-2 transcription factors leads to induction of apoptosis and an increase in chemo- and radiation- sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thewes, Verena

    2010-05-11

    Abstract Background Activator Protein-2 (AP-2) transcription factors are critically involved in a variety of fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Expression of the family members AP-2α and AP-2γ is particularly well documented in malignancies of the female breast. Despite increasing evaluation of single AP-2 isoforms in mammary tumors the functional role of concerted expression of multiple AP-2 isoforms in breast cancer remains to be elucidated. AP-2 proteins can form homo- or heterodimers, and there is growing evidence that the net effect whether a cell will proliferate, undergo apoptosis or differentiate is partly dependent on the balance between different AP-2 isoforms. Methods We simultaneously interfered with all AP-2 isoforms expressed in ErbB-2-positive murine N202.1A breast cancer cells by conditionally over-expressing a dominant-negative AP-2 mutant. Results We show that interference with AP-2 protein function lead to reduced cell number, induced apoptosis and increased chemo- and radiation-sensitivity. Analysis of global gene expression changes upon interference with AP-2 proteins identified 139 modulated genes (90 up-regulated, 49 down-regulated) compared with control cells. Gene Ontology (GO) investigations for these genes revealed Cell Death and Cell Adhesion and Migration as the main functional categories including 25 and 12 genes, respectively. By using information obtained from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Systems we were able to present proven or potential connections between AP-2 regulated genes involved in cell death and response to chemo- and radiation therapy, (i.e. Ctgf, Nrp1, Tnfaip3, Gsta3) and AP-2 and other main apoptosis players and to create a unique network. Conclusions Expression of AP-2 transcription factors in breast cancer cells supports proliferation and contributes to chemo- and radiation-resistance of tumor cells by impairing the

  19. Detection of the Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus by a Highly Sensitive Quantitative Real-time Reverse-transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yang; Guoliang Mao; Yujun Liu; Yuan-Chuan Chen; Chengjing Liu; Jun Luo; Xihan Li

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been widely used successfully for detection and monitoring of the pandemic H1N 1/2009 influenza A virus.In this study,we report the design and characterization of a novel set of primers to be used in a qRT-PCR assay for detecting the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus.The newly designed primers target three regions that are highly conserved among the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and are different from those targeted by the WHO-recommended primers.The qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers are highly specific,and as specific as the WHO-recommended primers for detecting pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and other influenza viruses including influenza B viruses and influenza A viruses of human,swine,and raccoon dog origin.Furthermore,the qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers appeared to be at least 10-fold more sensitive than those with the WHO-recommended primers as the detection limits of the assays with our primers and the WHO-recommended primers were 2.5 and 25 copies of target RNA per reaction,respectively.When tested with 83 clinical samples,32 were detected to be positive using the qRT-PCR assays with our designed primers,while only 25 were positive by the assays with the WHO-recommended primers.These results suggest that the qRT-PCR system with the newly designed primers represent a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis of the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus infection.

  20. The dynamin chemical inhibitor dynasore impairs cholesterol trafficking and sterol-sensitive genes transcription in human HeLa cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Girard

    Full Text Available Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In both cell types, dynasore treatment led to the abnormal accumulation of LDL and free cholesterol (FC within the endolysosomal network. The measure of cholesterol esters (CE further showed that the delivery of regulatory cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER was deficient. This resulted in the inhibition of the transcriptional control of the three major sterol-sensitive genes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCoAR, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. The sequestration of cholesterol in the endolysosomal compartment impaired both the active and passive cholesterol efflux in HMDM. Our data further illustrate the importance of membrane trafficking in cholesterol homeostasis and validate dynasore as a new pharmacological tool to study the intracellular transport of cholesterol.

  1. DETECTION SENSITIVITY AND QUANTITATION OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM VAR GENE TRANSCRIPTS BY REAL-TIME RT-PCR IN COMPARISON WITH CONVENTIONAL RT-PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Gatton, Michelle L; Peters, Jennifer M.; GRESTY, KARRYN; Fowler, Elizabeth V.; Chen, Nanhua; Cheng, Qin

    2006-01-01

    Antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1, caused by a switch in transcription of the encoding var gene, is an important feature of malaria. In this study, we quantified the relative abundance of var gene transcripts present in P. falciparum parasite clones using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and conventional RT-PCR combined with cloning and sequencing, with the aim of directly comparing the results obtained. When there wa...

  2. Sensitivity and reproducibility of standardized-competitive RT-PCR for transcript quantification and its comparison with real time RT-PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Willey James; Cai Jie; Laird Peter W; Groshen Susan; Beil Stephen J; George Ben; Pagliarulo Vincenzo; Cote Richard J; Datar Ram H

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Probe based detection assays form the mainstay of transcript quantification. Problems with these assays include varying hybridization efficiencies of the probes used for transcript quantification and the expense involved. We examined the ability of a standardized competitive RT-PCR (StaRT PCR) assay to quantify transcripts of 4 cell cycle associated genes (RB, E2F1, CDKN2A and PCNA) in two cell lines (T24 & LD419) and compared its efficacy with the established Taqman real ...

  3. Contact sensitizer nickel sulfate activates the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 and increases the expression of nitric oxide synthase in a skin dendritic cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, MT; Gonçalo, Margarida; A. Figueiredo; Carvalho, AP; Duarte, CB

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors are ubiquitously expressed signaling molecules known to regulate the transcription of a large number of genes involved in immune responses, namely the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In this study, we demonstrate that a fetal skin-derived dendritic cell line (FSDC) produces nitric oxide (NO) in response to the contact sensitizer nickel sulfate (NiSO(4)) and increases the expression of the i...

  4. Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL is a flavoprotein that modulates transcriptional activation of nitrogen-fixation genes via a redox-sensitive switch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, S.; Austin, S; Eydmann, T.; Jones, T.; Dixon, R

    1996-01-01

    The NIFL regulatory protein controls transcriptional activation of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in Azotobacter vinelandii by direct interaction with the enhancer binding protein NIFA. Modulation of NIFA activity by NIFL, in vivo occurs in response to external oxygen concentration or the level of fixed nitrogen. Spectral features of purified NIFL and chromatographic analysis indicate that it is a flavoprotein with FAD as the prosthetic group, which undergoes reduction in the presence of sodiu...

  5. Ablation of the transcriptional regulator Id1 enhances energy expenditure, increases insulin sensitivity, and protects against age and diet induced insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Satyanarayana, Ande; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Keller, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health concern that contributes to the development of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, and cancer. Id proteins are helix-loop-helix transcription factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells from multiple tissues, including adipocytes. We screened mouse tissues for the expression of Id1 and found that Id1 protein is highly expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT), suggesting a role for Id1 in adipogenes...

  6. Ectopic microRNA-150-5p transcription sensitizes glucocorticoid therapy response in MM1S multiple myeloma cells but fails to overcome hormone therapy resistance in MM1R cells

    OpenAIRE

    Palagani, Ajay; Op de Beeck, Ken; Naulaerts, Stefan; Diddens, Jolien; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Camp, Guy; Laukens, Kris; Heyninck, Karen; Gerlo, Sarah; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) selectively trigger cell death in the multiple myeloma cell line MM1S which express NR3C1/Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) protein, but fail to kill MM1R cells which lack GR protein. Given recent demonstrations of altered microRNA profiles in a diverse range of haematological malignancies and drug resistance, we characterized GC inducible mRNA and microRNA transcription profiles in GC sensitive MM1S as compared to GC resistant MM1R cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that...

  7. Rapid and sensitive detection of novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral-flow device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyue Ge

    Full Text Available A severe disease in humans caused by a novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged in China recently, which has caused at least 128 cases and 26 deaths. Rapid detection of the novel H7N9 virus is urgently needed to differentiate the disease from other infections, and to facilitate infection control as well as epidemiologic investigations. In this study, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow device (RT-LAMP-LFD assay to rapidly detect H7N9 virus was developed and evaluated. The RT-LAMP primers were designed to target the haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of H7N9 virus. Results of 10-fold dilution series assays showed that analysis of RT-LAMP products by the LFD method was as sensitive as real-time turbidity detection, and that the analytic sensitivities of the HA and NA RT-LAMP assays were both 10 copies of synthetic RNA. Furthermore, both the assays showed 100% clinical specificity for identification of H7N9 virus. The performance characteristics of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were evaluated with 80 clinical specimens collected from suspected H7N9 patients. The NA RT-LAMP-LFD assay was more sensitive than real time RT-PCR assay. Compared with a combination of virus culture and real-time RT-PCR, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were all 100%. Overall, The RT-LAMP-LFD assay established in this study can be used as a reliable method for early diagnosis of the avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus infection.

  8. A label-free and enzyme-free ultra-sensitive transcription factors biosensor using DNA-templated copper nanoparticles as fluorescent indicator and hairpin DNA cascade reaction as signal amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Liang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2016-08-15

    Detection and quantification of specific protein with ultralow concentration play a crucial role in biotechnological applications and biomedical diagnostics. In this paper, a label-free and enzyme-free amplified fluorescent biosensor has been developed for transcription factors detection based on AT-rich double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles (ds DNA/Cu NPs) and hairpin DNA cascade reaction. This strategy was demonstrated by using nuclear factor-kappa B p50 (NF-κB p50) and specific recognition sequences as a model case. In this assay, a triplex consists of double-stranded DNA containing NF-κB p50 specifically binding sequences and a special design single-stranded DNA (Trigger) which is able to activate the hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In the presence of NF-κB p50, the triplex became unstable since the target bound to the recognition sequences with strong affinity. The selective binding event confirmed that the Trigger was successfully released from the triplex and initiated HDCA to yield the product which could effectively template the formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. The experimental results revealed that the advanced strategy was ultra-sensitive for detecting NF-κB p50 in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 pM with a detection limit of 0.096 pM. In addition, the relative standard deviation was 4.08% in 3 repetitive assays of 500 pM NF-κB p50, which indicated that the reproducibility of this strategy was acceptable. Besides desirable sensitivity, the developed biosensor also showed high selectivity, cost-effective, and simplified operations. In addition, the proposed biosensing platform is versatile. By conjugating with various specific recognition units, it could hold considerable potential to sensitive and selective detect various DNA-binding proteins and might find wide applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27045526

  9. Allele-specific suppression of the temperature sensitivity of fitA/fitB mutants of Escherichia coli by a new mutation (fitC4): isolation, characterization and its implications in transcription control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Vidya; B Praveen Kamalakar; M Hussain Munavar; L Sathish Kumar; R Jayaraman

    2006-03-01

    The temperature sensitive transcription defective mutant of Escherichia coli originally called fitA76 has been shown to harbour two missense mutations namely pheS5 and fit95. In order to obtain a suppressor of fitA76, possibly mapping in rpoD locus, a Ts+ derivative (JV4) was isolated from a fitA76 mutant. It was found that JV4 neither harbours the lesions present in the original fitA76 nor a suppressor that maps in or near rpoD. We show that JV4 harbours a modified form of fitA76 (designated fitA76*) together with its suppressor. The results presented here indicate that the fit95 lesion is intact in the fitA76* mutant and the modification should be at the position of pheS5. Based on the cotransduction of the suppressor mutation and/or its wild type allele with pps, aroD and zdj-3124::Tn10 kan we have mapped its location to 39⋅01 min on the E. coli chromosome. We tentatively designate the locus defined by this new extragenic suppressor as fitC and the suppressor allele as fitC4. While fitC4 could suppress the Ts phenotype of fitA76* present in JV4, it fails to suppress the Ts phenotype of the original fitA76 mutant (harbouring pheS5 and fit95). Also fitC4 could suppress the Ts phenotype of a strain harbouring only pheS5. Interestingly, the fitC4 Ts phenotype could also be suppressed by fit95. The pattern of decay of pulse labelled RNA in the strains harbouring fitC4 and the fitA76* resembles that of the original fitA76 mutant implying a transcription defect similar to that of fitA76 in both these mutants. The implications of these findings with special reference to transcription control by Fit factors in vivo are discussed.

  10. Usporedba osjetljivosti ugnježđene PCR i kvantitativne PCR u određivanju Bcr-Abl p210 prijepisa kronične mijeloične leukemije

    OpenAIRE

    Marušić Vrsalović, Maruška; Kušec, Rajko; Pejša, Vlatko; Romić, Željko

    2007-01-01

    Uvod: Za otkrivanje minimalne ostatne bolesti u bolesnika s kroničnom mijeloičnom leukemijom (KML) koji su postigli potpunu kliničku remisiju i potpun citogenetski odgovor može se primijeniti ugnježđena PCR (engl. nestedPCR, nPCR) i kvantitativna PCR u stvarnom vremenu (engl. quantitative real-time PCR, qPCR). Cilj liječenja je postizanje molekularne remisije, pa postizanje visoke osjetljivosti molekularne pretrage ima presudnu ulogu i kliničku primjenu. Usporedili smo razinu osjetljivosti nP...

  11. A combination of STI571 and BCR-ABL1 siRNA with overexpressed p15INK4B induced enhanced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, D.Y.; Liu, L; Hao, M.W.; Liu, Q; Chen, R A; Y.M. Liang

    2014-01-01

    p15INK4B, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, has been recognized as a tumor suppressor. Loss of or methylation of the p15INK4B gene in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells enhances myeloid progenitor formation from common myeloid progenitors. Therefore, we examined the effects of overexpressed p15INK4B on proliferation and apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of p15INK4B inhibited the growth of K562 cells by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 expression. Over...

  12. Treatment of human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-739358 (Danusertib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Fei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemias (Ph-positive ALL with clinically approved inhibitors of the Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase frequently results in the emergence of a leukemic clone carrying the T315I mutation in Bcr/Abl, which confers resistance to these drugs. PHA-739358, an Aurora kinase inhibitor, was reported to inhibit the Bcr/Abl T315I mutant in CML cells but no preclinical studies have examined this in detail in human ALL. Results We compared the sensitivity of human Bcr/Abl T315I, Bcr/Abl wild type and non-Bcr/Abl ALL cells to this drug. PHA-739358 inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis independently of Bcr/Abl, the T315I mutation, or presence of the tumor suppressor p53, but the degree of effectiveness varied between different ALL samples. Since short-term treatment with a single dose of drug only transiently inhibited proliferation, we tested combination treatments of PHA-739358 with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor Lonafarnib, with vincristine and with dasatinib. All combinations reduced viability and cell numbers compared to treatment with a single drug. Clonogenic assays showed that 25 nM PHA-739358 significantly reduced the colony growth potential of Ph-positive ALL cells, and combined treatment with a second drug abrogated colony growth in this assay. PHA-739358 further effectively blocked Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase activity and Aurora kinase B in vivo, and mice transplanted with human Bcr/Abl T315I ALL cells treated with a 3x 7-day cycle of PHA-739358 as mono-treatment had significantly longer survival. Conclusions PHA-739358 represents an alternative drug for the treatment of both Ph-positive and negative ALL, although combined treatment with a second drug may be needed to eradicate the leukemic cells.

  13. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction

  14. The role of Ikaros transcriptional factor in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis: biological and clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Vshivkoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the pathogenesis and factors effecting recurrence, progression and drug resistance in acute leukemia (AL remains a major challenge for hematology and other related areas. The role of more than 50 genes and proteins in the AL pathogenesis has been shown, including the well-studied tumor suppressor (CDKN2A/CDKN2B, RB1, PTEN, p53, and classical fusion genes (BCR/ABL1, TEL/AML1, E2A/PBX, MLL translocations. In addition, high frequency of aberrations in genes responsible for lymphoid differentiation have been identified such as transcription factors (PAX5, IKZF1 and EBF1, transcriptional regulation of the genes (ETV6, ERG, and signaling pathways of antigen receptors (BTLA, CD200, TOX, BLNK, VPREB1, as well as genes involved in chemoresistance of leukemia cells (NR3C1. In recent studies, Ikaros abnormalities have been reported to be frequently associated with AL. Ikaros is a member of a Kruppel-like family of zinc finger transcription factors that also includes IKZF2 (Helios, IKZF3 (Aiolos, Eos and Pegasus, and encoded by the IKZF1 gene. In hematopoietic cells Ikaros functions as a transcription factor, a key protein controlling T-, B-, NK-, and dendritic cells early differentiation. At the early hematopoiesis stages, it represses the myeloid and erythroid lineages, and stimulates the lymphoid differentiation. Ikaros also normally modulates immune response and plays role of a tumor suppressor in lymphoid malignances. Data from numerous clinical studies confirmed an association between the presence of IKZF1 aberrations and B-cell and, to a lesser extent, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL development. Besides, loss of Ikaros function was associated with progression of myeloproliferative diseases to acute myeloid leukemia (AML in children. From clinical point of view, particular intragenic IKZF1 deletions and a short (non-functional protein Ikaros isoforms, which may occur as a result of intragenic deletions or aberrant splicing

  15. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  16. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  17. Plant transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing-Assisted DNA-Based Digital PCR for a Personalized Approach to the Detection and Quantification of Residual Disease in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikian, Mary; Ellery, Peter; Forbes, Martin; Gerrard, Gareth; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Sosinsky, Alona; Mueller, Michael; Whale, Alexandra S; Milojkovic, Dragana; Apperley, Jane; Huggett, Jim F; Foroni, Letizia; Reid, Alistair G

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that 40% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients who achieve sustained undetectable BCR-ABL1 transcripts on tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy remain disease-free after drug discontinuation. In contrast, 60% experience return of detectable disease and have to restart treatment, thus highlighting the need for an improved method of identifying patients with the lowest likelihood of relapse. Here we describe the validation of a personalized DNA-based digital PCR (dPCR) approach for quantifying very low levels of residual disease, which involves the rapid identification of t(9;22) fusion junctions using targeted next-generation sequencing coupled with the use of a dPCR platform. t(9;22) genomic breakpoints were successfully mapped in samples from 32 of 32 patients with early stage disease. Disease quantification by DNA-based dPCR was performed using the Fluidigm BioMark platform on 46 follow-up samples from 6 of the 32 patients, including 36 samples that were in deep molecular remission. dPCR detected persistent disease in 81% of molecular-remission samples, outperforming both RT-dPCR (25%) and DNA-based quantitative PCR (19%). We conclude that dPCR for BCR-ABL1 DNA is the most sensitive available method of residual-disease detection in chronic myeloid leukemia and may prove useful in the management of tyrosine kinase inhibitor withdrawal. PMID:26857065

  19. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Refsing Andersen, Peter; Valen, Eivind;

    2014-01-01

    by their sensitivity to the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex and by the nature of their transcription initiation. These measures are surprisingly effective at correctly classifying annotated transcripts, including lncRNAs of known function. The approach also identifies uncharacterized stable lncRNAs, hidden among...

  20. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  1. Molecular monitoring 101: helping your patients with chronic myeloid leukemia to understand the meaning of molecular response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    For patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), measurement of molecular response (i.e. the level of BCR-ABL1 transcripts) is firmly established as a key element of disease monitoring. Assessment of BCR-ABL1 levels may help to identify early signs of resistance to treatment and enable a timely switch to alternative therapies. Hence, regular and accurate monitoring of BCR-ABL1 transcripts helps to maximize the chance of successful outcomes in CML. Because the incidence of CML is relatively low, many community oncologists encounter only a limited number of cases; measuring and interpreting BCR-ABL1 measurements in a clinically relevant fashion may be challenging. The team at our institution often encounters questions regarding real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assessments of BCR-ABL1 levels, International Scale standardization, the implications of achieving or losing molecular responses and mutation monitoring. The aim of this article is to provide practical advice for effective long-term monitoring of patients with CML by addressing frequently asked questions and common case scenarios using guideline- and evidence-based approaches. PMID:22273251

  2. Monitoring disease burden in chronic myeloid leukemia: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Daniel; Radich, Jerald

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy yields sustained cytogenetic remissions in most patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Peripheral blood quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) monitoring of the chimeric BCR-ABL1 mRNA transcript levels is a very sensitive method to measure disease burden in patients with cytogenetic remission. qRT-PCR allows identification of patients (1) at high risk of progression early (3-6 months) after treatment initiation, (2) with no response to TKI therapy, (3) with undetectable disease who could be eligible for TKI discontinuation trials. Molecular monitoring is a minimally invasive method to optimize treatment and outcomes in CML. Am. J. Hematol. 91:742-746, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059166

  3. A molecular and biophysical comparison of macromolecular changes in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant K562 cells exposed to ponatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandim, Melis Kartal; Ceylan, Cagatay; Elmas, Efe; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a type of hematological malignancy that is characterized by the generation of Philadelphia chromosome encoding BCR/ABL oncoprotein. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib, are used for the frontline therapy of CML. Development of resistance against these TKIs in the patients bearing T315I mutation is a major obstacle in CML therapy. Ponatinib, the third-generation TKI, is novel drug that is effective even in CML patients with T315I mutation. The exact mechanism of ponatinib in CML has been still unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine the potential mechanisms and structural metabolic changes activated by ponatinib treatment in imatinib-sensitive K562 human CML cell lines and 3 μM-imatinib-resistant K562/IMA3 CML cell lines generated at our lab. Apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of ponatinib on imatinib-sensitive and 3 μM-imatinib-resistant K562/IMA3 CML cells were determined by proliferation and apoptosis assays. Additionally, the effects of ponatinib on macromolecules and lipid profiles were also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results revealed that ponatinib inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as determined by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased caspase-3 enzyme activity, and transfer of phosphatidylserine to the plasma membrane in both K562 and K562/IMA-3 cells. Furthermore, cell cycle analyses revealed that ponatinib arrested K562 and K562/IMA-3 cells at G1 phase. Moreover, ponatinib treatment created a more ordered nucleic acid structure in the resistant cells. Although the lipid to protein ratio increased in imatinib-sensitive K562 cells with a little decrease in the K562/IMA-3 cells, ponatinib treatment indicated significant changes in the lipid composition such as a significant increase in the cellular cholesterol amounts much more in the K562/IMA-3 cells than the sensitive counterparts. Unsaturation in lipids

  4. Ultrasensitive Detection of Bacteria by Targeting Abundant Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhui; Li, Xinran; Liu, Shiwei; Ren, Hang; Yang, Mingjuan; Ke, Yuehua; Huang, Liuyu; Liu, Chao; Liu, Bo; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-01-01

    Molecular detection assays are increasingly becoming routine diagnostic techniques for bacterial infection; however, their sensitivities are restricted by the low concentrations of bacteria in clinical samples. Here, we report a new paradigm for ultrasensitive detection of bacteria. The principle of this approach is that by choosing highly transcribed genes as signature sequences and detecting both DNA and its RNA transcripts, assay sensitivity can be greatly improved. First, signature genes with abundant transcripts were screened by RNA-Seq. We confirmed that RT-PCR efficiently amplifies both DNA and RNA, while PCR amplifies only DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the RNA extraction efficiency is relatively low, while simplified denaturation was more appropriate for transcript detection. For highly transcribed genes, RT-PCR consistently generated lower cycle threshold (Ct) values than those of PCR. The sensitivity of RT-PCR targeting abundant transcripts could detect quantities as low as one bacterium, which was not possible using PCR. Amplification of different genes among several other common bacteria also confirmed that transcript detection by RT-PCR is more sensitive than is DNA detection by PCR. Therefore, abundant transcript detection represents a universal strategy for ultrasensitive detection of bacteria. PMID:26848029

  5. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  6. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different from ... small intestine. Some of the symptoms of gluten sensitivity are similar to celiac disease. They include tiredness ...

  7. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  8. New Methodologies in the Molecular Monitoring of CML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Cecilia C S; Egan, Daniel; Radich, Jerald

    2016-04-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the BCR-ABL fusion gene is both the therapeutic target of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the indisputable direct marker of disease burden. Thus, sensitive assays for BCR-ABL now drive therapeutic options and are good surrogates for short- and long-term outcomes. Because CML is such an ideal model, new methods are arising that should make testing in CML faster, more reliable, and reach a greater sensitivity. These methods should be able to be transferred to other hematological malignancies that have mutation markers. PMID:26946301

  9. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  10. Sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General remarks on sensitivity analysis, the study of changes in a model output produced by varying model inputs, are made first. Sampling methods are discussed, and three sensitivity measures: partial rank correlation, derivative or response surface, and partial variance are described. Some sample results for a 16-input, 13-output hydrodynamics model are given. Both agreement and disagreement were found among the sensitivity measures. 4 figures

  11. Radiation sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following classes of radiosensitizers are discussed: electron affinic compounds, pyrimidine analogs, and antibiotics. Metronidazole and nitroimidazole are discussed as examples of electron-affinic compounds. Studies on the enhancement ratio for sensitization of x-irradiated hamster cells showed that these drugs sensitize at concentrations much lower than the toxic concentrations. Criteria for a clinically useful hypoxic cell sensitizer are listed and mechanisms of electron-affinic sensitizers are discussed. The radiosensitizing effects of the pyrimidine analogs, BUDR, BCDR, IUDR, CUDR, and FUDR, are examined and the enhancement of radiation effects by the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil, is discussed. Other agents discussed are methotrexate, actinomycin D, bleomycin, and adriamycin

  12. Ubiquitin and proteasomes in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription-from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus-is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system--from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome-are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  13. Allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ree, Ronald; Hummelshøj, Lone; Plantinga, Maud; Poulsen, Lars K.; Swindle, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Allergic sensitization is the outcome of a complex interplay between the allergen and the host in a given environmental context. The first barrier encountered by an allergen on its way to sensitization is the mucosal epithelial layer. Allergic inflammatory diseases are accompanied by increased...... play a dominant role, B cells switch to IgE-production, a process that is more effective at young age. IgE-producing plasma cells have been shown to be long-lived, hiding in the bone-marrow or inflammatory tissues where they cannot easily be targeted by therapeutic intervention. Allergic sensitization...

  14. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  15. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It is found mainly in foods but ... products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different ...

  16. Radioecological sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the release of radionuclide into the environment it is important to be able to readily identify major routes of radiation exposure, the most highly exposed individuals or populations and the geographical areas of most concern. Radioecological sensitivity can be broadly defined as the extent to which an ecosystem contributes to an enhanced radiation exposure to Man and biota. Radioecological sensitivity analysis integrates current knowledge on pathways, spatially attributes the underlying processes determining transfer and thereby identifies the most radioecologically sensitive areas leading to high radiation exposure. This identifies where high exposure may occur and why. A framework for the estimation of radioecological sensitivity with respect to humans is proposed and the various indicators by which it can be considered have been identified. These are (1) aggregated transfer coefficients (Tag), (2) action (and critical) loads, (3) fluxes and (4) individual exposure of humans. The importance of spatial and temporal consideration of all these outputs is emphasized. Information on the extent of radionuclide transfer and exposure to humans at different spatial scales is needed to reflect the spatial differences which can occur. Single values for large areas, such as countries, can often mask large variation within the country. Similarly, the relative importance of different pathways can change with time and therefore assessments of radiological sensitivity are needed over different time periods after contamination. Radioecological sensitivity analysis can be used in radiation protection, nuclear safety and emergency preparedness when there is a need to identify areas that have the potential of being of particular concern from a risk perspective. Prior identification of radioecologically sensitive areas and exposed individuals improve the focus of emergency preparedness and planning, and contribute to environmental impact assessment for future facilities. The

  17. Functional screening identifies CRLF2 in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Akinori; Yoda, Yuka; Chiaretti, Sabina; Bar-Natan, Michal; Mani, Kartik; Rodig, Scott J; West, Nathan; Xiao, Yun; Brown, Jennifer R; Mitsiades, Constantine; Sattler, Martin; Kutok, Jeffrey L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Dal Cin, Paola; Bradner, James E; Griffin, James D; Anderson, Kenneth C; Stone, Richard M; Ritz, Jerome; Foà, Robin; Aster, Jon C; Frank, David A; Weinstock, David M

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for adults with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) remains poor, in part from a lack of therapeutic targets. We identified the type I cytokine receptor subunit CRLF2 in a functional screen for B-ALL-derived mRNA transcripts that can substitute for IL3 signaling. We demonstrate that CRLF2 is overexpressed in approximately 15% of adult and high-risk pediatric B-ALL that lack MLL, TCF3, TEL, and BCR/ABL rearrangements, but not in B-ALL with these rearrangements or other lymphoid malignancies. CRLF2 overexpression can result from translocation with the IGH locus or intrachromosomal deletion and is associated with poor outcome. CRLF2 overexpressing B-ALLs share a transcriptional signature that significantly overlaps with a BCR/ABL signature, and is enriched for genes involved in cytokine receptor and JAK-STAT signaling. In a subset of cases, CRLF2 harbors a Phe232Cys gain-of-function mutation that promotes constitutive dimerization and cytokine independent growth. A mutually exclusive subset harbors activating mutations in JAK2. In fact, all 22 B-ALLs with mutant JAK2 that we analyzed overexpress CRLF2, distinguishing CRLF2 as the key scaffold for mutant JAK2 signaling in B-ALL. Expression of WT CRLF2 with mutant JAK2 also promotes cytokine independent growth that, unlike CRLF2 Phe232Cys or ligand-induced signaling by WT CRLF2, is accompanied by JAK2 phosphorylation. Finally, cells dependent on CRLF2 signaling are sensitive to small molecule inhibitors of either JAKs or protein kinase C family kinases. Together, these findings implicate CRLF2 as an important factor in B-ALL with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. PMID:20018760

  18. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Marquet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of reverse transcription and its importance for viral infectivity further points toward reverse transcription and potentially its initiation step as an important drug target.

  19. Prediction for human transcription start site using diversity measure with quadratic discriminant

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jun; Luo, LiaoFu

    2008-01-01

    The accurate identification of promoter regions and transcription start sites is a challenge to the construction of human transcription regulation networks. Thus, an efficient prediction method based on theoretical formulation is necessary for this purpose. We used the method of increment diversity with quadratic discriminant analysis (IDQD) to predict transcription start sites (TSS). The method produced sensitivity and positive predictive value of more than 65% with positives to negatives ra...

  20. The transcriptional basis of adipocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Evan D

    2005-07-01

    Adipogenesis is the developmental process by which a multipotent mesenchymal stem cell differentiates into a mature adipocyte. This process involves a highly regulated and coordinated cascade of transcription factors that together lead to the establishment of the differentiated state. In the presence of the correct hormonal cues, committed pre-adipocytes express the bZIP factors C/EBPb and C/EBPd. These factors in turn induce the expression of C/EBPa and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g (PPARg). C/EBPa and PPARg together promote differentiation by activating adipose-specific gene expression and by maintaining each others expression at high levels. We have investigated the relative contributions of PPARg and C/EBPa to adipogenesis by selectively ablating these genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). MEFs that lack C/EBPa are able to undergo adipogenesis, but only when PPARg is ectopically expressed. Interestingly, these cells are not sensitive to the metabolic actions of insulin. By way of contrast, cells that lack PPARg are utterly incapable of adipogenic conversion, even when supplemented with high levels of C/EBPa. Our current investigations are centered on the identification of novel adipogenic transcription factors, utilizing a variety of techniques, ranging from BAC transgenics to computational approaches. These approaches will be discussed, along with the roles of some new transcriptional players in adipogenesis, including the O/E family of proteins. PMID:15936931

  1. 腺病毒载体介导胞嘧啶脱氨酶基因转染的前列腺癌细胞株对5-氟胞嘧啶作用敏感性的研究%Sensitization of prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine induced by adenoviral vector carrying a CD transcription unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷莲华; 王新红

    2001-01-01

    Adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit can sensitize prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine. The system can significantly inhibit the growth of prostatic tumors in mice.

  2. A Preliminary Study of the Suitability of Archival Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Smears for Diagnosis of CML Using FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Charwudzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. FISH is a molecular cytogenetic technique enabling rapid detection of genetic abnormalities. Facilities that can run fresh/wet samples for molecular diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic disorders are not readily available in Ghana and other neighbouring countries. This study aims to demonstrate that interphase FISH can successfully be applied to archival methanol-fixed bone marrow and peripheral blood smear slides transported to a more equipped facility for molecular diagnosis of CML. Methods. Interphase FISH was performed on 22 archival methanol-fixed marrow (BM and 3 peripheral blood (PB smear slides obtained at diagnosis. The BM smears included 20 CML and 2 CMML cases diagnosed by morphology; the 3 PB smears were from 3 of the CML patients at the time of diagnosis. Six cases had known BCR-ABL fusion results at diagnosis by RQ-PCR. Full blood count reports at diagnosis were also retrieved. Result. 19 (95% of the CML marrow smears demonstrated the BCR-ABL translocation. There was a significant correlation between the BCR-ABL transcript detected at diagnosis by RQ-PCR and that retrospectively detected by FISH from the aged BM smears at diagnosis (r=0.870; P=0.035. Conclusion. Archival methanol-fixed marrow and peripheral blood smears can be used to detect the BCR-ABL transcript for CML diagnosis.

  3. Gender Specific Differences in RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, N; Koo, J; Cabarcas-Petroski, S; Schramm, L

    2016-01-01

    Background RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a variety of untranslated RNAs responsible for regulating cellular growth and is deregulated in a variety of cancers. In this study, we examined gender differences in RNA pol III transcription in vitro and in vivo. Methods Expression levels of U6 snRNA, tMet, and known modulators of RNA pol III transcription were assayed in male and female derived adenocarcinoma (AC) lung cancer cell lines and male and female C57BL/6J mice using real time quantitative PCR. Methylation status of the U6 snRNA promoter was determined for lung and liver tissue isolated from male and female C57BL/6J mice by digesting genomic DNA with methylation sensitive restriction enzymes and digestion profiles were analyzed by qPCR using primers spanning the U6 promoter. Results Here, we demonstrate that RNA pol III transcription is differentially regulated by EGCG in male and female derived AC lung cancer cell lines. Basal RNA pol III transcript levels are significantly different in male and female derived AC lung cancer cell lines. These data prompted an investigation of gender specific differences in RNA pol III transcription in vivo in lung and liver tissue. Herein, we report that U6 snRNA RNA pol III transcription is significantly stimulated in the liver tissue of male C57BL/6J mice. Further, the increase in U6 transcription correlates with a significant inhibition in the expression of p53, a negative regulator of RNA pol III transcription, and demethylation of the U6 promoter in the liver tissue of male C57BL/6J mice. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating gender specific differences in RNA pol III transcription both in vivo and in vitro and further highlights the need to include both male and female cell lines and animals in experimental design.

  4. [Transcript assembly and quality assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feilong; Jia, Xianbo; Lai, Songjia; Liu, Yiping; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-09-01

    The transcript assembly is essential for transcriptome studies trom next-generation sequencing data. However, there are still many faults of algorithms in the present assemblers, which should be largely improved in the future. According to the requirement of reference genome or not, the transcript assembly could be classified into the genome-guided and de novo methods. The two methods have different algorithms and implementation processes. The quality of assembled transcripts depends on a large number of factors, such as the PCR amplification, sequencing techniques, assembly algorithm and genome character. Here, we reviewed the present tools of transcript assembly and various indexes for assessing the quality of assembled transcripts, which would help biologists to determine which assembler should be used in their studies. PMID:26955705

  5. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...... in the area of mental health (Dupret Søndergaard 2009, 2010). The concept of sensitive innovation is developed to capture and conceptualise exactly those heterogenic and intangible processes. Sensitive innovation is therefore primarily a way to understand innovative sources that can be......, but are not necessarily, recognized and acknowledged as such in the outer organisational culture or by management. The added value that qualifies these processes to be defined as “innovative” are thus argued for along different lines than in more traditional innovation studies (e.g. studies that build on the classic...

  6. FRET Biosensors for Cancer Detection and Evaluation of Drug Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive and specific FRET biosensor was developed by Mizutani et al. and applied to detect the activity of BCR-ABL kinase in live cells. This biosensor allowed the detection of cancerous and drug-resistant cells, and the evaluation of kinase inhibitor efficacy. Future biosensor development and imaging can increasingly contribute to cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  7. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  8. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  9. Multimodal interactive handwritten text transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Veronica; Vidal, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an interactive multimodal approach for efficient transcription of handwritten text images. This approach, rather than full automation, assists the expert in the recognition and transcription process.Until now, handwritten text recognition (HTR) systems are far from being perfect and heavy human intervention is often required to check and correct the results of such systems. The interactive scenario studied in this book combines the efficiency of automatic handwriting recognition systems with the accuracy of the experts, leading to a cost-effective perfect transcription of th

  10. The grammar of transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Segal, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotes employ combinatorial strategies to generate a variety of expression patterns from a relatively small set of regulatory DNA elements. As in any other language, deciphering the mapping between DNA and expression requires an understanding of the set of rules that govern basic principles in transcriptional regulation, the functional elements involved, and the ways in which they combine to orchestrate a transcriptional output. Here, we review the current understanding of various grammatical rules, including the effect on expression of the number of transcription factor binding sites, their location, orientation, affinity and activity; co-association with different factors; and intrinsic nucleosome organization. We review different methods that are used to study the grammar of transcription regulation, highlight gaps in current understanding, and discuss how recent technological advances may be utilized to bridge them. PMID:24390306

  11. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  12. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem....... Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t...

  13. Zooming in on Transcription Preinitiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kapil; Sari-Ak, Duygu; Haffke, Matthias; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre

    2016-06-19

    Class II gene transcription commences with the assembly of the Preinitiation Complex (PIC) from a plethora of proteins and protein assemblies in the nucleus, including the General Transcription Factors (GTFs), RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II), co-activators, co-repressors, and more. TFIID, a megadalton-sized multiprotein complex comprising 20 subunits, is among the first GTFs to bind the core promoter. TFIID assists in nucleating PIC formation, completed by binding of further factors in a highly regulated stepwise fashion. Recent results indicate that TFIID itself is built from distinct preformed submodules, which reside in the nucleus but also in the cytosol of cells. Here, we highlight recent insights in transcription factor assembly and the regulation of transcription preinitiation. PMID:27067110

  14. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions...

  15. GATA Transcription Factors and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Rena; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost a quarter century since it was first appreciated that a class of oncogenes contained in rapidly transforming avian retroviruses encoded DNA-binding transcription factors. As with other oncogenes, genetic recombination with the viral genome led to their overexpression or functional alteration. In the years that followed, alterations of numerous transcription factors were shown to be causatively involved in various cancers in human patients and model organisms. Depending on t...

  16. Transcriptional approaches to riboswitch studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mironov, Alexander; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nudler, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    Natural RNA sensors of small molecules (a.k.a. riboswitches) regulate numerous metabolic genes. In bacteria, these RNA elements control transcription termination and translation initiation by changing the folding pathway of nascent RNA upon direct binding of a metabolite. To identify and study riboswitches we used in vitro reconstituted solid-phase transcription elongation/termination system. This approach allows for direct monitoring ligand binding and riboswitch functioning, establishing th...

  17. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos fami...

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics in nuclei of vasopressin-sensitive renal collecting duct cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bolger, Steven J.; Hurtado, Patricia A. Gonzales; Hoffert, Jason D.; Saeed, Fahad; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates transport across the collecting duct epithelium in part via effects on gene transcription. Transcriptional regulation occurs partially via changes in phosphorylation of transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, and protein kinases in the nucleus. To test whether vasopressin alters the nuclear phosphoproteome of vasopressin-sensitive cultured mouse mpkCCD cells, we used stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry to quantify thousands of phosphorylation sites...

  19. Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catassi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome characterized by intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subjects who are not affected by either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). The prevalence of NCGS is not clearly defined yet. Indirect evidence suggests that NCGS is slightly more common than CD, the latter affecting around 1% of the general population. NCGS has been mostly described in adults, particularly in females in the age group of 30-50 years; however, pediatric case series have also been reported. Since NCGS may be transient, gluten tolerance needs to be reassessed over time in patients with NCGS. NCGS is characterized by symptoms that usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, disappear with gluten withdrawal, and relapse following gluten challenge within hours/days. The 'classical' presentation of NCGS is a combination of irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities (either diarrhea or constipation), and systemic manifestations such as 'foggy mind', headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, dermatitis (eczema or skin rash), depression, and anemia. In recent years, several studies explored the relationship between the ingestion of gluten-containing food and the appearance of neurological and psychiatric disorders/symptoms like ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, schizophrenia, autism, depression, anxiety, and hallucinations (so-called gluten psychosis). The diagnosis of NCGS should be considered in patients with persistent intestinal and/or extraintestinal complaints showing a normal result of the CD and WA serological markers on a gluten-containing diet, usually reporting worsening of symptoms after eating gluten-rich food. NCGS should not be an exclusion diagnosis only. Unfortunately, no biomarker is sensitive and specific enough for diagnostic purposes; therefore, the diagnosis of NCGS is currently based on

  20. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1...

  1. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-α inhibit adiponectin transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-γ, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-γ-RXR-α heterodimers bound to PPAR-γ response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-α inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-γ2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-α and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-α did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-α, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-α may be required for the observed inhibition.

  2. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappala, Giovanna, E-mail: zappalag@mail.nih.gov [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rechler, Matthew M. [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Clinical Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  3. Pegasus: a comprehensive annotation and prediction tool for detection of driver gene fusions in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Francesco; Zairis, Sakellarios; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Wiggins, Chris H.; Frattini, Veronique; Lasorella, Anna; Iavarone, Antonio; Inghirami, Giorgio; Rabadan, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The extraordinary success of imatinib in the treatment of BCR-ABL1 associated cancers underscores the need to identify novel functional gene fusions in cancer. RNA sequencing offers a genome-wide view of expressed transcripts, uncovering biologically functional gene fusions. Although several bioinformatics tools are already available for the detection of putative fusion transcripts, candidate event lists are plagued with non-functional read-through events, reverse transcriptase tem...

  4. The yeast TFB1 and SSL1 genes, which encode subunits of transcription factor IIH, are required for nucleotide excision repair and RNA polymerase II transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Buratowski, S; Svejstrup, J Q; Feaver, W J; Wu, X; Kornberg, R D; Donahue, T F; Friedberg, E C

    1995-01-01

    The essential TFB1 and SSL1 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode two subunits of the RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIIH (factor b). Here we show that extracts of temperature-sensitive mutants carrying mutations in both genes (tfb1-101 and ssl1-1) are defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RNA polymerase II transcription but are proficient for base excision repair. RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription at the CYC1 promoter was normal at permissive tempera...

  5. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  6. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs. CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions.

  7. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Uosaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM differentiation. However, control of the CM maturation that is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs, which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent-stem-cell-derived CMs mature early in culture but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation.

  8. Intrinsic transcript cleavage activity of RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova, M; Newlands, J; Das, A; Goldfarb, A; Borukhov, S

    1995-01-01

    The GreA and GreB transcript cleavage factors of Escherichia coli suppress elongation arrest and may have a proofreading role in transcription. With the use of E. coli greA-greB- mutant, RNA polymerase is demonstrated to possess substantial intrinsic transcript cleavage activity. Mildly alkaline pH mimics the effect of the Gre proteins by inducing transcript cleavage in ternary complexes and antagonizing elongation arrest through a cleavage-and-restart reaction. Thus, transcript cleavage cons...

  9. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  10. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of st

  11. Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz; Paszek, Pawel; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Brasier, Allan R; Kimmel, Marek

    2006-01-21

    Due to the small number of copies of molecular species involved, such as DNA, mRNA and regulatory proteins, gene expression is a stochastic phenomenon. In eukaryotic cells, the stochastic effects primarily originate in regulation of gene activity. Transcription can be initiated by a single transcription factor binding to a specific regulatory site in the target gene. Stochasticity of transcription factor binding and dissociation is then amplified by transcription and translation, since target gene activation results in a burst of mRNA molecules, and each mRNA copy serves as a template for translating numerous protein molecules. In the present paper, we explore a mathematical approach to stochastic modeling. In this approach, the ordinary differential equations with a stochastic component for mRNA and protein levels in a single cells yield a system of first-order partial differential equations (PDEs) for two-dimensional probability density functions (pdf). We consider the following examples: Regulation of a single auto-repressing gene, and regulation of a system of two mutual repressors and of an activator-repressor system. The resulting PDEs are approximated by a system of many ordinary equations, which are then numerically solved. PMID:16039671

  12. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...

  13. Generalized tolerance sensitivity and DEA metric sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Luka Neralić; Richard E. Wendell

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between Tolerance sensitivity analysis in optimization and metric sensitivity analysis in Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Herein, we extend the results on the generalized Tolerance framework proposed by Wendell and Chen and show how this framework includes DEA metric sensitivity as a special case. Further, we note how recent results in Tolerance sensitivity suggest some possible extensions of the results in DEA metric sensitivity.

  14. Evidence that Transcript Cleavage Is Essential for RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurdsson, Stefan; Dirac-Svejstrup, A. Barbara; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During transcript elongation in vitro, backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a frequent occurrence that can lead to transcriptional arrest. The polymerase active site can cleave the transcript during such backtracking, allowing transcription to resume. Transcript cleavage is either stimulated by elongation factor TFIIS or occurs much more slowly in its absence. However, whether backtracking actually occurs in vivo, and whether transcript cleavage is important to escape it, has...

  15. Targeting transcriptional addictions in small cell lung cancer with a covalent CDK7 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J; Carretero, Julian; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R; Poulsen, Hans S; Aref, Amir R; Barbie, David A; Bradner, James E; George, Rani E; Gray, Nathanael S; Young, Richard A; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-12-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, in particular to THZ1, a recently identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7. We find that expression of super-enhancer-associated transcription factor genes, including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors, is highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  16. Detection, characterization and regulation of antisense transcripts in HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesnard Jean-Michel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have recently demonstrated that the human retrovirus HTLV-I was producing a spliced antisense transcript, which led to the synthesis of the HBZ protein. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1 and to provide a better characterization of the transcript and its regulation. Results Initial experiments conducted by standard RT-PCR analysis in latently infected J1.1 cell line and pNL4.3-transfected 293T cells confirmed the existence of antisense transcription in HIV-1. A more adapted RT-PCR protocol with limited RT-PCR artefacts also led to a successful detection of antisense transcripts in several infected cell lines. RACE analyses demonstrated the existence of several transcription initiation sites mapping near the 5' border of the 3'LTR (in the antisense strand. Interestingly, a new polyA signal was identified on the antisense strand and harboured the polyA signal consensus sequence. Transfection experiments in 293T and Jurkat cells with an antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 proviral DNA showed luciferase reporter gene expression, which was further induced by various T-cell activators. In addition, the viral Tat protein was found to be a positive modulator of antisense transcription by transient and stable transfections of this proviral DNA construct. RT-PCR analyses in 293T cells stably transfected with a pNL4.3-derived construct further confirmed these results. Infection of 293T, Jurkat, SupT1, U937 and CEMT4 cells with pseudotyped virions produced from the antisense luciferase-expressing NL4.3 DNA clone led to the production of an AZT-sensitive luciferase signal, which was however less pronounced than the signal from NL4.3Luc-infected cells. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that antisense transcription exists in HIV-1 in the context of infection. Possible translation of the predicted antisense ORF in this transcript should

  17. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  18. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J; Carretero, Julian; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription fact...

  19. Ultrasensitivity and heavy-metal selectivity of the allosterically modulated MerR transcription complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, D M; O'Halloran, T V

    1990-01-01

    The MerR metalloregulatory protein is a heavy-metal receptor that functions as the repressor and Hg(II)-responsive transcription activator of the prokaryotic mercury-resistance (mer) genes. We demonstrate that this allosterically modulated regulatory protein is sensitive to HgCl2 concentrations of 1.0 +/- 0.3 x 10(-8) M in the presence of 1.0 x 10(-3) M dithiothreitol for half-maximal induction of transcription of the mer promoter by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro. Transcription med...

  20. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  1. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  2. A Biclustering Approach to Combinatorial Transcription Control

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Venkataraghavan

    2005-01-01

    Combinatorial control of transcription is a well established phenomenon in the cell. Multiple transcription factors often bind to the same transcriptional control region of a gene and interact with each other to control the expression of the gene. It is thus necessary to consider the joint conservation of sequence pairs in order to identify combinations of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind. Conventional motif finding algorithms fail to address this issue. We propose a nove...

  3. Regulation of Transcription Elongation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Washburn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will review our current understanding of transcription elongation and termination in E. coli. We discuss why transcription elongation complexes pause at certain template sites and how auxiliary host and phage transcription factors affect elongation and termination. The connection between translation and transcription elongation is described. Finally we present an overview indicating where progress has been made and where it has not.

  4. Splice Junction Map of Simian Parvovirus Transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Vashisht, Kapil; Faaberg, Kay S.; Aber, Amanda L.; Brown, Kevin E.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard

    2004-01-01

    The transcription map of simian parvovirus (SPV), an Erythrovirus similar to Parvovirus B19, was investigated. RNA was extracted from tissues of experimentally infected cynomolgus macaques and subjected to reverse transcription-PCR with SPV-specific primers. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced to identify splice junctions. A total of 14 distinct sequences were identified as putative partial transcripts. Of these, 13 were spliced; a single unspliced transcript putatively encoded NS1. Se...

  5. Synthetic in vitro transcriptional oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Winfree, Erik

    2011-02-01

    The construction of synthetic biochemical circuits from simple components illuminates how complex behaviors can arise in chemistry and builds a foundation for future biological technologies. A simplified analog of genetic regulatory networks, in vitro transcriptional circuits, provides a modular platform for the systematic construction of arbitrary circuits and requires only two essential enzymes, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and Escherichia coli ribonuclease H, to produce and degrade RNA signals. In this study, we design and experimentally demonstrate three transcriptional oscillators in vitro. First, a negative feedback oscillator comprising two switches, regulated by excitatory and inhibitory RNA signals, showed up to five complete cycles. To demonstrate modularity and to explore the design space further, a positive-feedback loop was added that modulates and extends the oscillatory regime. Finally, a three-switch ring oscillator was constructed and analyzed. Mathematical modeling guided the design process, identified experimental conditions likely to yield oscillations, and explained the system's robust response to interference by short degradation products. Synthetic transcriptional oscillators could prove valuable for systematic exploration of biochemical circuit design principles and for controlling nanoscale devices and orchestrating processes within artificial cells. PMID:21283141

  6. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos family protein (ΔFosB), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), among several others, in drug addiction. As will be seen, each factor displays very different regulation by drugs of abuse within the brain's reward circuitry, and in turn mediates distinct aspects of the addiction phenotype. Current efforts are geared toward understanding the range of target genes through which these transcription factors produce their functional effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. This work promises to reveal fundamentally new insight into the molecular basis of addiction, which will contribute to improved diagnostic tests and therapeutics for addictive disorders. PMID:23430970

  7. Transcription Inhibition as a Therapeutic Target for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During tumorigenesis the transformed cells lose their normal growth control mechanisms and become dependent on oncogenes' products and pathways for survival. Treatments tailored to block the expression or function of transforming genes have shown efficacy in eliminating neoplastic cells. The mRNAs of many oncogenes, as well as regulators of other key processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, typically have shorter half-lives. Agents that impede mRNA synthesis are expected to selectively hinder the expression of these genes and, therefore, be detrimental to neoplastic cells that are physiologically dependent on them. In addition to exploiting the tumor cells' dependency on short-lived transcripts, RNA-directed agents also take advantage of the differential sensitivity between transformed and non-transformed cells, as the cytotoxic effects of inhibiting RNA synthesis have not been seen in non-transformed cells. The abrogation of the formation of oncotranscripts provides a new concept in cancer therapeutics and numerous agents have been developed which are able to target transcription. The focus of this review is to give an overview of transcription and the different inhibitory strategies that target various aspects of the transcriptional process

  8. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500...

  9. Effects of elongation delay in transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Jin, Huiqin; Yang, Zhuoqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2014-12-01

    In the transcription process, elongation delay is induced by the movement of RNA polymerases (RNAP) along the DNA sequence, and can result in changes in the transcription dynamics. This paper studies the transcription dynamics that involved the elongation delay and effects of cell division and DNA replication. The stochastic process of gene expression is modeled with delay chemical master equation with periodic coefficients, and is studied numerically through the stochastic simulation algorithm with delay. We show that the average transcription level approaches to a periodic dynamics over cell cycles at homeostasis, and the elongation delay can reduce the transcription level and increase the transcription noise. Moreover, the transcription elongation can induce bimodal distribution of mRNA levels that can be measured by the techniques of flow cytometry. PMID:25365608

  10. Rethinking Transcription Coupled DNA Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a sub-pathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, pla...

  11. Automatic transcription of polyphonic singing

    OpenAIRE

    Paščinski, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    In this work we focus on automatic transcription of polyphonic singing. In particular we do the multiple fundamental frequency (F0) estimation. From the terrain recordings a test set of Slovenian folk songs with polyphonic singing is extracted and manually transcribed. On the test set we try the general algorithm for multiple F0 detection. An interactive visualization of the main parts of the algorithm is made to analyse how it works and try to detect possible issues. As the data set is ne...

  12. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  13. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; J.M. Ofrecio; Chapman, J; Subramaniam, S

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecula...

  14. Role of Transcription Factor Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver not due to alcohol abuse. NAFLD is accompanied by variety of symptoms related to metabolic syndrome. Although the metabolic link between NAFLD and insulin resistance is not fully understood, it is clear that NAFLD is one of the main cause of insulin resistance. NAFLD is shown to affect the functions of other organs, including pancreas, adipose tissue, muscle and inflammatory systems. Currently efforts are being made to understand molecular mechanism of interrelationship between NAFLD and insulin resistance at the transcriptional level with specific focus on post-translational modification (PTM of transcription factors. PTM of transcription factors plays a key role in controlling numerous biological events, including cellular energy metabolism, cell-cycle progression, and organ development. Cell type- and tissue-specific reversible modifications include lysine acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. Moreover, phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine residues have been shown to affect protein stability, subcellular distribution, DNA-binding affinity, and transcriptional activity. PTMs of transcription factors involved in insulin-sensitive tissues confer specific adaptive mechanisms in response to internal or external stimuli. Our understanding of the interplay between these modifications and their effects on transcriptional regulation is growing. Here, we summarize the diverse roles of PTMs in insulin-sensitive tissues and their involvement in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  15. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  16. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Comprehensive Detection of Human Rhinoviruses▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Holloway, Brian; Dare, Ryan K.; Kuypers, Jane; Yagi, Shigeo; Williams, John V.; Hall, Caroline B.; Erdman, Dean D.

    2007-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are important contributors to respiratory disease, but their healthcare burden remains unclear, primarily because of the lack of sensitive, accurate, and convenient means of determining their causal role. To address this, we developed and clinically validated the sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay targeting the viral 5′ noncoding region defined by sequences obtained from all 100 currently recognized HRV prototype strai...

  17. Evaluation of the Hologic Panther Transcription-Mediated Amplification Assay for Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, S N; Costa, A M; Su, J; Lowe, P; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K; Garland, S M

    2016-08-01

    The detection of Mycoplasma genitalium was evaluated on 1,080 urine samples by the use of a Panther instrument. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were 100%, 99.4%, 93.6%, and 100%, respectively. Detection of M. genitalium by the use of the Panther transcription-mediated amplification assay offers a simple, accurate, and sensitive platform for diagnostic laboratories. PMID:27307453

  18. Human gene expression sensitivity according to large scale meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tu Kang; Ping Jie; Zheng Siyuan; Hao Pei; Gieger Christian; Wang-Sattler Rui; Zhong Yang; Li Yixue

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Genes show different sensitivities in expression corresponding to various biological conditions. Systematical study of this concept is required because of its important implications in microarray analysis etc. J.H. Ohn et al. first studied this gene property with yeast transcriptional profiling data. Results Here we propose a calculation framework for gene expression sensitivity analysis. We also compared the functions, centralities and transcriptional regulations of the s...

  19. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with [355]methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units

  20. Thyrotropin controls transcription of the thyroglobulin gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Heuverswyn, B; Streydio, C; Brocas, H; Refetoff, S.; Dumont, J.; Vassart, G.

    1984-01-01

    The availability of rat thyroglobulin cDNA clones was exploited to study the regulation of thyroglobulin gene transcription by thyrotropin (TSH). Groups of rats were subjected to treatments leading to reduction or increase in the rat serum TSH (rTSH) levels. Thyroid gland nuclei were isolated, incubated in vitro in the presence of 32P-labeled uridine triphosphate, and thyroglobulin transcripts were quantitated by hybridization to immobilized rat thyroglobulin cDNA clones. Transcription of the...

  1. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z.; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  2. How Sensitively Timed Are Sensitive Periods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zener, Rita Schaefer

    2003-01-01

    Reviews Maria Montessori's view of sensitive periods and examines the kinds of help needed from adults: an open mind, specific help from a prepared learning environment, and challenges presented at the right time. Stresses the universality of sensitive periods and their connection to brain development. Focuses on the unconscious nature and…

  3. Diversity of transcripts and transcript processing forms in plastids of the dinoflagellate alga Karenia mikimotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, Richard G; Hinksman, George A; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Plastids produce a vast diversity of transcripts. These include mature transcripts containing coding sequences, and their processing precursors, as well as transcripts that lack direct coding functions, such as antisense transcripts. Although plastid transcriptomes have been characterised for many plant species, less is known about the transcripts produced in other plastid lineages. We characterised the transcripts produced in the fucoxanthin-containing plastids of the dinoflagellate alga Karenia mikimotoi. This plastid lineage, acquired through tertiary endosymbiosis, utilises transcript processing pathways that are very different from those found in plants and green algae, including 3' poly(U) tail addition, and extensive substitutional editing of transcript sequences. We have sequenced the plastid transcriptome of K. mikimotoi, and have detected evidence for divergent evolution of fucoxanthin plastid genomes. We have additionally characterised polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from two plastid loci, psbD-tRNA (Met)-ycf4 and rpl36-rps13-rps11. We find evidence for a range of transcripts produced from each locus that differ in terms of editing state, 5' end cleavage position, and poly(U) tail addition. Finally, we identify antisense transcripts in K. mikimotoi, which appear to undergo different processing events from the corresponding sense transcripts. Overall, our study provides insights into the diversity of transcripts and processing intermediates found in plastid lineages across the eukaryotes. PMID:26768263

  4. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  5. Purified estrogen receptor enhances in vitro transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Molinari, A M; Armetta, I; de Falco, A; Abbondanza, C; Medici, N; Puca, G A

    1992-07-31

    An in vitro transcription system was developed to investigate the mechanisms of gene regulation by the estrogen receptor (ER). ER purified from calf uterus was highly active in enhancing RNA transcription from a template DNA containing estrogen response elements (EREs) upstream from a minimal promoter. Under the conditions employed, no addition of tissue specific factors was required and both estrogen or antiestrogens were ineffective. The stimulation of transcription correlated with the copy number of EREs in the template. The addition of competitor ERE oligonucleotides specifically inhibited the ER-induced transcription. We suggest that the ER may be involved in the formation of the stable initiation complex. PMID:1497666

  6. Performance of the RealStar Chikungunya Virus Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Kit▿

    OpenAIRE

    Panning, Marcus; Hess, Markus; Fischer, Waldemar; Grywna, Klaus; Pfeffer, Martin; Drosten, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A novel commercial Chikungunya virus real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) kit was evaluated on a comprehensive panel of original patient samples. The assay was 100% sensitive and specific in comparison to a published real-time RT-PCR. Viral loads from both assays were highly correlated. The kit proved to be suitable for routine use in patient care.

  7. Single-molecule transcript counting of stem-cell markers in the mouse intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itzkovitz, S.; Lyubimova, A.; Blat, I.C.; Maynard, M.; van Es, J.H.; Lees, J.; Jacks, T.; Clevers, H.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the molecular identities of adult stem cells requires technologies for sensitive transcript detection in tissues. In mouse intestinal crypts, lineage-tracing studies indicated that different genes uniquely mark spatially distinct stem-cell populations, residing either at crypt bases or a

  8. E2F1-mediated transcriptional inhibition of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziczak, M; Müller, H; Helin, K;

    2001-01-01

    -sensitive retinoblastoma protein (pRB), a shift to a permissive temperature induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In U2OS cells stably expressing an E2F1-estrogen receptor chimeric protein that could be activated by tamoxifen, PAI-1 gene transcription was markedly reduced by tamoxifen even in the presence of cycloheximide. These...

  9. Archaeal Transcription: Function of an Alternative Transcription Factor B from Pyrococcus furiosus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Micorescu, Michael; Grünberg, Sebastian; Franke, Andreas; Cramer, Patrick; Thomm, Michael; Bartlett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the hyperthermophile archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus encodes two transcription factor B (TFB) paralogs, one of which (TFB1) was previously characterized in transcription initiation. The second TFB (TFB2) is unusual in that it lacks recognizable homology to the archaeal TFB/eukaryotic TFIIB B-finger motif. TFB2 functions poorly in promoter-dependent transcription initiation, but photochemical cross-linking experiments indicated that the orientation and occupancy of transcription com...

  10. Coregulation of transcription factors and microRNAs in human transcriptional regulatory network

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Shui-Tein; Fuh Chiou-Shann; Chen Cho-Yi; Juan Hsueh-Fen; Huang Hsuan-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have suggested that miRNAs and transcription factors are primary metazoan gene regulators; however, the crosstalk between them still remains unclear. Methods We proposed a novel model utilizing functional annotation information to identify significant coregulation between transcriptional and post-transcriptional layers. Based on this model, function-en...

  11. Transcript Fraud and Handling Fraudulent Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Transcript fraud is a common problem for colleges and universities, businesses, employers, governmental licensing boards, and other agencies, with some experiencing it more so than others. The only difference between a large and small institution is the volume of degree and transcript fraud it experiences. This article discusses the types and…

  12. Transcriptional Regulatory Elements in Fungal Secondary Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Wenbing; Keller, Nancy P.

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites of diverse beneficial and detrimental activities to humankind. The genes encoding the enzymatic machinery required to make these metabolites are typically clustered in fungal genomes. There is considerable evidence that secondary metabolite gene regulation is, in part, by transcriptional control through hierarchical levels of transcriptional regulatory elements involved in secondary metabolite cluster regulation. Identification of s...

  13. Transcriptional profiling of nitrogen fixation in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Ludwig, Marcus; Dixon, Ray; Boyd, Eric S; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Setubal, João C; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Most biological nitrogen (N(2)) fixation results from the activity of a molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, a complex iron-sulfur enzyme found associated with a diversity of bacteria and some methanogenic archaea. Azotobacter vinelandii, an obligate aerobe, fixes nitrogen via the oxygen-sensitive Mo nitrogenase but is also able to fix nitrogen through the activities of genetically distinct alternative forms of nitrogenase designated the Vnf and Anf systems when Mo is limiting. The Vnf system appears to replace Mo with V, and the Anf system is thought to contain Fe as the only transition metal within the respective active site metallocofactors. Prior genetic analyses suggest that a number of nif-encoded components are involved in the Vnf and Anf systems. Genome-wide transcription profiling of A. vinelandii cultured under nitrogen-fixing conditions under various metal amendments (e.g., Mo or V) revealed the discrete complement of genes associated with each nitrogenase system and the extent of cross talk between the systems. In addition, changes in transcript levels of genes not directly involved in N(2) fixation provided insight into the integration of central metabolic processes and the oxygen-sensitive process of N(2) fixation in this obligate aerobe. The results underscored significant differences between Mo-dependent and Mo-independent diazotrophic growth that highlight the significant advantages of diazotrophic growth in the presence of Mo. PMID:21724999

  14. Early transcriptional response of soybean contrasting accessions to root dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ribamar Costa Ferreira Neto

    Full Text Available Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression "protein binding" as the most represented for "Molecular Function", whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to "hormone response" (LOX, ERF1b, XET, "water response" (PUB, BMY, "salt stress response" (WRKY, MYB and "oxidative stress response" (PER figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with important

  15. Sensitivity versus block sensitivity of Boolean functions

    CERN Document Server

    Virza, Madars

    2010-01-01

    Determining relationship between sensitivity and block sensitivity of Boolean functions is of interest for computational complexity theory. We construct a sequence of Boolean functions with bs(f) = 1/2 (s(f))^2+ 1/2 s(f). The best known separation previously was bs(f) = 1/2 (s(f))^2 due to Rubinstein (1995). We also report results of computer search for functions with at most 12 variables.

  16. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    is regulated to allocate resources to growth and/or defense at different time points. Among plant chemical defenses are the amino acid-derived glucosinolates (GLS). Their absolute and relative accumulation is tightly regulated at basal level, but also in response to e.g. pathogen attack and hormone......Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  18. Automatic Phonetic Transcription for Danish Speech Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkedal, Andreas Søeborg

    to acquire and expensive to create. For languages with productive compounding or agglutinative languages like German and Finnish, respectively, phonetic dictionaries are also hard to maintain. For this reason, automatic phonetic transcription tools have been produced for many languages. The quality...... of automatic phonetic transcriptions vary greatly with respect to language and transcription strategy. For some languages where the difference between the graphemic and phonetic representations are small, graphemic transcriptions can be used to create ASR systems with acceptable performance. In other languages......, syllabication, stød and several other suprasegmental features (Kirkedal, 2013). Simplifying the transcriptions by filtering out the symbols for suprasegmental features in a post-processing step produces a format that is suitable for ASR purposes. eSpeak is an open source speech synthesizer originally created...

  19. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Chiquet, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins of the tenascin family resemble each other in their domain structure, and also share functions in modulating cell adhesion and cellular responses to growth factors. Despite these common features, the 4 vertebrate tenascins exhibit vastly different expression patterns. Tenascin-R is specific to the central nervous system. Tenascin-C is an "oncofetal" protein controlled by many stimuli (growth factors, cytokines, mechanical stress), but with restricted occurrence in space and time. In contrast, tenascin-X is a constituitive component of connective tissues, and its level is barely affected by external factors. Finally, the expression of tenascin-W is similar to that of tenascin-C but even more limited. In accordance with their highly regulated expression, the promoters of the tenascin-C and -W genes contain TATA boxes, whereas those of the other 2 tenascins do not. This article summarizes what is currently known about the complex transcriptional regulation of the 4 tenascin genes in development and disease. PMID:25793574

  20. How sensitizing is chlorocresol?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1984-01-01

    Chlorocresol is a biocide with widespread use in industry and pharmaceutical products. It is an occasional human contact sensitizer. The sensitizing potential of chlorocresol was judged strong using the guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) and doubtful in the less sensitive open epicutaneous test ...

  1. Root-Specific Transcript Profiling of Contrasting Rice Genotypes in Response to Salinity Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olivier Cotsaftis; Darren Plett; Alexander A.T. Johnson; Harkamal Walia; Clyde Wilson; Abdelbagi M. Ismail; Timothy J. Close; Mark Tester; Ute Baumann

    2011-01-01

    Elevated salinity imposes osmotic and ion toxicity stresses on living cells and requires a multitude of responses in order to enable plant survival. Building on earlier work profiling transcript levels in rice (Oryza sativa) shoots of FL478, a salt-tolerant indica recombinant inbred line, and IR29, a salt-sensitive cultivar, transcript levels were compared in roots of these two accessions as well as in the roots of two additional salt-tolerant indica genotypes, the landrace Pokkali and the recombinant inbred line IR63731. The aim of this study was to compare transcripts in the sensitive and the tolerant lines in order to identify genes likely to be involved in plant salinity tolerance, rather than in responses to salinity perse. Transcript profiles of several gene families with known links to salinity tolerance are described (e.g. HKTs,NHXs). The putative function of a set of genes identified through their salt responsiveness, transcript levels, and/or chro-mosomal location (i.e. Underneath QTLs for salinity tolerance) is also discussed. Finally, the parental origin of the Saltol region in FL478 is further investigated. Overall, the dataset presented appears to be robust and it seems likely that this system could provide a reliable strategy for the discovery of novel genes involved in salinity tolerance.

  2. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Valmor J; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  3. Prunus transcription factors: Breeding perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor João Bianchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs. In peach, 1,533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome.

  4. Ultrasensitivity and heavy-metal selectivity of the allosterically modulated MerR transcription complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MerR metalloregulatory protein is a heavy-metal receptor that functions as the repressor and Hg(II)-responsive transcription activator of the prokaryotic mercury-resistance (mer) genes. The authors demonstrate that this allosterically modulated regulatory protein is sensitive to HgCl2 concentrations of 1.0 ± 0.3 x 10-8 M in the presence of 1.0 x 10-3 M dithiothreitol for half-maximal induction of transcription of the mer promoter by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro. Transcription mediated by MerR increases from 10% to 90% of maximum in response to a 7-fold change in concentration of HgCl2, consistent with a threshold phenomenon known as ultrasensitivity. In addition, MerR exhibits a high degree of selectivity. Cd(II), Zn(II), Ag(I), Au(I), and Au(III) have been found to partially stimulate transcription in the presence of MerR, but concentrations at least two to three orders of magnitude greater than for Hg(II) are required. The molecular basis of the ultrasensitivity and selectivity phenomena are postulated to arise from the unusual topology of the transcription complex and a rare trigonal mercuric ion coordination environment, respectively. This mercuric ion-induced switch is to our knowledge the only known example of ultrasensitivity in a signal-responsive transcription mechanism

  5. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protein...... level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has...

  6. Positive roles of SAS2 in DNA replication and transcriptional silencing in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Yanfei; Bi, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Sas2p is a histone acetyltransferase implicated in the regulation of transcriptional silencing, and ORC is the six-subunit origin recognition complex involved in the initiation of DNA replication and the establishment of transcriptionally silent chromatin by silencers in yeast. We show here that SAS2 deletion (sas2Δ) exacerbates the temperature sensitivity of the ORC mutants orc2-1 and orc5-1. Moreover, sas2Δ and orc2-1 have a synthetic effect on cell cycle progression through S phase and ini...

  7. Distinct graft-versus-leukemic stem cell effects of early or delayed donor leukocyte infusions in a mouse chronic myeloid leukemia model

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yi-Fen; Gavrilescu, L Cristina; Betancur, Monica; Lazarides, Katherine; Klingemann, Hans; Van Etten, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Among hematologic neoplasms, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is exquisitely sensitive to graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) because patients relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT) can be cured by donor leukocyte infusion (DLI); however, the cellular mechanisms and strategies to separate GVL from GVHD are unclear. We used a BCR-ABL1 transduction/transplantation mouse model to study the mechanisms of DLI in MHC-matched, minor histocompatibility antigen–mismatched ...

  8. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  9. Molecular biology Mediating transcription and RNA export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Taatjes, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    The finding that the Mediator protein complex contributes to messenger RNA export from the nucleus in yeast adds to a growing list of roles for the complex in regulating transcriptional processes. PMID:26450052

  10. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  11. Dynamics of transcription-translation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D.; Edwards, R.

    2016-09-01

    A theory for qualitative models of gene regulatory networks has been developed over several decades, generally considering transcription factors to regulate directly the expression of other transcription factors, without any intermediate variables. Here we explore a class of models that explicitly includes both transcription and translation, keeping track of both mRNA and protein concentrations. We mainly deal with transcription regulation functions that are steep sigmoids or step functions, as is often done in protein-only models, though translation is governed by a linear term. We extend many aspects of the protein-only theory to this new context, including properties of fixed points, description of trajectories by mappings between switching points, qualitative analysis via a state-transition diagram, and a result on periodic orbits for negative feedback loops. We find that while singular behaviour in switching domains is largely avoided, non-uniqueness of solutions can still occur in the step-function limit.

  12. T-lineage blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia: simple record of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika W. Taroeno-Hariadi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Blast crisis (BC transformation in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML can involve each differentiation lineage of the hematopoietic system, i.e. granulocyte, monocyte, erythrocyte, megakaryocyte, and lymphocyte lineage. The lymphoid blast crisis (BC leukemia cells usually belong to B-lineage, commonly having the phenotype of Pre-B stage of the B-lineage, in which cell-surface immunoglobulin (sIg is not yet expressed. In contrast, T-lineage BC of CML is extremely rare. The objective of this study is to describe the fenotype, fusion transcript of bcr-abl, TdT, and cytoplasmic CD3 in T-lineage BC CML cases. Case report study. This report shows a simple summary of 4 cases of T-lineage BC of CML which have been collected in the phenotypic and genotypic analysis study for 17 years (1987-2004. In all cases, the chromosomal analysis revealed the presence of t(9;22(q34;q11 at presentation. Cell surface analysis were done at diagnosis. Cases’ mononuclear cells stored as 10% DMSO were retrieved to be performed reverse transcription (RT PCR BCR-ABL multiplex to demonstrate the presence of the fusion transcript of bcr-abl. RT-PCR was also performed for detecting the expression of cytoplasmic CD3ε and terminal deoxynucleotydil transferase (TdT. The results of cell surface antigen (CSA at presentation showed that 1 case was CD7+, CD5-, and CD2-; 1 case CD7+, CD5+, and CD2-; and 2 cases CD7+, CD5+ and CD2+ indicating that all these T-lineage BC of CML cells show the phenotype of pre-(pro- thymic stage phenotype. In the present study, two cases showed b2a2, one e1a2, and one negative bcr-abl transcript. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of CD3ε mRNA in all cases, and TdT mRNA in only one case. These results can constitute a basis for the future analysis of T-lineage BC of CML from now on. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 184-9Keywords: chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, blastic crisis (BC, T-lineage, bcr-abl fusion gene, CDε, TdT

  13. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  14. Extraction of Transcript Diversity from Scientific Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Parantu K Shah; Jensen, Lars J.; Stéphanie Boué; Peer Bork

    2005-01-01

    Synopsis Given the functional complexity of higher eukaryotes, the relatively small number of genes in the human and other mammalian genomes came as a surprise to the scientific community. Later it was discovered that the majority of genes are subject to alternative splicing (“cutting and pasting”) or associated mechanisms that ultimately increase the diversity of transcripts that code for proteins. Studies exploring transcript diversity are currently dominated by high-throughput experiments ...

  15. A Discriminative Model for Polyphonic Piano Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliner Graham E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a discriminative model for polyphonic piano transcription. Support vector machines trained on spectral features are used to classify frame-level note instances. The classifier outputs are temporally constrained via hidden Markov models, and the proposed system is used to transcribe both synthesized and real piano recordings. A frame-level transcription accuracy of 68% was achieved on a newly generated test set, and direct comparisons to previous approaches are provided.

  16. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  17. Do transcriptional enhancers also augment DNA replication?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, D T; Subramani, S

    1988-01-01

    Enhancers are DNA elements that augment transcription in cis, independent of distance and orientation. Evidence such as hormone dependent neoplastic cell growth and the stimulation of viral replication by sequences present in enhancers suggests that enhancers may also directly affect DNA replication. We tested this hypothesis in recombinant plasmids by asking whether sequences that stimulated DNA replication shared the properties of transcriptional enhancers. The homologous simian virus 40 (S...

  18. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  19. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Robson; David G. Hirst

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these stra...

  20. Evaluation framework for automatic singing transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Emilio; Ana M. Barbancho; Tardón, Lorenzo J.; Barbancho, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the evaluation strategies used in previous works on automatic singing transcription, and we present a novel, comprehensive and freely available evaluation framework for automatic singing transcription. This framework consists of a cross-annotated dataset and a set of extended evaluation measures, which are integrated in a Matlab toolbox. The presented evaluation measures are based on standard MIREX note-tracking measures, but they provide extra information about the ...

  1. Transcription Factor Oscillations Induce Differential Gene Expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Keng Boon; Yio, Wee Kheng; Surana, Uttam; Chiam, Keng Hwee

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular protein levels of diverse transcription factors (TFs) vary periodically with time. However, the effects of TF oscillations on gene expression, the primary role of TFs, are poorly understood. In this study, we determined these effects by comparing gene expression levels induced in the presence and in the absence of TF oscillations under same mean intracellular protein level of TF. For all the nonlinear TF transcription kinetics studied, an oscillatory TF is predicted to induce ge...

  2. Evolution of transcriptional regulatory circuits in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, J. Christian; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2009-01-01

    Related organisms typically respond to a given cue by altering the level or activity of orthologous transcription factors, which, paradoxically, often regulate expression of distinct gene sets. Although promoter rewiring of shared genes is primarily responsible for regulatory differences among related eukaryotic species, in bacteria, species-specific genes are often controlled by ancestral transcription factors and regulatory circuit evolution has been further shaped by horizontal gene transf...

  3. Transcription of piano music with deep learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jug, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of music is a complex process of transcribing an audio recording into a symbolic notation. The goal of this thesis was to examine transcription of piano music with deep learning, for which three models of deep neural networks were implemented: multilayer perceptron, convolutional neural network and deep belief network. Through the use of deep belief network, unsupervised pretraining for automatic extraction of musical features from audio signals was also tested. Learning of thes...

  4. Phonetic transcription standards for european names (onomastica).

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Mark; Fitt, Susan; Scott, Christina; Jack, Mervyn A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper details the standards identified for phonetic transcription of names as part of the ONOMASTICA project, a European-wide research initiative for the construction of a multi-language pronunciation lexicon of proper names. The main design criteria adopted by the consortium for the development of this multi-language pronunciation dictionary are discussed, including aspects such as phonetic transcription standards, definitions of quality, quality control mechanisms ...

  5. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...... structure to the next. We propose a model to explain this behavior, and use it to discuss more generally the origin of structure sensitivity in heterogeneous catalysis....

  6. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22643861

  7. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan G; Navon, Ionel Michael

    2005-01-01

    As computer-assisted modeling and analysis of physical processes have continued to grow and diversify, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have become indispensable scientific tools. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis. Volume I: Theory focused on the mathematical underpinnings of two important methods for such analyses: the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure and the Global Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure. This volume concentrates on the practical aspects of performing these analyses for large-scale systems. The applications addressed include two-phase flow problems, a radiative c

  8. Developing cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi; Turner, deSalle

    2007-01-01

    Title. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students’ experiences of a study abroad programme Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students...... findings suggest that study abroad is a useful strategy for bridging the theory–practice divide. However, further research is needed with larger and more diverse students to test the generalizability of the findings. Longitudinal research is also needed to assess the impact of study abroad programmes on...... the deliver of culturally sensitive care. Keywords: cultural sensitivity, nursing students, empirical research, report, interviews, study abroad programmes, phenomenology...

  9. Allergic sensitization: screening methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladics, Gregory S.; Fry, Jeremy; Goodman, Richard;

    2014-01-01

    Experimental in silico, in vitro, and rodent models for screening and predicting protein sensitizing potential are discussed, including whether there is evidence of new sensitizations and allergies since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, the importance of linear versus...... infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing...

  10. Sectional global sensitivity measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the approach of sectional sensitivity measures is introduced. Opposite to well-known global sensitivity measures not only a singleton value is provided to appraise the functional input–output interrelation but rather a more detailed description of these interrelation is enabled. Therefore, the domain of definition (input space) and/or the codomain (result space) are subdivided in a finite number of subdomains/subranges. The evaluation of global sensitivity measures in these subdomains/subranges allows for a proper appraisal of the functional interrelation in local regions. The theoretic background of sectional sensitivity measures is elaborated in detail and exemplified by means of analytical functions. The advantages of sectional sensitivity measures are discussed by means of a medical intervention planning of a radio frequency ablation. - Highlights: • Global sensitivity measures provide just a singleton value per input dimension. • Sectional sensitivity measures enable evaluation of functional interrelation. • Subdivision of input and output in intervals (subdomains). • Usage of absolute partial derivatives as sensitivity measure. • Regional sensitivity statements in input as well as in output space possible

  11. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  12. A bacteriophage transcription regulator inhibits bacterial transcription initiation by σ-factor displacement

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bing; Shadrin, Andrey; Sheppard, Carol; Mekler, Vladimir; Xu, Yingqi; Severinov, Konstantin; Matthews, Steve; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) appropriate essential processes of bacterial hosts to benefit their own development. The multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAp) enzyme, which catalyses DNA transcription, is targeted by phage-encoded transcription regulators that selectively modulate its activity. Here, we describe the structural and mechanistic basis for the inhibition of bacterial RNAp by the transcription regulator P7 encoded by Xanthomonas oryzae phage Xp10. We reveal that P7 uses a two-step ...

  13. A TATA sequence-dependent transcriptional repressor activity associated with mammalian transcription factor IIA.

    OpenAIRE

    Aso, T.; Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1994-01-01

    In the process of characterizing cellular proteins that modulate basal transcription by RNA polymerase II, we identified a novel repressor activity specific for promoters containing consensus TATA boxes. This activity strongly represses TATA-binding protein (TBP)-dependent transcription initiation from core promoter elements containing a consensus TATA sequence, but activates TBP-dependent transcription from core promoter elements lacking a consensus TATA sequence. Purification of this activi...

  14. Sensitivity to dioxin decreases as zebrafish mature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Kevin A; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2012-06-01

    The embryos of teleost fish are exquisitely sensitive to the toxic effects of exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, several lines of evidence suggest that adults are less sensitive to TCDD. To better understand and characterize this difference between early life stage and adults, we exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to graded TCDD concentrations at different ages. The LD(50) for embryos exposed at 1 day post-fertilization (dpf) was more than an order of magnitude lower than it was for juveniles exposed at 30 dpf. The latency between exposure and response also increased with age. Embryo toxicity was characterized by marked cardiovascular collapse and heart malformation, whereas juveniles exposed at 30 dpf had no detectable cardiovascular toxicity. In juveniles, the effects of TCDD exposure included stunted growth, altered pigmentation, and skeletal malformations. Furthermore, the transcriptional profile produced in hearts exposed to TCDD as embryos had very little overlap with the transcriptional changes induced by TCDD at 30 dpf. The early cardiotoxic response was associated with fish exposed prior to metamorphosis from the larval to the adult body plan at approximately 14 dpf. Our results show conclusively that the developmental stage at the time of exposure controls the toxic response to TCDD. PMID:22403156

  15. [Research Progress on CALR Mutation in the Myeloproliterative Neoplasm -Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Hao, Hong-Ling; Li, Yan; Wang, Rui-Cang; Zhang, Xiao-Xia

    2016-08-01

    There is no gold diagnostic standard for BCR-ABL fusion gene negative chronic myeloproliterative neoplasm(cMPN). The following detection methods such as comprehensive bone marrow cell morphology, bone marrow pathology, genetic mutation, flow cytometry and immunohistochemical are needed to diagnose the BCR-ABL fusion gene positive cMPN. The JAK2 mutation can be used as a specific diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera (PV), but there is no specific and sensitive indication for the JAK2 mutation-negative MPN. CALR mutation would be an indication in a certain extent. In this review, the CALR mutation detection, detection mean and its correlation with disease diagnosis and prognosis etc were summarized. PMID:27531810

  16. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7% patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4% patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1% patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8% patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4% patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  17. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  18. Therapy adapted to molecular response in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia in first chronic phase: results of the Duesseldorf study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Frank; Markett, Judith; Fenk, Roland; Pooten, Monika; Koch, Anne; Bruennert, Daniela; Schimkus, Nadine; Wulfert, Michael; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Kronenwett, Ralf; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluates response-adapted treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase using molecular response criteria. bcr-abl/G6PDH ratios were assessed by Light-Cycler quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR( in 277 peripheral blood samples from 33 patients, before and every 3 months during therapy. Sixty-six per cent (22/33) of the patients fulfiled our molecular response criterion of > or = 1 log decrease in bcr-abl transcript after 6 or > or = 2 log decrease after 9 and every following 3 months. Dose escalation was necessary for 33% (11/33) of the patients. Of these, 54% (6/11) achieved a reduction of bcr-abl mRNA by > or = 2 log (n = 3) or > or = 3 log (n = 3) with 800 mg Imatinib. Forty-five per cent (5/11) showed insufficient molecular response with 800 mg Imatinib and received Nilotinib. In conclusion, the assessment of molecular response permits an individual patient-tailored treatment of CML in first chronic phase, resulting in the majority of patients achieving a major molecular response after 2 years of therapy. PMID:18449950

  19. Long Open Reading Frame Transcripts Escape Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Decourty

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD destabilizes eukaryotic transcripts with long 3′ UTRs. To investigate whether other transcript features affect NMD, we generated yeast strains expressing chromosomal-derived mRNAs with 979 different promoter and open reading frame (ORF regions and with the same long, destabilizing 3′ UTR. We developed a barcode-based DNA microarray strategy to compare the levels of each reporter mRNA in strains with or without active NMD. The size of the coding region had a significant negative effect on NMD efficiency. This effect was not specific to the tested 3′ UTR because two other different NMD reporters became less sensitive to NMD when ORF length was increased. Inefficient NMD was not due to a lack of association of Upf1 to long ORF transcripts. In conclusion, in addition to a long 3′ UTR, short translation length is an important feature of NMD substrates in yeast.

  20. Long open reading frame transcripts escape nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decourty, Laurence; Doyen, Antonia; Malabat, Christophe; Frachon, Emmanuel; Rispal, Delphine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Feuerbach, Frank; Jacquier, Alain; Saveanu, Cosmin

    2014-02-27

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) destabilizes eukaryotic transcripts with long 3' UTRs. To investigate whether other transcript features affect NMD, we generated yeast strains expressing chromosomal-derived mRNAs with 979 different promoter and open reading frame (ORF) regions and with the same long, destabilizing 3' UTR. We developed a barcode-based DNA microarray strategy to compare the levels of each reporter mRNA in strains with or without active NMD. The size of the coding region had a significant negative effect on NMD efficiency. This effect was not specific to the tested 3' UTR because two other different NMD reporters became less sensitive to NMD when ORF length was increased. Inefficient NMD was not due to a lack of association of Upf1 to long ORF transcripts. In conclusion, in addition to a long 3' UTR, short translation length is an important feature of NMD substrates in yeast. PMID:24529707

  1. Regulation of MCP-1 chemokine transcription by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasylyk Bohdan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies showed that the expression of the monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, a chemokine, which triggers the infiltration and activation of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is abrogated in human papillomavirus (HPV-positive premalignant and malignant cells. In silico analysis of the MCP-1 upstream region proposed a putative p53 binding side about 2.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start. The aim of this study is to monitor a physiological role of p53 in this process. Results The proposed p53 binding side could be confirmed in vitro by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays and in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the availability of p53 is apparently important for chemokine regulation, since TNF-α can induce MCP-1 only in human keratinocytes expressing the viral oncoprotein E7, but not in HPV16 E6 positive cells, where p53 becomes degraded. A general physiological role of p53 in MCP-1 regulation was further substantiated in HPV-negative cells harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of p53 and in Li-Fraumeni cells, carrying a germ-line mutation of p53. In both cases, non-functional p53 leads to diminished MCP-1 transcription upon TNF-α treatment. In addition, siRNA directed against p53 decreased MCP-1 transcription after TNF-α addition, directly confirming a crosstalk between p53 and MCP-1. Conclusion These data support the concept that p53 inactivation during carcinogenesis also affects immune surveillance by interfering with chemokine expression and in turn communication with cells of the immunological compartment.

  2. How sensitive are price sensitive events?

    OpenAIRE

    Duque, João; Pinto, Inês

    2004-01-01

    According to the Portuguese law and in line with the regulatory framework of the majority of the European capital markets (namely the UK market), security issuers have the obligation to reveal, in an appropriate way, publishable information, in order to avoid information asymmetry. This information is classified into two categories: the first called "Price Sensitive Events" and the second under the designation "Other Events/Communications" and, as it is expected, it does not necessarily influ...

  3. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...

  4. Assessing Sensitiveness to Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieb, Christoph; Suter, Stefan; Sánchez, Alfredo;

    Summary The EU-project ASSET (ASessing SEnsitiveness to Transport) aims at developing and implementing a concise concept to assess transport sensitive areas (TSA) in a European context, i.e. areas in which transport leads to more serious impacts than in other areas. The aim of work package 2 (WP2...

  5. Multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Kupers, Ron;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent, non-specific symptoms in response to chemically unrelated exposures in non-toxic concentrations. Although the pathophysiology of MCS remains unknown, central sensitization may be an important factor...

  6. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  7. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (sensitivity levels.

  8. Sensitive skin: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun C Inamadar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  9. Finnish Teachers’ Ethical Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Kuusisto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the ethical sensitivity of Finnish teachers (=864 using a 28-item Ethical Sensitivity Scale Questionnaire (ESSQ. The psychometric qualities of this instrument were analyzed, as were the differences in self-reported ethical sensitivity between practicing and student teachers and teachers of different subjects. The results showed that the psychometric qualities of the ESSQ were satisfactory and enabled the use of an explorative factor analysis. All Finnish teachers rated their level of ethical sensitivity as high, which indicates that they had internalized the ethical professionalism of teaching. However, practicing teachers’ assessments were higher than student teachers’. Moreover, science as a subject was associated with lower self-ratings of ethical sensitivity.

  10. Extraction of transcript diversity from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcript diversity generated by alternative splicing and associated mechanisms contributes heavily to the functional complexity of biological systems. The numerous examples of the mechanisms and functional implications of these events are scattered throughout the scientific literature. Thus, it is crucial to have a tool that can automatically extract the relevant facts and collect them in a knowledge base that can aid the interpretation of data from high-throughput methods. We have developed and applied a composite text-mining method for extracting information on transcript diversity from the entire MEDLINE database in order to create a database of genes with alternative transcripts. It contains information on tissue specificity, number of isoforms, causative mechanisms, functional implications, and experimental methods used for detection. We have mined this resource to identify 959 instances of tissue-specific splicing. Our results in combination with those from EST-based methods suggest that alternative splicing is the preferred mechanism for generating transcript diversity in the nervous system. We provide new annotations for 1,860 genes with the potential for generating transcript diversity. We assign the MeSH term "alternative splicing" to 1,536 additional abstracts in the MEDLINE database and suggest new MeSH terms for other events. We have successfully extracted information about transcript diversity and semiautomatically generated a database, LSAT, that can provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific gene expression. LSAT (Literature Support for Alternative Transcripts is publicly available at http://www.bork.embl.de/LSAT/.

  11. Reliable prediction of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhong, Sheng; Wong, Wing H

    2005-11-22

    We present a statistical methodology that largely improves the accuracy in computational predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in eukaryote genomes. This method models the cross-species conservation of binding sites without relying on accurate sequence alignment. It can be coupled with any motif-finding algorithm that searches for overrepresented sequence motifs in individual species and can increase the accuracy of the coupled motif-finding algorithm. Because this method is capable of accurately detecting TF binding sites, it also enhances our ability to predict the cis-regulatory modules. We applied this method on the published chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that its sensitivity and specificity are 9% and 14% higher than those of two recent methods. We also recovered almost all of the previously verified TF binding sites and made predictions on the cis-regulatory elements that govern the tight regulation of ribosomal protein genes in 13 eukaryote species (2 plants, 4 yeasts, 2 worms, 2 insects, and 3 mammals). These results give insights to the transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16286651

  12. Circadian Transcription from Beta Cell Function to Diabetes Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelis, Mark; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian circadian clock plays a central role in the temporal coordination of physiology across the 24-h light-dark cycle. A major function of the clock is to maintain energy constancy in anticipation of alternating periods of fasting and feeding that correspond with sleep and wakefulness. While it has long been recognized that humans exhibit robust variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity across the sleep-wake cycle, experimental genetic analysis has now revealed that the clock transcription cycle plays an essential role in insulin secretion and metabolic function within pancreatic beta cells. This review addresses how studies of the beta cell clock may elucidate the etiology of subtypes of diabetes associated with circadian and sleep cycle disruption, in addition to more general forms of the disease. PMID:27440914

  13. Rapid identification of compound mutations in patients with Ph-positive leukemias by long-range next generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, R.; Zopf, A.; Preuner, S.; Pröll, J.; Niklas, N.; Foskett, P.; Valent, P.; Lion, T.; Gabriel, C.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging problem in patients with Ph-positive leukemias is the occurrence of cells with multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) associated with high resistance to different tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Rapid and sensitive detection of leukemic subclones carrying such changes, referred to as compound mutations, is therefore of increasing clinical relevance. However, current diagnostic methods including next generation sequencing (NGS) of short fragments do not optimally meet these requirements. We have therefore established a long-range (LR) NGS approach permitting massively parallel sequencing of the entire TKD length of 933bp in a single read using 454 sequencing with the GS FLX+ instrument (454 Life Sciences). By testing a series of individual and consecutive specimens derived from six patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, we demonstrate that long-range NGS analysis permits sensitive identification of mutations and their assignment to the same or to separate subclones. This approach also facilitates readily interpretable documentation of insertions and deletions in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD. The long-range NGS findings were reevaluated by an independent technical approach in select cases. PCR amplicons of the BCR-ABL1 TKD derived from individual specimens were subcloned into pGEM®-T plasmids, and >100 individual clones were subjected to analysis by Sanger sequencing. The NGS results were confirmed, thus documenting the reliability of the new technology. Long-range NGS analysis therefore provides an economic approach to the identification of compound mutations and other genetic alterations in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD, and represents an important advancement of the diagnostic armamentarium for rapid assessment of impending resistant disease. PMID:24365090

  14. Molecular genetic and cytogenetic determinants of primary resistance or loss of the response to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlyarchuk K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to analyze molecular genetic and cytogenetic reasons for disease resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI imatinib (IM and nilotinib (NI in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Material and methods. A group of 32 CML patients with primary or acquired resistance to TKI treatment was investigated. Cytogenetic response was determined by conventional karyotyping with differential banding. Presence of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations was investigated by direct sequencing. Results and discussion. The frequency of mutations was 37% (12 patients with prevailing occurrence of mutations with low sensitivity to nilotinib – E255K/V; Т315I; F359V; Y253H. In 47% of the cases (15 patients additional chromosome aberrations (ACA were revealed which could also be the reason for TKI resistance in patients without BCR/ABL mutations. Patients with detected mutations of BCR/ABL gene were either switched to nilotinib or treated with increased dose of IM. Cytogenetic response was achieved in only 2 patients with mutations and in 12 patients without them. Frequency of blast crisis development did not differ significantly in both groups. Conclusions. Among the investigated patients with CML resistant to IM BCR/ABL gene mutations were detected in more than third of the cases whereas ACA were found in almost half of the group. Taking into account revealed prevalence of mutations not sensitive to the 2nd generation TKI nilotinib, investigation of mutational status has to be obligatory in all patients for whom treatment correction is considered. Presence of ACA should also be taken into account in patients requiring administration of the second line TKI since they can adversely influence expected treatment response as well.

  15. Manuscript Transcription by Crowdsourcing: Transcribe Bentham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Moyle

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcribe Bentham is testing the feasibility of outsourcing the work of manuscript transcription to members of the public. UCL Library Services holds 60,000 folios of manuscripts of the philosopher and jurist Jeremy Bentham (1748–1832. Transcribe Bentham will digitise 12,500 Bentham folios, and, through a wiki-based interface, allow volunteer transcribers to take temporary ownership of manuscript images and to create TEI-encoded transcription text for final approval by UCL experts. Approved transcripts will be stored and preserved, with the manuscript images, in UCL’s public Digital Collections repository. The project makes innovative use of traditional library material. It will stimulate public engagement with UCL’s scholarly archive collections and the challenges of palaeography and manuscript transcription; it will raise the profile of the work and thought of Jeremy Bentham; and it will create new digital resources for future use by professional researchers. Towards the end of the project, the transcription tool will be made available to other projects and services. This paper is based on a presentation given by the lead author at LIBER’s 39th Annual General Conference in Aarhus, Denmark, 2010.

  16. Myc induced miR-144/451 contributes to the acquired imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Li, E-mail: liuli029@yahoo.cn [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang, Sitao; Chen, Renan; Wu, Yanlan; Zhang, Bei; Huang, Siyong; Zhang, Jingyi; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Meng; Liang, Yingmin [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased c-myc expression in imatinib resistant CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc contributes the imatinib resistance in CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc transcriptionally reduces the expression of miR-144/451 in K562R cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restoration of miR-144/451 reverses the resistance of K562R cells to imatinib. -- Abstract: Imatinib resistance remains the big hurdle for CML therapy. Previous study reveals that c-myc is important for bcr-abl CML cell proliferation, while its role in imatinib resistance is largely unknown. In this study, we first found that c-myc expression is upregulated in imatinib resistant K562R cells, which in turn enhances the expression of miR-144/451. Knockdown of c-myc or restoration of miR-144/451 in the K562R cells sensitizes K562R cells to imatinib therapy. Our study here reveals an regulatory pathway between myc and miR-144/451 and highlights that targeting either myc or miR-144/451 might be valuable for eliminating the imatinib resistant CML cells.

  17. [Contrast sensitivity in glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, D

    1989-05-01

    Author reports on results of the contrast sensitivity examinations using the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test supplied by Clement Clarke International LTD, in patients with open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. In glaucoma patients there was observed statistically significant decrease of the contrast sensitivity. In patients with ocular hypertension decrease of the contrast sensitivity was in patients affected by corresponding changes of the visual field and of the optical disc. The main advantages of the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test were simplicity, rapidity and precision of its performance. PMID:2743444

  18. Quality control of transcription start site selection by nonsense-mediated-mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabat, Christophe; Feuerbach, Frank; Ma, Laurence; Saveanu, Cosmin; Jacquier, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a translation-dependent RNA quality-control pathway targeting transcripts such as messenger RNAs harboring premature stop-codons or short upstream open reading frame (uORFs). Our transcription start sites (TSSs) analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for RNA degradation pathways revealed that about half of the pervasive transcripts are degraded by NMD, which provides a fail-safe mechanism to remove spurious transcripts that escaped degradation in the nucleus. Moreover, we found that the low specificity of RNA polymerase II TSSs selection generates, for 47% of the expressed genes, NMD-sensitive transcript isoforms carrying uORFs or starting downstream of the ATG START codon. Despite the low abundance of this last category of isoforms, their presence seems to constrain genomic sequences, as suggested by the significant bias against in-frame ATGs specifically found at the beginning of the corresponding genes and reflected by a depletion of methionines in the N-terminus of the encoded proteins. PMID:25905671

  19. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  20. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied in vitro transcription of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor proto-oncogene using nuclear extracts of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells, which overproduce the EGF receptor. With the in vitro system we found that Sp1 and other trans-acting factors bound to the EGF receptor promoter regions and are required for maximal expression. Fractionation showed that a DEAE-Sepharose fraction (BA) contained a novel factor, which specifically stimulated EGF receptor transcription 5- to 10-fold. The molecular mass of the native form of the factor is about 270-kDa based on its migration on Sephacryl S-300. This factor may activate transcription of the proto-oncogene through a weak or indirect interaction with the DNA template

  1. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M. The underphosphory......The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M. The......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  2. Phonemic Transcriptions in British and American Dictionaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Šuštaršič

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of recent criticisms concerning vowel symbols in some British English dictionaries (in particular by J. Windsor Lewis in JIPA (Windsor Lewis, 2003, with regard to the Oxford Dictionary of Pronunciation (Upton, 2001, this article extends the discussion on English phonemic transcriptions by including those that typically occur in standard American dictionaries, and by comparing the most common conventions of British and American dictionaries. In addition to symbols for both vowels and consonants, the paper also deals with the different representations of word accentuation and the issue of consistency regarding application of phonemic (systemic, broad, rather than phonetic (allophonic, narrow transcription. The different transcriptions are assessed from the points of view of their departures from the International Phonetic Alphabet, their overlapping with orthographic representation (spelling and their appropriateness in terms of reflecting actual pronunciation in standard British and/or American pronunciation.

  3. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  5. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrastructural study of transcription factories in mouse erythroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Eskiw, Christopher H.; Fraser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription has been proposed to occur at transcription factories; nuclear focal accumulations of the active, phosphorylated forms of RNAPII. The low ratio of transcription factories to active genes and transcription units suggests that genes must share factories. Our previous analyses using light microscopy have indicated that multiple genes could share the same factory. Furthermore, we found that a small number of specialized transcription factories containing h...

  7. RNA polymerase III transcription in cancer: the BRF2 connection

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm Laura; Cabarcas Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription is responsible for the transcription of small, untranslated RNAs involved in fundamental metabolic processes such mRNA processing (U6 snRNA) and translation (tRNAs). RNA pol III transcription contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic capacity of a cell and a direct link exists between cancer cell proliferation and deregulation of RNA pol III transcription. Accurate transcription by RNA pol III requires TFIIIB, a known target of regulatio...

  8. Structural basis for S-adenosylmethionine binding and methyltransferase activity by mitochondrial transcription factor B1

    OpenAIRE

    Guja, Kip E.; Venkataraman, Krithika; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Hui SHI; Mejia, Edison; Hambardjieva, Elena; Karzai, A. Wali; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factor B (TFB) proteins are homologous to KsgA/Dim1 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases. The mammalian TFB1, mitochondrial (TFB1M) factor is an essential protein necessary for mitochondrial gene expression. TFB1M mediates an rRNA modification in the small ribosomal subunit and thus plays a role analogous to KsgA/Dim1 proteins. This modification has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions leading to maternally inherited deafness, aminoglycoside sensitivity and di...

  9. The Adipocyte-Expressed Forkhead Transcription Factor Foxc2 Regulates Metabolism Through Altered Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Lidell, Martin E.; Seifert, Erin L.; Westergren, Rickard; Heglind, Mikael; Gowing, Adrienne; Sukonina, Valentina; Arani, Zahra; Itkonen, Paula; Wallin, Simonetta; Westberg, Fredrik; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Laakso, Markku; Nilsson, Tommy; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous findings demonstrate that enhanced expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxc2 in adipose tissue leads to a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. These findings prompted us to further investigate the role of Foxc2 in the regulation of genes of fundamental importance for metabolism and mitochondrial function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of Foxc2 on expression of genes involved in mitochondriogenesis and mitochondrial function were assessed by quantitati...

  10. DeepSAGE—digital transcriptomics with high sensitivity, simple experimental protocol and multiplexing of samples

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Kåre L; Høgh, Annabeth Laursen; Emmersen, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    Digital transcriptomics with pyrophosphatase based ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing of di-tags provides high sensitivity and cost-effective gene expression profiling. Sample preparation and handling are greatly simplified compared to Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). We compare DeepSAGE and LongSAGE data and demonstrate greater power of detection and multiplexing of samples derived from potato. The transcript analysis revealed a great abundance of up-regulated potato transcripts ...

  11. Molecular Buffers Permit Sensitivity Tuning and Inversion of Riboswitch Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Genee, Hans Jasper; Jensen, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    Predictable integration of foreign biological signals and parts remains a key challenge in the systematic engineering of synthetic cellular actuations, and general methods to improve signal transduction and sensitivity are needed. To address this problem we modeled and built a molecular signal...... buffer network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inspired by chemical pH buffer systems. The molecular buffer system context-insulates a riboswitch enabling synthetic control of colony formation and modular signal manipulations. The riboswitch signal is relayed to a transcriptional activation domain of a split...... transcription factor, while interacting DNA-binding domains mediate the transduction of signal and form an interacting molecular buffer. The molecular buffer system enables modular signal inversion through integration with repressor modules. Further, tuning of input sensitivity was achieved through perturbation...

  12. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  13. Radiation sensitive acrylate composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This application relates to radiation-sensitive compositions and more particularly to such compositions comprising acrylated esters. As used in this specification, the term acrylated esters refers to either acrylic or methacrylic acid resins. 3 tabs

  14. Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Petra; Bauer, Axel; Müller, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) indicates poor prognosis after acute myocardial infarction. Noninvasive BRS assessment is complicated by nonstationarities and noise in electrocardiogram and pressure signals. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a novel signal processing technology overcoming these...

  15. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott;

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding the...... relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... scientists from academia, government, and industry participated in the symposium. Experts provided overviews on known mechanisms by which proteins in food may cause sensitization, discussed experimental models to predict protein sensitizing potential, and explored whether such experimental techniques may be...

  16. Sensitive skin: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Inamadar, Arun C.; Aparna Palit

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial...

  17. CONTRAST SENSITIVITY IN AMBLYOPIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity function(CSF) for sinusoid gratings of varying spatial frequencies was determined for each eye of 21 cases with unilateral amblyopia. The CSF of all amblyopic eyes, except one, showed reduced sensitivity when compared with the non-amblyopic eye of the same person. The curve showed reduction more significantly at middle and high spatial frequencies. The cut-off frequency was shifted toward lower spatial frequencies. The relationship between CSF and various degree of amblyopia was als...

  18. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Startsev V. I.; Yampolsky Ju. S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  19. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel;

    2014-01-01

    assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS...... albuminuria. This finding suggests that reduced insulin sensitivity either is simply related to or might causally contribute to the initial pathogenesis of albuminuria....

  20. Transcription and the aspect ratio of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    analysis of transcription. It is shown that under certain reasonable assumptions transcription is only possible if the aspect ratio is in the regime corresponding to further twisting. We find this constraint to be in agreement with long-established crystallographic studies of DNA.......Two separate regimes exist for the aspect ratio of DNA. A low aspect regime where DNA will twist further under strain and a high aspect regime where DNA will untwist under strain. The question of the overall geometry, i.e. the aspect ratio, of DNA is revisited from the perspective of a geometrical...

  1. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce D. Uhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed.

  2. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of salinity stressed japonica and indica rice genotypes during panicle initiation stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice yield is most sensitive to salinity imposed during panicle initiation stage. In this study, we have focused on physiological and transcriptional responses of four rice genotypes exposed to salinity stress during panicle initiation. The genotypes selected included a pair of indicas (IR63731 and ...

  4. Human Mitochondrial Transcription Revisited: ONLY TFAM AND TFB2M ARE REQUIRED FOR TRANSCRIPTION OF THE MITOCHONDRIAL GENES IN VITRO*

    OpenAIRE

    Litonin, Dmitry; Sologub, Marina; Shi, Yonghong; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Human mitochondrial transcription is driven by a single subunit RNA polymerase and a set of basal transcription factors. The development of a recombinant in vitro transcription system has allowed for a detailed molecular characterization of the individual components and their contribution to transcription initiation. We found that TFAM and TFB2M act synergistically and increase transcription efficiency 100–200-fold as compared with RNA polymerase alone. Both the light-strand promoter (LSP) an...

  5. Energy expenditure and bone formation share a common sensitivity to AP-1 transcription in the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, Glenn C; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa; Saito, Hiroaki; Yin, Min; Green, Thomas A; Lotinun, Sutada; Kveiborg, Marie; Horne, William C; Nestler, Eric J; Baron, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of bone and fat homeostasis and its relationship to energy expenditure has recently been the focus of increased attention due to its potential relevance to osteoporosis, obesity and diabetes. Although central effectors within the hypothalamus have been shown to contribute to the......-antagonistic properties, have increased energy expenditure and bone mass. Since these mice express ¿FosB in bone, fat and hypothalamus, we sought to determine 1) whether overexpression of ¿FosB within the hypothalamus was sufficient to regulate energy expenditure and whether it would also regulate bone mass, and 2......) whether these effects were due to antagonism to AP1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ¿FosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wildtype mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass...

  6. Noisy transcription factor NF-¿B oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangstad, S.W.; Feldager, C.W.; Juul, Jeppe Søgaard; Trusina, A.

    2013-01-01

    amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as...

  7. FOXP3 Regulates Sensitivity of Cancer Cells to Irradiation by Transcriptional Repression of BRCA1

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiquan; Katoh, Hiroto; Wang, Lizhong; Yu, Xiaochun; Du, Zhanwen; Yan, Xiaoli; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    FOXP3 is an X-linked tumor suppressor gene and a master regulator in T regulatory cell function. This gene has been found to be mutated frequently in breast and prostate cancers and to inhibit tumor cell growth, but its functional significance in DNA repair has not been studied. We found that FOXP3 silencing stimulates homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair and also repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage. Expression profiling and chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ...

  8. PRC2 loss amplifies Ras-driven transcription and confers sensitivity to BRD4-based therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Raedt, Thomas; Beert, Eline; Pasmant, Eric;

    2014-01-01

    The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) exerts oncogenic effects in many tumour types. However, loss-of-function mutations in PRC2 components occur in a subset of haematopoietic malignancies, suggesting that this complex plays a dichotomous and poorly understood role in cancer. Here we provide g...

  9. Exponential sensitivity of noise-driven switching in genetic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing experimental evidence that cells can utilize biochemical noise to switch probabilistically between distinct gene-expression states. In this paper, we demonstrate that such noise-driven switching is dominated by tails of probability distributions and is therefore exponentially sensitive to changes in physiological parameters such as transcription and translation rates. Exponential sensitivity limits the robustness of noise-driven switching, suggesting cells may use other mechanisms in order to switch reliably. We discuss our results in the context of competence in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis

  10. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb. PMID:27207833

  11. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  12. Integrating transcriptional controls for plant cell expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Mockaitis, Keithanne; Estelle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The plant hormones auxin and brassinosteroid promote cell expansion by regulating gene expression. In addition to independent transcriptional responses generated by the two signals, recent microarray analyses indicate that auxin and brassinosteroid also coordinate the expression of a set of shared target genes.

  13. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  14. 20 CFR 901.47 - Transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcript. 901.47 Section 901.47 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension or Termination of...

  15. Interaction of Restin with transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yousheng; LU; Fan; QI; Yinxin; WANG; Ruihua; ZHANG; Jia

    2005-01-01

    Restin, a member of melanoma-associated antigen superfamily gene, was first cloned from differentiated leukemia cell induced by all trans-retinoic acid, and was able to inhibit cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism was not clear. Since Restin was localized in cell nucleus, and its homolog member, Necdin (neuronal growth suppressor factor), could interact with transcription factors p53 and E2F1, we proposed that Restin might also function as Necdin through interacting with some transcription factors. In this study, transcription factors p53, AP1,ATFs and E2Fs were cloned and used in the mammalian two-hybrid system to identify their interaction with Restin. The results showed that only ATF3 had a strong interaction with Restin. It is interesting to know that ATF3 was an important transcription factor for G1 cell cycle initiation in physiological stress response. It was possible that the inhibition of cell proliferation by Restin might be related with the inhibition of ATF3 activity.

  16. Transcriptional Responses to the Auxin Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, Dolf; Wagner, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is arguably the most important signaling molecule in plants, and the last few decades have seen remarkable breakthroughs in understanding its production, transport, and perception. Recent investigations have focused on transcriptional responses to auxin, providing novel insight into the fun

  17. Systematic clustering of transcription start site landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters and e...

  18. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattiello Lucia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aluminum (Al toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17 showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6. Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The

  19. Transcription rate and transcript length drive formation of chromosomal interaction domain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung Bk; Laub, Michael T

    2016-07-15

    Chromosomes in all organisms are highly organized and divided into multiple chromosomal interaction domains, or topological domains. Regions of active, high transcription help establish and maintain domain boundaries, but precisely how this occurs remains unclear. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and chromosome conformation capture in conjunction with deep sequencing (Hi-C), we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, both transcription rate and transcript length, independent of concurrent translation, drive the formation of domain boundaries. We find that long, highly expressed genes do not form topological boundaries simply through the inhibition of supercoil diffusion. Instead, our results support a model in which long, active regions of transcription drive local decompaction of the chromosome, with these more open regions of the chromosome forming spatial gaps in vivo that diminish contacts between DNA in neighboring domains. These insights into the molecular forces responsible for domain formation in Caulobacter likely generalize to other bacteria and possibly eukaryotes. PMID:27288403

  20. Transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington’s disease: a failure of adaptive transcriptional homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Amit; Vaish, Manisha; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a signature polyglutamine disorder. An enduring theory of HD pathogenesis has involved dysregulation of transcription. Indeed, transcriptional regulatory proteins can be modulated to overcome cardinal features of HD-modeled mice, and efforts to move these into human studies are ongoing. Here, we discuss a unifying hypothesis emerging from these studies, which is that HD represents the pathological disruption of evolutionarily conserved adaptive gene programs to co...

  1. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 activates transcription of thyroid transcription factor 1 in respiratory epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, K.; Shaw-White, J R; Wert, S E; Whitsett, J A

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), hepatocyte nuclear factor 3alpha (HNF-3alpha), and HNF-3beta regulate the transcription of genes expressed in the respiratory epithelium. To test whether members of the HNF-3/forkhead family influence TTF-1 gene expression, deletion constructs containing the 5' region of the human TTF-1 gene were transfected into immortalized mouse lung epithelial (MLE) cells. DNase I protection and electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified elements in the 5' reg...

  2. Regulation of phage Mu repressor transcription by IHF depends on the level of the early transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    van Rijn, P A; Goosen, N; Turk, S C; van de Putte, P

    1989-01-01

    Integration Host Factor (IHF) of E. coli can stimulate both early and repressor transcription of bacteriophage Mu. We introduced several mutations in the early promoter (Pe) and studied the effect of these mutations on the stimulation of early and repressor transcription by IHF. All mutant promoters are still positive regulated by IHF, but the level of stimulation is dependent on the strength of the promoter. The strength of the early promoter has an even greater impact on the regulation of t...

  3. The Basal Transcription Complex Component TAF3 Transduces Changes in Nuclear Phosphoinositides into Transcriptional Output

    OpenAIRE

    Stijf-Bultsma, Y.; Sommer, L.; Tauber, M; M. Baalbaki; Giardoglou, P.; D. Jones; Gelato, K.; Pelt, J.; Shah, Z.; Rahnamoun, H.; Toma, C; Anderson, K.(Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.); Hawkins, P; Lauberth, S.; Haramis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphoinositides (PI) are important signaling molecules in the nucleus that influence gene expression. However, if and how nuclear PI directly affects the transcriptional machinery is not known. We report that the lipid kinase PIP4K2B regulates nuclear PI5P and the expression of myogenic genes during myoblast differentiation. A targeted screen for PI interactors identified the PHD finger of TAF3, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor with important roles in transcription regul...

  4. High-density transcriptional initiation signals underline genomic islands in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianli Huang

    Full Text Available Genomic islands (GIs, frequently associated with the pathogenicity of bacteria and having a substantial influence on bacterial evolution, are groups of "alien" elements which probably undergo special temporal-spatial regulation in the host genome. Are there particular hallmark transcriptional signals for these "exotic" regions? We here explore the potential transcriptional signals that underline the GIs beyond the conventional views on basic sequence composition, such as codon usage and GC property bias. It showed that there is a significant enrichment of the transcription start positions (TSPs in the GI regions compared to the whole genome of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. There was up to a four-fold increase for the 70% GIs, implying high-density TSPs profile can potentially differentiate the GI regions. Based on this feature, we developed a new sliding window method GIST, Genomic-island Identification by Signals of Transcription, to identify these regions. Subsequently, we compared the known GI-associated features of the GIs detected by GIST and by the existing method Islandviewer to those of the whole genome. Our method demonstrates high sensitivity in detecting GIs harboring genes with biased GI-like function, preferred subcellular localization, skewed GC property, shorter gene length and biased "non-optimal" codon usage. The special transcriptional signals discovered here may contribute to the coordinate expression regulation of foreign genes. Finally, by using GIST, we detected many interesting GIs in the 2011 German E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain TY-2482, including the microcin H47 system and gene cluster ycgXEFZ-ymgABC that activates the production of biofilm matrix. The aforesaid findings highlight the power of GIST to predict GIs with distinct intrinsic features to the genome. The heterogeneity of cumulative TSPs profiles may not only be a better identity for "alien" regions, but also provide hints to the special

  5. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death

  7. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowski, Tomasz W; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-07-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5' peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential "housekeeping" roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3'-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3'-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5'-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  8. Transcription Start Site Scanning and the Requirement for ATP during Transcription Initiation by RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, James; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2016-06-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase (Pol) II locates transcription start sites (TSS) at TATA-containing promoters by scanning sequences downstream from the site of preinitiation complex formation, a process that involves the translocation of downstream promoter DNA toward Pol II. To investigate a potential role of yeast Pol II transcription in TSS scanning, HIS4 promoter derivatives were generated that limited transcripts in the 30-bp scanned region to two nucleotides in length. Although we found that TSS scanning does not require RNA synthesis, our results revealed that transcription in the purified yeast basal system is largely ATP-independent despite a requirement for the TFIIH DNA translocase subunit Ssl2. This result is rationalized by our finding that, although they are poorer substrates, UTP and GTP can also be utilized by Ssl2. ATPγS is a strong inhibitor of rNTP-fueled translocation, and high concentrations of ATPγS make transcription completely dependent on added dATP. Limiting Pol II function with low ATP concentrations shifted the TSS position downstream. Combined with prior work, our results show that Pol II transcription plays an important role in TSS selection but is not required for the scanning reaction. PMID:27129284

  9. Sensitization of Parker fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At your request, ferrules from 316 SS Parker-Hannifen compression fittings at the FFTF have been examined and evaluated to determine the metallurgical condition as related to carbide precipitation in grain boundaries (known as sensitization) and the implications this may have with regard to corrosion resistance. To accomplish this, two ferrules from new stock, two ferrules from old stock and two ferrules that had seen service were examined metallurgically. The samples were prepared for optical metallography. They were viewed in both the etched and unetched condition and analyzed on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for elemental content. It was confirmed that the ferrules from new stock had a 5 mil thick nitrided layer on the ferrule ID at the lead end and that the 316 SS ferrule material was in the sensitized condition, indicating low resistance to aqueous corrosion. The material from old stock had no nitride layer but was in the sensitized condition indicating low resistance to aqueous corrosion. The ferrules that had seen service had not been nitrided and were not sensitized indicating high resistance to aqueous corrosion

  10. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram

    Et voksende antal mennesker i Danmark oplever at være overfølsomme over for dufte og kemikalier. Imidlertid er den tilskrevne diagnose Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) ikke medicinsk anerkendt i Danmark pga. mangel på organiske og patofysiologisk basis for symptomerne. Dette speciale bygger på...

  11. PAYMENT CAPACITY SENSITIVITY FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel BRÎNDESCU – OLARIU

    2014-11-01

    The results of the study facilitate the determination and classification of the main sensitivity factors for the payment capacity at sample level, the establishment of general benchmarks for the payment capacity (as no such benchmarks currently exist in the Romanian literature and the identification of the mechanisms through which the variation of different factors impacts the payment capacity.

  12. UNITEC SENS-IT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The UniTec Sens-It is a small gas-sensing device that can measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This sensor is used to measure VOCs in applications such as urban air quality, roadside pollution, and (solid waste) landfill monitoring. This operating procedure explains what yo...

  13. Theoretical analysis of transcription process with polymerase stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidences show that in gene transcription, RNA polymerase has the possibility to be stalled at certain position of the transcription template. This may be due to the template damage, or protein barriers. Once stalled, polymerase may backtrack along the template to the previous nucleotide to wait for the repair of the damaged site, or simply bypass the barrier or damaged site and consequently synthesize an incorrect messenger RNA, or degrade and detach from the template. Thus, the {\\it effective} transcription rate (the rate to synthesize correct product mRNA) and the transcription {\\it effectiveness} (the ratio of the {\\it effective} transcription rate to the {\\it effective} transcription initiation rate) are both influenced by polymerase stalling events. This study shows that, Without backtracking, detachment of stalled polymerase can also help to increase the {\\it effective} transcription rate and transcription {\\it effectiveness}. Generally, the increase of bypass rate of the stalled polymeras...

  14. The three Rs of transcription: recruit, retain, and recycle

    OpenAIRE

    Motta-Mena, Laura B.; Partch, Carrie L.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic protein interactions required for transcription are functionally important yet poorly understood; in this issue, Zobeck et al. (2010) resolve the sequential recruitment and selective recycling of transcription factors at an actively transcribing locus in Drosophila.

  15. Salt sensitivity correlates positively with insulin sensitivity in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Voordouw, JJ; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB

    1999-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between insulin sensitivity and salt sensitivity in healthy subjects who display a wide range of insulin sensitivity. As a secondary objective, we assessed the relationship between salt sensitivity and the other characteristics of the in

  16. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  17. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  18. Molecular basis of transcription initiation in Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    De Carlo, Sacha; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Hoenger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Compared with eukaryotes, the archaeal transcription initiation machinery—commonly known as the Pre-Initiation Complex—is relatively simple. The archaeal PIC consists of the TFIIB ortholog TFB, TBp and an 11-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP). The relatively small size of the entire archaeal PIC makes it amenable to structural analysis. Using purified RNAP, TFB and TBP from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, we assembled the biochemically active PIC at 65°C. The intact archaeal PIC was isolated ...

  19. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP?p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  20. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG RuiHua; LU Fan; FU HaiYan; WU YouSheng; YANG GuoDong; ZHAO WenMing; Zhao ZhongLiang

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP△p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  1. Heritable Change Caused by Transient Transcription Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Alasdair J. E.; Satory, Dominik; Halliday, Jennifer A.; Herman, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations) and protein conformation (prions) can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change (‘epim...

  2. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen met...

  3. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Saheed Imam; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen met...

  4. Comprehensive transcriptional landscape of aging mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    White, Ryan R.; Milholland, Brandon; MacRae, Sheila L.; Lin, Mingyan; Zheng, Deyou; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammalian aging is a highly complex process, a full mechanistic understanding of which is still lacking. One way to help understand the molecular changes underlying aging is through a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, the primary determinant of age-related phenotypic diversity. Previous studies have relied on microarray analysis to examine gene expression profiles in different tissues of aging organisms. However, studies have shown microarray-based transcriptional profil...

  5. Phonemic Transcriptions in British and American Dictionaries

    OpenAIRE

    Rastislav Šuštaršič

    2005-01-01

    In view of recent criticisms concerning vowel symbols in some British English dictionaries (in particular by J. Windsor Lewis in JIPA (Windsor Lewis, 2003), with regard to the Oxford Dictionary of Pronunciation (Upton, 2001), this article extends the discussion on English phonemic transcriptions by including those that typically occur in standard American dictionaries, and by comparing the most common conventions of British and American dictionaries. In addition to symbols for both vowels and...

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, Sina A; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Takamoto Ohse; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs ...

  7. Music transcription within Irish traditional music

    OpenAIRE

    Gainza, Mikel

    2006-01-01

    Transcribing Irish traditional music is an open-field of research. The oral transmission of the music between generations explains the lack of transcription until recent times. The music can be played solo, which permits the player to exploit the variety of ornamentation types, in unison, and also with the accompaniment of a harmonic instrument. Different signal processing applications for transcribing Irish traditional music are presented in this thesis, including onset, ornamentation and pi...

  8. Identification and gene-silencing of a putative odorant receptor transcription factor in Varroa destructor: possible role in olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N K; Eliash, N; Stein, I; Kamer, Y; Ilia, Z; Rafaeli, A; Soroker, V

    2016-04-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the major threats to apiculture. Using a behavioural choice bioassay, we determined that phoretic mites were more successful in reaching a bee than reproductive mites, suggesting an energy trade-off between reproduction and host selection. We used both chemo-ecological and molecular strategies to identify the regulation of the olfactory machinery of Varroa and its association with reproduction. We focused on transcription regulation. Using primers designed to the conserved DNA binding region of transcription factors, we identified a gene transcript in V. destructor homologous to the pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) gene of Pediculus humanus corporis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed that this PRTF-like gene transcript is expressed in the forelegs at higher levels than in the body devoid of forelegs. Subsequent comparative qPCR analysis showed that transcript expression was significantly higher in the phoretic as compared to the reproductive stage. Electrophysiological and behavioural studies revealed a reduction in the sensitivity of PRTF RNA interference-silenced mites to bee headspace, consistent with a reduction in the mites' ability to reach a host. In addition, vitellogenin expression was stimulated in PRTF-silenced mites to similar levels as found in reproductive mites. These data shed light upon the regulatory mechanism of host chemosensing in V. destructor. PMID:26801167

  9. A model for genesis of transcription systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Zachary F; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guowei; Geiger, James H

    2016-01-01

    Repeating sequences generated from RNA gene fusions/ligations dominate ancient life, indicating central importance of building structural complexity in evolving biological systems. A simple and coherent story of life on earth is told from tracking repeating motifs that generate α/β proteins, 2-double-Ψ-β-barrel (DPBB) type RNA polymerases (RNAPs), general transcription factors (GTFs), and promoters. A general rule that emerges is that biological complexity that arises through generation of repeats is often bounded by solubility and closure (i.e., to form a pseudo-dimer or a barrel). Because the first DNA genomes were replicated by DNA template-dependent RNA synthesis followed by RNA template-dependent DNA synthesis via reverse transcriptase, the first DNA replication origins were initially 2-DPBB type RNAP promoters. A simplifying model for evolution of promoters/replication origins via repetition of core promoter elements is proposed. The model can explain why Pribnow boxes in bacterial transcription (i.e., (-12)TATAATG(-6)) so closely resemble TATA boxes (i.e., (-31)TATAAAAG(-24)) in archaeal/eukaryotic transcription. The evolution of anchor DNA sequences in bacterial (i.e., (-35)TTGACA(-30)) and archaeal (BRE(up); BRE for TFB recognition element) promoters is potentially explained. The evolution of BRE(down) elements of archaeal promoters is potentially explained. PMID:26735411

  10. Glucocorticoid regulation of human BMP-6 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Barghouthi, Mejd; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Hair, Gregory; Boden, Scott D

    2004-09-01

    Addition of dexamethasone (Dex) to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) resulted in a 16-fold increase in human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (hBMP-6) mRNA levels 24 h after treatment. Evaluation of luciferase expression after transfection of HeLa cells with hBMP-6 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs indicated that the hBMP-6 promoter activity was contained in a 268-bp region (-1051 to -784 where +1 is the translation start site) over 600 bases 5' to that previously published. It further showed that the promoter activity is regulated by glucocorticoid treatment. Analysis of RNA from hMSCs and HeLa cells by primer extension, RNase protection, and 5' RACE further narrowed the location of the transcription start site to an 84-bp region (-940 to -857). To determine whether this start site was regulated in hMSCs, hBMP-6 mRNA levels in control and Dex-treated cells were quantitated by RT-PCR using one primer set in the translated region of the gene and one located just 3' of the 84-bp region. Both primer sets showed hBMP-6 mRNA levels approximately 16- to 22-fold higher in the Dex-treated cells, demonstrating that hBMP-6 transcription is being regulated by glucocorticoids in the pluripotent hMSCs at the upstream transcription start site. PMID:15336603

  11. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2011-09-19

    Background: Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC) through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone.Results: The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs) that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers.Conclusions: We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors. 2011 Kaur et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.

    2013-06-13

    Background:Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG) pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated.Principal Findings:Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C). Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins.Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  13. Physiological and transcriptional responses of nitrifying bacteria exposed to copper in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Fan; Zhai, Hongyan; Ji, Min; Zhang, Hongyang; Dong, Zhao

    2016-01-15

    Cu inhibition of gene transcription in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were rarely studied simultaneously in activated sludge. In this study, the transcription of amoA (for AOB) and nxrB (for NOB), nitrification efficiencies, AOB and NOB respiratory rates, and Cu distribution were simultaneously investigated. Modeling the relationships among the aforementioned parameters revealed that in complex activated sludge systems, nitrification efficiency was an insensitive parameter for showing Cu inhibition. Respiration activities and gene transcription were sensitive to Cu and positively correlated with each other. The transcription of amoA and nxrB genes indicated that the Cu had different inhibitory effects on AOB and NOB. AOB were more susceptible to Cu toxicity than NOB. Moreover, the degree of Cu inhibition on ammonia oxidation was greater than on nitrite oxidation. The analysis and related modeling results indicate that the inhibitory actions of Cu on nitrifying bacteria could mainly be attributed to intracellular Cu. The findings from this study provide insight into the mechanism of Cu inhibition on nitrification in complex activated sludge systems. PMID:26348150

  14. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Qiao Xin Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression.

  15. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Charles G; Hyland, Stephanie L; Core, Leighton J; Martins, Andre L; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G; Kraus, W Lee; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Modifications to the global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) protocol that enrich for 5'-capped RNAs can be used to reveal active transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) with high accuracy. Here, we introduce discriminative regulatory-element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), a sensitive machine learning method that uses support vector regression to identify active TREs from GRO-seq data without requiring cap-based enrichment (https://github.com/Danko-Lab/dREG/). This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Predicted TREs are more enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation—including expression quantitative trait loci, disease-associated polymorphisms, acetylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and transcription factor binding—than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we surveyed TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  16. Stress and odor sensitivity in persons with noise sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Nordin; Jessica Körning Ljungberg; Anna-Sara Claeson; Gregory Neely

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that sensory sensitivity/intolerance to a specific modality may be part of a more general environmental hypersensitivity, and possibly mediated by stress. This study investigated the relationship between noise sensitivity, perceived stress, and odor sensitivity in a group of men. A quasi-experimental design was used. One-hundred and thirty-four male undergraduate students completed Weinstein′s noise sensitivity scale from which a low-sensitivity group (n = 16) ...

  17. Activation of archaeal transcription mediated by recruitment of transcription factor B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Simon M; Thumann, Sybille; Richau, Renate; Weirauch, Matt T; Lowe, Todd M; Thomm, Michael; Hausner, Winfried

    2012-05-25

    Archaeal promoters consist of a TATA box and a purine-rich adjacent upstream sequence (transcription factor B (TFB)-responsive element (BRE)), which are bound by the transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TFB. Currently, only a few activators of archaeal transcription have been experimentally characterized. The best studied activator, Ptr2, mediates activation by recruitment of TBP. Here, we present a detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal transcriptional activator, PF1088, which was identified in Pyrococcus furiosus by a bioinformatic approach. Operon predictions suggested that an upstream gene, pf1089, is polycistronically transcribed with pf1088. We demonstrate that PF1088 stimulates in vitro transcription by up to 7-fold when the pf1089 promoter is used as a template. By DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments, we show that the binding site of PF1088 is located directly upstream of the BRE of pf1089. Mutational analysis indicated that activation requires the presence of the binding site for PF1088. Furthermore, we show that activation of transcription by PF1088 is dependent upon the presence of an imperfect BRE and is abolished when the pf1089 BRE is replaced with a BRE from a strong archaeal promoter. Gel shift experiments showed that TFB recruitment to the pf1089 operon is stimulated by PF1088, and TFB seems to stabilize PF1088 operator binding even in the absence of TBP. Taken together, these results represent the first biochemical evidence for a transcriptional activator working as a TFB recruitment factor in Archaea, for which the designation TFB-RF1 is suggested. PMID:22496454

  18. The zinc cluster transcriptional regulator Asg1 transcriptionally coordinates oleate utilization and lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansuriyakul, Siripat; Somboon, Pichayada; Rodboon, Napachai; Kurylenko, Olena; Sibirny, Andriy; Soontorngun, Nitnipa

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we characterize a new function for activator of stress response genes (Asg1) in fatty acid utilization. Asg1 is required for full activation of genes in several pathways, including β-oxidation (POX1, FOX2, and POT1), gluconeogenesis (PCK1), glyoxylate cycle (ICL1), triacylglycerol breakdown (TGL3), and peroxisomal transport (PXA1). In addition, the transcriptional activator Asg1 is found to be enriched on promoters of genes in β-oxidation and gluconeogenesis pathways, suggesting that Asg1 is directly involved in the control of fatty acid utilizing genes. In agreement, impaired growth on non-fermentable carbons such as fatty acids and oils and increased sensitivity to some oxidative agents are found for the Δasg1 strain. The lipid class profile of the Δasg1 cells grown in oleate displays approximately 3-fold increase in free fatty acid (FFA) content in comparison to glucose-grown cells, which correlates with decreased expression of β-oxidation genes. The ∆asg1 strain grown in glucose also exhibits higher accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) during log phase, reaching levels typically observed in stationary phase cells. Altered TAG accumulation is partly due to the inability of the Δasg1 cells to efficiently break down TAGs, which is consistent with lowered expression of TGL3 gene, encoding triglycerol lipase. Overall, these results highlight a new role of the transcriptional regulator Asg1 in coordinating expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization and its role in regulating cellular lipid accumulation, thereby providing an attractive approach to increase FFAs and TAGs content for the production of lipid-derived biofuels and chemicals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:26875874

  19. 5 CFR 1632.10 - Transcripts, recordings, and minutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maintain a complete transcript or electronic recording or transcription thereof adequate to record fully... call vote (reflecting the vote of each member on the question), for meetings or portions of meetings... copy of the minutes, or a complete electronic recording or verbatim copy of a transcription thereof...

  20. Transcription-associated quality control of mRNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2013-01-01

    Although a prime purpose of transcription is to produce RNA, a substantial amount of transcript is nevertheless turned over very early in its lifetime. During transcription RNAs are matured by nucleases from longer precursors and activities are also employed to exert quality control over the RNA ...

  1. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐进平; 叶林柏

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  2. Validation, automatic generation and use of broad phonetic transcriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bael, Cristophe Patrick Jan Van

    2007-01-01

    Broad phonetic transcriptions represent the pronunciation of words as strings of characters from specifically designed symbol sets. In everyday life, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used as aids to pronounce (foreign) words. In addition, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used for lingu

  3. DNA repair deficiencies associated with mutations in genes encoding subunits of transcription initiation factor TFIIH in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Sweder, K S; Chun, R; Mori, T; Hanawalt, P C

    1996-01-01

    Several proteins, including Rad3 and Rad25(Ssl2), are essential for nucleotide excision repair (NER) and function in the RNA polymerase II transcription initiation complex TFIIH. Mutations in genes encoding two other subunits of TFIIH, TFB1 and SSL1, result in UV sensitivity and have been shown to take part in NER in an in vitro system. However, a deficiency in global NER does not exclude the possibility that such repair-deficient mutants can perform transcription-coupled repair (TCR), as sho...

  4. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay to rapidly diagnose foot-and-mouth disease virus C

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Yao-zhong; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Ma, Li-na; Qi, Yan-ni; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yong-guang

    2014-01-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed to rapidly detect foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype C (FMDV C). By testing 10-fold serial dilutions of FMDV C samples, sensitivity of the FMDV C RT-LAMP was found to be 10 times higher than that of conventional reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). No cross-reactivity with A, Asia 1, or O FMDV or swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) indicated that FMDV C RT-LAMP may be an exciting novel method for d...

  5. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan; Müller, Barbara; Germann, Susanne M; Cramer, Patrick; Lisby, Michael; Strässer, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  6. Comparison of thyroid transcription factor-1 expression by two monoclonal antibodies in pulmonary and non-pulmonary primary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Matoso, Andres; Singh, Kamaljeet; JACOB, RAFIK; Greaves, Wesley O.; Tavares, Rosemarie; Noble, Lelia; Resnick, Murray B.; DeLellis, Ronald A.; Wang, Li J.

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is a transcription factor that plays a role in the development and physiology of the thyroid and lungs. Expression of TTF-1 is used as a marker of lung and thyroid clinically. Commercially available clones of TTF-1 monoclonal antibodies, 8G7G3/1 and SPT24, have been reported to have different sensitivities for the detection of neoplasms of different origins. Although they are used extensively in daily practice, a comprehensive comparative study of these ...

  7. HSF1 transcriptional activity mediates alcohol induction of Vamp2 expression and GABA release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence P. Varodayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many central synapses are highly sensitive to alcohol, and it is now accepted that short-term alterations in synaptic function may lead to longer term changes in circuit function. The regulation of postsynaptic receptors by alcohol has been well studied, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of alcohol on the presynaptic terminal are relatively unexplored. To identify a pathway by which alcohol regulates neurotransmitter release, we recently investigated the mechanism by which ethanol induces the Vamp2 gene, but not Vamp1, in mouse primary cortical cultures. These two genes encode isoforms of synaptobrevin, a vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE protein required for synaptic vesicle fusion. We found that alcohol activates the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 to induce Vamp2 gene expression, while Vamp1 mRNA levels remain unaffected. As the Vamp2 gene encodes a SNARE protein, we then investigated whether ethanol exposure and HSF1 transcriptional activity alter neurotransmitter release using electrophysiology. We found that alcohol increased the frequency of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated miniature IPSCs via HSF1, but had no effect on mEPSCs. Overall, these data indicate that alcohol induces HSF1 transcriptional activity to trigger a specific coordinated adaptation in GABAergic presynaptic terminals. This mechanism could explain some of the changes in synaptic function that occur soon after alcohol exposure, and may underlie some of the more enduring effects of chronic alcohol intake on local circuit function.

  8. UV-B induced transcript accumulation of DAHP synthase in suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase (EC 4.1.2.15) catalyzes the first committed step in the shikimate pathway of tryptophan synthesis, an important precursor for the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). A full-length cDNA encoding nuclear coded chloroplast-specific DAHP synthase transcript was isolated from a Catharanthus roseus cDNA library. This had high sequence similarity with other members of plant DAHP synthase family. This transcript accumulated in suspension cultured C. roseus cells on ultraviolet (UV-B) irradiation. Pretreatment of C.roseus cells with variety of agents such as suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, and inhibitors of calcium fluxes and protein kinases and MAP kinase prevented this effect of UV-B irriadiation. These data further show that the essential components of the signaling pathway involved in accumulation DAHP synthase transcript in C. roseus cells include suramin-sensitive cell surface receptor, staurosporine-sensitive protein kinase and MAP kinase. PMID:20704760

  9. Sensitivity analysis and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of performance assessment modelling for high-level radioactive waste disposal in geologic repositories, evaluating model uncertainties is a key factor in estimating radionuclide transport rate and extrapolating thousands of years into the future. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is performed to determine the relationships among the input and output variables of a mathematical model through numerical methods. Because post-closure performance assessment relies heavily on models, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses will become an integral part of the model evaluation and validation process. Model validation is also needed to establish the credibility of predictions to the technical community, and to achieve grater public confidence in the long-term safety of a geologic repository. In this paper, the role of sensitivity analysis as a part of near-field performance assessment will be discussed in terms of model validation. A description of the ENTRY (the Engineered Scale Test and Research Facility) project for validation study will also be presented. (au) (17 refs., 5 figs.)

  10. Induction of contact sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells taken from the draining lymph nodes of mice 1 day after painting with picryl chloride can induce contact hypersensitivity when injected into the footpads of normal recipients. Footpad injection of 5 x 106 1-day draining lymph node cells induced a similar degree of hypersensitivity to the original skin painting with picryl chloride but no antibody, as judged by anti-TNP splenic PFC and serum antibody, in constrast to the moderate antibody response found after skin painting. The apprarent inability to induce a response did, however, correlate with the finding that the draining lymph nodes of mice painted with picryl chloride had few PFC. Some effect of the cells on antibody was noted in that after mice were challenged on the ear to produce contact sensitivity reactions they produced an antibody response larger than that of mice not injected with cells. This was not a large phenomenon but was unusual because 2.5 x 106 cells was more effective than either 106 or 5 x 106 cells, even though 5 x 106 cells produced the largest contact sensitivity reactions. The augmentation was antigen specific and the same dose-response effect could be obtained with irradiated cells (2000 rad). It is suggested that these cells may have an important role in the immunogenicity of contact sensitizing agents, which can induce large delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions accompanied only by moderate antibody responses. (author)

  11. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  12. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  13. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges XY, e.g. AG, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information. PMID:27079465

  14. piRNA-guided slicing of transposon transcripts enforces their transcriptional silencing via specifying the nuclear piRNA repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    Senti, Kirsten-André; Jurczak, Daniel; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Senti et al investigate how cytoplasmic post-transcriptional silencing influences transcriptional silencing in the nucleus. They show that Piwi-bound piRNA populations depend almost exclusively on prior piRNA-guided transcript slicing, thus providing further insight into the regulation of piRNA biogenesis in the developing Drosophila ovary.

  15. Inducible nitric oxide synthase after sensitization and allergen challenge of Brown Norway rat lung

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Liu, Shu; Haddad, El-Bdaoui; Adcock, Ian; Salmon, Michael; Koto, Hiro; Gilbey, Tom; Peter J. Barnes; Fan Chung, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of ovalbumin (OA) sensitization and challenge on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene and protein expression in Brown-Norway rats in vivo.By use of Northern analysis, a 4.4-kb iNOS mRNA transcript was weakly observed in control rat lung but there was a 3 fold increase in lungs sensitized to OA alone (P

  16. Correlation of the electrophysiological profiles and sodium channel transcripts of individual rat dorsal root ganglia neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Chahine

    2014-09-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration to record Na+ currents and action potentials from acutely dissociated small diameter DRG neurons (<30 µM from adult rats. We also performed single cell qPCR on the same neurons. Our results revealed that there is a strong correlation between Na+ currents and mRNA transcripts in individual neurons. A cluster analysis showed that subgroups formed by Na+ channel transcripts by mRNA quantification have different biophysical properties. In addition, the firing frequency of the neurons was not affected by the relative populations of Na+ channel. The synergy between populations of Na+ channel in individual small diameter DRG neurons gives each neuron a unique electrophysiological profile. The Na+ channel remodeling that occurs in different pathological pain states may be responsible for the sensitization of the neurons.

  17. CLAUSA Is a MYB Transcription Factor That Promotes Leaf Differentiation by Attenuating Cytokinin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Maya; Israeli, Alon; Levy, Matan; Ben Gera, Hadas; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Kouril, Stepan; Tarkowski, Petr; Ori, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    Leaf morphogenesis and differentiation are highly flexible processes, resulting in a large diversity of leaf forms. The development of compound leaves involves an extended morphogenesis stage compared with that of simple leaves, and the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant clausa (clau) exposes a potential for extended morphogenesis in tomato leaves. Here, we report that the CLAU gene encodes a MYB transcription factor that has evolved a unique role in compound-leaf species to promote an exit from the morphogenetic phase of tomato leaf development. We show that CLAU attenuates cytokinin signaling, and that clau plants have increased cytokinin sensitivity. The results suggest that flexible leaf patterning involves a coordinated interplay between transcription factors and hormones. PMID:27385816

  18. Genomic organization and transcription of satellite DNA in the ant Aphaenogaster subterranea (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, P; Renault, S; Rouleux-Bonnin, F; Bigot, S; Periquet, G; Palomeque, T

    2002-08-01

    A satellite DNA family (APSU) was isolated and characterized in the ant Aphaenogaster subterranea. This satellite DNA is organized in tandem repeats of 162 bp and is relatively AT rich (51.9%). Sequence analysis showed a high level of homogeneity between monomers. Loss of satellite DNA has been detected in queens in relation to workers, because the amount of satellite DNA in queens is about 25% of the amount found in workers. Restriction analysis of the total DNA with methylation-sensitive enzymes suggests that this DNA is not methylated. Analysis of the electrophoretic mobility of satellite DNA on non-denaturing polyacrylamide showed that this satellite DNA is only very lightly curved. Their possible transcription was analyzed using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The satellite DNA is transcribed on the two DNA strands at the same level in worker and queen pupae, as well as in worker adults. PMID:12175063

  19. Collective Properties of a Transcription Initiation Model Under Varying Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yucheng; Lowengrub, John S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of gene transcription is tightly regulated in eukaryotes. Recent experiments have revealed various kinds of transcriptional dynamics, such as RNA polymerase II pausing, that involves regulation at the transcription initiation stage, and the choice of different regulation pattern is closely related to the physiological functions of the target gene. Here we consider a simplified model of transcription initiation, a process including the assembly of transcription complex and the pausing and releasing of the RNA polymerase II. Focusing on the collective behaviors of a population level, we explore the potential regulatory functions this model can offer. These functions include fast and synchronized response to environmental change, or long-term memory about the transcriptional status. As a proof of concept we also show that, by selecting different control mechanisms cells can adapt to different environments. These findings may help us better understand the design principles of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26645781

  20. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design. PMID:26764017

  1. The CREB Transcription Factor Controls Transcriptional Activity of the Human RIC8B Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maureira, Alejandro; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Valenzuela, Nicole; Torrejón, Marcela; Hinrichs, María V; Olate, Juan; Gutiérrez, José L

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development, cellular growth, and differentiation. Differential expression profiles of mRNA coding for vertebrate Ric-8B during embryo and adult stages have been observed. In addition, Ric-8B is expressed in few cerebral nuclei subareas. These facts point to a dynamic control of RIC8B gene expression. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we searched for cis-elements in the sequence of the human RIC8B promoter region, identifying binding sites for the basic/leucine zipper (bZip) CREB transcription factor family (CRE sites) and C/EBP transcription factor family (C/EBP sites). CRE sites were found clustered near the transcription start site, while the C/EBP sites were found clustered at around 300 bp upstream the CRE sites. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CREB1 and C/EBPβ to bind their respective elements identified in the RIC8B promoter. Comparative protein-DNA interaction analyses revealed only the proximal elements as high affinity sites for CREB1 and only the distal elements as high affinity sites for C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, carried out using a human neuroblastoma cell line, confirmed the preferential association of CREB to the proximal region of the RIC8B promoter. By performing luciferase reporter assays, we found the CRE sites as the most relevant elements for its transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data show the existence of functional CREB and C/EBP binding sites in the human RIC8B gene promoter, a particular distribution of these sites and demonstrate a relevant role of CREB in stimulating transcriptional activity of this gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1797-1805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729411

  2. Context Sensitive Health Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuziemsky, Craig; Nøhr, Christian; Aarts, Jos;

    2013-01-01

    Context is a key consideration when designing and evaluating health information technology (HIT) and cannot be overstated. Unintended consequences are common post HIT implementation and even well designed technology may not achieve desired outcomes because of contextual issues. While context should...... be considered in the design and evaluation of health information systems (HISs) there is a shortcoming of empirical research on contextual aspects of HIT. This conference integrates the sociotechnical and Human-Centered-Design (HCD) approaches and showcases current research on context sensitive...... health informatics. The papers and presentations outlines theories and models for studying contextual issues and insights on how we can better design HIT to accommodate different healthcare contexts....

  3. Performance-Sensitive Debt

    OpenAIRE

    Manso, Gustavo; Strulovici, Bruno; Tchistyi, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    This article studies performance-sensitive debt (PSD), the class of debt obligations whose interest payments depend on some measure of the borrower’s performance. We demonstrate that the existence of PSD obligations cannot be explained by the trade-off theory of capital structure, as PSD leads to earlier default and lower equity value compared to fixed-rate debt of the same market value. We show that, consistent with the pecking-order theory, PSD can be used as an inexpensive screening device...

  4. Pressure pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    induce hyperalgesia.The aim of the present study was to evaluate hyperalgesia by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) in patients with IHD, and compare PPS to questionnaires measuring depressive symptoms, reduced psychological wellbeing, and QOL as markers of stress. Design. A cross-sectional study of 361...... subjects with IHD. Methods. PPS was measured on the sternum, and compared to the questionnaires: Clinical stress symptoms score (CSS), Major Depression Inventory (MDI), WHO-5 Wellbeing Index, and SF-36 QOL score. Results. PPS correlated to CSS (r = 0.20, p <0.001), MDI (r = 0.14, p = 0.02), SF-36 mental...

  5. Crystal structure of the transcription factor sc-mtTFB offers insights into mitochondrial transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Schubot, Florian D; Chen, Chun-Jung; Rose, John P.; Dailey, Tamara A.; Dailey, Harry A.; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    Although it is commonly accepted that binding of mitochondrial transcription factor sc-mtTFB to the mitochondrial RNA polymerase is required for specific transcription initiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its precise role has remained undefined. In the present work, the crystal structure of sc-mtTFB has been determined to 2.6 Å resolution. The protein consists of two domains, an N-terminal α/β-domain and a smaller domain made up of four α-helices. Contrary to previous predictions, sc-mtTFB...

  6. Mechanism for the autogenous control of the crp operon: transcriptional inhibition by a divergent RNA transcript.

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, K.; Freundlich, M

    1986-01-01

    Expression of the crp gene is negatively autoregulated by the complex of cyclic AMP and its receptor protein (cAMP-CRP). We find a second promoter in this region that is strongly activated in vitro and in vivo by cAMP-CRP. Transcription from this promoter is initiated 3 nucleotides upstream and on the opposite strand from the start of crp mRNA. The addition of the purified 5' segment of the divergent RNA specifically inhibits crp transcription in vitro. cAMP-CRP does not block crp expression ...

  7. Tandem machine learning for the identification of genes regulated by transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuetz Erin G

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of promoter regions that are regulated by a given transcription factor has traditionally relied upon the identification and distributions of binding sites recognized by the factor. In this study, we have developed a tandem machine learning approach for the identification of regulatory target genes based on these parameters and on the corresponding binding site information contents that measure the affinities of the factor for these cognate elements. Results This method has been validated using models of DNA binding sites recognized by the xenobiotic-sensitive nuclear receptor, PXR/RXRα, for target genes within the human genome. An information theory-based weight matrix was first derived and refined from known PXR/RXRα binding sites. The promoter region of candidate genes was scanned with the weight matrix. A novel information density-based clustering algorithm was then used to identify clusters of information rich sites. Finally, transformed data representing metrics of location, strength and clustering of binding sites were used for classification of promoter regions using an ensemble approach involving neural networks, decision trees and Naïve Bayesian classification. The method was evaluated on a set of 24 known target genes and 288 genes known not to be regulated by PXR/RXRα. We report an average accuracy (proportion of correctly classified promoter regions of 71%, sensitivity of 73%, and specificity of 70%, based on multiple cross-validation and the leave-one-out strategy. The performance on a test set of 13 genes showed that 10 were correctly classified. Conclusion We have developed a machine learning approach for the successful detection of gene targets for transcription factors with high accuracy. The method has been validated for the transcription factor PXR/RXRα and has the potential to be extended to other transcription factors.

  8. Laser Microdissection of Grapevine Leaves Reveals Site-Specific Regulation of Transcriptional Response to Plasmopara viticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Luisa; Caruso, Carla; Bianchedi, Pier Luigi; Pertot, Ilaria; Perazzolli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and it is highly susceptible to downy mildew caused by the biotrophic oomycete Plasmopara viticola. Gene expression profiling has been used extensively to investigate the regulation processes of grapevine-P. viticola interaction, but all studies to date have involved the use of whole leaves. However, only a small fraction of host cells is in contact with the pathogen, so highly localized transcriptional changes of infected cells may be masked by the large portion of non-infected cells when analyzing the whole leaf. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of the plant reaction at the sites of pathogen infection, we optimized a laser microdissection protocol and analyzed the transcriptional changes in stomata cells and surrounding areas of grapevine leaves at early stages of P. viticola infection. The results indicate that the expression levels of seven P. viticola-responsive genes were greater in microdissected cells than in whole leaves, highlighting the site-specific transcriptional regulation of the host response. The gene modulation was restricted to the stomata cells and to the surrounding areas of infected tissues, indicating that the host response is mainly located at the infection sites and that short-distance signals are implicated. In addition, due to the high sensitivity of the laser microdissection technique, significant modulations of three genes that were completely masked in the whole tissue analysis were detected. The protocol validated in this study could greatly increase the sensitivity of further transcriptomic studies of the grapevine-P. viticola interaction. PMID:26546320

  9. Transcription factor oscillations induce differential gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Keng Boon; Yio, Wee Kheng; Surana, Uttam; Chiam, Keng Hwee

    2012-06-01

    Intracellular protein levels of diverse transcription factors (TFs) vary periodically with time. However, the effects of TF oscillations on gene expression, the primary role of TFs, are poorly understood. In this study, we determined these effects by comparing gene expression levels induced in the presence and in the absence of TF oscillations under same mean intracellular protein level of TF. For all the nonlinear TF transcription kinetics studied, an oscillatory TF is predicted to induce gene expression levels that are distinct from a nonoscillatory TF. The conditions dictating whether TF oscillations induce either higher or lower average gene expression levels were elucidated. Subsequently, the predicted effects from an oscillatory TF, which follows sigmoid transcription kinetics, were applied to demonstrate how oscillatory dynamics provide a mechanism for differential target gene transactivation. Generally, the mean TF concentration at which oscillations occur relative to the promoter binding affinity of a target gene determines whether the gene is up- or downregulated whereas the oscillation amplitude amplifies the magnitude of the differential regulation. Notably, the predicted trends of differential gene expressions induced by oscillatory NF-κB and glucocorticoid receptor match the reported experimental observations. Furthermore, the biological function of p53 oscillations is predicted to prime the cell for death upon DNA damage via differential upregulation of apoptotic genes. Lastly, given N target genes, an oscillatory TF can generate between (N-1) and (2N-1) distinct patterns of differential transactivation. This study provides insights into the mechanism for TF oscillations to induce differential gene expressions, and underscores the importance of TF oscillations in biological regulations. PMID:22713556

  10. RETINOID METABOLISM IN FISH EMBRYOS FROM SENSITIVE AND RESISTANT POPULATIONS EXPOSED TO DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early developmental stages of fish are extremely sensitive to a class of toxic and persistent environmental contaminants known as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Most of the toxicological actions of DLCs are mediated via the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) that regulates transcript...

  11. Sensitive ligand-based protein quantification using immuno-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marcus Celik; Nederby, Line; Henriksen, Mads Okkels-Birk; Hansen, Maria; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) of reverse-transcribed mRNA has revolutionized gene expression analyses. qPCR analysis is based on the prevalent assumption that mRNA transcript numbers provide an adequate measure of specific biomarker expression. However, taking the complexity of protein turnover into...... account, there is a need to correlate qPCR-derived transcriptional patterns with protein translational patterns so as to not leave behind important pathobiological details. One emerging approach in protein analysis is PCR-coupled protein quantification, often denoted as immuno-PCR (iPCR), which targets...... soluble proteins. Here we review recent trends and applications in iPCR assays that may bridge the gap between classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and mass spectrometry methodologies in terms of sensitivity and multiplexing....

  12. Transcriptional regulation by Polycomb group proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of transcription that have key roles in stem-cell identity, differentiation and disease. Mechanistically, they function within multiprotein complexes, called Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs), which modify histones (and other proteins) and...... silence target genes. The dynamics of PRC1 and PRC2 components has been the focus of recent research. Here we discuss our current knowledge of the PRC complexes, how they are targeted to chromatin and how the high diversity of the PcG proteins allows these complexes to influence cell identity....

  13. The AP-2 family of transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, Dawid; Buhl, Sandra; Weber, Susanne; Jäger, Richard; Schorle, Hubert

    2005-01-01

    The AP-2 family of transcription factors consists of five different proteins in humans and mice: AP-2α, AP-2β, AP-2γ, AP-2δ and AP-2ε. Frogs and fish have known orthologs of some but not all of these proteins, and homologs of the family are also found in protochordates, insects and nematodes. The proteins have a characteristic helix-span-helix motif at the carboxyl terminus, which, together with a central basic region, mediates dimerization and DNA binding. The amino terminus contains the tra...

  14. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  15. Transcriptional landscape of glomerular parietal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs. In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire.

  16. Transcriptional programs controlling perinatal lung maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0 using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6 and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6transcriptional networks controlling lung maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5-E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5-20.5, STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation than in A/J (long gestation mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators

  17. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤ 4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥ 8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients. PMID:25332688

  18. Mga2 Transcription Factor Regulates an Oxygen-responsive Lipid Homeostasis Pathway in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Risa; Stewart, Emerson V; Shao, Wei; Zhao, Shan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Ejsing, Christer S; Espenshade, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic lipid synthesis is oxygen-dependent with cholesterol synthesis requiring 11 oxygen molecules and fatty acid desaturation requiring 1 oxygen molecule per double bond. Accordingly, organisms evaluate oxygen availability to control lipid homeostasis. The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipid homeostasis. In mammals, SREBP-2 controls cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas SREBP-1 controls triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SREBP-2 homolog Sre1 regulates sterol homeostasis in response to changing sterol and oxygen levels. However, notably missing is an SREBP-1 analog that regulates triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in response to low oxygen. Consistent with this, studies have shown that the Sre1 transcription factor regulates only a fraction of all genes up-regulated under low oxygen. To identify new regulators of low oxygen adaptation, we screened the S. pombe nonessential haploid deletion collection and identified 27 gene deletions sensitive to both low oxygen and cobalt chloride, a hypoxia mimetic. One of these genes, mga2, is a putative transcriptional activator. In the absence of mga2, fission yeast exhibited growth defects under both normoxia and low oxygen conditions. Mga2 transcriptional targets were enriched for lipid metabolism genes, and mga2Δ cells showed disrupted triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis, most notably with an increase in fatty acid saturation. Indeed, addition of exogenous oleic acid to mga2Δ cells rescued the observed growth defects. Together, these results establish Mga2 as a transcriptional regulator of triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis in S. pombe, analogous to mammalian SREBP-1. PMID:27053105

  19. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  20. Selective modulation of promoter recruitment and transcriptional activity of PPARγ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor regulated by the insulin-sensitizing thiazolidinediones (TZDs). We studied selective modulation of endogenous genes by PPARγ ligands using microarray, RNA expression kinetics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found over 300 genes that were significantly regulated the TZDs pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and troglitazone. TZD-mediated expression profiles were unique but overlapping. Ninety-one genes were commonly regulated by all three ligands. TZD time course and dose-response studies revealed gene- and TZD-specific expression kinetics. PEPCK expression was induced rapidly but PDK4 expression was induced gradually. Troglitazone EC50 values for PEPCK, PDK4, and RGS2 regulation were greater than those for pioglitazone and rosiglitazone. TZDs differentially induced histone acetylation of and PPARγ recruitment to target gene promoters. Selective modulation of PPARγ by TZDs resulted in distinct expression profiles and transcription kinetics which may be due to differential promoter activation and chromatin remodeling of target genes

  1. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy-transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age-related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion-centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age-related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion-related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non-CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy- or redox-sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion-implicated, age-related disorders. PMID:26293414

  2. Enhanced NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity associated with antiestrogen resistant breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signaling pathways that converge on two different transcription factor complexes, NFκB and AP-1, have been identified in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers resistant to the antiestrogen, tamoxifen. Two cell line models of tamoxifen-resistant ER-positive breast cancer, MCF7/HER2 and BT474, showing increased AP-1 and NFκB DNA-binding and transcriptional activities, were studied to compare tamoxifen effects on NFκB and AP-1 regulated reporter genes relative to tamoxifen-sensitive MCF7 cells. The model cell lines were treated with the IKK inhibitor parthenolide (PA) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (PS341), alone and in combination with tamoxifen. Expression microarray data available from 54 UCSF node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases with known clinical outcome were used to search for potential genes signifying upregulated NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity in association with tamoxifen resistance. The association of these genes with patient outcome was further evaluated using node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases identified from three other published data sets (Rotterdam, n = 209; Amsterdam, n = 68; Basel, n = 108), each having different patient age and adjuvant tamoxifen treatment characteristics. Doses of parthenolide and bortezomib capable of sensitizing the two endocrine resistant breast cancer models to tamoxifen were capable of suppressing NFκB and AP-1 regulated gene expression in combination with tamoxifen and also increased ER recruitment of the transcriptional co-repressor, NCoR. Transcript profiles from the UCSF breast cancer cases revealed three NFκB and AP-1 upregulated genes – cyclin D1, uPA and VEGF – capable of dichotomizing node-negative ER-positive cases into early and late relapsing subsets despite adjuvant tamoxfien therapy and most prognostic for younger age cases. Across the four independent sets of node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases (UCSF, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Basel), high expression of

  3. Enhanced NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity associated with antiestrogen resistant breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Dan H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways that converge on two different transcription factor complexes, NFκB and AP-1, have been identified in estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancers resistant to the antiestrogen, tamoxifen. Methods Two cell line models of tamoxifen-resistant ER-positive breast cancer, MCF7/HER2 and BT474, showing increased AP-1 and NFκB DNA-binding and transcriptional activities, were studied to compare tamoxifen effects on NFκB and AP-1 regulated reporter genes relative to tamoxifen-sensitive MCF7 cells. The model cell lines were treated with the IKK inhibitor parthenolide (PA or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (PS341, alone and in combination with tamoxifen. Expression microarray data available from 54 UCSF node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases with known clinical outcome were used to search for potential genes signifying upregulated NFκB and AP-1 transcriptional activity in association with tamoxifen resistance. The association of these genes with patient outcome was further evaluated using node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases identified from three other published data sets (Rotterdam, n = 209; Amsterdam, n = 68; Basel, n = 108, each having different patient age and adjuvant tamoxifen treatment characteristics. Results Doses of parthenolide and bortezomib capable of sensitizing the two endocrine resistant breast cancer models to tamoxifen were capable of suppressing NFκB and AP-1 regulated gene expression in combination with tamoxifen and also increased ER recruitment of the transcriptional co-repressor, NCoR. Transcript profiles from the UCSF breast cancer cases revealed three NFκB and AP-1 upregulated genes – cyclin D1, uPA and VEGF – capable of dichotomizing node-negative ER-positive cases into early and late relapsing subsets despite adjuvant tamoxfien therapy and most prognostic for younger age cases. Across the four independent sets of node-negative ER-positive breast cancer cases

  4. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  5. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  6. Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitive immunoassay methods should be applied to small molecules of biological importance, which are non-immunogenic by themselves, such as small peptide hormones (e.g. bradykinin), plant hormones (e.g. indoleacetic acid), nucleotides and other small molecules. Methods of binding these small molecules, as haptens, to immunogenic carriers by various cross-linking agents are described (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, tolylene-diisocyanate and glutaraldehyde), and the considerations involved in relation to the methods of binding and the specificity of the antibodies formed are discussed. Some uses of antibody bound to bromoacetyl cellulose as an immuno adsorbent convenient for assay of immunoglobulins are described. Finally, the sensitive immunoassay method of chemically modified phage is described. This includes methods of binding small molecules (such as the dinitrophenyl group, penicillin, indoleacetic acid) or proteins (such as insulin, immunoglobulins) to phages. Methods of direct chemical conjugation, or an indirect binding via anti-phage Fab, are described. The phage inactivation method by direct plating and its modifications (such as decision technique and complex inactivation) are compared with the more simple end-point titration method. The inhibition of phage inactivation has some advantages as it does not require radioactive material, or expensive radioactive counters, and avoids the need for separation between bound and unbound antigen. Hence, if developed, it could be used as an alternative to radioimmunoassay. (author)

  7. Coherency Sensitive Hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Simon; Avidan, Shai

    2016-06-01

    Coherency Sensitive Hashing (CSH) extends Locality Sensitivity Hashing (LSH) and PatchMatch to quickly find matching patches between two images. LSH relies on hashing, which maps similar patches to the same bin, in order to find matching patches. PatchMatch, on the other hand, relies on the observation that images are coherent, to propagate good matches to their neighbors in the image plane, using random patch assignment to seed the initial matching. CSH relies on hashing to seed the initial patch matching and on image coherence to propagate good matches. In addition, hashing lets it propagate information between patches with similar appearance (i.e., map to the same bin). This way, information is propagated much faster because it can use similarity in appearance space or neighborhood in the image plane. As a result, CSH is at least three to four times faster than PatchMatch and more accurate, especially in textured regions, where reconstruction artifacts are most noticeable to the human eye. We verified CSH on a new, large scale, data set of 133 image pairs and experimented on several extensions, including: k nearest neighbor search, the addition of rotation and matching three dimensional patches in videos. PMID:26372204

  8. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D. [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Jamie [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio Finland (Finland); Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boutros, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Boutros@oicr.on.ca [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  9. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Norton

    Full Text Available Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16. Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988 between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads. Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol

  10. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  11. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  12. Assessment of hepatotoxic liabilities by transcript profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male Wistar rats were treated with various model compounds or the appropriate vehicle controls in order to create a reference database for toxicogenomics assessment of novel compounds. Hepatotoxic compounds in the database were either known hepatotoxicants or showed hepatotoxicity during preclinical testing. Histopathology and clinical chemistry data were used to anchor the transcript profiles to an established endpoint (steatosis, cholestasis, direct acting, peroxisomal proliferation or nontoxic/control). These reference data were analyzed using a supervised learning method (support vector machines, SVM) to generate classification rules. This predictive model was subsequently used to assess compounds with regard to a potential hepatotoxic liability. A steatotic and a non-hepatotoxic 5HT6 receptor antagonist compound from the same series were successfully discriminated by this toxicogenomics model. Additionally, an example is shown where a hepatotoxic liability was correctly recognized in the absence of pathological findings. In vitro experiments and a dog study confirmed the correctness of the toxicogenomics alert. Another interesting observation was that transcript profiles indicate toxicologically relevant changes at an earlier timepoint than routinely used methods. Together, these results support the useful application of toxicogenomics in raising alerts for adverse effects and generating mechanistic hypotheses that can be followed up by confirmatory experiments

  13. Molecular basis of transcription initiation in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Sacha; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hoenger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Compared with eukaryotes, the archaeal transcription initiation machinery-commonly known as the Pre-Initiation Complex-is relatively simple. The archaeal PIC consists of the TFIIB ortholog TFB, TBP, and an 11-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP). The relatively small size of the entire archaeal PIC makes it amenable to structural analysis. Using purified RNAP, TFB, and TBP from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, we assembled the biochemically active PIC at 65ºC. The intact archaeal PIC was isolated by implementing a cross-linking technique followed by size-exclusion chromatography, and the structure of this 440 kDa assembly was determined using electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction techniques. Combining difference maps with crystal structure docking of various sub-domains, TBP and TFB were localized within the macromolecular PIC. TBP/TFB assemble near the large RpoB subunit and the RpoD/L "foot" domain behind the RNAP central cleft. This location mimics that of yeast TBP and TFIIB in complex with yeast RNAP II. Collectively, these results define the structural organization of the archaeal transcription machinery and suggest a conserved core PIC architecture. PMID:21326901

  14. Transcript mapping for handwritten English documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Damien; Bharadwaj, Anurag; Govindaraju, Venu

    2008-01-01

    Transcript mapping or text alignment with handwritten documents is the automatic alignment of words in a text file with word images in a handwritten document. Such a mapping has several applications in fields ranging from machine learning where large quantities of truth data are required for evaluating handwriting recognition algorithms, to data mining where word image indexes are used in ranked retrieval of scanned documents in a digital library. The alignment also aids "writer identity" verification algorithms. Interfaces which display scanned handwritten documents may use this alignment to highlight manuscript tokens when a person examines the corresponding transcript word. We propose an adaptation of the True DTW dynamic programming algorithm for English handwritten documents. The integration of the dissimilarity scores from a word-model word recognizer and Levenshtein distance between the recognized word and lexicon word, as a cost metric in the DTW algorithm leading to a fast and accurate alignment, is our primary contribution. Results provided, confirm the effectiveness of our approach.

  15. Automatic transcription of Turkish microtonal music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetos, Emmanouil; Holzapfel, André

    2015-10-01

    Automatic music transcription, a central topic in music signal analysis, is typically limited to equal-tempered music and evaluated on a quartertone tolerance level. A system is proposed to automatically transcribe microtonal and heterophonic music as applied to the makam music of Turkey. Specific traits of this music that deviate from properties targeted by current transcription tools are discussed, and a collection of instrumental and vocal recordings is compiled, along with aligned microtonal reference pitch annotations. An existing multi-pitch detection algorithm is adapted for transcribing music with 20 cent resolution, and a method for converting a multi-pitch heterophonic output into a single melodic line is proposed. Evaluation metrics for transcribing microtonal music are applied, which use various levels of tolerance for inaccuracies with respect to frequency and time. Results show that the system is able to transcribe microtonal instrumental music at 20 cent resolution with an F-measure of 56.7%, outperforming state-of-the-art methods for the same task. Case studies on transcribed recordings are provided, to demonstrate the shortcomings and the strengths of the proposed method. PMID:26520294

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of TMP21 by NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Kun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TMP21 is a member of the p24 cargo protein family, which is involved in protein transport between the Golgi apparatus and ER. Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative disorder leading to dementia and deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ is the pathological feature of AD pathogenesis. Knockdown of TMP21 expression by siRNA causes a sharp increase in Aβ production; however the underlying mechanism by which TMP21 regulates Aβ generation is unknown, and human TMP21 gene expression regulation has not yet been studied. Results In this report we have cloned a 3.3-kb fragment upstream of the human TMP21 gene. The transcription start site (TSS of the human TMP21 gene was identified. A series of nested deletions of the 5' flanking region of the human TMP21 gene were subcloned into the pGL3-basic luciferase reporter plasmid. We identified the -120 to +2 region as containing the minimal sequence necessary for TMP21 gene promoter activity. Gel shift assays revealed that the human TMP21 gene promoter contains NFAT response elements. Expression of NFAT increased TMP21 gene expression and inhibition of NFAT by siRNA reduced TMP21 gene expression. Conclusion NFAT plays a very important role in the regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. This study demonstrates that the human TMP21 gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by NFAT signaling.

  17. Cdk phosphorylation of the Ste11 transcription factor constrains differentiation-specific transcription to G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Søren; Andersen, Nicoline Resen; Borup, Mia Trolle;

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells normally differentiate from G(1); here we investigate the mechanism preventing expression of differentiation-specific genes outside G(1). In fission yeast, induction of the transcription factor Ste11 triggers sexual differentiation. We find that Ste11 is only active in G(1) when ...

  18. The basal transcription complex component TAF3 transduces changes in nuclear phosphoinositides into transcriptional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijf-Bultsma, Yvette; Sommer, Lilly; Tauber, Maria; Baalbaki, Mai; Giardoglou, Panagiota; Jones, David R; Gelato, Kathy A; van Pelt, Jason; Shah, Zahid; Rahnamoun, Homa; Toma, Clara; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Philip; Lauberth, Shannon M; Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G; Hart, Daniel; Fischle, Wolfgang; Divecha, Nullin

    2015-05-01

    Phosphoinositides (PI) are important signaling molecules in the nucleus that influence gene expression. However, if and how nuclear PI directly affects the transcriptional machinery is not known. We report that the lipid kinase PIP4K2B regulates nuclear PI5P and the expression of myogenic genes during myoblast differentiation. A targeted screen for PI interactors identified the PHD finger of TAF3, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor with important roles in transcription regulation, pluripotency, and differentiation. We show that the PI interaction site is distinct from the known H3K4me3 binding region of TAF3 and that PI binding modulates association of TAF3 with H3K4me3 in vitro and with chromatin in vivo. Analysis of TAF3 mutants indicates that TAF3 transduces PIP4K2B-mediated alterations in PI into changes in specific gene transcription. Our study reveals TAF3 as a direct target of nuclear PI and further illustrates the importance of basal transcription components as signal transducers. PMID:25866244

  19. ServCat Sensitivity Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This guide covers sensitivity in ServCat. This document provides technical guidance on how sensitivity fields work in ServCat, and provides suggestions on what...

  20. Disgust sensitivity and anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ruth Aharoni; Hertz, Marianne M

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies found inconsistent differences in disgust sensitivity between patients with a variety of eating disorders and normal controls.......Previous studies found inconsistent differences in disgust sensitivity between patients with a variety of eating disorders and normal controls....