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Sample records for bcr-abl transcripts sensitize

  1. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

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    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  2. Detection of p190BCR-ABL AND p210BCR-ABL fusion transcripts in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML using qualitative RT-PCR

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    Aya Bonilla, Carlos Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph, resulting from the balanced reciprocal translocation t(9;22(q34;q11. This marker chromosome is found less frequently in patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective: To determine the frequency of BCR-ABL gene fusions encoding the p210BCR-ABL y p190 BCR-ABL transcripts in Colombian patients diagnosed with CML in different stages of the disease and/or its treatment. Materials and methods: Cross sectional, descriptive study of thirty one CML patients (aged 15-78. Analysis was carried out through qualitative nested PCR for the isoforms P210 BCR-ABL (b3a2 e b2a2 and P190 BCR-ABL (e1a2, and based on peripheral blood samples. Results: In 29 of the 31 patients (93.6% transcript p210BCR-ABL was detected; b2a2 and b3a2 gene fusions and the coexpression b3a2 y b2a2 were identified in 55.2% (16/29, 34.5% (10/29 and 10.3% (3/29 of the cases, respectively. Conclusion: b2a2 gene fusion was the most frequent in this CML population.

  3. Combination of bortezomib and mitotic inhibitors down-modulate Bcr-Abl and efficiently eliminates tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sensitive and resistant Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells.

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    Bucur, Octavian; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Goganau, Ioana; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Pennarun, Bodvael; Bertomeu, Thierry; Dewar, Rajan; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib, in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) demands new therapeutic strategies. We and others have previously established bortezomib, a selective proteasome inhibitor, as an important potential treatment in CML. Here we show that the combined regimens of bortezomib with mitotic inhibitors, such as the microtubule-stabilizing agent Paclitaxel and the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, efficiently kill TKIs-resistant and -sensitive Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells. Combined treatment activates caspases 8, 9 and 3, which correlate with caspase-induced PARP cleavage. These effects are associated with a marked increase in activation of the stress-related MAP kinases p38MAPK and JNK. Interestingly, combined treatment induces a marked decrease in the total and phosphorylated Bcr-Abl protein levels, and inhibits signaling pathways downstream of Bcr-Abl: downregulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation and/or total levels and a decrease in phosphorylation of the Bcr-Abl-associated proteins CrkL and Lyn. Moreover, we found that other mitotic inhibitors (Vincristine and Docetaxel), in combination with bortezomib, also suppress the Bcr-Abl-induced pro-survival signals and result in caspase 3 activation. These results open novel possibilities for the treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias, especially in the imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib-resistant CML cases.

  4. Frequency of BCR-ABL Transcript Types in Syrian CML Patients

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    Sulaf Farhat-Maghribi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Syria, CML patients are started on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and monitored until complete molecular response is achieved. BCR-ABL mRNA transcript type is not routinely identified, contrary to the recommendations. In this study we aimed to identify the frequency of different BCR-ABL transcripts in Syrian CML patients and highlight their significance on monitoring and treatment protocols. Methods. CML patients positive for BCR-ABL transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR were enrolled. BCR-ABL transcript types were investigated using a home-made PCR method that was adapted from published protocols and optimized. The transcript types were then confirmed using a commercially available research kit. Results. Twenty-four transcripts were found in 21 patients. The most common was b2a2, followed by b3a2, b3a3, and e1a3 present solely in 12 (57.1%, 3 (14.3%, 2 (9.5%, and 1 (4.8%, respectively. Three samples (14.3% contained dual transcripts. While b3a2 transcript was apparently associated with warning molecular response to imatinib treatment, b2a2, b3a3, and e1a3 transcripts collectively proved otherwise (P=0.047. Conclusion. It might be advisable to identify the BCR-ABL transcript type in CML patients at diagnosis, using an empirically verified method, in order to link the detected transcript with the clinical findings, possible resistance to treatment, and appropriate monitoring methods.

  5. Molecular measurement of BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in cytogenetic remission

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    Costa Juliana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monitoring of BCR-ABL transcript levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become important to assess minimal residual disease (MRD and standard of care in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. In this study, we performed a prospective, sequential analysis using RT-qPCR monitoring of BCR-ABL gene rearrangements in blood samples from 91 CML patients in chronic phase (CP who achieved complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR and major molecular remission (MMR throughout imatinib treatment. Methods The absolute level of BCR-ABL transcript from peripheral blood was serially measured every 4 to 12 weeks by RT-qPCR. Only level variations > 0.5%, according to the international scale, was considered positive. Sequential cytogenetic analysis was also performed in bone marrow samples from all patients using standard protocols. Results Based on sequential analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts, the 91 patients were divided into three categories: (A 57 (62.6% had no variation on sequential analysis; (B 30 (32.9% had a single positive variation result obtained in a single sample; and (C 4 (4.39% had variations of BCR-ABL transcripts in at least two consecutive samples. Of the 34 patients who had elevated levels of transcripts (group B and C, 19 (55.8% had a BCR-ABL/BCR ratio, 13 (38.2% patients had a 1% to 10% increase and 2 patients had a >10% increase of RT-qPCR. The last two patients had lost a CCyR, and none of them showed mutations in the ABL gene. Transient cytogenetic alterations in Ph-negative cells were observed in five (5.5% patients, and none of whom lost CCyR. Conclusions Despite an increase levels of BCR-ABL/BCR ratio variations by RT-qPCR, the majority of CML patients with MMR remained in CCyR. Thus, such single variations should neither be considered predictive of subsequent failure and nor an indication for altering imatinib dose or switching to second generation therapy. Changing of

  6. Colorimetric assessment of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in clinical samples via gold nanoprobes.

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    Vinhas, Raquel; Correia, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Patricia; Lourenço, Alexandra; Botelho de Sousa, Aida; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) have been used in a range of applications for the detection of bioanalytes of interest, from ions to proteins and DNA targets. These detection strategies are based on the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles, in particular, the intense color that is subject to modulation by modification of the medium dieletric. Au-nanoprobes have been applied for the detection and characterization of specific DNA sequences of interest, namely pathogens and disease biomarkers. Nevertheless, despite its relevance, only a few reports exist on the detection of RNA targets. Among these strategies, the colorimetric detection of DNA has been proven to work for several different targets in controlled samples but demonstration in real clinical bioanalysis has been elusive. Here, we used a colorimetric method based on Au-nanoprobes for the direct detection of the e14a2 BCR-ABL fusion transcript in myeloid leukemia patient samples without the need for retro-transcription. Au-nanoprobes directly assessed total RNA from 38 clinical samples, and results were validated against reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The colorimetric Au-nanoprobe assay is a simple yet reliable strategy to scrutinize myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis and evaluate progression, with obvious advantages in terms of time and cost, particularly in low- to medium-income countries where molecular screening is not routinely feasible. Graphical abstract Gold nanoprobe for colorimetric detection of BCR-ABL1 fusion transcripts originating from the Philadelphia chromosome.

  7. Prospective molecular monitoring of BCR/ABL transcript in children with Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia unravels differences in treatment response.

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    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Lanciotti, Marina; Rossi, Vincenzo; Di Martino, Daniela; Aricò, Maurizio; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Basso, Giuseppe; Masera, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Biondi, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    Children with Philadelphia-chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) represent a subgroup at very high risk for treatment failure, despite intensive chemotherapy. However, recent retrospective studies showed that Ph+ childhood ALL is a heterogeneous disease with regard to treatment response. We have prospectively monitored, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) during follow-up, the presence of the BCR/ABL fusion transcript in Ph+ ALL children diagnosed in the Italian multicentre Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica ALL-AIEOP-95 therapy protocol. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) in childhood Ph+ ALL prospectively enrolled in an intensive, Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM)-type treatment protocol. Twenty-seven of 36 (75.0%) Ph+ patients consecutively enrolled into the high-risk group of the AIEOP-ALL protocol between May 1995 and October 1999 were successfully analysed. Twenty were good responders to the pre-phase of prednisone/intrathecal methotrexate treatment (PGR) and seven were poor responders (PPR). Within the PPR group, the RT-PCR monitoring constantly showed positivity for the BCR/ABL fusion transcript and all the patients died of disease progression. In contrast, highly sensitive qualitative RT-PCR monitoring revealed heterogeneity within the PGR group of Ph+ childhood ALL patients. Three different subgroups could be defined, according to the clearance of Ph+ cells within the first 5 months of treatment. This provides useful information on the capability of chemotherapy to reduce the leukaemic clone, with prognostic implications.

  8. UV Differentially Induces Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and Apoptosis in BCR-ABL1-Positive Cells Sensitive and Resistant to Imatinib

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    Ewelina Synowiec

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cells express the active BCR-ABL1 protein, which has been targeted by imatinib in CML therapy, but resistance to this drug is an emerging problem. BCR-ABL1 induces endogenous oxidative stress promoting genomic instability and imatinib resistance. In the present work, we investigated the extent of oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis and expression of apoptosis-related genes in BCR-ABL1 cells sensitive and resistant to imatinib. The resistance resulted either from the Y253H mutation in the BCR-ABL1 gene or incubation in increasing concentrations of imatinib (AR. UV irradiation at a dose rate of 0.12 J/(m2·s induced more DNA damage detected by the T4 pyrimidine dimers glycosylase and hOGG1, recognizing oxidative modifications to DNA bases in imatinib-resistant than -sensitive cells. The resistant cells displayed also higher susceptibility to UV-induced apoptosis. These cells had lower native mitochondrial membrane potential than imatinib-sensitive cells, but UV-irradiation reversed that relationship. We observed a significant lowering of the expression of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB gene, encoding a component of the complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is involved in apoptosis sensing. Although detailed mechanism of imatinib resistance in AR cells in unknown, we detected the presence of the Y253H mutation in a fraction of these cells. In conclusion, imatinib-resistant cells may display a different extent of genome instability than their imatinib-sensitive counterparts, which may follow their different reactions to both endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors, including DNA repair and apoptosis.

  9. Comparative quantitative analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader method.

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    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Maho; Suzuki, Makoto; Saito, Tomoyoshi; Suzuki, Yoshie; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Yagasaki, Fumiharu

    2011-09-01

    Drug resistance is a serious complication in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The most common and best-characterized mechanism of secondary imatinib resistance in CML is the development of kinase domain mutations in the BCR-ABL gene. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as dasatinib or nilotinib, overcome most of these mutations, but they are not effective against the T315I mutant. To determine whether these mutations contribute to clinical resistance, it is necessary to monitor the ratio of the mutant and wild-type forms. Here, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Invader assay for comparative quantitative analysis (qPI assay) of BCR-ABL transcripts with the T315I mutant clone. T315I ratios were calculated for the wild-type and mutant fold-over-zero (FOZ) values. In examination with 2 kinds of plasmids containing wild-type or T315I mutant PCR amplicons, mutant FOZ values were detected down to 1% of the total. The results of 12 serial samples from 2 patients (case A: Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and case B: CML) with the T315I mutant clone were compared with those of direct sequencing or 2 kinds of allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO)-PCR. All samples showed the T315I mutation by qPI assay and ASO-PCR, and 10 samples showed it by direct sequencing. Significant correlation (correlation coefficient; r2 = 0.951) was noted between the qPI assay and quantitative ASO-PCR to analyze T315I mutant ratios. Thus, the qPI assay is a useful method for evaluating the T315I mutant clone in BCR-ABL transcripts.

  10. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

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    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  11. Sensitivity of imatinib-resistant T315I BCR-ABL CML to a synergistic combination of ponatinib and forskolin treatment.

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    Oaxaca, Derrick M; Yang-Reid, Sun Ah; Ross, Jeremy A; Rodriguez, Georgialina; Staniswalis, Joan G; Kirken, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have dramatically improved the life expectancy of patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, patients will eventually develop resistance to TKI therapy or adverse side effects due to secondary off-target mechanisms associated with TKIs. CML patients exhibiting TKI resistance are at greater risk of developing an aggressive and drug-insensitive disease. Drug-resistant CML typically arises in response to spontaneous mutations within the drug binding sites of the targeted oncoproteins. To better understand the mechanism of drug resistance in TKI-resistant CML patients, the BCR-ABL transformed cell line KCL22 was grown with increasing concentrations of imatinib for a period of 6 weeks. Subsequently, a drug-resistant derivative of the parental KCL22 cell line harboring the T315I gatekeeper mutation was isolated and investigated for TKI drug sensitivity via multi-agent drug screens. A synergistic combination of ponatinib- and forskolin-reduced cell viability was identified in this clinically relevant imatinib-resistant CML cell line, which also proved efficacious in other CML cell lines. In summary, this study provides new insight into the biological underpinnings of BCR-ABL-driven CML and potential rationale for investigating novel treatment strategies for patients with T315I CML.

  12. Overexpression or knock-down of runt-related transcription factor 1 affects BCR-ABL-induced proliferation and migration in vitro and leukemogenesis in vivo in mice

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    YANG Li-jun; YU Wei-dong; DU Jun-bao; CHAO Shuang; CHEN Min-xia; ZHAO He-hua; GUO Jing-zhu

    2009-01-01

    Background Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1) plays a crucial role in hematogenesis and its dysfunction may contribute to leukemogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or not abnormal expression of Runx1 will induce leukemia and how the change of Runx1 expression level could affect BCR-ABL-induced leukemogenesis. In the present study, we aimed to analyze if abnormal expression of Runx1 in BaF3 cells alone would induce leukemogenesis. And we also wanted to know if abnormal expression of Runx1 in leukemic cells would affect leukemogenesis. Furthermore, we investigated whether overexpression or knock-down of Runx1 in BaF3 cells would induce leukemogenesis.Methods Plasmids containing full-length Runx1 cDNA were transduced into BaF3 cells and BaF3-P185wt cells (BCR-ABL transformed BaF3 cells) by electroporation. Plasmids containing a short hairpin RNA of Runx1 were transduced into BaF3 cells and BaF3-P185wt cells by electroporation. Runx1 expression level was quantified by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. The effects of overexpression or knock-down of Runx1 on proliferation, apoptosis and migration of cells were detected in vitro. Then, using MSCV-P185wt-FGFP as a control, we transplanted MSCV-P185wt-Runx1 cells or MSCV-P185wt-shRNA cells into Balb/c mice through tail vein and observed tumorgenesis of the different phenotypes.Results In vitro analysis revealed that overexpression of Runx1 in P185wt cells could inhibit cell proliferation and slow down cell migration; while knock-down of Runx1 could promote cell proliferation and speed up cell migration. In vivo analysis indicated that mice transplanted with MSCV-P185wt-Runx1 survived longer than controls. In contrast, mice transplanted with MSCV-P185wt-shRNA survived shorter than the control group. Gross pathological analysis revealed that the MSCV-P185wt-Runx1 group had less severe splenomegaly and hepatomegaly compared to the control group, and the MSCV-P185wt-shRNA group had more severe

  13. A Requirement for SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 Phosphorylation in Bcr-Abl-Induced Tumorigenesis

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    Xiaoxue Qiu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 are inhibitors of the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT pathway and function in a negative feedback loop during cytokine signaling. Abl transformation is associated with constitutive activation of JAK/STAT-dependent signaling. However, the mechanism by which Abl oncoproteins bypass SOCS inhibitory regulation remains poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that coexpression of Bcr-Abl with SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 results in tyrosine phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins. Interestingly, SOCS-1 is highly tyrosine phosphorylated in one of five primary chronic myelogenous leukemia samples. Bcr-Abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 occurs mainly on Tyr 155 and Tyr 204 residues of SOCS-1 and on Tyr 221 residue of SOCS-3. We observed that phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins was associated with their binding to Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-dependent phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 diminished their inhibitory effects on the activation of JAK and STAT5 and thereby enhanced JAK/STAT5 signaling. Strikingly, disrupting the tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 impaired the expression of Bcl-XL protein and sensitized K562 leukemic cells to undergo apoptosis. Moreover, selective mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 significantly blocked Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenesis in nude mice and inhibited Bcr-Abl-mediated murine bone marrow transformation. Together, these results reveal a mechanism of how Bcr-Abl may overcome SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 inhibition to constitutively activate the JAK/STAT-dependent signaling, and suggest that Bcr-Abl may critically requires tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to mediate tumorigenesis when these SOCS proteins are present in cells.

  14. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia = Determinação da lactate desidrogenase (LDH e do transcrito Bcr-Abl em pacientes com leucemia mielóide crônica

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    Roberto Iemitsu Tatakihara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease. Leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma desordem mieloproliferativa maligna que é originada de célula-tronco pluripotente caracterizada por expansão anormal, maligna de clones de células tronco da medula óssea na circulação. A grande maioria dos pacientes com LMC apresentam transcritos Bcr-Abl. Lactato desidrogenase (LDH,considerado um marcador bioquímico para crescimento tumoral, glicólise anaeróbica, e tem sido considerado um fator de pior prognóstico da LMC. Portanto, este estudo visa avaliar a concentraçãode LDH no plasma e a detecção do transcrito Bcr-Abl em 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 indivíduos saudáveis. Foram avaliados 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 doadores saudáveis. A

  15. Doxorubicin Differentially Induces Apoptosis, Expression of Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Related Genes, and Mitochondrial Potential in BCR-ABL1-Expressing Cells Sensitive and Resistant to Imatinib

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    Ewelina Synowiec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib resistance is an emerging problem in the therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Because imatinib induces apoptosis, which may be coupled with mitochondria and DNA damage is a prototype apoptosis-inducing factor, we hypothesized that imatinib-sensitive and -resistant CML cells might differentially express apoptosis-related mitochondrially encoded genes in response to genotoxic stress. We investigated the effect of doxorubicin (DOX, a DNA-damaging anticancer drug, on apoptosis and the expression of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase 3 (MT-ND3 and cytochrome b (MT-CYB in model CML cells showing imatinib resistance caused by Y253H mutation in the BCR-ABL1 gene (253 or culturing imatinib-sensitive (S cells in increasing concentrations of imatinib (AR. The imatinib-resistant 253 cells displayed higher sensitivity to apoptosis induced by 1 μM DOX and this was confirmed by an increased activity of executioner caspases 3 and 7 in those cells. Native mitochondrial potential was lower in imatinib-resistant cells than in their sensitive counterparts and DOX lowered it. MT-CYB mRNA expression in 253 cells was lower than that in S cells and 0.1 μM DOX kept this relationship. In conclusion, imatinib resistance may be associated with altered mitochondrial response to genotoxic stress, which may be further exploited in CML therapy in patients with imatinib resistance.

  16. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408 Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408

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    Thiago Cezar Fujita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed

  17. Establishment and characterization of A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia cell line, TCC-S, expressing P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts but missing normal ABL gene.

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    Van, Phan Nguyen Thanh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph+) cell line, TCC-S, has been established from a patient with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the blastic crisis. TCC-S cells were shown to express both P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), although quantitative-PCR revealed that TCC-S cells mainly expressed P210 BCR/ABL transcript. Karyotype analysis revealed several triploid clones which constantly harbored two der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;qll)s and two del(9) (q21)s. The der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;q11) is rarely found in other CML cell lines. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, del(9) (q21) resulting in missing of a restrict region including normal ABL gene has not been found among CML cell lines previously described. Thus, TCC-S cells with only BCR/ABL gene and no normal ABL gene may be a useful tool for functional study of ABL in Ph+ CML.

  18. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

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    Cao Qi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5 or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for

  19. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability

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    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O.; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC -mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL –dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability. PMID:21123451

  20. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here, we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTK), such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC-mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL-dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability.

  1. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  2. RT-PCR ANALYSIS OF E2A-PBX1, TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL AND MLL-AF4 FUSION GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN B-LINEAGE ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliu-Cristian Ivanov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents a heterogeneous group of hematological malignancies, defined by clonal proliferation of lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and molecular analysis for the detection of genetic anomalies are clinical standard procedures for diagnosis, sub-classification and post-therapeutic evaluation. Samples from 105 patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were immunophenotyped at diagnosis and were investigated by molecular analysis in order to identify the occurrence of four fusion genes: MLL-AF4, TEL-AML-1, BCR-ABL-p190, E2A-PBX-1. There were no associations found between the immunophenotype and the presence of any fusion genes evaluated. Both methods in combination remain a prerequisite for an improved subclassification of hematological malignancies, therapeutic decision, and evaluation of treatment response.

  3. Targeting the SH2-Kinase Interface in Bcr-Abl Inhibits Leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebien, Florian; Hantschel, Oliver; Wojcik, John; Kaupe, Ines; Kovacic, Boris; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz M.; Gish, Gerald D.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Koide, Akiko; Beug, Hartmut; Pawson, Tony; Valent, Peter; Koide, Shohei; Superti-Furga, Giulio (AAS); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (Med U. Vienna); (UC); (IMP-CNRS)

    2012-10-25

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively active tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. However, emerging TKI resistance prevents complete cure. Therefore, alternative strategies targeting regulatory modules of Bcr-Abl in addition to the kinase active site are strongly desirable. Here, we show that an intramolecular interaction between the SH2 and kinase domains in Bcr-Abl is both necessary and sufficient for high catalytic activity of the enzyme. Disruption of this interface led to inhibition of downstream events critical for CML signaling and, importantly, completely abolished leukemia formation in mice. Furthermore, disruption of the SH2-kinase interface increased sensitivity of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl mutants to TKI inhibition. An engineered Abl SH2-binding fibronectin type III monobody inhibited Bcr-Abl kinase activity both in vitro and in primary CML cells, where it induced apoptosis. This work validates the SH2-kinase interface as an allosteric target for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Susceptibility of Ph-positive all to TKI therapy associated with Bcr-Abl rearrangement patterns: a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have demonstrated success in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in patients that express BCR-ABL rearrangements (Philadelphia chromosome [Ph]. The current study aimed to assess the efficacy of TKIs and prognostic factors in the treatment of adults with Ph+-ALL. METHODS: In this multicenter retrospective study, the relationship between Ph+-ALL and treatment outcomes among Chinese patients receiving TKI-containing induction/consolidation chemotherapy was examined. A total of 86 Ph+-ALL patients were included and followed for 3.85 (0.43-9.30 years. Overall survival (OS and event-free survival (EFS were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 86 Ph+-ALL patients (40 females and 46 males; median age: 34.0 years were enrolled, including those with BCR/ABL transcripts 190 (n = 52, 210 (n = 25, and 230 (n = 2; BCR/ABL isoform determination was not available for 7 patients. Mortality was influenced by variable BCR/ABL transcripts and TKI administration, and BCR/ABL transcripts, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and TKI administration were associated with the occurrence of events. The OS rate in the TKI administration group during steady state was significantly higher compared with those patients who did not receive TKI administration (P = 0.008, the EFS rate in the TKI administration group during steady state was significantly higher compared with those patients who did not receive TKIs (P = 0.012, and also higher than those with TKI salvage administration (P = 0.004. BCR/ABL transcripts 210 showed preferable OS and EFS compared with BCR/ABL transcripts 190 and 230 (P<0.05 for each. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility of Ph+-ALL to TKI associated with the patterns of BCR-ABL rearrangement is demonstrated for the first time, thus adding another risk-stratifying molecular prognostic tool for the management of patients with Ph+-ALL.

  5. Oridonin Triggers Chaperon-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of BCR-ABL in Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huilin; Weng, Hengyou; Dong, Bowen; Zhao, Panpan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Lianghu

    2017-01-01

    Inducing degradation of oncoproteins by small molecule compounds has the potential to avoid drug resistance and therefore deserves to be exploited for new therapies. Oridonin is a natural compound with promising antitumor efficacy that can trigger the degradation of oncoproteins; however, the direct cellular targets and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that oridonin depletes BCR-ABL through chaperon-mediated proteasomal degradation in leukemia. Mechanistically, oridonin poses oxidative stress in cancer cells and directly binds to cysteines of HSF1, leading to the activation of this master regulator of the chaperone system. The resulting induction of HSP70 and ubiquitin proteins and the enhanced binding to CHIP E3 ligase hence target BCR-ABL for ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Both wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL can be efficiently degraded by oridonin, supporting its efficacy observed in cultured cells as well as mouse tumor xenograft assays with either imatinib-sensitive or -resistant cells. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism by which oridonin induces rapid degradation of BCR-ABL as well as a novel pharmaceutical activator of HSF1 that represents a promising treatment for leukemia. PMID:28128329

  6. shRNA library screening identifies nucleocytoplasmic transport as a mediator of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashad, Jamshid S; Eiring, Anna M; Mason, Clinton C; Gantz, Kevin C; Bowler, Amber D; Redwine, Hannah M; Yu, Fan; Kraft, Ira L; Pomicter, Anthony D; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Iovino, Anthony J; Zabriskie, Matthew S; Heaton, William L; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Chenchik, Alex; Bonneau, Kyle; Ullman, Katharine S; O'Hare, Thomas; Deininger, Michael W

    2015-03-12

    The mechanisms underlying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients lacking explanatory BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations are incompletely understood. To identify mechanisms of TKI resistance that are independent of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, we introduced a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library targeting ∼5000 cell signaling genes into K562(R), a CML cell line with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance expressing exclusively native BCR-ABL1. A customized algorithm identified genes whose shRNA-mediated knockdown markedly impaired growth of K562(R) cells compared with TKI-sensitive controls. Among the top candidates were 2 components of the nucleocytoplasmic transport complex, RAN and XPO1 (CRM1). shRNA-mediated RAN inhibition or treatment of cells with the XPO1 inhibitor, KPT-330 (Selinexor), increased the imatinib sensitivity of CML cell lines with kinase-independent TKI resistance. Inhibition of either RAN or XPO1 impaired colony formation of CD34(+) cells from newly diagnosed and TKI-resistant CML patients in the presence of imatinib, without effects on CD34(+) cells from normal cord blood or from a patient harboring the BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. These data implicate RAN in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent imatinib resistance and show that shRNA library screens are useful to identify alternative pathways critical to drug resistance in CML.

  7. Efficacy of Retinoids in IKZF1-Mutated BCR-ABL1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchman, Michelle L; Low, Jonathan; Qu, Chunxu; Paietta, Elisabeth M; Kasper, Lawryn H; Chang, Yunchao; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Althoff, Mark J; Song, Guangchun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ma, Jing; Rusch, Michael; McGoldrick, Dan; Edmonson, Michael; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Yong-Dong; Caufield, William; Freeman, Burgess; Li, Lie; Panetta, John C; Baker, Sharyn; Yang, Yung-Li; Roberts, Kathryn G; McCastlain, Kelly; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Peters, Jennifer L; Centonze, Victoria E; Notta, Faiyaz; Dobson, Stephanie M; Zandi, Sasan; Dick, John E; Janke, Laura; Peng, Junmin; Kodali, Kiran; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Min, Jaeki; Mayasundari, Anand; Williams, Richard T; Willman, Cheryl L; Rowe, Jacob; Luger, Selina; Dickins, Ross A; Guy, R Kiplin; Chen, Taosheng; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-09-14

    Alterations of IKZF1, encoding the lymphoid transcription factor IKAROS, are a hallmark of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), however the role of IKZF1 alterations in ALL pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that in mouse models of BCR-ABL1 leukemia, Ikzf1 and Arf alterations synergistically promote the development of an aggressive lymphoid leukemia. Ikzf1 alterations result in acquisition of stem cell-like features, including self-renewal and increased bone marrow stromal adhesion. Retinoid receptor agonists reversed this phenotype, partly by inducing expression of IKZF1, resulting in abrogation of adhesion and self-renewal, cell cycle arrest, and attenuation of proliferation without direct cytotoxicity. Retinoids potentiated the activity of dasatinib in mouse and human BCR-ABL1 ALL, providing an additional therapeutic option in IKZF1-mutated ALL.

  8. [Guidelines for molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia patients by RT-qPCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larripa, Irene; Ruiz, María Sol; Gutiérrez, Marina; Bianchini, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical guidelines for managing chronic myeloid leukemia include molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 transcript quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Despite the proven prognostic significance of molecular response, it is not widely appreciated that quantitative reverse-transcription PCR potentially produces highly variable data, which may affect the validity of results, making comparability between different laboratories difficult. Therefore, standardized reporting of BCR-ABL1 measurements is needed for optimal clinical management. An approach to achieve comparable BCR-ABL1 values is the use of an international reporting scale. Conversion to the international scale is achieved by the application of laboratory specific conversion factor that is obtained by using validated secondary reference calibrators. Moreover, with the aim to mitigate the interlaboratory imprecision of quantitative BCR-ABL1 measurements and to facilitate local laboratory results interpretation and reporting, we decide to prepare laboratory guidelines that will further facilitate interlaboratory comparative studies and independent quality-assessment programs, which are of paramount importance for worldwide standardization of BCR-ABL1 monitoring results, in particular for those most isolated laboratories, with not easy access to commercial kits or sample interchange programs.

  9. Guidelines for molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia patients by RT-qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Larripa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Current clinical guidelines for managing chronic myeloid leukemia include molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 transcript quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Despite the proven prognostic significance of molecular response, it is not widely appreciated that quantitative reverse-transcription PCR potentially produces highly variable data, which may affect the validity of results, making comparability between different laboratories difficult. Therefore, standardized reporting of BCR-ABL1 measurements is needed for optimal clinical management. An approach to achieve comparable BCR-ABL1 values is the use of an international reporting scale. Conversion to the international scale is achieved by the application of laboratory specific conversion factor that is obtained by using validated secondary reference calibrators. Moreover, with the aim to mitigate the interlaboratory imprecision of quantitative BCR-ABL1 measurements and to facilitate local laboratory results interpretation and reporting, we decide to prepare laboratory guidelines that will further facilitate interlaboratory comparative studies and independent quality-assessment programs, which are of paramount importance for worldwide standardization of BCR-ABL1 monitoring results, in particular for those most isolated laboratories, with not easy access to commercial kits or sample interchange programs

  10. Targeting Hedgehog signaling pathway and autophagy overcomes drug resistance of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yubin; Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance is the major clinical challenge in the treatment of CML. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and autophagy are both related to tumorigenesis, cancer therapy, and drug resistance. This study was conducted to explore whether the Hh pathway could regulate autophagy in CML cells and whether simultaneously regulating the Hh pathway and autophagy could induce cell death of drug-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Our results indicated that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Hh pathway could markedly induce autophagy in BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Autophagic inhibitors or ATG5 and ATG7 silencing could significantly enhance CML cell death induced by Hh pathway suppression. Based on the above findings, our study demonstrated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could markedly reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells. Moreover, this combination had little cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, this combined strategy was related to PARP cleavage, CASP3 and CASP9 cleavage, and inhibition of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. In conclusion, this study indicated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could potently kill imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells, providing a novel concept that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy might be a potent new strategy to overcome CML drug resistance.

  11. Rapid detection of BCR-ABL fusion genes using a novel combined LUX primer, in-cell RT-PCR and flow cytometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Li, Li-Zhen; Sun, Jian-Zhi; Zhang, Ti; Peng, Jun; Xu, Cong-Gao

    2008-01-01

    Currently, quantitative and semiquantitative assays for minimal residual disease detection include fluorescence in situ hybridisation, multiparameter flow cytometric immunophenotyping and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). We have developed a new approach to detect hybrid breakpoint cluster region and Abelson proto-oncogene (BCR-ABL) transcripts inside suspension cells using in situ RT-PCR and light upon extension (LUX) primer, followed by rapid quantitative analysis with flow cytometry. After cellular permeabilization and fixation of single cell suspension, the neoplastic mRNA was reverse transcribed and amplified by PCR with LUX primer. The results demonstrated that a strong positive yellow-green signal was observed in 99-100% cells of K562 cell line, only the red nucleus was detected in NB4 cell line and normal controls. The technique has been utilised to study 12 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, and the results were compared with those of BCR-ABL fusion mRNA by RT-PCR and BCR-ABL fusion gene of the interphase cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In the five diagnosed patients, 90-98% cells were strongly positive. Four patients, including three patients treated with interferon-alpha and hydroxyurea and one patient treated with imatinib mesylate, had 26-82.5% positive cells. Three patients treated with imatinib mesylate were negative. The in situ RT-PCR results demonstrated complete concordance with the results of I-FISH and RT-PCR. A fluorescence signal was detectable at 1/10(4) cells and became negative below this threshold with flow cytometry. The results of the present study suggest that (1) LUX primers can be used to efficiently detect BCR-ABL fusion mRNA by in-cell RT-PCR; (2) the novel technique is a specific and sensitive way of detecting fusion gene with potential clinical usefulness.

  12. INHIBITION OF APOPTOSIS BY bcr-abl FUSION GENE IN K562 CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-hong; SUN Bing-zhong; YUAN Yue-chuan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of bcr-abl fusion gene on CML cell apoptosis. Methods: Apoptosis of exvivo cultured K562 cells were observed after exposure to synthetic 18 mer antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the bcr-abl junction (b3a2). Results: Apoptosis of K562 cells was significantly increased associated with inhibition of bcr-abl expression. Conclusion: bcr-abl fusion gene formation due to chromosome translocation may be the major mechanism of CML via inhibition of apoptosis.

  13. Detection of BCR-ABL Fusion mRNA Using Reverse Transcriptase Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, L C; Hall, S; Kohlgruber, A; Urbin, S; Torres, C; Wilson, P

    2011-12-08

    RT-PCR is commonly used for the detection of Bcr-Abl fusion transcripts in patients diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML. Two fusion transcripts predominate in CML, Br-Abl e13a2 and e14a2. They have developed reverse transcriptase isothermal loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assays to detect these two fusion transcripts along with the normal Bcr transcript.

  14. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  15. BCR-ABL DERIVED PEPTIDE VACCINES FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKAEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bocchia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative pluripotent stem cell disorder characterized by the presence of a cytogenetic hallmark, the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, and accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. The disease progresses from a chronic phase through an accelerated phase to a blast phase and its natural course accounts for a median 4 years survival1. The Ph chromosome is derived by a reciprocal translocation termed t(9;22 in which the c-abl oncogene has moved from chromosome 9 into the breakpoint cluster region (bcr, within the bcr gene on chromosome 22, resulting in a chimeric bcr-abl fusion gene that encodes a 210 KD protein (p210 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Two major alternative chimeric p210 can result from this fusion gene: p210-b2a2 where the junction occurs between bcr exon 2 (b2 and abl exon 2 (a2 and p210-b3a2 where the the junction occurs between bcr exon 3 (b3 and abl exon 2 (a2. About 40% of CML patients harbor the p210-b2a2 and about 60% of them show the p210-b3a2.

  16. A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM method to detect Bcr-Abl kinase activity in CML using a peptide biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The protein kinase Bcr-Abl plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, and is the target of the breakthrough drug imatinib (Gleevec™. While most patients respond well to imatinib, approximately 30% never achieve remission or develop resistance within 1-5 years of starting imatinib treatment. Evidence from clinical studies suggests that achieving at least 50% inhibition of a patient's Bcr-Abl kinase activity (relative to their level at diagnosis is associated with improved patient outcomes, including reduced occurrence of resistance and longer maintenance of remission. Accordingly, sensitive assays for detecting Bcr-Abl kinase activity compatible with small amounts of patient material are desirable as potential companion diagnostics for imatinib. Here we report the detection of Bcr-Abl activity and inhibition by imatinib in the human CML cell line K562 using a cell-penetrating peptide biosensor and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. MRM enabled reproducible, selective detection of the peptide biosensor at fmol levels from aliquots of cell lysate equivalent to ~15,000 cells. This degree of sensitivity will facilitate the miniaturization of the entire assay procedure down to cell numbers approaching 15,000, making it practical for translational applications in patient cells in which the limited amount of available patient material often presents a major challenge.

  17. Targeting the SH2-Kinase Interface in Bcr-Abl Inhibits Leukemogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Grebien, Florian; Hantschel, Oliver; Wojcik, John; Kaupe, Ines; Kovacic, Boris; Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz M.; Gish, Gerald D.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Koide, Akiko; Beug, Hartmut; Pawson, Tony; Valent, Peter; Koide, Shohei; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    Summary Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively active tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. However, emerging TKI resistance prevents complete cure. Therefore, alternative strategies targeting regulatory modules of Bcr-Abl in addition to the kinase active site are strongly desirable. Here, we show that an intramolecular interaction between the SH2 and kinase domains in Bcr-Abl is both necessary and sufficient for hig...

  18. Detection of residual bcr/abl translocation by polymerase chain reaction in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients after bone-marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabert, J; Thuret, I; Lafage, M; Carcassonne, Y; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1989-11-11

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate minimum residual disease in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) patients after bone-marrow transplantation, by amplification of the transcript of the specific bcr/abl hybrid gene. Strict precautions were taken to avoid contamination. Peripheral blood cells from 22 patients transplanted for haematological malignant disorders were analysed. The results were clearcut for positive controls (patients with CML in relapse) and negative controls (patients with malignant disorders other than CML). In 11 of 12 CML patients in clinical and cytogenetic remission the bcr/abl transcript was detected 3 months to 6 years after transplantation. Thus, it appears that cells expressing the bcr/abl mRNA are not eradicated from the blood of CML patients in complete clinical remission even years after bone-marrow transplantation.

  19. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Outcomes of Children With BCR-ABL1–Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Risk-Directed Therapy Based on the Levels of Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kathryn G.; Pei, Deqing; Campana, Dario; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Li, Yongjin; Cheng, Cheng; Sandlund, John T.; Jeha, Sima; Easton, John; Becksfort, Jared; Zhang, Jinghui; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Leung, Wing H.; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose BCR-ABL1–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently identified B-cell ALL (B-ALL) subtype with poor outcome that exhibits a gene expression profile similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL but lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. We examined the outcome of children with BCR-ABL1–like ALL treated with risk-directed therapy based on minimal residual disease (MRD) levels during remission induction. Patients and Methods Among 422 patients with B-ALL enrolled onto the Total Therapy XV study between 2000 and 2007, 344 had adequate samples for gene expression profiling. Next-generation sequencing and/or analysis of genes known to be altered in B-ALL were performed in patients with BCR-ABL1–like ALL who had available material. Outcome was compared between patients with and those without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Results Forty (11.6%) of the 344 patients had BCR-ABL1–like ALL. They were significantly more likely to be male, have Down syndrome, and have higher MRD levels on day 19 and at the end of induction than did other patients with B-ALL. Among 25 patients comprehensively studied for genetic abnormalities, 11 harbored a genomic rearrangement of CRLF2, six had fusion transcripts responsive to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors or JAK inhibitors, and seven had mutations involving the Ras signaling pathway. There were no significant differences in event-free survival (90.0% ± 4.7% [SE] v 88.4% ± 1.9% at 5 years; P = .41) or in overall survival (92.5% ± 4.2% v 95.1% ± 1.3% at 5 years; P = .41) between patients with and without BCR-ABL1–like ALL. Conclusion Patients who have BCR-ABL1–like ALL with poor initial treatment response can be salvaged with MRD-based risk-directed therapy and may benefit from identification of kinase-activating lesions for targeted therapies. PMID:25049327

  1. Detection of a rare BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase fusion protein in H929 multiple myeloma cells using immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Pihan, German A; Asara, John M

    2012-10-02

    Hypothesis directed proteomics offers higher throughput over global analyses. We show that immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in H929 multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells led to the discovery of a rare and unexpected BCR-ABL fusion, informing a therapeutic intervention using imatinib (Gleevec). BCR-ABL is the driving mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is uncommon to other cancers. Three different IP-MS experiments central to cell signaling pathways were sufficient to discover a BCR-ABL fusion in H929 cells: phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide IP, p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) IP, and the GRB2 adaptor IP. The pY peptides inform tyrosine kinase activity, p85 IP informs the activating adaptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) involved in AKT activation and GRB2 IP identifies RTKs and adaptors leading to ERK activation. Integration of the bait-prey data from the three separate experiments identified the BCR-ABL protein complex, which was confirmed by biochemistry, cytogenetic methods, and DNA sequencing revealed the e14a2 fusion transcript. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the GAB2 adaptor protein, important for MAPK signaling, were common to all three IP-MS experiments. The comparative treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drugs revealed only imatinib, the standard of care in CML, was inhibitory to BCR-ABL leading to down-regulation of pERK and pS6K and inhibiting cell proliferation. These data suggest a model for directed proteomics from patient tumor samples for selecting the appropriate TKI drug(s) based on IP and LC-MS/MS. The data also suggest that MM patients, in addition to CML patients, may benefit from BCR-ABL diagnostic screening.

  2. Improved coiled-coil design enhances interaction with Bcr-Abl and induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew S; Miller, Geoffrey D; Bruno, Benjamin J; Constance, Jonathan E; Woessner, David W; Fidler, Trevor P; Robertson, James C; Cheatham, Thomas E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl drives aberrant downstream activity through trans-autophosphorylation of homo-oligomers in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).(1, 2) The formation of Bcr-Abl oligomers is achieved through the coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus of Bcr.(3, 4) We have previously reported a modified version of this coiled-coil domain, CCmut2, which exhibits disruption of Bcr-Abl oligomeric complexes and results in decreased proliferation of CML cells and induction of apoptosis.(5) A major contributing factor to these enhanced capabilities is the destabilization of the CCmut2 homodimers, increasing the availability to interact with and inhibit Bcr-Abl. Here, we included an additional mutation (K39E) that could in turn further destabilize the mutant homodimer. Incorporation of this modification into CCmut2 (C38A, S41R, L45D, E48R, Q60E) generated what we termed CCmut3, and resulted in further improvements in the binding properties with the wild-type coiled-coil domain representative of Bcr-Abl [corrected]. A separate construct containing one revert mutation, CCmut4, did not demonstrate improved oligomeric properties and indicated the importance of the L45D mutation. CCmut3 demonstrated improved oligomerization via a two-hybrid assay as well as through colocalization studies, in addition to showing similar biologic activity as CCmut2. The improved binding between CCmut3 and the Bcr-Abl coiled-coil may be used to redirect Bcr-Abl to alternative subcellular locations with interesting therapeutic implications.

  3. The Study on BCR/ABL Fusion Gene in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the significance of BCR/ABC fusion gene in adult acute lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), 28 patients who were diagnosed as ALL were enrolled to detect BCR/ABC gene using nested-RT PCR. The results showed that 9 cases (31.25%) were BCR/ABL positive ,and expressed P210 subtype. A mong them 7 cases were B-ALL, and one was T-ALL. The diagnosis was proved by monoclonal antibodies recognition by indirect immunofluorescence. Adult patients with BCR/ABL positive ALL were significantly older (p<0. 01) and had higher WBC count (p<0. 01) as compared with BCR/ABL-negative patients. There was no significant difference in sex, hemoglobin and splenomegaly between two group (p>0. 05). The induc tion failure rate was high in BCR/ABL positive patients and those who achieved complete remission usually relapsed earlier. In conclusion, adult ALL patients with BCR/ABL-positive have poorer prognosis.

  4. Cell sorting enables interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of low BCR-ABL1 producing stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients beyond deep molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten Niekerk, Peter B; Petersen, Charlotte C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Ommen, Hans B; Roug, Anne S; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2014-01-01

    The exact disease state of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission is unknown, because even the most sensitive quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods cannot identify patients prone to relapse after treatment withdrawal. To elucidate this, CD34(+) stem cell and progenitor cell subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and their content of residual Philadelphia positive (Ph(+) ) cells was evaluated in 17 CML patients (major molecular response, n = 6; 4-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 expression (MR(4) ), n = 11) using both sensitive qPCR and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). Despite evaluating fewer cells, iFISH proved superior to mRNA-based qPCR in detecting residual Ph(+) stem cells (P = 0·005), and detected Ph(+) stem- and progenitor cells in 9/10 patients at frequencies of 2-14%. Moreover, while all qPCR(+) samples also were iFISH(+) , 9/33 samples were qPCR-/iFISH(+) , including all positive samples from MR(4) patients. Our findings show that residual Ph(+) cells are low BCR-ABL1 producers, and that DNA-based methods are required to assess the content of persisting Ph(+) stem cells in these patients. This approach demonstrates a clinically applicable manner of assessing residual disease at the stem cell level in CML patients in MR(4) , and may enable early and safe identification of candidates for tyrosine kinase inhibitor withdrawal.

  5. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  6. Expression of BCR/ABL p210 from a Knockin Allele Enhances Bone Marrow Engraftment without Inducing Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B. Foley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and some acute lymphoblastic leukemias are characterized by the t(9;22 chromosome, which encodes the BCR/ABL oncogene. Multiple mouse models of CML express BCR/ABL at high levels from non-Bcr promoters, resulting in the development of leukemias. In contrast, a significant fraction of healthy humans have been found to have BCR/ABL-positive hematopoietic cells. To bridge the gap between the information derived from current mouse models and nonleukemic humans with the BCR/ABL oncogene, we generated a knockin model with BCR/ABL p210 expressed from the Bcr locus. Unlike previous models, expression of BCR/ABL from the knockin allele did not induce leukemia. BCR/ABL mutant cells did exhibit favorable bone marrow engraftment compared to control cells. These data suggest that BCR/ABL expression alone is insufficient to induce disease. This model allows for inducible spatial and temporal control of BCR/ABL expression for analysis of early steps in the pathogenesis of BCR/ABL-expressing leukemias.

  7. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-03-02

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance.

  8. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyin Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag, HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI-resistance.

  9. Papel da P190 BCR-ABL como parâmetro de recaída na leucemia mielóide crônica P190 BCR-ABL role in myeloid chronic leukemia relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. Andrade

    2008-08-01

    and P190BCR-ABL (e1a2. In our pre-bone marrow transplant study, a prevalence of isoforms characteristic of CML was observed (b3a2 and/or b2a2, a fact essential for the patients to be followed up within the CML protocol. The e1a2 isoform, characteristic of LLA, was detected in 11 patients together with the isoforms characteristic of CML. The detection of the e1a2 transcript was evaluated in respect to its probable role in LMC and was one of the parameters evaluated in this study.

  10. Activity of the Aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680 against Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fei; Stoddart, Sonia; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-05-01

    The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors due to point mutations in Bcr/Abl is a challenging problem for Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph-positive) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, especially for those with the T315I mutation, against which neither nilotinib or dasatinib shows significant activity. VX-680 is a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor active against all Bcr/Abl proteins but has not been extensively examined in preclinical models of Ph-positive ALL. Here, we have tested VX-680 for the treatment of Bcr/Abl-positive ALL when leukemic cells are protected by the presence of stroma. Under these conditions, VX-680 showed significant effects on primary human Ph-positive ALL cells both with and without the T315I mutation, including ablation of tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of Bcr/Abl, decreased viability, and induction of apoptosis. However, drug treatment of human Ph-positive ALL cells for 3 days followed by drug removal allowed the outgrowth of abnormal cells 21 days later, and on culture of mouse Bcr/Abl ALL cells on stroma with lower concentrations of VX-680, drug-resistant cells emerged. Combined treatment of human ALL cells lacking the T315I mutation with both VX-680 and dasatinib caused significantly more cytotoxicity than each drug alone. We suggest that use of VX-680 together with a second effective drug as first-line treatment for Ph-positive ALL is likely to be safer and more useful than second-line treatment with VX-680 as monotherapy for drug-resistant T315I Ph-positive ALL.

  11. Evaluation of Morpholino Antisense Oligos’ Role on BCR-ABL Gene Silencing in the K562 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Delalat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML develops when a hematopoietic stem cellacquires the BCR/ABL fusion gene. This causes these transformed hematopoietic cellsto have a greater than normal proliferation rate. Scientists attempt to improve the CMLtreatment process by silencing the BCR/ABL oncogene. In this work, we used morpholinoantisense oligos to silence the BCR/ABL oncogene.Materials and Methods: In this study, the K562 was used as a BCR/ABL fusion-genepositive cell line and the Jurkat cell line as a control. We explored the inhibiting capacityof morpholino antisense oligos in the the expression of the BCR/ABL oncogene andstudied their p210 BCR/ABL suppression, inhibition of cell proliferation and stimulation ofapoptosis in the K562 cells after 24 and 48 hours. Endo-Porter was used for delivery ofmorpholino antisense oligos into cell cytosols. Meanwhile, flow cytometric analysis wasperformed in order to determine the appropriate concentration of morpholino antisenseoligos.Results: Prolonged exposure of the K562 cell line to the morpholino antisense oligostargeted against the BCR-ABL gene showed proliferation inhibition as its main feature.After western blotting, we found that complete silencing of BCR/ABL was achieved, butflow cytometric analysis showed no broad apoptosis.Conclusion: The results indicate that the Morpholino antisense oligo is able to inhibitp210 BCR/ABL; however, it cannot induce broad apoptosis due to co-silencing of BCR.

  12. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    T315I(+) Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABL(T315I) mutations. Median follow...... myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011......) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABL(T315I) mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors....

  13. LMC y detección del gen de fusión BCR/ABL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Artigas Allaire

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La anormalidad citogenética más común en la leucemia mieloide crónica (LMC es el cromosoma Philadelphia producida por la translocación t(9:22, cuya expresión molecular es el gen de fusión BCR-ABL, que codifica una proteína con actividad tirosinquinasa.

  14. Antileukemia effects of xanthohumol in Bcr/Abl-transformed cells involve nuclear factor-kappaB and p53 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteghirfo, Stefano; Tosetti, Francesca; Ambrosini, Claudia; Stigliani, Sara; Pozzi, Sarah; Frassoni, Francesco; Fassina, Gianfranco; Soverini, Simona; Albini, Adriana; Ferrari, Nicoletta

    2008-09-01

    The oncogenic Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase activates various signaling pathways including phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB that mediate proliferation, transformation, and apoptosis resistance in Bcr-Abl+ myeloid leukemia cells. The hop flavonoid xanthohumol inhibits tumor growth by targeting the nuclear factor-kappaB and Akt pathways and angiogenesis. Here, we show that xanthohumol has in vitro activity against Bcr-Abl+ cells and clinical samples and retained its cytotoxicity when imatinib mesylate-resistant K562 cells were examined. Xanthohumol inhibition of K562 cell viability was associated with induction of apoptosis, increased p21 and p53 expression, and decreased survivin levels. We show that xanthohumol strongly inhibited Bcr-Abl expression at both mRNA and protein levels and show that xanthohumol caused elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blunted xanthohumol-induced events. Further, we observed that xanthohumol inhibits leukemia cell invasion, metalloprotease production, and adhesion to endothelial cells, potentially preventing in vivo life-threatening complications of leukostasis and tissue infiltration by leukemic cells. As structural mutations and/or gene amplification in Bcr-Abl can circumvent an otherwise potent anticancer drug such as imatinib, targeting Bcr-Abl expression as well as its kinase activity could be a novel additional therapeutic approach for the treatment of Bcr-Abl+ myeloid leukemia.

  15. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene.

  16. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Wang, Li [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Department of Medical Laboratory, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center (Chongqing The Fourth Hospital), Chongqing, 400016 (China); Sheng, Shangchun [The No.2 Peoples' Hospital of Yibin, Sichuan, 644000 (China); Wang, Teng; Yang, Juan [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Xie, Guoming, E-mail: guomingxie@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Feng, Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China)

    2015-08-19

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application. - Highlights: • A transducer hairpin was designed to improve the versatility of DNA circuit. • GS/PANI/AuNPs were introduced to the DNA circuit for further signal amplification. • The established biosensor displayed high sensitivity and good specificity.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Bcr-Abl Phosphokinase in a Xenograft Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ji Yuan; David J. Yang; Angelo, Laura S.; Kohanim, Saady; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase can be assessed by gamma imaging using an 111Indium-labeled anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, and if the response to treatment with imatinib could be detected using this imaging technique. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibody (APT) was labeled with indium (111In) using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator. To determine if 111In-EC-APT could assess a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, xenografts of the human chronic myelogenous l...

  18. Targeting of heme oxygenase-1 attenuates the negative impact of Ikaros isoform 6 in adult BCR-ABL1-positive B-ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaojing; Zou, Xingli; Wang, Ziming; Fang, Qin; Chen, Shuya; Huang, Jun; Zhe, Nana; Yu, Meisheng; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Jishi

    2016-08-16

    The correlation between Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and dominant-negative Ikaros isoform 6 (IK6) is unclear. Firstly, we detected that IK6 existed in 20 of 42 (47.6%) adult BCR-ABL1-positive B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCR-ABL1-positive B-ALL) by using reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequencing. IK6-positive patients had an unfavorable outcome compared with IK6-negative ones. Further study showed that the level of HO-1 expression was higher in IK6-positive patients' samples than that in IK6-negative ones. And there was a strong correlation between the expression of IK6 and HO-1. The growth of primary CD34+ leukemic cells derived from our IK6-positive patients' pool was prohibited by silencing HO-1, further promoting their apoptosis. Furthermore, primary CD34+ leukemic cells derived from IK6-positive patients shown poor responses to imatinib in comparison with wild-type (IK1) patients, suggesting that the expression of IK6 resisted to imatinib in adult BCR-ABL1-positive B-ALL. Importantly, inhibition of HO-1 also increased their sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Finally, we found that IK6 activated downstream STAT5, and HO-1 was one of the downstream target genes of STAT5. In conclusion, HO-1 is an essential survival factor in BCR-ABL1-positive B-ALL with IK6, and targeting HO-1 can attenuate the negative impact of IK6.

  19. Modeling the influence of stromal microenvironment in the selection of ENU-induced BCR-ABL1 mutants by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggoune, Djamel; Tosca, Lucie; Sorel, Nathalie; Bonnet, Marie-Laure; Dkhissi, Fatima; Tachdjian, Gérard; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Turhan, Ali G

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have profoundly changed the natural history of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance to imatinib, dasatinib or nilotinib (1(st) and 2(nd) generation TKIs), due in part to BCR-ABL1 kinase mutations, has been largely described. These drugs are ineffective on the T315I gatekeeper substitution, which remains sensitive to 3(rd) generation TKI ponatinib. It has recently been suggested that the hematopoietic niche could protect leukemic cells from targeted therapy. In order to investigate the role of a stromal niche in mutation-related resistance, we developed a niche-based cell mutagenesis assay. For this purpose, ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea)-exposed UT-7 cells expressing non-mutated or T315I-mutated BCR-ABL1 were cultured with or without murine MS-5 stromal cells and in the presence of imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, or ponatinib. In the assays relative to 1(st) and 2(nd) generation TKIs, which were performed on non-mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, our data highlighted the increasing efficacy of the latter, but did not reveal any substantial effect of the niche. In ponatinib assays performed on both non-mutated and T315I-mutated BCR-ABL1 cells, an increased number of resistant clones were observed in the presence of MS-5. Present data suggested that T315I mutants need either compound mutations (e.g. E255K/T315I) or a stromal niche to escape from ponatinib. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization experiments, we found an increased number of variations (involving some recurrent chromosome regions) in clones cultured on MS-5 feeder. Overall, our study suggests that the hematopoietic niche could play a crucial role in conferring resistance to ponatinib, by providing survival signals and favoring genetic instability.

  20. [Standardization of quantitative detection of BCR-ABL gene expression by RQ-PCR in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in cooperation with European Leukemia Net].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Tomasz; Zawada, Magdalena; Czekalska, Sylwia; Florek, Izabela; Mueller, Martin; Gniot, Michał; Jaźwiec, Bozena; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Leszczyńska, Aleksandra; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Matiakowska, Karolina; Solarska, Iwona; Stokłosa, Tomasz; Skotnicki, Aleksander B

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of chronic myeloid leukemia treatment efficacy requires very sensitive methods of BCR-ABL gene detection based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lack of comparability of BCR-ABL mRNA quantification results generated by various methodologies in different laboratories was the cause of an international multicenter trial initiation with the participation of 133 laboratories in 24 European countries cooperating within the "EUTOS for CML" project. Pracownia Diagnostyki Molekularnej Kliniki Hematologii is taking part in standardisation rounds organised since 2005. The compatibility of methodology used in Pracownia with European Leukemia Net (ELN) standards was confirmed, and correction factor for the expression of RQ-PCR results in an international scale was calculated. Pracownia was charge by ELN with a task of conducting the standardisation in polish molecular biology laboratories. Test probes were prepared and sent to eight cooperating laboratories. The results obtained in six laboratories were concordant with results from laboratory in Krakow after conversion to international scale, therefore it was possible to calculate individual correction factors. The participation of polish laboratories in international standardization process created the opportunity for unification of BCR-ABL quantification methodologies with recommendations of international experts, and showed that the quality of analyses performed in majority of them was satisfactory enough to calculate correction factor and to express the RQ-PCR results in widely accepted international scale.

  1. Janus kinase 2 mutations in cases with BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ismail; Yokuş, Osman; Gedik, Habip

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the frequency of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutations in cases with chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMDs), and the relationship between the presence of JAK2 mutation and leukocytosis and splenomegaly, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: Patients, who were diagnosed with BCR-ABL-negative CMDs according to diagnosis criteria of the World Health Organization and followed up at the hematology clinic between 2013 and 2015, were investigated in terms of the frequency of JAK2 mutation in cases with CMDs, and the relationship between the presence of JAK2 mutation and leukocytosis and splenomegaly, retrospectively. Results: In total, 100 patients, who were diagnosed with BCR-ABL-negative CMDs, were evaluated retrospectively. The mean age of the patients with JAK2 positivity was significantly higher compared to patients with negative. JAK2-positivity rates in the age groups were significantly different. Gender, diagnosis, splenomegaly, and leukocytosis were not statistically different for JAK2 positivity between the groups. Conclusion: JAK2 V617F mutation is more commonly seen in older age as a risk for complications related to CDMS. Splenomegaly and leukocytosis are not associated with JAK2 V617F mutation. PMID:28182037

  2. Inverse regulation of bridging integrator 1 and BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Morano, Annalisa; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Bianchino, Gabriella; Grieco, Vitina; Signorino, Elisabetta; Fragasso, Alberto; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Venturi, Claudia; Rosti, Gianantonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator process of tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) functional activities. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a key protein involved in RTK intracellular trafficking. Here, we report, by studying 34 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis, that BIN1 gene is downregulated in CML as compared to healthy controls, suggesting an altered endocytosis of RTKs. Rab interactor 1 (RIN1), an activator of BIN1, displayed a similar behavior. Treatment of 57 patients by tyrosine kinase inhibitors caused, along with BCR-ABL1 inactivation, an increase of BIN1 and RIN1 expression, potentially restoring endocytosis. There was a significant inverse correlation between BIN1-RIN1 and BCR-ABL1 expression. In vitro experiments on both CML and nontumorigenic cell lines treated with Imatinib confirmed these results. In order to provide another proof in favor of BIN1 and RIN1 endocytosis function in CML, we demonstrated that Imatinib induced, in K562 cell line, BIN1-RIN1 upregulation accompanied by a parallel AXL receptor internalization into cytoplasmic compartment. This study shows a novel deregulated mechanism in CML patients, indicating BIN1 and RIN1 as players in the maintenance of the abnormal RTK signaling in this hematological disease.

  3. Autophagy induction by Bcr-Abl-expressing cells facilitates their recovery from a targeted or nontargeted treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowley, Lisa C

    2012-01-31

    Although Imatinib has transformed the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), it is not curative due to the persistence of resistant cells that can regenerate the disease. We have examined how Bcr-Abl-expressing cells respond to two mechanistically different therapeutic agents, etoposide and Imatinib. We also examined Bcr-Abl expression at low and high levels as elevated expression has been associated with treatment failure. Cells expressing low levels of Bcr-Abl undergo apoptosis in response to the DNA-targeting agent (etoposide), whereas high-Bcr-Abl-expressing cells primarily induce autophagy. Autophagic populations engage a delayed nonapoptotic death; however, sufficient cells evade this and repopulate following the withdrawal of the drug. Non-Bcr-Abl-expressing 32D or Ba\\/F3 cells induce both apoptosis and autophagy in response to etoposide and can recover. Imatinib treatment induces both apoptosis and autophagy in all Bcr-Abl-expressing cells and populations rapidly recover. Inhibition of autophagy with ATG7 and Beclin1 siRNA significantly reduced the recovery of Imatinib-treated K562 cells, indicating the importance of autophagy for the recovery of treated cells. Combination regimes incorporating agents that disrupt Imatinib-induced autophagy would remain primarily targeted and may improve response to the treatment in CML.

  4. Transferred BCR/ABL DNA from K562 extracellular vesicles causes chronic myeloid leukemia in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Cai

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that besides mRNAs and microRNAs, there are DNA fragments within extracellular vesicles (EVs. The BCR/ABL hybrid gene, involved in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, could be transferred from K562 EVs to neutrophils and decrease their phagocytic activity in vitro. Our present study provides evidence that BCR/ABL DNAs transferred from EVs have pathophysiological significance in vivo. Two months after injection of K562 EVs into the tail vein of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, they showed some characteristics of CML, e.g., feeble, febrile, and thin, with splenomegaly and neutrophilia but with reduced neutrophil phagocytic activity. These findings were also observed in immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice treated with K562 EVs; BCR/ABL mRNA and protein were found in their neutrophils. The administration of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of de novo mRNA synthesis, prevented the abnormalities caused by K562 EVs in NOD/SCID mice related to CML, including neutrophilia and bone marrow hyperplasia. As a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, imatinib blocked the activity of tyrosine kinases and the expression of phospho-Crkl, induced by the de novo BCR/ABL protein caused by K562 EVs bearing BCR/ABL DNA. Our current study shows the pathophysiological significance of transferred tumor gene from EVs in vivo, which may represent an important mechanism for tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis.

  5. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, Artur; Falinski, Rafal; Znojek, Pawel; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Flis, Sylwia; Doneddu, Valentina; Pytel, Dariusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Blasiak, Janusz; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Skorski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of CML-CP. Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50–90% of TKI-responding patients carry CML clones expressing TKI resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1 –transformed cell lines and CD34+ CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na+/K+ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI-resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML. PMID:23047475

  6. Combinations of Novel Histone Deacetylase and Bcr-Abl Inhibitors in the Therapy of Imatinib Mesylate-Sensitive and -Refractory Bcr-Abl Expressing Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    changes to the principles of treatment for both basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers and changes in the consideration of radiotherapy . 550...including those that contain FLT-3 mutations, while relatively sparing NBMCs.26,28,29 On the basis of the strong rationale generated by these observations...neutropenia (14 percent) were mainly grade 3 or 4 and appeared to increase with increasing doses of the drug. Pruritus, rash, and dry skin were almost

  7. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl+ K562 and Jak2(V617F+ HEL Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML and Jak2(V617F in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl+ K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL

  8. Immunologic evaluation of peptides derived from BCR/ABL-out-of-frame fusion protein in HLA A2.1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casnici, Claudia; Volpe, Gisella; Crotta, Katia; Lattuada, Donatella; Saglio, Giuseppe; Marelli, Ornella

    2012-05-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia express, besides the main BCR/ABL transcripts, novel BCR/ABL transcripts derived from alternative splicing between BCR exons 1, 13, or 14 with ABL exons 4 and 5. Their translational products present at C-terminus an amino acid portion derived from out-of-frame (OOF) reading of the ABL gene. The presence of OOF-peptide-specific T cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients was demonstrated and a first study in in vivo model demonstrated that OOF ABL portion was immunogenic in human leukcocyte antigen (HLA)-A2.1 transgenic mice. Here we immunized HLA A2.1 mice with novel peptides designed on the ABL OOF sequence, containing epitopes with high affinity for HLA A2.1 molecule. The specific immune response, cellular and humoral, obtained ex vivo against HLA A2.1-positive human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells using peptide 22-53 and the cytotoxic activity induced by peptide 32mer confirm the possibility to use the ABL OOF portion as target to evoke a specific and multiple immune response in Philadelphia positive leukemic patients in cytogenetic remission.

  9. Expression patterns of WT-1 and Bcr-Abl measured by TaqMan quantitative real-time RT-PCR during follow-up of leukemia patients with the Ph chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zi-xing陈子兴; Jaspal Kaeda; Sue Saunders; John M Goldman

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was designed to quantitatively measure WT-1 expression levels in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during follow-up and to clarify the value of WT-1 as a molecular marker in minimal residual disease monitoring.Methods The TaqMan quantitative real-time RT-PCR method was established by using cloned WT-1 cDNA or synthesized oligonucleotides resembling WT-1 cDNA fragments in limit dilution as template until a stable and reliable standard curve was obtained. In a 25-month follow-up, the transcriptional levels of WT-1, Bcr-Abl, and Abl gene, were quantitatively measured in bone marrow cells from 25 CML or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with the Ph chromosome. In addition, the expression of these genes in 40 samples of normal peripheral blood was also examined using the same method. The ratios of WT-1/Abl and Bcr-Abl/Abl were both plotted, and the two expression patterns were compared as well as their clinical significance.Results The levels of WT-1 expression in normal peripheral blood were detectable. In CML and Ph positive ALL patients, WT-1 expression levels changed in parallel with the Bcr-Abl expression pattern as the disease progressed or responded to effective treatment.Conclusion WT-1 expression provides a novel molecular marker in addition to Bcr-Abl for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) and targeting therapy in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia patients.

  10. Functionally deregulated AML1/RUNX1 cooperates with BCR-ABL to induce a blastic phase-like phenotype of chronic myelogenous leukemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Patients in the chronic phase (CP of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML have been treated successfully following the advent of ABL kinase inhibitors, but once they progress to the blast crisis (BC phase the prognosis becomes dismal. Although mechanisms underlying the progression are largely unknown, recent studies revealed the presence of alterations of key molecules for hematopoiesis, such as AML1/RUNX1. Our analysis of 13 BC cases revealed that three cases had AML1 mutations and the transcript levels of wild-type (wt. AML1 were elevated in BC compared with CP. Functional analysis of representative AML1 mutants using mouse hematopoietic cells revealed the possible contribution of some, but not all, mutants for the BC-phenotype. Specifically, K83Q and R139G, but neither R80C nor D171N mutants, conferred upon BCR-ABL-expressing cells a growth advantage over BCR-ABL-alone control cells in cytokine-free culture, and the cells thus grown killed mice upon intravenous transfer. Unexpectedly, wt.AML1 behaved similarly to K83Q and R139G mutants. In a bone marrow transplantation assay, K83Q and wt.AML1s induced the emergence of blast-like cells. The overall findings suggest the roles of altered functions of AML1 imposed by some, but not all, mutants, and the elevated expression of wt.AML1 for the disease progression of CML.

  11. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (ARIAD)

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  12. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, A; Falinski, R; Znojek, P; Stoklosa, T; Flis, S; Doneddu, V; Pytel, D; Synowiec, E; Blasiak, J; Bellacosa, A; Skorski, T

    2013-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50-90% of patients developing TKI-resistance carry CML clones expressing TKI-resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species, which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI-resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1-transformed cell lines and CD34(+) CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI, we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML.

  13. ON012380: A Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitor of BCR-ABL for the Therapy of Imatinib-Resistant CMLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    diverse client proteins. Biopolymers 2009. 41. Tsuruma R, Ohbayashi N, Kamitani S, et al. Physical and functional interactions between STAT3 and...compounds to significantly inhibit the proliferation of K562 and Ba/F3:JAK2V617F cells suggests that this scaffold could be a promising lead for the... scaffold could be a promising lead for the development of anticancer agents that are able to block BCR-ABL phosphorylation in leuke- mic cells. 2010

  14. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in Plasma/Serum of Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwako Narita, Anri Saito, Aya Kojima, Minami Iwabuchi, Naoya Satoh, Takayoshi Uchiyama, Akie Yamahira, Tatsuo Furukawa, Hirohito Sone, Masuhiro Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  15. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian (ARIAD)

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.

  16. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-08

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome.

  17. Comparative study of DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis in human K562 and CCRF-CEM leukemia cells: role of BCR/ABL in therapeutic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Wysocki, Tomasz; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2006-09-01

    The Philadelphia translocation t(9;22) resulting in the bcr/abl fusion gene is the pathogenic principle of almost 95% of human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Imatinib mesylate (STI571) is a specific inhibitor of the BCR/ABL fusion tyrosine kinase that exhibits potent antileukemic effects in CML. BCR/ABL-positive K562 and -negative CCRF-CEM human leukemia cells were investigated. MTT survival assay and clonogenic test of the cell proliferation ability were used to estimate resistance against idarubicin. DNA damage after cell treatment with the drug at the concentrations from 0.001 to 3 microM with or without STI571 pre-treatment were examined by the alkaline comet assay. We found that the level of DNA damages was lower in K562 cells after STI571 pre-treatment. It is suggested that BCR/ABL activity may promote genomic instability, moreover K562 cells were found to be resistant to the drug treatment. Further, we provided evidence of apoptosis inhibition in BCR/ABL-positive cells using caspase-3 activity colorimetric assay and DAPI nuclear staining for chromatin condensation. We suggest that these processes associated with cell cycle arrest in G2/M checkpoint detected in K562 BCR/ABL-positive compared to CCRF-CEM cells without BCR/ABL expression might promote clone selection resistance to drug treatment.

  18. CCR7 is involved in BCR-ABL/STAP-2-mediated cell growth in hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Kaori; Iwakami, Masashi; Muromoto, Ryuta; Inagaki, Takuya; Kitai, Yuichi; Kon, Shigeyuki; Sekine, Yuichi; Oritani, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-08-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a clonal disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and its oncogenic product, BCR-ABL, which activates multiple pathways involved in cell survival, growth promotion, and disease progression. We previously reported that in murine hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells, signal transducing adaptor protein-2 (STAP-2) binds to BCR-ABL and up-regulates BCR-ABL phosphorylation, leading to enhanced activation of its downstream signaling molecules. The binding of STAP-2 to BCR-ABL also influenced the expression levels of chemokine receptors, such as CXCR4 and CCR7. For the induction of CCR7 expression, signals mediated by the MAPK/ERK pathway were critical in Ba/F3 cells expressing BCR-ABL and STAP-2. In addition, STAP-2 cooperated with BCR-ABL to induce the production of CCR7 ligands, CCL19 and CCL21. Our results demonstrate a contribution of CCR7 to STAP-2-dependent enhancement of BCR-ABL-mediated cell growth in Ba/F3 cells.

  19. 用COLD-PCR方法提高BCR-ABL1激酶区耐药突变检测灵敏度%Application of COLD-PCR for improved detection of BCR-ABL1 kinase domain drug-resistant mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆; 刘红星; 孙慧; 王倩; 张之芬; 武焕玲; 李元堂; 陈永金; 田文君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the co-amplification using a low denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) method in improving the detection of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene kinase domain drug-resistant mutation.Methods Conventional nested PCR (CN-PCR) and COLD-PCR protocol were designed to amplify full-length of BCR-ABL1 kinase domain.PCR products were purified and then Sanger sequenced to detect BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutation (KDM).20 newly diagnosed CML patients and 32 Imatinib (IM) resistant patients were chosen and peripheral blood or bone marrow samples were collected.PCR products of the clinical specimens were purified and then cloned to evaluate the proportion of the KDM allele.Standard samples with different proportion of KDMs were prepared using T-A vectors with KDM and wild type BCR-ABL1 kinase domain sequence,and then CN-PCR,COLD-PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to compare the detection sensitivity.Results In the 32 IM-resistant patients,23 were identified KDM-positive using CN-PCR and 28 KDM-positive using COLD-PCR.In the 20 newly diagnosed CML patients,none was identified KDM-positive using CN-PCR and 1 was identified carrying a lower proportion of KDM using COLD-PCR.For 16 different types of KDMs,COLD-PCR method could improve the detection sensitivity 4-12 times.Conclusion Detection sensitivity of BCR-ABL1 drug-resistant kinase domain mutation can be effectively improved by using COLD-PCR method and may contribute to early detection of resistance KDMs.%目的 探讨用低变性温度共扩增PCR(COLD-PCR)方法提高BCR-ABL1融合基因激酶区耐药突变检测灵敏度的可行性.方法 本研究为实验诊断研究.设计常规巢式PCR(CN-PCR)和COLD-PCR方案扩增BCR-ABL1激酶区全长,扩增产物纯化后用Sanger测序法检测激酶区突变(KDM).采集32例经伊马替尼(IM)治疗并出现耐药的慢性粒细胞性白血病(CML)患者和20例初诊CML患者外周血或骨髓标本,用上述2种方案检测标本中的KDM.

  20. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH for BCR/ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari Chauffaille

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Identification of Philadelphia chromosome or BCR/ABL gene rearrangement in chronic myeloid leukemia is important at diagnosis as well as after treatment. OBJECTIVE: To compare the results of karyotyping using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH upon diagnosis and 1 year after bone marrow transplantation in 12 patients. TYPE OF STUDY: Diagnostic test and residual disease detection. SETTING: Hematology and Hemotherapy Department, Federal University of São Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil. SAMPLE: 12 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia at diagnosis and 1 year after bone marrow transplantation. DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Karyotyping was done in the usual way and the BCR/ABL gene-specific probe was used for FISH. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Disease at diagnosis and residual. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 10 patients presented t(9;22(q34.1;q11 as well as positive FISH. Two cases did not have metaphases but FISH was positive. After bone marrow transplantation, 8 patients presented normal karyotype, 1 had persistence of identifiable Philadelphia chromosome and 3 had no metaphases. Two cases showed complete chimera and 2 had donor and host cells simultaneously. FISH was possible in all cases after bone marrow transplantation and confirmed the persistence of identifiable Philadelphia chromosome clone in one patient, and identified another that did not present metaphases for analysis. Cases that showed mixed chimera in karyotype were negative for BCR/ABL by FISH. CONCLUSION: The applicability of FISH is clear, particularly for residual disease detection. Classical and molecular cytogenetics are complementary methods.

  1. A Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitor of BCR-ABL for the Therapy of Imatinib-Resistant Cmls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    10% SDS-PAGE and analyzed for indicated proteins by infrared labeled secondary antibodies and scanning with Odyssey scanner ( LiCor Technology). pBcr...proteins by infrared labeled secondary antibodies and scanning with Odyssey scanner ( LiCor Technology). 10 treated 32D/T315I-BCR-ABL cells with increasing...with Odyssey scanner ( LiCor Technology). V G 0.5 1.0 2.5 5.0 0.5 1.0 2.5 5.0 (µM

  2. Biosensing of BCR/ABL fusion gene using an intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiangling; Huang, Yu; Bian, Xintong; Li, DanDan; Cheng, Quan; Ding, Shijia

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a custom-made intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system has been developed to directly detect a specific sequence of BCR/ABL fusion gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The variation in the reflected light intensity detected from the sensor chip composed of gold islands array is proportional to the change of refractive index due to the selective hybridization of surface-bound DNA probes with target ssDNA. SPRi measurements were performed with different concentrations of synthetic target DNA sequence. The calibration curve of synthetic target sequence shows a good relationship between the concentration of synthetic target and the change of reflected light intensity. The detection limit of this SPRi measurement could approach 10.29 nM. By comparing SPRi images, the target ssDNA and non-complementary DNA sequence are able to be distinguished. This SPRi system has been applied for assay of BCR/ABL fusion gene extracted from real samples. This nucleic acid-based SPRi biosensor therefore offers an alternative high-effective, high-throughput label-free tool for DNA detection in biomedical research and molecular diagnosis.

  3. A target-disease network model of second-generation BCR-ABL inhibitor action in Ph+ ALL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Rix

    Full Text Available Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL is in part driven by the tyrosine kinase bcr-abl, but imatinib does not produce long-term remission. Therefore, second-generation ABL inhibitors are currently in clinical investigation. Considering different target specificities and the pronounced genetic heterogeneity of Ph+ ALL, which contributes to the aggressiveness of the disease, drug candidates should be evaluated with regard to their effects on the entire Ph+ ALL-specific signaling network. Here, we applied an integrated experimental and computational approach that allowed us to estimate the differential impact of the bcr-abl inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib, Bosutinib and Bafetinib. First, we determined drug-protein interactions in Ph+ ALL cell lines by chemical proteomics. We then mapped those interactions along with known genetic lesions onto public protein-protein interactions. Computation of global scores through correlation of target affinity, network topology, and distance to disease-relevant nodes assigned the highest impact to dasatinib, which was subsequently confirmed by proliferation assays. In future, combination of patient-specific genomic information with detailed drug target knowledge and network-based computational analysis should allow for an accurate and individualized prediction of therapy.

  4. Allosteric Inhibition of Bcr-Abl Kinase by High Affinity Monobody Inhibitors Directed to the Src Homology 2 (SH2)-Kinase Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, John; Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Grabe, Grzegorz; Koide, Akiko; Akin, Louesa; Gerig, Barbara; Hantschel, Oliver; Koide, Shohei

    2016-04-15

    Bcr-Abl is a constitutively active kinase that causes chronic myelogenous leukemia. We have shown that a tandem fusion of two designed binding proteins, termed monobodies, directed to the interaction interface between the Src homology 2 (SH2) and kinase domains and to the phosphotyrosine-binding site of the SH2 domain, respectively, inhibits the Bcr-Abl kinase activity. Because the latter monobody inhibits processive phosphorylation by Bcr-Abl and the SH2-kinase interface is occluded in the active kinase, it remained undetermined whether targeting the SH2-kinase interface alone was sufficient for Bcr-Abl inhibition. To address this question, we generated new, higher affinity monobodies with single nanomolar KD values targeting the kinase-binding surface of SH2. Structural and mutagenesis studies revealed the molecular underpinnings of the monobody-SH2 interactions. Importantly, the new monobodies inhibited Bcr-Abl kinase activity in vitro and in cells, and they potently induced cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines. This work provides strong evidence for the SH2-kinase interface as a pharmacologically tractable site for allosteric inhibition of Bcr-Abl.

  5. Stat5 Exerts Distinct, Vital Functions in the Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 and Jak2(V617F){sup +} HEL Leukemia Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Axel [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany); Borghouts, Corina [Ganymed Pharmaceuticals AG, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Brendel, Christian [Boston Children’s Hospital, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Moriggl, Richard [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR), Vienna 1090 (Austria); Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd, E-mail: Groner@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Georg-Speyer-Haus, Institute for Tumor Biology and Experimental Therapy, Frankfurt am Main 60596 (Germany)

    2015-03-19

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) play central roles in the conversion of extracellular signals, e.g., cytokines, hormones and growth factors, into tissue and cell type specific gene expression patterns. In normal cells, their signaling potential is strictly limited in extent and duration. The persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5 is found in many human tumor cells and contributes to their growth and survival. Stat5 activation plays a pivotal role in nearly all hematological malignancies and occurs downstream of oncogenic kinases, e.g., Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and Jak2(V617F) in other myeloproliferative diseases (MPD). We defined the mechanisms through which Stat5 affects growth and survival of K562 cells, representative of Bcr-Abl positive CML, and HEL cells, representative for Jak2(V617F) positive acute erythroid leukemia. In our experiments we suppressed the protein expression levels of Stat5a and Stat5b through shRNA mediated downregulation and demonstrated the dependence of cell survival on the presence of Stat5. Alternatively, we interfered with the functional capacities of the Stat5 protein through the interaction with a Stat5 specific peptide ligand. This ligand is a Stat5 specific peptide aptamer construct which comprises a 12mer peptide integrated into a modified thioredoxin scaffold, S5-DBD-PA. The peptide sequence specifically recognizes the DNA binding domain (DBD) of Stat5. Complex formation of S5-DBD-PA with Stat5 causes a strong reduction of P-Stat5 in the nuclear fraction of Bcr-Abl-transformed K562 cells and a suppression of Stat5 target genes. Distinct Stat5 mediated survival mechanisms were detected in K562 and Jak2(V617F)-transformed HEL cells. Stat5 is activated in the nuclear and cytosolic compartments of K562 cells and the S5-DBD-PA inhibitor most likely affects the viability of Bcr-Abl{sup +} K562 cells through the inhibition of canonical Stat5 induced target gene transcription. In HEL cells

  6. Frequency of the ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL1, TCF3-PBX1, and MLL-AFF1 fusion genes in Guatemalan pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and their ethnic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Claudia; Granados, Lilian; Morales, Oneida; Jo, Wendy; Villagran, Swuanny; Tinti, Damaris; Villegas, Mauricio; Antillón, Federico; Torselli, Silvana; Silva, Gabriel

    2013-06-01

    Fusion genes involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occur mostly due to genetic and environmental factors, and only a limited number of studies have reported any ethnic influence. This study assesses whether an ethnic influence has an effect on the frequency of any of the four fusion genes: BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, and MLL-AFF1 found in ALL. To study this ethnic influence, mononuclear cells were obtained from bone marrow samples from 143 patients with ALL. We performed RNA extraction and reverse transcription, then assessed the quality of the cDNA by amplifying the ABL1 control gene, and finally evaluated the presence of the four transcripts by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. We found 10 patients who had the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene (7%); 3 patients (2%) were TCF3-PBX1 positive; and 6 patients (4.5%) were ETV6-RUNX1 positive. The incidence of this last fusion gene is quite low when compared to the values reported in most countries. The low incidence of the ETV6-RUNX1 fusion gene found in Guatemala matches the incidence rates that have been reported in Spain and Indian Romani. Since it is known that an ethnic resemblance exists among these three populations, as shown by ancestral marker studies, the ALL data suggests an ethnic influence on the occurrence and frequency of this particular fusion gene.

  7. Persistence of BCR/ABL mRNA-expressing bone-marrow cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in complete cytogenetic remission induced by interferon-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, F; Toiron, Y; Camerlo, J; Lafage, M; Sainty, D; Arnoulet, C; Raineri, V; Gabert, J; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-06-01

    Complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses can be obtained with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in 15-25% of the patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In these patients, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can be used to evaluate minimal residual disease. We studied 12 patients who remained Philadelphia-negative for a median period of 21 months on IFN-alpha therapy. Using RT-PCR, the specific transcript was found in all bone marrow (BM) samples. Ten patients still exhibiting a persistent residual clone remained in cytogenetic remission for a median period of 14 months. As we observed a dissociation between bcr-abl expression in BM and peripheral blood (PB) cells, and given the known fluctuations of the bcr-abl PCR results, we suggest that PB negative results should be confirmed on BM specimens. Alternatively, it remains to be demonstrated whether longitudinal monitoring of residual disease would benefit from quantitative PCR or double fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  8. miR-29b suppresses CML cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via regulation of BCR/ABL1 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yajuan; Wang, Haixia; Tao, Kun [Department of Clinical Hematology, Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics Designated of Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, 1 Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Xiao, Qing [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, 1 Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Huang, Zhenglan; Zhong, Liang; Cao, Weixi [Department of Clinical Hematology, Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics Designated of Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, 1 Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wen, Jianping [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Feng, Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Department of Clinical Hematology, Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics Designated of Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, 1 Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally and are critical for many cellular pathways. Recent evidence has shown that aberrant miRNA expression profiles and unique miRNA signaling pathways are present in many cancers. Here, we demonstrate that miR-29b is markedly lower expressed in CML patient samples. Bioinformatics analysis reveals a conserved target site for miR-29b in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of ABL1. miR-29b significantly suppresses the activity of a luciferase reporter containing ABL1-3′UTR and this activity is not observed in cells transfected with mutated ABL1-3′UTR. Enforced expression of miR-29b in K562 cells inhibits cell growth and colony formation ability thereby inducing apoptosis through cleavage of procaspase 3 and PARP. Furthermore, K562 cells transfected with a siRNA targeting ABL1 show similar growth and apoptosis phenotypes as cells overexpression of miR-29b. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-29b may function as a tumor suppressor by targeting ABL1 and BCR/ABL1. - Highlights: ► miR-29b expression was downregulated in CML patients. ► ABL1 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-29b. ► Enforced expression of miR-29b inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. ► miR-29b might be a therapeutic target to CML.

  9. A Non-ATP-Competitive Dual Inhibitor of JAK2 and BCR-ABL Kinases: Elucidation of a Novel Therapeutic Spectrum Based on Substrate Competitive Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatiani, Shashidhar S; Cosenza, Stephen C; Reddy, M V Ramana; Ha, Ji Hee; Baker, Stacey J; Samanta, Ajoy K; Olnes, Matthew J; Pfannes, Loretta; Sloand, Elaine M; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Reddy, E Premkumar

    2010-04-01

    Here we report the discovery of ON044580, an α-benzoyl styryl benzyl sulfide that possesses potent inhibitory activity against two unrelated kinases, JAK2 and BCR-ABL, and exhibits cytotoxicity to human tumor cells derived from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and myelodysplasia (MDS) patients or cells harboring a mutant JAK2 kinase. This novel spectrum of activity is explained by the non-ATP-competitive inhibition of JAK2 and BCR-ABL kinases. ON044580 inhibits mutant JAK2 kinase and the proliferation of JAK2(V617F)-positive leukemic cells and blocks the IL-3-mediated phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5. Interestingly, this compound also directly inhibits the kinase activity of both wild-type and imatinib-resistant (T315I) forms of the BCR-ABL kinase. Finally, ON044580 effectively induces apoptosis of imatinib-resistant CML patient cells. The apparently unrelated JAK2 and BCR-ABL kinases share a common substrate, STAT5, and such substrate competitive inhibitors represent an alternative therapeutic strategy for development of new inhibitors. The novel mechanism of kinase inhibition exhibited by ON044580 renders it effective against mutant forms of kinases such as the BCR-ABL(T315I) and JAK2(V617F). Importantly, ON044580 selectively reduces the number of aneuploid cells in primary bone marrow samples from monosomy 7 MDS patients, suggesting another regulatory cascade amenable to this agent in these aberrant cells. Data presented suggest that this compound could have multiple therapeutic applications including monosomy 7 MDS, imatinib-resistant CML, and myeloproliferative neoplasms that develop resistance to ATP-competitive agents.

  10. Low expression of miR-196b enhances the expression of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 oncogenes in chronic myeloid leukemogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs can function as tumor suppressors or oncogene promoters during tumor development. In this study, low levels of expression of miR-196b were detected in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Bisulfite genomic sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR were used to examine the methylation status of the CpG islands in the miR-196b promoter in K562 cells, patients with leukemia and healthy individuals. The CpG islands showed more methylation in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared with healthy individuals (P<0.05, which indicated that low expression of miR-196b may be associated with an increase in the methylation of CpG islands. The dual-luciferase reporter assay system demonstrated that BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 are the target genes of miR-196b, which was consistent with predictions from bioinformatics software analyses. Further examination of cell function indicated that miR-196b acts to reduce BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 protein levels, decrease cell proliferation rate and retard the cell cycle. A low level of expression of miR-196b can cause up-regulation of BCR-ABL1 and HOXA9 expression, which leads to the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. MiR-196b may represent an effective target for chronic myeloid leukemia therapy.

  11. Attomolar electrochemical detection of the BCR/ABL fusion gene based on an amplifying self-signal metal nanoparticle-conducting polymer hybrid composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, Karen Y P S; Frias, Isaac A M; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Gomes, Renan G; de Melo, Celso P; Oliveira, Maria D L; Andrade, César A S

    2016-12-01

    In the last ten years, conjugated polymers started to be used in the immobilization of nucleic acids via non-covalent interactions. In the present study, we describe the construction and use of an electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a nanostructured polyaniline-gold composite, specifically developed for the detection of the BCR/ABL chimeric oncogene. This chromosome translocation is used as a biomarker to confirm the clinical diagnosis of both chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The working principle of the biosensor rests on measuring the conductivity resulting from the non-covalent interactions between the hybrid nanocomposite and the DNA probe. The nanostructured platform exhibits a large surface area that enhances the conductivity. Positive cases, which result from the hybridization between DNA probe and targeted gene, induce changes in the amperometric current and in the charge transfer resistance (RCT) responses. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images showed changes in the genosensor surface after exposure to cDNA sample of patient with leukemia, evidencing the hybridization process. This new hybrid sensing-platform displayed high specificity and selectivity, and its detection limit is estimated to be as low as 69.4 aM. The biosensor showed excellent analytical performance for the detection of the BCR/ABL oncogene in clinical samples of patients with leukemia. Hence, this electrochemical sensor appears as a simple and attractive tool for the molecular diagnosis of the BCR/ABL oncogene even in early-stage cases of leukemia and for the monitoring of minimum levels of residual disease.

  12. The CRISPR/Cas9 system efficiently reverts the tumorigenic ability of BCR/ABL in vitro and in a xenograft model of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Ordoñez, José Luis; Alonso-Pérez, Veronica; Álamo-Quijada, Miguel; Benito, Rocio; Guerrero, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel

    2017-02-09

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to abrogate p210 oncoprotein expression in the Boff-p210 cell line, a pro-B line derived from interlukin-3-dependent Baf/3, that shows IL-3-independence arising from the constitutive expression of BCR-ABL p210. Using this approach, pools of Boff-p210-edited cells and single edited cell-derived clones were obtained and functionally studied in vitro. The loss of p210 expression in Boff-p210 cells resulted in the loss of ability to grow in the absence of IL-3, as the Baf/3 parental line, showing significantly increased apoptosis levels. Notably, in a single edited cell-derived clone carrying a frame-shift mutation that prevents p210 oncoprotein expression, the effects were even more drastic, resulting in cell death. These edited cells were injected subcutaneously in immunosuppressed mice and tumor growth was followed for three weeks. BCR/ABL-edited cells developed smaller tumors than those originating from unedited Boff-p210 parental cells. Interestingly, the single edited cell-derived clone was unable to develop tumors, similar to what is observed with the parental Baf/3 cell line.CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing technology allows the ablation of the BCR/ABL fusion gene, causing an absence of oncoprotein expression, and blocking its tumorigenic effects in vitro and in the in vivo xenograft model of CML. The future application of this approach in in vivo models of CML will allow us to more accurately assess the value of CRISPR/Cas9 technology as a new therapeutic tool that overcomes resistance to the usual treatments for CML patients.

  13. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Mauro, Michael J; Martinelli, Giovanni;

    2009-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP......), or blastic-phase (BP) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph)(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with T315I mutation. Medical records of 222 patients from 9 countries were reviewed; data were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Median age at T315I mutation...

  14. Detection of BCR/ABL Fusion Gene by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Its Clinical Application%荧光原位杂交技术检测BCR/ABL融合基因的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周瑞莲; 莫耀禧; 蓝梅; 林金盈

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the clinical value of detecting BCR/ABL fusion gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The conventional cytogenetic test and detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene by FISH for bone marrow of patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloproliferative disease or myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disorders, acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were carried out. The results showed that ( 1 ) out of 46 newly diagnosed as chronic myeloproliferative dsease or myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disorders, 22 cases were diagnosed as CML, the FISH detection showed all positive (100% ), while cytogenetic test showed 86.4% (19/22) positive, in the other 24 patients who were diagnosed as other chronic myeloproliferative disease or myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disorders, BCR/ABL fusion gene all were be detected as regative 100% by FISH, while the cytogenetic test of bone marrow in 3 cases supported the diagnosis of CML, and the diagnosis of myelodysplastic disorder in 1 case; (2) in 3 out of 7 acute lymphocytic leukemia cases the BCR/ABL fusion gene could not be detected by FISH; (3) the BCR/ABL fusion gene could be detected by FISH in 2 cases of CML received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with abnormal threshold 6.5% and 1. 2% respectively. It is concluded that the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene by FISH is sensitive and reliable, which is very important for the diagnosis and differential dignosis of chronic myeloproliferative disorders, myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disease, as well as definite diagnosis of Ph* acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This method also has an important significance for monitor of minimal residual disease in CML patients received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.%本研究探讨应用荧光原位杂交技术( FISH)检测BCR/ABL融合基因在临床中的应用价

  15. Patan hospital experience in treating philadelphia chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive chronic myeloid leukemia patients with gleevec (imatinib mesylate; the first generation specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Mark

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is caused by the abnormal fusion protein BCR-ABL1, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase and product of the Philadelphia chromosome. Gleevec (Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of this kinase. Treatment with this agent is known to result in hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses. Patan hospital (Patan, Nepal is one of the Gleevec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP centers for patients with CML. Methods A total of 106 Philadelphia positive CML patients were enrolled in our center between Feb 2003 and Jun 2008, and 103 of them were eligible for cytogenetic and/or hematologic response analyses. Results Out of 103 patients, 27% patients underwent cytogenetic analysis. Imatinib induced major cytogenetic responses in 89% and complete hematologic responses in almost 100% of the patients with confirmed CML. After a mean follow up of 27 months, an estimated 90% of the patients on imatinib remained in hematologic remission and more than 90% of the patients are still alive. About 30% of patients developed some form of manageable myelosuppression. A few patients developed non-hematologic toxic side effects such as edema and hepatotoxicity. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that imatinib is safe to use in a developing country. Furthermore, we demonstrate that imatinib is very effective and induced long lasting responses in a high proportion of patients with Ph chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive CML. Imatinib is well tolerated by our patients. The lack of cytogenetic analysis in the majority of our patients hindered our ability to detect inadequate responses to imatinib and adjust therapy appropriately.

  16. A BCR-ABL1 cutoff of 1.5% at 3 months, determined by the GeneXpert system, predicts an optimal response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Gómez-Casares, María T.; Puerta, José M.; Alonso-Domínguez, Juan M.; Osorio, Santiago; Hernández-Boluda, Juan C.; Collado, Rosa; Ramírez, María J.; Ibáñez, Fátima; Martín, María L.; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D.; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Gómez, Montse; Fiallo, Dolly V.; Redondo, Sara; Rodríguez, Alicia; Ruiz-Nuño, Concepción; Steegmann, Juan L.

    2017-01-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, 3-month BCR-ABL1 levels have consistently been correlated with further outcomes. Monitoring molecular responses in CML using the GeneXpert (Cepheid) platform has shown an optimal correlation with standardized RQ-PCR (IS) when measuring BCR-ABL1 levels lower than 10%, as it is not accurate for values over 10%. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive molecular value at three months on different outcome variables using the Xpert BCR-ABL1 MonitorTM assay (Xpert BCR-ABL1). We monitored 125 newly diagnosed consecutive CML patients in the chronic phase (CML-CP) using an automated method: Xpert BCR-ABL1. Only 5% of patients did not achieve an optimal response at 3 months, and the 10% BCR-ABL1 cutoff defined by RQ-PCR (IS) methods was unable to identify significant differences in the probabilities of achieving a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) (50% vs. 87%, p = 0.1) or a major molecular response (MMR) (60% vs. 80%, p = 0.29) by 12 months. In contrast, a cutoff of 1.5% more accurately identified differences in the probabilities of achieving CCyR (98% vs. 54%, p<0.001) and MMR (88% vs. 56%, p<0.001) by 12 months, as well as probabilities of treatment changes (p = 0.005). Therefore, when using the Xpert BCR-ABL1 assay, a cutoff of 1.5% at 3 months could with high probability identify patients able to achieve an optimal response at 12 months. PMID:28278193

  17. A natural-like synthetic small molecule impairs bcr-abl signaling cascades and induces megakaryocyte differentiation in erythroleukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Turroni

    Full Text Available Over the past years, we synthesized a series of new molecules that are hybrids of spirocyclic ketones as complexity-bearing cores with bi- and ter-phenyls as privileged fragments. Some of these newly-shaped small molecules showed antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic and differentiating activity in leukemia cell lines. In the present study, to investigate more in depth the mechanisms of action of these molecules, the protein expression profiles of K562 cells treated with or without the compounds IND_S1, MEL_T1, IND_S7 and MEL_S3 were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Proteome comparisons revealed several differentially expressed proteins, mainly related to cellular metabolism, chaperone activity, cytoskeletal organization and RNA biogenesis. The major results were validated by Western blot and qPCR. To attempt integrating findings into a cellular signaling context, proteomic data were explored using MetaCore. Network analysis highlighted relevant relationships between the identified proteins and additional potential effectors. Notably, qPCR validation of central hubs showed that the compound MEL_S3 induced high mRNA levels of the transcriptional factors EGR1 and HNF4-alpha; the latter to our knowledge is reported here for the first time to be present in K562 cells. Consistently with the known EGR1 involvement in the regulation of differentiation along megakaryocyte lineage, MEL_S3-treated leukemia cells showed a marked expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (CD41 and glycoprotein Ib (CD42, two important cell markers in megakaryocytic differentiation, together with morphological aspects of megakaryoblasts and megakaryocytes.

  18. Pharmacophore modeling of nilotinib as an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2014-07-07

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with minimal interactions with ABC drug transporters. Three-dimensional pharmacophore modeling and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were carried out on a series of nilotinib analogues to identify chemical features that contribute to inhibitory activity of nilotinib against BCR-ABL kinase activity, P-gp, and ABCG2. Twenty-five derivatives of nilotinib were synthesized and were then tested to measure their activity to inhibit BCR-ABL kinase and to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters. A set of in vitro experiments including kinase activity and cell-based transport assays and photolabeling of P-gp and ABCG2 with a transport substrate, [(125)I]-iodoarylazido-prazosin (IAAP), were carried out in isolated membranes to evaluate the potency of the derivatives to inhibit the function of ABC drug transporters and BCR-ABL kinase. Sixteen, fourteen, and ten compounds were selected as QSAR data sets, respectively, to generate PHASE v3.1 pharmacophore models for BCR-ABL kinase, ABCG2, and P-gp inhibitors. The IC50 values of these derivatives against P-gp, ABCG2, or BCR-ABL kinase were used to generate pharmacophore features required for optimal interactions with these targets. A seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for BCR-ABL kinase inhibitory activity, a six-point pharmacophore (ADHRRR) for ABCG2 inhibitory activity, and a seven-point pharmacophore (AADDRRR) for P-gp inhibitory activity were generated. The derived models clearly demonstrate high predictive power

  19. BCR-ABL1: Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... molecular genetic test, and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) . These help establish the initial diagnosis of ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  20. Application of BCR-ABL in chronic myelogenous leukemia%BCR-ABL探针在慢性粒细胞白血病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟; 陆莉; 蒲育栋; 杨柳; 赵丽

    2009-01-01

    目的 用常规细胞遗传学(conventional cytogenetics,CC)和荧光原位杂交(fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization,FISH)技术检测Ph染色体.方法 常规细胞遗传学分析(CC),荧光原位杂交(FISH)技术.结果 7例患者4例Ph染色体阴性,其中2例分别伴有t(18;22)和t(17;22)异常,其余2例为异基因造血干细胞移植后正常核型.一例培养后无中期分裂相.2例Ph染色体阳性,FISH结果bcr/abl(+)细胞检出率分别为63.87%,84.51%,7.56%,4.0%,74.45%,67%,47%.结论 常规细胞遗传学与荧光原位杂交技术相结合对CML患者诊断治疗过程中肿瘤负荷动态检测有显著意义.

  1. Induction of apoptosis by shikonin through a ROS/JNKmediated process in Bcr/Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the signaling events induced by shikonin that lead to the induction of apoptosis in Bcr/ Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (e.g., K562, LAMA84). Treatment of K562 cells with shikonin (e.g., 0.5 μM) resulted in profound induction of apoptosis accompanied by rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), striking activation of c-Jun-N-terminai kinase (JNK) and p38, marked release of the mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, activation of caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Scavenging of ROS completely blocked all of the above-mentioned events (i.e., JNK and p38 phosphorylation, cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO release, caspase and PARP cleavage, as well as the induction of apoptosis) following shikonin treatment. Inhibition of JNK and knock-down of JNKI significantly attenuated cytochrome c release, caspase cleavage and apoptosis, but did not affect shikonin-mediated ROS production. Additionally, inhibition of caspase activation completely blocked shikonin-induced apoptosis, but did not appreciably modify shikonin-mediated cytochrome c release or ROS generation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that shikonin-induced oxidative injury operates at a proximal point in apoptotic signaling cascades, and subsequently activates the stress-related JNK pathway, triggers mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation, and leads to apoptosis. Our data also suggest that shikonin may be a promising agent for the treatment of CML, as a generator of ROS.

  2. Increased acetylation of lysine 317/320 of p53 caused by BCR-ABL protects from cytoplasmic translocation of p53 and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusio-Kobialka, Monika; Wolanin, Kamila; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Sikora, Ewa; Skowronek, Krzysztof; McKenna, Sharon L.; Ghizzoni, Massimo; Dekker, Frank J.; Piwocka, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disorder of hematopoietic stem cells caused by the expression of BCR-ABL. Loss of p53 has not been implicated as important for the development of CML. Mutations in p53 protein are infrequent, however they correlate with the disease progression. The absence of p53

  3. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein.

  4. Which method better evaluates the molecular response in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with imatinib treatment, BCR-ABL(IS) or log reduction from the baseline level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Jiang, Hao; Li, Jin-Lan; Li, Ling-Di; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Lai, Yue-Yun; Lu, Xi-Jing; Liu, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-09-01

    The molecular response of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment can be evaluated either by BCR-ABL mRNA levels on international scale (IS) or by log reduction from the baseline level of the laboratory. Both methods were compared in 248 newly diagnosed chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib. The major molecular responses (MMR) obtained by both methods predict progression-free survival (PFS, all Plog reduction method, had the same PFS as MMR patients identified by both methods. The molecular responses of patients at 3 and 6 months, as evaluated by the two methods, have similar predictive values on their cytogenetic responses at 12 months and on their molecular responses at 18 months. Both ≤ 10%(IS) and ≥ 1 log reduction at 3 months and ≤ 1%(IS) at 6 months were significantly associated with PFS (P=0.0011, 0.0090, and 0.0064). The percentages of patients with BCR-ABL(IS) of ≤ 1%, >1-10%, and of >10% at 3 months and 6 months in the German CML Study IV were similar with those with corresponding BCR-ABL(IS) in our center, but was significantly different with those evaluated by the log reduction method. Therefore, the molecular response evaluated by BCR-ABL(IS) has similar trends in PFS and in response prediction, but can better differentiate patients than that by the log reduction method. Furthermore, the IS method allows comparison among molecular response results from different laboratories.

  5. The synthetic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor EC141 induces degradation of Bcr-Abl p190 protein and apoptosis of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei-Gang; Estrov, Zeev; Wang, Yongtao; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Harris, David M; Van Pham, Quin; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Liu, Zhiming; Koch, Patricia; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael J; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    The prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is poor. Chemotherapy is rarely curative and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) induce only transient responses. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a chaperone protein that is important in signal transduction, cell cycle control, and transcription regulation in both normal and leukemia cells. In the current study, we tested the growth inhibitory and apoptotic effects of a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, EC141 on the Ph+ ALL lines Z-119, Z-181, and Z-33, as well as primary bone marrow-derived blasts from patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. We found that EC141 inhibited the growth of Ph+ ALL cells in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) ranged from 1 to 10 nM. EC141 also inhibited the proliferation of primary bone marrow-derived blasts using the ALL blast colony assay. EC141 down-regulated Hsp90 and up-regulated Hsp70 protein levels, inhibited CrkL phosphorylation, and induced degradation of Bcr-Abl p190 protein through ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. Furthermore, exposure of Ph+ ALL cells to EC141 resulted in activation of caspase-3, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that EC141 is a potent Hsp90 inhibitor with activity against Ph+ ALL. Further studies to investigate the anticancer effect of EC141 either as a single agent, or in combination in Ph+ ALL and other hematological malignancies are warranted.

  6. 自身淬灭荧光定量PCR检测慢性粒细胞白血病bcr/abl mRNA%Quantification of bcr/abl mRNA in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia by using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR with self-quenched primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭辉; 冯文莉; 王小中; 曾建明; 肖青; 潘健; 曹唯希; 罗云萍; 黄宗干

    2007-01-01

    目的 利用自身淬灭探针技术建立一种能检测慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)bcr/abl融合基因mRNA的实时荧光定量PCR方法,为CML的诊断、疗效观察以及微量残留白血病(MRD)的监测提供有效手段.方法 用逆转录PCR方法(RT-PCR)扩增K562细胞的bcr/abl融合基因,A-T克隆法构建定量标准模板;设计自身淬灭荧光引物(探针),建立自身淬灭荧光定量逆转录PCR方法(FQRT-PCR),并对该方法的线性检测范围、灵敏度、重复性、稳定性进行检测;然后检测临床白血病患者骨髓标本bcr/abl mRNA.结果 建立的FQ-RT-PCR方法可检测10 copies/μl的bcr/abl重组质粒,并能从105个正常细胞中检出1个白血病细胞,该方法的批内、批间变异系数(CV)分别为2.1%、6.1%,线性检测范围为102~109 copies/μl.25例CML患者bcr/abl融合基因mRNA表达量中位数为4.50×104[(0.45~89.00)×104]copies/μg RNA,其中11例慢性期初诊患者bcr/abl mRNA表达量中位数为5.45×104[(2.95~19.30)×104]copies/μg RNA,6例急变期患者bcr/abl mRNA表达量中位数为13.00×104[(4.10~89.00)×104]copies/μg RNA,8例慢性期治疗后复查患者bcr/ablmRNA表达量中位数为2.35×104[(0.45~5.12)×104]copies/μg RNA,CML急变期患者bcr/abl融合基因表达水平与慢性期患者之间差异有统计学意义(q=3.41,P<0.05).PCR产物经电泳分析,其中21例CML患者为b3a2型,4例CML患者为b2a2型;3例急性淋巴细胞白血病(ALL)患者中,1例有bcr/abl mRNA表达,为b2a2型.结论 所建立的基于自身淬灭探针技术的实时荧光定量PCR检测方法灵敏、特异、重复性好,结果用拷贝数表示,准确可靠,利于标准统一.可广泛用于CML的诊断、疗效观察以及MRD的监测.

  7. SPR Detection and Discrimination of the Oligonucleotides Related to the Normal and the Hybrid bcr-abl Genes by Two Stringency Control Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsishin, M. J.; Ushenin, Iu. V.; Rachkov, A. E.; Solatkin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we applied two stringency control strategies for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of DNA hybridization and discrimination of completely and partially complementary 24-mer sequences. These sequences are specific to the human normal bcr and the hybrid bcr-abl genes, protein products of which are responsible for some leukemia. SPR sensors based on resonance phenomena in nanoscale gold films are well suited for label-free, real-time investigations of the macromolecule interactions. Thermodynamic parameters obtained using the web server DINAMelt allowed supposing the possibility for realization (a) stringency control based on the ionic strength of the hybridization buffer and (b) stringency control based on the temperature elevation. The first one resulted in that the discrimination index of completely complementary and partially complementary oligonucleotides depending on the target concentration varied from 1.3 to 1.8 in 2 × SSC and from 2.0 to 2.9 in 0.5 × SSC. For implementation of the second stringency control strategy, SPR spectrometer measuring flow cell with built-in high-precision temperature control and regulation as well as corresponding software was created. It is shown that the duplexes formed by the immobilized probes mod-Ph and completely complementary oligonucleotides P1 remained without significant changes until ~50 °C, while the duplexes formed with partially complementary oligonucleotide Bcrex14 almost entirely disrupted at 40 °C. Thus, the absolutely effective thermodiscrimination of this pair of oligonucleotides was achieved in this temperature range (40-50 °C).

  8. BCR/ABL DCDF-FISH信号特征与染色体核型的关系及其在慢性粒细胞白血病中的意义%Significance of BCR/ABL DCDF-FISH signal pattern and karyotype in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜庆华; 应逸; 陈晓燕

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)BCR/ABL DCCF-FISH的信号特点及其与染色体核型的关系.结果 使用BCR/ABL的DCDF探针对65例慢性粒细胞白血病骨髓标本进行荧光原位杂交及染色体核型检查.结果 65例CML核型43例Ph阳性,1例阴性,其余21例未行核性检查或无可分析分裂相;FISH结果65例均为BCR/ABL阳性,其中9例伴ASS基因缺失,5例复杂易位,1例+Ph伴ASS基因缺失.结论 传统核型与DCDF-FISH,应互相结合,方可对遗传学特征作出更准确分析.%Objective To investigate the relation between the BCR/ABL DCDF-FISH signal pattern and karyotype in chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). Methods 65 cases of CML were performed FISH and karyotyping. Results In 65 cases CML. 43 cases were Ph positive, 1 case was Ph negative, 21 cases had no performed karyotyping analysis. All of 65 cases were FISH positive,9 cases with ASS gene deletion, 5 cases with complex variant translocation, 1 case with (+) Ph and ASS gene deletion. Conclusion More precise analysis can be got by combining the result of FISH and karyotyping.

  9. Biodegradable charged polyester-based vectors (BCPVs) as an efficient non-viral transfection nanoagent for gene knockdown of the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengbin; Panwar, Nishtha; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Butian; Liu, Maixian; Toh, Huiting; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-04-01

    First-line therapy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has always involved the use of BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase inhibitors which is associated with an abnormal chromosome called Philadelphia chromosome. Although the overall survival rate has been improved by the current therapeutic regime, the presence of resistance has resulted in limited efficacy. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutic regime is proposed with the aim to knockdown the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA transfection rates have usually been limited due to the declining contact probability among polyplexes and the non-adherent nature of leukemic cells. Our work aims at addressing this limitation by using a biodegradable charged polyester-based vector (BCPV) as a nanocarrier for the delivery of BCR-ABL-specific siRNA to the suspension culture of a K562 CML cell line. BCR-ABL siRNAs were encapsulated in the BCPVs by electrostatic force. Cell internalization was facilitated by the BCPV and assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The regulation of the BCR-ABL level in K562 cells as a result of RNAi was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed that BCPV was able to form stable nanoplexes with siRNA molecules, even in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and successfully assisted in vitro siRNA transfection in the non-adherent K562 cells. As a consequence of downregulation of BCR-ABL, BCPV-siRNA nanoplexes inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. All results were compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine2000™, which served as a positive control. More importantly, this class of non-viral vector exhibits biodegradable features and negligible cytotoxicity, thus providing a versatile platform to deliver siRNA to non-adherent leukemia cells with high transfection efficiency by effectively overcoming extra- and intra-cellular barriers. Due to the excellent in vitro

  10. 伴不典型BCR-ABL融合基因的慢性髓性白血病的临床和实验研究%A clinical and laboratory study of chronic myeloid leukemia with atypical BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂晓敏; 潘金兰; 仇惠英; 岑建农; 薛永权; 陈苏宁; 沈宏杰; 姚利; 张俊

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨伴不典型BCR-ABL融合基因亚型el4a3和e19a2型慢性髓性白血病(CML)的临床和实验室特点.方法 对2004至2012年染色体核型分析有t(9;22) (q34;q11),荧光原位杂交(FISH)证实为BCR-ABL融合基因阳性,而常规实时定量PCR(RQ-PCR)检测常见BCR-ABL融合基因(b3a2、b2a2和e1a2)阴性的6例CML患者,重新设计引物进行PCR扩增,并将扩增产物测序,以明确不典型BCR-ABL融合基因类型.对BCR-ABL融合基因扩增产物进行突变检测.对患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 6例患者PCR扩增产物经测序分析,其中5例为e14a3型,1例为e19a2型.5例e14a3型CML患者中,男4例,女1例,中位年龄48岁,慢性期4例,加速期1例;1例e19a2型患者为女性,40岁,CML慢性期,PLT>1 000× 109/L.5例e14a3型CML患者中4例在羟基脲或IFN治疗无效后予以伊马替尼(IM)治疗,1例行造血干细胞移植(HSCT).前4例患者中1例因有E255K突变而对IM耐药,改用达沙替尼后获完全细胞遗传学反应(CCyR);1例在IM治疗获CCyR后3个月复发并急变,最终死亡;2例IM治疗后获CCyR,目前状态稳定,仍处于CCyR,尽管其中1例伴有I293T突变.行HSCT治疗患者目前处于CCyR.1例e19a2型CML患者羟基脲治疗后获得完全血液学反应,后改用IM治疗,很快获得CCyR.结论 伴不典型BCR-ABL融合基因的CML发病率极低,酪氨酸激酶抑制剂或HSCT都可以取得疗效,常规RQ-PCR可能漏检少见的不典型BCR-ABL融合基因亚型.%Objective To explore the clinical and laboratory features of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with atypical e14a3 and e19a2 BCR-ABL fusion gene subtypes.Methods We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of CML patients with Ph chromosome positive confirmed by cytogenetic and FISH but classical el3a3 (b2a2),e14a2 (b3a2)and ela2 fusion transcripts negative identified by conventional realtime quantification RT-PCR (RQ-PCR).Further RQ-PCR was done with the forward primer and reverse primer designed to

  11. The HDAC inhibitor SB939 overcomes resistance to BCR-ABL kinase Inhibitors conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzan, Muhammad; Chuah, Charles T H; Ko, Tun Kiat; Ong, S Tiong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has been improved by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate (IM) but various factors can cause TKI resistance in patients with CML. One factor which contributes to TKI resistance is a germline intronic deletion polymorphism in the BCL2-like 11 (BIM) gene which impairs the expression of pro-apoptotic splice isoforms of BIM. SB939 (pracinostat) is a hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties, and we investigated if this drug could overcome BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance. We found that SB939 corrects BIM pre-mRNA splicing in CML cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism, and induces apoptotic cell death in CML cell lines and primary cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism. More importantly, SB939 both decreases the viability of CML cell lines and primary CML progenitors with the BIM deletion and restores TKI-sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that SB939 overcomes BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance, and suggest that SB939 may be useful in treating CML patients with BIM deletion-associated TKI resistance.

  12. The HDAC inhibitor SB939 overcomes resistance to BCR-ABL kinase Inhibitors conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzan, Muhammad; Chuah, Charles T. H.; Ko, Tun Kiat; Ong, S. Tiong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has been improved by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate (IM) but various factors can cause TKI resistance in patients with CML. One factor which contributes to TKI resistance is a germline intronic deletion polymorphism in the BCL2-like 11 (BIM) gene which impairs the expression of pro-apoptotic splice isoforms of BIM. SB939 (pracinostat) is a hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties, and we investigated if this drug could overcome BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance. We found that SB939 corrects BIM pre-mRNA splicing in CML cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism, and induces apoptotic cell death in CML cell lines and primary cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism. More importantly, SB939 both decreases the viability of CML cell lines and primary CML progenitors with the BIM deletion and restores TKI-sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that SB939 overcomes BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance, and suggest that SB939 may be useful in treating CML patients with BIM deletion-associated TKI resistance. PMID:28301600

  13. First Case of Biphenotypic/bilineal (B/myeloid, B/monocytic) Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia with t(9;22)(q34;q11.2);BCR-ABL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Nyeon; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Ji, Misuk; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo-Min; Lee, Mark Hong

    2016-07-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic leukemia, bilineal leukemia, or its combination by the 2008 WHO classification. A few cases of combined biphenotypic/bilineal MPAL have been reported so far; they all had biphenotypic expressions in only one of the two distinct leukemic populations. A 43-year-old female presented with leukocytosis and bicytopenia. Her complete blood counts were: hemoglobin, 6.9 g/dL; white blood cells, 62.8×10(9)/L; and platelets, 83×10(9)/L. Neither lymphadenopathy nor organomegaly was observed. Blasts and promonocytes/monoblasts were increased in her peripheral blood (42%) and bone marrow (60.1%). Flow cytometric analysis revealed two distinct populations of leukemic cells, which expressed CD11c, CD19, and cytoplasmic CD79a in common. Additionally, the first population expressed CD10 and CD117 (B/myeloid), and the second one expressed CD14 and CD20 (B/monocytic). She had a karyotype of 46,XX,inv(9)(p12q13),t(9;22)(q34;q11.2)[20] and BCR/ABL1 rearrangement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of biphenotypic/bilineal MPAL with B/myeloid and B/monocytic expressions.

  14. Switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor improves the response and outcome of frontline imatinib-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 10% of BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Luis-Felipe; García-Gutiérrez, José-Valentín; Massagué, Isabel; Giraldo, Pilar; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; de Paz, Raquel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Bautista, Guiomar; Osorio, Santiago; Requena, María-José; Palomera, Luis; Peñarrubia, María-Jesús; Calle, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, José-Ángel; Burgaleta, Carmen; Maestro, Begoña; García-Ormeña, Nuria; Steegmann, Juan-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia patients display heterogeneous responses to imatinib. Survival depends on baseline clinical characteristics (including prognostic scoring systems) and on early response (such as >10% BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months of therapy). The results of switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (2GTKIs) may contain a bias since, in the majority of these studies, patients who switch treatment due to intolerance or failure are censored or excluded. We analyzed the Spanish Registry data on switching in an intention-to-treat analysis of patients in standard clinical practice. Switching to 2GTKIs improves responses from 45% to 75% of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and from 15% to 45% of major molecular response (MMR) in the group without molecular response 1 (MR1) at 3 months and from 70% to 87% in CCyR and from 52% to 87% in MMR in the group with MR1. The final response rate is poorer in the group with no MR1 at 3 months. Nevertheless, the differences in the rates of response were not translated into differences in major events (transformations or deaths), and the final progression-free survival and overall survival were similar. PMID:25756742

  15. Estandarización de la TR-PCR para la detección de las fusiones génicas BCR-ABL en pacientes con leucemia Mieloide Crónica (LMC y Linfoide Aguda (LLA provenientes de HUSVP y Clíncia León XIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzálo Vásquez Palacio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La translocación recíproca t(9:22(q34;q11 involucra el proto-oncogen ABL y el gen BCR, originando un gen de fusión BCR-ABL, que codifica una proteína con elevada actividad tirosina quinasa, implicada en la leucemogénesis.

  16. Potent, transient inhibition of BCR-ABL with dasatinib 100 mg daily achieves rapid and durable cytogenetic responses and high transformation-free survival rates in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, suboptimal response or intolerance to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil P.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop; Rousselot, Philippe; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Enrico, Alicia; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Silver, Richard T.; Khoury, Hanna Jean; Müller, Martin C.; Lambert, Alexandre; Matloub, Yousif; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves intermittent BCR-ABL kinase inhibition and is approved for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib. To better assess durability of response to and tolerability of dasatinib, data from a 2-year minimum follow-up for a dose-optimization study in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia are reported here. Design and Methods In a phase 3 study, 670 chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, intolerance, or suboptimal response to imatinib were randomized to dasatinib 100 mg once-daily, 50 mg twice-daily, 140 mg once-daily, or 70 mg twice-daily. Results Data from a 2-year minimum follow-up demonstrate that dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates comparable to those in the other treatment arms, and reduces the frequency of key side effects. Comparable 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were observed (80% and 91%, respectively, for 100 mg once daily, and 75%–76% and 88%–94%, respectively, in other arms). Complete cytogenetic responses were achieved rapidly, typically by 6 months. In patients treated with dasatinib 100 mg once daily for 6 months without complete cytogenetic response, the likelihood of achieving such a response by 2 years was 50% for patients who had achieved a partial cytogenetic response, and only 8% or less for patients with minor, minimal, or no cytogenetic response. Less than 3% of patients suffered disease transformation to accelerated or blast phase. Conclusions Intermittent kinase inhibition can achieve rapid and durable responses, indistinguishable from those achieved with more continuous inhibition. PMID:20139391

  17. Efficacy of Dasatinib in Treatment of Imatinib-Resistant BCR/ABL Positive Leukemia%达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雨; 潘良琴; 钱思轩; 宋萍; 于慧; 张苏江; 葛峥; 洪鸣; 田甜

    2013-01-01

    本研究评价达沙替尼治疗原发或继发伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病的疗效和安全性.对27例原发或继发伊马替尼耐药的慢性髓系白血病(CML)或Ph阳性急性淋巴细胞白血病(Ph+ ALL)患者,给予达沙替尼100-140 mg/d口服治疗,评估疗效、总体生存和耐受情况.结果表明:27例伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病中位达沙替尼治疗时间8(1-66)个月,中位随访时间54(3-75)个月.27例接受达沙替尼治疗的患者中,88.8%获得完全血液学反应(CHR),44.4%获得主要细胞遗传学反应(mCyR),37%获得完全遗传学反应(CCyR),18.5%获得主要分子学反应(MMR).伊马替尼耐药的进展期(CML-AP、CML-BC、骨髓复发Ph+ ALL)患者接受达沙替尼治疗获CCyR率低于疾病稳定期(CML-CP、骨髓缓解Ph+ ALL)患者(P=0.0377),且3-4级不良反应发生率明显增高.达沙替尼治疗后获得CCyR的患者生存期(OS)较未达CCyR者明显延长(63个月vs9个月,P=0.0126).达沙替尼治疗后最常见的3-4级不良反应包括血液学反应如血小板减少(51.8%)、中性粒细胞减少(48.1%)、贫血(33.3%)和非血液学反应如胸腔积液(18.5%)、肺部感染(18.5%)、心包积液(11.1%).3-4级不良反应主要发生在疾病进展期时改服达沙替尼者,均发生于服药12个月内.结论:达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病有效,且在疾病稳定期改服达沙替尼疗效和耐受性更好.%This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dasatinib in BCR/ABL positive leukemia patients with primary or secondary resistance to imatinib.27 patients with primary or secondary imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphocytic leukemia (Ph + ALL) received 100-140 mg/d dasatinib orally.Their overall survival and tolerance were evaluated.The results showed that the median duration of dasatinib therapy was 8 (1-66) months in the 27

  18. 达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的 BCR/ABL阳性白血病%Dasatinib in treatment of imatinib-resistant BCR/ABL positive leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严红; 赵海军

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dasatinib in BCR /ABL positive leukemia patients with resistance to imatinib.Method 9 patients with imatinib -resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia ( CML) or Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphocytic leukemia (Ph+ALL) received 100~140 mg· d-1 dasatinib orally.Their overall survival and tolerance were evalua-ted.Results After the dasatinib treatment ,2 patients with CML in chronic phase achieved complete hematologic response ( CHR) ,one of them achieved complete cytogenetic response (CCyR);4 of 5 patients with CML in blast crisis achieved CHR and partly cytogenetic response (PCyR);one patient had no response .Treated with dasatinib,one patient with Ph +ALL,presented with E255V mutation,a-chieved CHR and PCyR .The other died of infection .Conlusion Receiving therapy of dasatinib , patients with resistance to imatinib could achieve CHR ,even PCyR .%目的:评价达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病的疗效和安全性。方法对9例伊马替尼耐药的慢性髓系白血病( CML)或Ph阳性急性淋巴细胞白血病( Ph+ALL)患者,给予达沙替尼100~140 mg· d-1口服治疗,评估疗效和耐受情况。结果9例伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病,2例CML-CP患者均获得CHR,1例达CCyR;5例CML-BC患者中4例获得CHR和PCyR,1例NR;2例Ph+ALL患者中1例检测到E255V突变,采用达沙替尼治疗达CHR和PCyR,1例诱导缓解时,同时行VDP方案化疗,继发严重感染死亡。结论达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的BCR/ABL阳性白血病患者可获得血液学甚至细胞遗传学缓解,且耐受性好。

  19. PESV对K562细胞BCR/ABL融合基因及凋亡调控因子Bcl-2、Bad表达的影响%The Effects of PESV on the Expression of BCR/ABL Fusion Gene and Bcl-2, Bad of Apoptosis Regulators on the K562 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于文俊; 杨文华; 杨向东; 史哲新; 王兴丽; 郝征; 张佳

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the PESV of K562 cells BCR / ABL fusion gene and apoptosis regulators bcl-2 and bad expression. Methods: K562 cells were cultured in vitro, by PESV for different times, the apoptosis rate by flow cytometry, fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR detection of BCR / ABL, Bcl-2, Bad mRNA level changes. Results: Compared with the control group, PESV treated K562 cells, apoptosis increased, BCR / ABL fusion gene reduced expression, anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased, pro-apoptotic gene Bad mRNA expression. Conclusion: PESV reduced in K562 cells can reduce the BCR / ABL fusion gene, may regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bad, inhibit proliferation of K562 cells and promote their apoptosis.%目的:探讨PESV对K562细胞BCR/ABL融合基因及凋亡调控因子bcl-2和bad表达的影响.方法:将体外培养K562细胞,经PESV处理不同时间后,流式细胞术检测细胞凋亡率,荧光定量RT-PCR检测BCR/ABL、Bcl-2、Bad mRNA水平变化.结果:与对照组相比,PESV处理后K562细胞,凋亡率增加,BCR/ABL融合基因表达降低,抗凋亡相关基因Bcl-2 mRNA表达降低,促凋亡基因Bad mRNA表达增加.结论:PESV能降低降低K562细胞BCR/ABL融合基因的表达,可能通过调节Bcl-2和Bad表达,抑制K562细胞增殖,促进其凋亡.

  20. Fluctuation sensitivity of a transcriptional signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R.; Mayo, Michael L.

    2016-09-01

    The internal biochemical state of a cell is regulated by a vast transcriptional network that kinetically correlates the concentrations of numerous proteins. Fluctuations in protein concentration that encode crucial information about this changing state must compete with fluctuations caused by the noisy cellular environment in order to successfully transmit information across the network. Oftentimes, one protein must regulate another through a sequence of intermediaries, and conventional wisdom, derived from the data processing inequality of information theory, leads us to expect that longer sequences should lose more information to noise. Using the metric of mutual information to characterize the fluctuation sensitivity of transcriptional signaling cascades, we find, counter to this expectation, that longer chains of regulatory interactions can instead lead to enhanced informational efficiency. We derive an analytic expression for the mutual information from a generalized chemical kinetics model that we reduce to simple, mass-action kinetics by linearizing for small fluctuations about the basal biological steady state, and we find that at long times this expression depends only on a simple ratio of protein production to destruction rates and the length of the cascade. We place bounds on the values of these parameters by requiring that the mutual information be at least one bit—otherwise, any received signal would be indistinguishable from noise—and we find not only that nature has devised a way to circumvent the data processing inequality, but that it must be circumvented to attain this one-bit threshold. We demonstrate how this result places informational and biochemical efficiency at odds with one another by correlating high transcription factor binding affinities with low informational output, and we conclude with an analysis of the validity of our assumptions and propose how they might be tested experimentally.

  1. 荧光原位杂交在慢性粒细胞白血病细胞BCR/ABL融合基因检测中的应用及其意义%The detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张济; 李君君; 颜家运; 邹礼衡; 刘静

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨荧光原位杂交(FISH)技术检测慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)骨髓和外周血细胞的BCR /ABL融合基因的临床价值.方法:应用FISH 对正常对照组及CML患者骨髓和外周血细胞BCR/ ABL融合基因进行检测和分析.结果:慢性期CML 患者骨髓和外周血细胞该融合基因阳性细胞率分别为(61.9 ± 22.3)%和(68.4 ± 19.8)%,加速期为(77.2 ± 16.7)% 和(86.8 ± 12.1)%,急变期为(80.6 ± 17.5)%和(81.4 ± 18.0)%,两者细胞中BCR/ABL 基因的阳性率未见统计学差异(P>0.05),且骨髓和外周血细胞之间融合基因阳性细胞比率呈直线正相关.同时发现在完全临床缓解患者中,经伊马替尼治疗的CML 患者(71.4%)较经干扰素和羟基脲联合治疗者(10.0%)有更高的分子生物学缓解(P 0.05). A significant correlation was found between the BCR/ABL positive cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow samples. Moreover, the higher rate of complete molecular remission was achieved by treating with imatinib than with interferon and hydroxyurea during complete remission phase (P < 0.05). Conclusions Detecting BCR/ABL fusion gene in peripheral blood and bone marrow samples by FISH are beneficial to diagnosis, treatment and minimal residual disease monitor in CML.

  2. Transcriptional networks for alcohol sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Tatiana V; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of polygenic traits requires investigating how complex networks of interacting molecules mediate the effect of genetic variation on organismal phenotypes. We used a combination of P-element mutagenesis and analysis of natural variation in gene expression to predict transcriptional networks that underlie alcohol sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified 139 unique P-element mutations (124 in genes) that affect sensitivity or resistance to alcohol exposure. Further analyses of nine of the lines showed that the P-elements affected expression levels of the tagged genes, and P-element excision resulted in phenotypic reversion. The majority of the mutations were in computationally predicted genes or genes with unexpected effects on alcohol phenotypes. Therefore we sought to understand the biological relationships among 21 of these genes by leveraging genetic correlations among genetically variable transcripts in wild-derived inbred lines to predict coregulated transcriptional networks. A total of 32 "hub" genes were common to two or more networks associated with the focal genes. We used RNAi-mediated inhibition of expression of focal genes and of hub genes connected to them in the network to confirm their effects on alcohol-related phenotypes. We then expanded the computational networks using the hub genes as foci and again validated network predictions. Iteration of this approach allows a stepwise expansion of the network with simultaneous functional validation. Although coregulated transcriptional networks do not provide information about causal relationships among their constituent transcripts, they provide a framework for subsequent functional studies on the genetic basis of alcohol sensitivity.

  3. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  4. BCR/ABL阴性骨髓增生性疾病患者JAK2-V617F点突变与外周血三系变化的相关性%Correlation between JAK2-V617F mutations and variation of peripheral blood cells among BCR/ABL-negative MPD patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶远馨; 宋兴勃; 周易; 应斌武; 陆小军

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨BCR/ABL阴性骨髓增生性疾病患者JAK2-V617F突变的阳性率以及突变量与外周血三系变化的相关性.方法 对191例确诊为BCR/ABL阴性的骨髓增生性疾病患者进行JAK2-V617F突变检测,分别以外周血中红细胞、白细胞、血小板计数进行分类统计,分析不同类型的标本JAK2-V617F基因点突变的发生率及相对定量变化.结果 外周血红细胞、白细胞、血小板计数不同范围的标本JAK2-V617F突变阳性率有统计学差异.随着外周血红细胞、血小板计数增高,JAK2-V617F突变阳性率也随之增高,且以三系均增多者JAK2-V617F突变率为最高(92.86%).结论 BCR/ABL阴性的骨髓增生性疾病JAK2-V617F点突变发生率与外周血三系变化存在明显的相关性.外周血三系变化、尤其是红细胞计数与BCR/ABL阴性的骨髓增生性疾病JAK2-V617F突变的阳性率以及突变相对定量存在一定的相关性.%Objective To assess the correlation between JAK2-V617F mutation and complete blood counts among patients with BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative diseases (MPD).Methods One hundred and ninety one patients were recruited.Retrospectively,their laboratory data were analyzed for the counts of red blood cells (RBC),white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT).And the incidence of JAK2-V617F mutation was determined.Results There was significant difference in the incidence of JAK2-V617F mutation between patients with different cell counts (P<0.01).The incidence of JAK2-V617F mutation has increased with the counts of RBC and PLT,which was the highest (92.86%) among those featuring simultaneous increase in all three series.Conclusion The incidence of JAK2-V617F mutation seems to be strongly associated with variation of peripheral blood cell counts among patients with BCR/ABL-negative MPD.Variation of peripheral blood cells,particularly RBC,may be correlated with the rate of JAK2-V617F mutation.

  5. Dasatinib treatment based on BCR-ABL mutation detection in imatinib-resistant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia%BCR-ABL突变检测指导下的达沙替尼治疗伊马替尼耐药的慢性髓性白血病疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江倩; 秦亚溱; 赖悦云; 江浩; 石红霞

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficiency of dasatinib as the second-or third-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)in imatinib-resistant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia(CML)based on BCR-ABL mutation detection. Methods 122 CML patients received dasatinib treatment, including 83 with imatinib-resistance and 39 with both imatinib-and nilotinib-resistance, 55 in the chronic-phase(CP), 21 in the accelerated-phase (AP) and 46 in the blast-phase (BP). Those harboring dasatinib highly-resistant mutations(T315I/A, F317L/V/C and V299L)were excluded based on BCR-ABL kinase domain mutation screening by Sanger sequencing at baseline. Hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular responses were evaluated regularly, and rates of progression-free-survival(PFS)and overall survival(OS)were analyzed. BCR-ABL mutation detection was performed once the patients failed on dasatinib. Results In the CP patients, the rates of complete hematological response (CHR), complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), major molecular response(MMR)and molecular response 4.5(MR4.5)were 92.7%, 53.7%, 29.6%and 14.8%, respectively. 4-year PFS and OS rates were 84.4%and 89.5%, respectively. In the AP patients, HR and CCyR rates were 81.0%and 35.0%;and 3-year PFS and OS rates were 56.1%and 59.3%, respectively. In the BP patients, HR and CCyR rates were 63.0%and 21.4%;and 1-year PFS and OS rates were 43.6%and 61.8%, respectively. Outcomes were similar when dasatinib was used as the second-line TKI or thethird-line TKI. Of the 75 patients who were resistant to dasatinib, 37(48.7%)developed new mutation(s), and T315I(59.5%)was the most common mutation type. The patients who already harbored mutation(s) before dasatinib therapy achieved similar responses and outcomes to those with no mutation at baseline. However, they had higher likelihood of developing additional mutations associated with resistance to dasatinib(65.7%vs 34.1%, P=0.006). Conclusions Dasatinib was proved to be effective in the treatment of imatinib

  6. BCR-ABL融合基因T315I突变的白血病行异基因HSCT的疗效及复发后的治疗分析%Curative effectiveness of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and treatment of recurrence in patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂晓敏; 仇惠英; 潘金兰; 周敏; 鲍协炳; 陈苏宁; 孙爱宁; 吴德沛; 岑建农

    2014-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively analyze the curative effectiveness of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for the leukemia patients with the T315I mutation,and to discuss the treatments for the relapsing patients after allo-SCT.Method Through observing 10 leukemia patients harboring a T315I BCR-ABL mutation who underwent allo-SCT,we analyzed the remission rate,recurrence rate and long-term survival situation of these patients and explored the treatments for relapsing patients after allo-SCT.Result Of 10 patients,4 patients were female and 6 were male.The median age was 29 years (range,18-49).Before HSCT,5 were given imatinib,3 nilotinib and 2 dasatinib,respectively.Ten patients (100%) obtained complete remission (CR) and the median remission time was 23 days (range,14-56).During the follow-up period,1 case of CML and 3 cases of Ph+-ALL (40%) obtained CR.The survival time was 75 to 741 days.In the 6 dead patients,1 died of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage on the day 137 after allo-SCT; 2 died of graft versus host disease on the day 53 and 617 respectively after allo-SCT; 1 case of CML and 2 cases of Ph+ ALL relapsed on the day 27,50 and 130 respectively after allo-SCT,and 2 of them died on the day 5 and 40 respectively after relapse,and 1 recurrent case did not obtain remission after chemotherapy and died on the day 97 after relapse.Conclusion The allo-SCT can be used to treat the leukemia patients with T315I mutation,and high remission rate can be obtained,tut there is the high risk of recurrence.The patients with recurrent leukemia can take further relevant treatment to prolong survival time.%目的 分析BCR-ABL融合基因T315I突变的白血病患者接受异基因造血干细胞移植(HSCT)的资料,探讨移植疗效及复发后的治疗.方法 观察10例伴T315I突变的费城染色体阳性(Ph+)的急性淋巴细胞白血病(ALL)和慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)接受异基因HSCT后缓解率、复发率以及长期存活情况,分析这

  7. Homeostatic regulation of supercoiling sensitivity coordinates transcription of the bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Nicolas; Mavathur, Ramesh; Geertz, Marcel; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2006-07-01

    Regulation of cellular growth implies spatiotemporally coordinated programmes of gene transcription. A central question, therefore, is how global transcription is coordinated in the genome. The growth of the unicellular organism Escherichia coli is associated with changes in both the global superhelicity modulated by cellular topoisomerase activity and the relative proportions of the abundant DNA-architectural chromatin proteins. Using a DNA-microarray-based approach that combines mutations in the genes of two important chromatin proteins with induced changes of DNA superhelicity, we demonstrate that genomic transcription is tightly associated with the spatial distribution of supercoiling sensitivity, which in turn depends on chromatin proteins. We further demonstrate that essential metabolic pathways involved in the maintenance of growth respond distinctly to changes of superhelicity. We infer that a homeostatic mechanism organizing the supercoiling sensitivity is coordinating the growth-phase-dependent transcription of the genome.

  8. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply.

  9. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino Acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  10. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Elf

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  11. What Makes Ribosome-Mediated Transcriptional Attenuation Sensitive to Amino Acid Limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with “regulatory” codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid

  12. The Adipose Transcriptional Response to Insulin Is Determined by Obesity, Not Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 healthy...... non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small...... that differences in the acute transcriptional response to insulin are primarily driven by obesity per se, challenging the notion of healthy obese adipose tissue, at least in severe obesity....

  13. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, 4, and 5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, 4, or 5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. PMID:28178529

  14. Coexistance of JAK2V617F mutation and BCR/ABL translocation in one patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Albayrak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,The myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs constitute a subcategory of chronic myeloid disorders and include chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, essential thrombocytemia (ET, polycythemia vera (PV and myelofibrosis (MF. In 1960, the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph became a cornerstone in CML treatment and led to the development of moleculary targeted therapy. Recently, an acquired mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 gene has been discovered in nearly all patents with PV and approximately half of the patients with primary MF and ET. Subsequently, the mutation has been demonstrated in atypical MPDs (chronic neutrophilic leukemia, unclassified, de novo myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.1 It has been hoped that targeted inhibition of JAK2V617F should achieve similar disease control as thyrosine kinases has produced in CML.

  15. Management of side effects of BCR/ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm therapies. Focus on anagrelide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, María Luisa; de Las Heras, Natalia; Gonzalez Porras, Jose Ramón; Kerguelen, Ana; Raya, Jose María

    2015-12-01

    Although hydroxyurea is considered the first-line cytoreductive therapy in high-risk patients with polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia, approximately 20-25% of patients develop resistance or intolerance and they need an alternative therapy. Anagrelide is the treatment of choice in patients with essential thrombocythemia intolerant or with resistance to hydroxyurea. Anagrelide is usually well tolerated. Although there is concern about the increased risk of cardiac side effects, in most cases these are mild, and easily manageable. In this paper, the available evidence about the management of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, with a special focus on the side effects of drug therapies is reviewed.

  16. Ethanol sensitivity: a central role for CREB transcription regulation in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswal Shyam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lowered sensitivity to the effects of ethanol increases the risk of developing alcoholism. Inbred mouse strains have been useful for the study of the genetic basis of various drug addiction-related phenotypes. Inbred Long-Sleep (ILS and Inbred Short-Sleep (ISS mice differentially express a number of genes thought to be implicated in sensitivity to the effects of ethanol. Concomitantly, there is evidence for a mediating role of cAMP/PKA/CREB signalling in aspects of alcoholism modelled in animals. In this report, the extent to which CREB signalling impacts the differential expression of genes in ILS and ISS mouse cerebella is examined. Results A training dataset for Machine Learning (ML and Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA was generated from promoter region sequences of a set of genes known to be targets of CREB transcription regulation and a set of genes whose transcription regulations are potentially CREB-independent. For each promoter sequence, a vector of size 132, with elements characterizing nucleotide composition features was generated. Genes whose expressions have been previously determined to be increased in ILS or ISS cerebella were identified, and their CREB regulation status predicted using the ML scheme C4.5. The C4.5 learning scheme was used because, of four ML schemes evaluated, it had the lowest predicted error rate. On an independent evaluation set of 21 genes of known CREB regulation status, C4.5 correctly classified 81% of instances with F-measures of 0.87 and 0.67 respectively for the CREB-regulated and CREB-independent classes. Additionally, six out of eight genes previously determined by two independent microarray platforms to be up-regulated in the ILS or ISS cerebellum were predicted by C4.5 to be transcriptionally regulated by CREB. Furthermore, 64% and 52% of a cross-section of other up-regulated cerebellar genes in ILS and ISS mice, respectively, were deemed to be CREB-regulated. Conclusion These

  17. Characterization of S1 nuclease sensitive site at transcription initiation region of Attacus ricini rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明亮; 赵慕钧; 靳嘉瑞; 李载平

    1997-01-01

    A single-stranded S1 nuclease hypersensitive site which contains a d(AT)18 sequence structure locat-ed in the 5 -non transcription spacer of silkworm A . ricini ribosomal RNA gene has been reported[1] Using starved-refed silkworms, another S1 nuclease sensitive site was found existing in the rDNA chromatin, while under merely starving, this S1 sensitive site disappeared[2] . Recently this inducible S1 sensitive site has been further determined. It consists of a d(GT)10-d(AT)10 special DNA sequence at the transcription initiation region, and shows a behavior of ease in DNA-unwinding, indicating that S1 nuclease sensitive sites may have an important function in the regulation of rDNA transcription and replication.

  18. A dumbell probe-mediated rolling circle amplification strategy for highly sensitive transcription factor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiang; Qiu, Xiyang; Hou, Zhaohui; Deng, Keqin

    2015-02-15

    Highly sensitive detection of transcription factors (TF) is essential to proteome and genomics research as well as clinical diagnosis. We describe herein a novel fluorescent-amplified strategy for ultrasensitive, quantitative, and inexpensive detection of TF. The strategy consists of a hairpin DNA probe containing a TF binding sequence for target TF, a dumbbell-shaped probe, a primer DNA probe designed partly complementary to hairpin DNA probe, and a dumbbell probe. In the presence of target TF, the binding of the TF with hairpin DNA probe will prohibit the hybridization of the primer DNA probe with the "stem" and "loop" region of the hairpin DNA probe, then the unhybridized region of the primer DNA will hybridize with dumbbell probe, subsequently promote the ligation reaction and the rolling circle amplification (RCA), finally, the RCA products are quantified via the fluorescent intensity of SYBR Green I (SG). Using TATA-binding protein (TBP) as a model transcription factor, the proposed assay system can specifically detect TBP with a detection limit as low as 40.7 fM, and with a linear range from 100 fM to 1 nM. Moreover, this assay related DNA probe does not involve any modification and the whole assay proceeds in one tube, which makes the assay simple and low cost. It is expected to become a powerful tool for bioanalysis and clinic diagnostic application.

  19. Circadian rhythms, metabolism, and insulin sensitivity: transcriptional networks in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    Homeostatic systems have adapted to respond to the diurnal light/dark cycle. Numerous physiological pathways, including metabolism, are coordinated by this 24-h cycle. Animals with mutations in clock genes show abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism, indicating a critical relationship between the circadian clock and metabolism. Energy homeostasis is achieved through circadian regulation of the expression and activity of several key metabolic enzymes. Temporal organization of tissue metabolism is coordinated by reciprocal cross-talk between the core clock mechanism and key metabolic enzymes and transcriptional activators. The aim of this review is to define the role of the circadian clock in the regulation of insulin sensitivity by describing the interconnection between the circadian clock and metabolic pathways.

  20. PRC2 loss amplifies Ras-driven transcription and confers sensitivity to BRD4-based therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Raedt, Thomas; Beert, Eline; Pasmant, Eric

    2014-01-01

    genomic, cellular, and mouse modelling data demonstrating that the polycomb group gene SUZ12 functions as tumour suppressor in PNS tumours, high-grade gliomas and melanomas by cooperating with mutations in NF1. NF1 encodes a Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP) and its loss drives cancer by activating...... Ras. We show that SUZ12 loss potentiates the effects of NF1 mutations by amplifying Ras-driven transcription through effects on chromatin. Importantly, however, SUZ12 inactivation also triggers an epigenetic switch that sensitizes these cancers to bromodomain inhibitors. Collectively, these studies...... not only reveal an unexpected connection between the PRC2 complex, NF1 and Ras, but also identify a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy that may be exploited for a variety of cancers....

  1. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts.

  2. SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1, CALMODULIN BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2, and other transcription factors are involved in ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Saito, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the root apex is protected from aluminum (Al) rhizotoxicity by excretion of malate, an Al chelator, by ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 (AtALMT1). AtALMT1 expression is fundamentally regulated by the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (STOP1) zinc finger protein, but other transcription factors have roles that enable Al-inducible expression with a broad dynamic range. In this study, we characterized multiple cis-elements in the AtALMT1 promoter that interact with transcription factors. In planta complementation assays of AtALMT1 driven by 5' truncated promoters of different lengths showed that the promoter region between -540 and 0 (the first ATG) restored the Al-sensitive phenotype of atalm1 and thus contains cis-elements essential for AtALMT1 expression for Al tolerance. Computation of overrepresented octamers showed that eight regions in this promoter region contained potential cis-elements involved in Al induction and STOP1 regulation. Mutation in a position around -297 from the first ATG completely inactivated AtALMT1 expression and Al response. In vitro binding assays showed that this region contained the STOP1 binding site, which accounted for the recognition by four zinc finger domains of the protein. Other positions were characterized as cis-elements that regulated expression by repressors and activators and a transcription factor that determines root tip expression of AtALMT1. From the consensus of known cis-elements, we identified CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR2 to be an activator of AtALMT1 expression. Al-inducible expression of AtALMT1 changed transcription starting sites, which increased the abundance of transcripts with a shortened 5' untranslated region. The present analyses identified multiple mechanisms that regulate AtALMT1 expression.

  3. REDOX-SENSITIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS EGR-1 AND SP1 IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EXPERIMENTAL GASTRIC ULCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregovyi, S M; Chervinska, T M; Dranitsina, A S; Szabo, S; Tolstanova, G M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in redox status of gastric mucosa cells are the main pathogenic factor of gastric erosion and gastric ulcer development. Pro-oxidants can affect cell transcription activity via changes in redox-sensitive transcription factors. Egr-1 and Sp-1 may regulate the transcription of genes that are associated with the pathogenesis of gastric ulcer (growthfactors, cell cycle regulators, etc.). The aim of the present study was to reveal the possible involvement of zinc-finger transcriptionfactors Egr-1 & Sp-1 in the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric lesions caused by aspirin administration and stress. Gastric ulcer was induced in male rats (180-220 g) by immobilization stress combined with water-immersion (IMO-WI) or aspirin gavage (10 mg/100 g). The rats were euthanized 20 min, 1 hour, or 3 hours following the ulcerogenic factor exposure. Protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR; levels of SH-groups of proteins were determined by method of Ellman et al. Development of gastric ulcer lesions was associated with twofold (P gastric mucosa. These changes were accompanied by significant (P gastric ulcer models, and the changes in IMO-WI were more profound. Increased levels of Egr-1 were associated with the decrease in SpI protein levels. We showed for the first time the competitive interaction between redox-sensitive transcription factors Egr-1 and Sp1 in the early phases of gastric ulcer development, which might facilitate inducible transcriptional activity of Egr-1 at the expense of reduction in Sp1 activity.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals.

  5. A novel first exon directs hormone-sensitive transcription of the pig prolactin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) to confer a wide range of biological functions, including its established role during lactation.We have identified a novel first exon of the porcine PRLR that gives rise to three different mRNA transcripts. Transcri...

  6. Transformation of an Unclassified Myeloproliferative Neoplasm with a Rare BCR-JAK2 Fusion Transcript Resulting from the Translocation (9;22)(p24;q11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamseddine, A. N.; Etancelin, P.; Penther, D.; Parmentier, F.; Kuadjovi, C.; Camus, V.; Contentin, N.; Lenain, P.; Bastard, C.; Tilly, H.; Jardin, F.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are known to contain alterations of the tyrosine kinase JAK2 (located on 9p24) that result in constitutive activation of the encoded protein. JAK2 fusions are reported in acute and chronic leukemias of myeloid and lymphoid phenotypes. Here, we report an unclassified case of MPN (MPN-U) showing a t(9;22)(p24;q11), which generates a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene by fusing the BCR at intron 13 to JAK2 at intron 17 on the derivative chromosome 22. Most reported JAK2 fusions cases reveal an aggressive clinical course and long-term remissions have only been achieved after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth case reported worldwide to describe a BCR-JAK2 fusion transcript in MPN-U. The present report revealed a sustained complete clinical, hematologic, and cytogenetic remission 35 months after diagnosis and ~24 months after ASCT. Regarding BCR-ABL1  negative MPN patients this case report provides strong support for a role of JAK2 activation in the oncogenesis and suggests a possible diagnostic and therapeutic target that should be investigated. PMID:25789185

  7. Transformation of an Unclassified Myeloproliferative Neoplasm with a Rare BCR-JAK2 Fusion Transcript Resulting from the Translocation (9;22(p24;q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chamseddine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are known to contain alterations of the tyrosine kinase JAK2 (located on 9p24 that result in constitutive activation of the encoded protein. JAK2 fusions are reported in acute and chronic leukemias of myeloid and lymphoid phenotypes. Here, we report an unclassified case of MPN (MPN-U showing a t(9;22(p24;q11, which generates a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene by fusing the BCR at intron 13 to JAK2 at intron 17 on the derivative chromosome 22. Most reported JAK2 fusions cases reveal an aggressive clinical course and long-term remissions have only been achieved after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the thirteenth case reported worldwide to describe a BCR-JAK2 fusion transcript in MPN-U. The present report revealed a sustained complete clinical, hematologic, and cytogenetic remission 35 months after diagnosis and ~24 months after ASCT. Regarding BCR-ABL1  negative MPN patients this case report provides strong support for a role of JAK2 activation in the oncogenesis and suggests a possible diagnostic and therapeutic target that should be investigated.

  8. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  9. The sensitivity and specificity of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for the avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J C; Reynolds, D L; Ali, A

    2000-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of avian pneumovirus (APV), Colorado strain (US/CO), was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity. The single-tube RT-PCR assay utilized primers developed from the matrix (M) gene sequence of the US/CO APV. The RT-PCR amplified the US/CO APV but did not amplify other pneumoviruses, including the avian pneumoviruses subgroups A and B. The RT-PCR was capable of detecting between 10(0.25) mean tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and 10(-0.44) TCID50 of the US/CO APV. These results have demonstrated that the single-tube RT-PCR assay is a specific and sensitive assay for the detection of US/CO APV.

  10. Depletion of SAM50 Specifically Targets BCR-ABL-Expressing Leukemic Stem and Progenitor Cells by Interfering with Mitochondrial Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capala, Marta E; Pruis, Maurien; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    A high proliferation rate of malignant cells requires an increased energy production, both by anaerobic glucose metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, increased levels of mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote survival of transformed cells and contribute to the dise

  11. Unsupervised explorative data analysis of normal human leukocytes and BCR/ABL positive leukemic cells mid-infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellisola, G.; Bolomini-Vittori, M.; Cinque, G.; Dumas, P.; Fiorini, Z.; Laudanna, C.; Mirenda, M.; Sandt, C.; Silvestri, G.; Tomasello, L.; Vezzalini, M.; Wehbe, K.; Sorio, C.

    2015-01-01

    We proved the ability of Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR) complemented by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to detect protein phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in mammalian cells. We analyzed by microFTIR human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMNs) leukocytes, mouse-derived p

  12. Ph+, BCR-ABL+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in early chronic phase | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALT ≤ 2.5 x valore massimo della normalità o ≤ 5.0 x valore massimo della normalità se considerato secondario alla leucemia...o venga considerato secondario alla leucemia - Bilirubina diretta ≤ 1.5 x valore massimo della normalità, sa

  13. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Koczula, Katarzyna M; Jaques, Jennifer; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Brouwers-Vos, Annet Z; Pruis, Maurien; Günther, Ulrich L; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduce

  14. “Preleukemic or smoldering” chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML:BCR-ABL1 positive: A brief case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Bennett

    2015-01-01

    The most common feature of CML is an elevated WBC count, usually above 25×103/µL, and frequently above 100×103/µL. We report a case of confirmed Ph+CML with a normal CBC detected because of the presence of rare myelocytes and 2% basophils [Fig. 1]. Previous leukocyte counts for the preceding eight years were normal with the exception of one done four months prior to his presentation that showed an abnormal differential with 1% basophils, 2% metamyelocytes and 2% myelocytes.

  15. The adipose transcriptional response to insulin is determined by obesity, not insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 health...

  16. Noisy transcription factor NF-¿B oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangstad, S.W.; Feldager, C.W.; Juul, Jeppe Søgaard;

    2013-01-01

    NF-¿B is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response - a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-¿B is an important mediator of cellular...... amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude...... as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have...

  17. Rapid and Sensitive Salmonella Typhi Detection in Blood and Fecal Samples Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenxia; Yan, Meiying; Du, Pengcheng; Chen, Chen; Kan, Biao

    2015-09-01

    Typhoid fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi remains a significant public health problem in developing countries. Although the main method for diagnosing typhoid fever is blood culture, the test is time consuming and not always able to detect infections. Thus, it is very difficult to distinguish typhoid from other infections in patients with nonspecific symptoms. A simple and sensitive laboratory detection method remains necessary. The purpose of this study is to establish and evaluate a rapid and sensitive reverse transcription-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method to detect Salmonella Typhi infection. In this study, a new specific gene marker, STY1607, was selected to develop a STY1607-RT-LAMP assay; this is the first report of specific RT-LAMP detection assay for typhoid. Human-simulated and clinical blood/stool samples were used to evaluate the performance of STY1607-RT-LAMP for RNA detection; this method was compared with STY1607-LAMP, reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), and bacterial culture methods for Salmonella Typhi detection. Using mRNA as the template, STY1607-RT-LAMP exhibited 50-fold greater sensitivity than STY1607-LAMP for DNA detection. The STY1607-RT-LAMP detection limit is 3 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL for both the pure Salmonella Typhi samples and Salmonella Typhi-simulated blood samples and was 30 CFU/g for the simulated stool samples, all of which were 10-fold more sensitive than the rRT-PCR method. RT-LAMP exhibited improved Salmonella Typhi detection sensitivity compared to culture methods and to rRT-PCR of clinical blood and stool specimens from suspected typhoid fever patients. Because it can be performed without sophisticated equipment or skilled personnel, RT-LAMP is a valuable tool for clinical laboratories in developing countries. This method can be applied in the clinical diagnosis and care of typhoid fever patients as well as for a quick public health response.

  18. Confirmation of mutant alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase gene and transcript in Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Opazo, N; Barany, F; Hirayama, K; Herrera, V L

    1994-09-01

    As the sole renal Na,K-ATPase isozyme, the alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase accounts for all active transport of Na+ throughout the nephron. This role in renal Na+ reabsorption and the primacy of the kidney in hypertension pathogenesis make it a logical candidate gene for salt-sensitive genetic hypertension. An adenine (A)1079-->thymine (T) transversion, resulting in the substitution of glutamine276 with leucine and associated with decreased net 86Rb+ (K+) influx, was identified in Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rat kidney alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase cDNA. However, because a Taq polymerase chain reaction amplification-based reanalysis did not detect the mutant T1079 but rather only the wild-type A1079 alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele in Dahl salt-sensitive rat genomic DNA, we reexamined alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase sequences using Taq polymerase error-independent amplification-based analyses of genomic DNA (by polymerase allele-specific amplification and ligase chain reaction analysis) and kidney RNA (by mRNA-specific thermostable reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis). We also performed modified 3' mismatched correction analysis of genomic DNA using an exonuclease-positive thermostable DNA polymerase. All the confirmatory test results were concordant, confirming the A1079-->T transversion in the Dahl salt-sensitive alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele and its transcript, as well as the wild-type A1079 sequence in the Dahl salt-resistant alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase allele and its transcript. Documentation of a consistent Taq polymerase error that selectively substituted A at T1079 (sense strand) was obtained from Taq polymerase chain reaction amplification and subsequent cycle sequencing of reconfirmed known Dahl salt-sensitive/JR rat mutant T1079 alpha 1 cDNA M13 subclones. This Taq polymerase error results in the reversion of mutant sequence back to the wild-type alpha 1 Na,K-ATPase sequence. This identifies a site- and nucleotide-specific Taq polymerase misincorporation, suggesting that a structural

  19. Noisy transcription factor NF-κB oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangstad, Sirin W.; Feldager, Cilie W.; Juul, Jeppe; Trusina, Ala

    2013-02-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response—a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-κB is an important mediator of cellular communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-κB has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have evolved to increase robustness of the inflammatory response and the system's ability to return to a pre-stimulated state.

  20. A Field-Tailored Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Assay for High Sensitivity Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemleu, Sylvie; Guelig, Dylan; Eboumbou Moukoko, Carole; Essangui, Estelle; Diesburg, Steven; Mouliom, Abas; Melingui, Bernard; Manga, Jeanne; Donkeu, Christiane; Epote, Annie; Texier, Gaëtan; LaBarre, Paul; Burton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive and field deployable molecular diagnostic tools are critically needed for detecting submicroscopic, yet transmissible levels of malaria parasites prevalent in malaria endemic countries worldwide. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated in comparison with thick blood smear microscopy, an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and an in-house RT-PCR targeting the same RT-LAMP transcript. The optimized assay detected Plasmodium falciparum infections in as little as 0.25ng of total parasite RNA, and exhibited a detection limit of 0.08 parasites/ μL when tested directly on infected whole blood lysates, or ~0.0008 parasites/ μL when using RNA extracts. Assay positivity was observed as early as eight minutes from initiation of the RT-LAMP and in most cases the reaction was complete before twenty minutes. Clinical evaluation of the assay on 132 suspected malaria cases resulted in a positivity rate of 90% for RT-LAMP using extracted RNA, and 85% when using whole blood lysates. The positivity rates were 70% for P. falciparum-specific RDT, 83% for RT-PCR, and 74% for thick blood smear microscopy (Mean parasite density = 36,986 parasites/ μL). Concordance rates between the developed RT-LAMP and comparator tests were greater than 75%, the lowest being with light microscopy (78%, McNemar’s test: P = 0.0002), and the highest was with RT-PCR (87%, McNemar’s test: P = 0.0523). Compared to reference RT-PCR, assay sensitivity was 90% for RT-LAMP on whole blood, and 96% for RT-LAMP using corresponding RNA extracts. Electricity-free heaters were further developed and evaluated in comparison with a battery-operated isothermal amplification machine for use with the developed test in resource-limited settings. Taken together, the data highlight the benefits of targeting high abundant RNA transcripts in molecular diagnosis, as well as the potential usefulness of the developed RT-LAMP-assay in

  1. THZ1 targeting CDK7 suppresses STAT transcriptional activity and sensitizes T-cell lymphomas to BCL2 inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Florencia; Praditsuktavorn, Pannee; Fernando, Tharu M.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Marullo, Rosella; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Phillip, Jude; Pera, Benet; Yang, Shao Ning; Takpradit, Kaipol; Roman, Lidia; Gaudiano, Marcello; Crescenzo, Ramona; Ruan, Jia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Zhang, Tinghu; Cremaschi, Graciela; Gray, Nathanael S.; Cerchietti, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are aggressive diseases with poor response to chemotherapy and dismal survival. Identification of effective strategies to target PTCL biology represents an urgent need. Here we report that PTCL are sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and, in particular, to THZ1, a covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). The STAT-signalling pathway is highly vulnerable to THZ1 even in PTCL cells that carry the activating STAT3 mutation Y640F. In mutant cells, CDK7 inhibition decreases STAT3 chromatin binding and expression of highly transcribed target genes like MYC, PIM1, MCL1, CD30, IL2RA, CDC25A and IL4R. In surviving cells, THZ1 decreases the expression of STAT-regulated anti-apoptotic BH3 family members MCL1 and BCL-XL sensitizing PTCL cells to BH3 mimetic drugs. Accordingly, the combination of THZ1 and the BH3 mimetic obatoclax improves lymphoma growth control in a primary PTCL ex vivo culture and in two STAT3-mutant PTCL xenografts, delineating a potential targeted agent-based therapeutic option for these patients. PMID:28134252

  2. Elf5 is an epithelium-specific, fibroblast growth factor-sensitive transcription factor in the embryonic lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David E; Xu, Yan; Shannon, John M

    2007-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling has been shown to be essential for many aspects of normal lung development. To determine epithelial targets of FGF signaling, we cultured embryonic day (E) 11.5 mouse lungs for 24 hr in the presence or absence of the FGF receptor antagonist SU5402, which inhibited branching morphogenesis. Affymetrix gene chip analysis of treated and control epithelia identified several genes regulated by FGF signaling, including Elf5, a member of the Epithelial-specific Ets family of transcription factors. SU5402 reduced Elf5 expression in mesenchyme-free cultures of E12.5 epithelium, demonstrating that the inhibition was direct. In situ hybridization revealed that Elf5 had a dynamic pattern of expression during lung development. We found that expression of Elf5 was induced by FGF7 and FGF10, ligands that primarily bind FGFR2b. To further define the pathways by which FGFs activate Elf5 expression, we cultured E11.5 lung tips in the presence of compounds to inhibit FGF receptors (SU5402), PI3-Kinase/Akt-mediated signaling (LY294002), and MAP Kinase/Erk-mediated signaling (U0126). We found that SU5402 and LY294002 significantly reduced Elf5 expression, whereas U0126 had no effect. LY294002 also reduced Elf5 expression in cultures of purified epithelium. Finally, pAkt was coexpressed with Elf5 in the proximal epithelial airways of E17.5 lungs. These results demonstrate that Elf5 is an FGF-sensitive transcription factor in the lung with a dynamic pattern of expression and that FGF regulation of Elf5 by means of FGFR2b occurs through the PI3-Kinase/Akt pathway.

  3. Differential sensitivity to methylated DNA by ETS-family transcription factors is intrinsically encoded in their DNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dominique C; Poon, Gregory M K

    2016-10-14

    Transactivation by the ETS family of transcription factors, whose members share structurally conserved DNA-binding domains, is variably sensitive to methylation of their target genes. The mechanism by which DNA methylation controls ETS proteins remains poorly understood. Uncertainly also pervades the effects of hemi-methylated DNA, which occurs following DNA replication and in response to hypomethylating agents, on site recognition by ETS proteins. To address these questions, we measured the affinities of two sequence-divergent ETS homologs, PU.1 and Ets-1, to DNA sites harboring a hemi- and fully methylated CpG dinucleotide. While the two proteins bound unmethylated DNA with indistinguishable affinity, their affinities to methylated DNA are markedly heterogeneous and exhibit major energetic coupling between the two CpG methylcytosines. Analysis of simulated DNA and existing co-crystal structures revealed that hemi-methylation induced non-local backbone and groove geometries that were not conserved in the fully methylated state. Indirect readout of these perturbations was differentially achieved by the two ETS homologs, with the distinctive interfacial hydration in PU.1/DNA binding moderating the inhibitory effects of DNA methylation on binding. This data established a biophysical basis for the pioneering properties associated with PU.1, which robustly bound fully methylated DNA, but not Ets-1, which was substantially inhibited.

  4. Transcription factor CecR (YbiH) regulates a set of genes affecting the sensitivity of Escherichia coli against cefoperazone and chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Genomic SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) screening was performed for identification of the binding site of YbiH, an as yet uncharacterized TetR-family transcription factor, on the Escherichia coli genome. YbiH was found to be a unique single-target regulator that binds in vitro within the intergenic spacer located between the divergently transcribed ybiH-ybhGFSR and rhlE operons. YbhG is an inner membrane protein and YbhFSR forms a membrane-associated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while RhlE is a ribosome-associated RNA helicase. Gel shift assay and DNase footprinting analyses indicated one clear binding site of YbiH, including a complete palindromic sequence of AATTAGTT-AACTAATT. An in vivo reporter assay indicated repression of the ybiH operon and activation of the rhlE operon by YbiH. After phenotype microarray screening, YbiH was indicated to confer resistance to chloramphenicol and cefazoline (a first-generation cephalosporin). A systematic survey of the participation of each of the predicted YbiH-regulated genes in the antibiotic sensitivity indicated involvement of the YbhFSR ABC-type transporter in the sensitivity to cefoperazone (a third-generation cephalosporin) and of the membrane protein YbhG in the control of sensitivity to chloramphenicol. Taken together with the growth test in the presence of these two antibiotics and in vitro transcription assay, it was concluded that the hitherto uncharacterized YbiH regulates transcription of both the bidirectional transcription units, the ybiH-ybhGFSR operon and the rhlE gene, which altogether are involved in the control of sensitivity to cefoperazone and chloramphenicol. We thus propose to rename YbiH as CecR (regulator of cefoperazone and chloramphenicol sensitivity).

  5. Rapid and sensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of rotavirus by magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan Fangfang; Zhou Xiaoming [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Xing Da, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2013-01-25

    Graphical abstract: In this work, we have developed and demonstrated a magnetic primer based RT-PCR assay for ECL detection of rotavirus. In the presence of two functional primers (magnetic primer and TBR-primer) and PCR reagents, cDNA from RT was amplified directly onto MPs during PCR cycles of denaturation, annealing and extension. The resulting MPs-TBR complexes were easily loaded on the electrode surface and produced a concentrated ECL signal. The figure shows the schematic illustration of magnetic primer RT-PCR based ECL assay for rotavirus detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the presence of magnetic primer, TBR-primer and PCR reagents, cDNA form RT was amplified directly onto MPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To obtain the best sensing and efficient performance, important parameters associated with the efficiency were investigated carefully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method will find numerous applications in food safety field and clinical diagnosis. - Abstract: A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed by integrating magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. This is realized by accomplishing RT of rotavirus RNA in traditional way and performing PCR of the resulting cDNA fragment on the surface of magnetic particles (MPs). In order to implement PCR on MPs and achieve rapid ECL detection, forward and reverse primers are bounded to MPs and tris-(2,2 Prime -bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR), respectively. After RT-PCR amplification, the TBR labels are directly enriched onto the surface of MPs. Then the MPs-TBR complexes can be loaded on the electrode surface and analyzed by magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation process. So some laborious manual operations can be avoided to achieve rapid yet sensitive detection

  6. Ubiquitous [Na+]i/[K+]i-sensitive transcriptome in mammalian cells: evidence for Ca(2+)i-independent excitation-transcription coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltsova, Svetlana V; Trushina, Yulia; Haloui, Mounsif; Akimova, Olga A; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Orlov, Sergei N

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus-dependent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) affects the expression of numerous genes--a phenomenon known as excitation-transcription coupling. Recently, we found that increases in [Na(+)](i) trigger c-Fos expression via a novel Ca(2+) (i)-independent pathway. In the present study, we identified ubiquitous and tissue-specific [Na(+)](i)/[K(+)](i)-sensitive transcriptomes by comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta (RVSMC), the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To augment [Na(+)](i) and reduce [K(+)](i), cells were treated for 3 hrs with the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain or placed for the same time in the K(+)-free medium. Employing Affymetrix-based technology, we detected changes in expression levels of 684, 737 and 1839 transcripts in HeLa, HUVEC and RVSMC, respectively, that were highly correlated between two treatments (p0.62). Among these Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes, 80 transcripts were common for all three types of cells. To establish if changes in gene expression are dependent on increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we performed identical experiments in Ca(2+)-free media supplemented with extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) chelators. Surprisingly, this procedure elevated rather than decreased the number of ubiquitous and cell-type specific Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes. Among the ubiquitous Na(+) (i)/K(+) (i)-sensitive genes whose expression was regulated independently of the presence of Ca(2+) chelators by more than 3-fold, we discovered several transcription factors (Fos, Jun, Hes1, Nfkbia), interleukin-6, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit, dual specificity phosphatase (Dusp8), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, cyclin L1, whereas expression of metallopeptidase Adamts1, adrenomedulin, Dups1, Dusp10 and Dusp16 was detected exclusively in Ca(2+)-depleted cells. Overall, our findings indicate that Ca(2

  7. Iron, oxidative stress, and virulence: roles of iron-sensitive transcription factor Sre1 and the redox sensor ChAp1 in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; MohdZainudin, Nur A I; Scher, Keren; Condon, Bradford J; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2013-12-01

    The gene SRE1, encoding the GATA transcription factor siderophore biosynthesis repressor (Sre1), was identified in the genome of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus and deleted. Mutants were altered in sensitivity to iron, oxidative stress, and virulence to the host. To gain insight into mechanisms of this combined regulation, genetic interactions among SRE1 (the nonribosomal peptide synthetase encoding gene NPS6, which is responsible for extracellular siderophore biosynthesis) and ChAP1 (encoding a transcription factor regulating redox homeostasis) were studied. To identify members of the Sre1 regulon, expression of candidate iron and oxidative stress-related genes was assessed in wild-type (WT) and sre1 mutants using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In sre1 mutants, NPS6 and NPS2 genes, responsible for siderophore biosynthesis, were derepressed under iron replete conditions, whereas the high-affinity reductive iron uptake pathway associated gene, FTR1, was not, in contrast to outcomes with other well-studied fungal models. C. heterostrophus L-ornithine-N(5)- monooxygenase (SIDA2), ATP-binding cassette (ABC6), catalase (CAT1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD1) genes were also derepressed under iron-replete conditions in sre1 mutants. Chap1nps6 double mutants were more sensitive to oxidative stress than either Chap1 or nps6 single mutants, while Chap1sre1 double mutants showed a modest increase in resistance compared with single Chap1 mutants but were much more sensitive than sre1 mutants. These findings suggest that the NPS6 siderophore indirectly contributes to redox homeostasis via iron sequestration, while Sre1 misregulation may render cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. The double-mutant phenotypes are consistent with a model in which iron sequestration by NPS6 defends the pathogen against oxidative stress. C. heterostrophus sre1, nps6, Chap1, Chap1nps6, and Chap1sre1 mutants are all reduced in virulence toward the

  8. The Hansenula polymorpha MOX gene presents two alternative transcription start points differentially utilized and sensitive to respiratory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genu, Victor; Gödecke, Stefanie; Hollenberg, Cornelis P; Pereira, Gonçalo G

    2003-06-01

    The peroxisomal methanol metabolism of Hansenula polymorpha depends on a group of genes that are coordinately regulated. Methanol oxidase (Mox) plays a key role in this pathway and its synthesis has been shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level. MOX expression is strongly repressed on glucose and activated on glycerol or methanol. In this study we have identified two MOX transcripts that are differentially expressed along MOX derepression. The first one, named l-MOX (for longer MOX), starts at position -425, is only weakly and transiently transcribed and is not translated into the Mox protein. The other is the true MOX mRNA, which initiates around position -25. Using a strain bearing multiple copies of MOX(Q1N) and a reporter gene fused to the MOX promoter, regulation of the two transcripts was investigated. Initiation of the true MOX correlates with repression of l-MOX and conditions that are repressive for MOX transcription, such as the inhibition of mitochondrial activity, lead to higher levels of l-MOX expression. This effect was first observed in a mox mutant (Q1N-M8) unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. No function was detected for l-MOX, but its regulation follows a pattern similar to that of catalase, which is essential for methanol metabolism. This suggests that, l-MOX, although precisely regulated, seems to be a remnant of the evolution of the methanol metabolism network.

  9. Homozygous mdm2 SNP309 cancer cells with compromised transcriptional elongation at p53 target genes are sensitive to induction of p53-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Melissa; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-10-27

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (T to G) in the mdm2 P2 promoter, mdm2 SNP309, leads to MDM2 overexpression promoting chemotherapy resistant cancers. Two mdm2 G/G SNP309 cancer cell lines, MANCA and A875, have compromised wild-type p53 that co-localizes with MDM2 on chromatin. We hypothesized that MDM2 in these cells inhibited transcription initiation at the p53 target genes p21 and puma. Surprisingly, following etoposide treatment transcription initiation occurred at the compromised target genes in MANCA and A875 cells similar to the T/T ML-1 cell line. In all cell lines tested there was equally robust recruitment of total and initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We found that knockdown of MDM2 in G/G cells moderately increased expression of subsets of p53 target genes without increasing p53 stability. Importantly, etoposide and actinomycin D treatments increased histone H3K36 trimethylation in T/T, but not G/G cells, suggesting a G/G correlated inhibition of transcription elongation. We therefore tested a chemotherapeutic agent (8-amino-adenosine) that induces p53-independent cell death for higher clinically relevant cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that T/T and G/G mdm2 SNP309 cells were equally sensitive to 8-amino-adenosine induced cell death. In conclusion for cancer cells overexpressing MDM2, targeting MDM2 may be less effective than inducing p53-independent cell death.

  10. Species-specific antimonial sensitivity in Leishmania is driven by post-transcriptional regulation of AQP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Mandal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is a digenetic protozoan parasite causing leishmaniasis in humans. The different clinical forms of leishmaniasis are caused by more than twenty species of Leishmania that are transmitted by nearly thirty species of phlebotomine sand flies. Pentavalent antimonials (such as Pentostam or Glucantime are the first line drugs for treating leishmaniasis. Recent studies suggest that pentavalent antimony (Sb(V acts as a pro-drug, which is converted to the more active trivalent form (Sb(III. However, sensitivity to trivalent antimony varies among different Leishmania species. In general, Leishmania species causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL are more sensitive to Sb(III than the species responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL. Leishmania aquaglyceroporin (AQP1 facilitates the adventitious passage of antimonite down a concentration gradient. In this study, we show that Leishmania species causing CL accumulate more antimonite, and therefore exhibit higher sensitivity to antimonials, than the species responsible for VL. This species-specific differential sensitivity to antimonite is directly proportional to the expression levels of AQP1 mRNA. We show that the stability of AQP1 mRNA in different Leishmania species is regulated by their respective 3'-untranslated regions. The differential regulation of AQP1 mRNA explains the distinct antimonial sensitivity of each species.

  11. Species-Specific Antimonial Sensitivity in Leishmania Is Driven by Post-Transcriptional Regulation of AQP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Goutam; Mandal, Srotoswati; Sharma, Mansi; Charret, Karen Santos; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is a digenetic protozoan parasite causing leishmaniasis in humans. The different clinical forms of leishmaniasis are caused by more than twenty species of Leishmania that are transmitted by nearly thirty species of phlebotomine sand flies. Pentavalent antimonials (such as Pentostam or Glucantime) are the first line drugs for treating leishmaniasis. Recent studies suggest that pentavalent antimony (Sb(V)) acts as a pro-drug, which is converted to the more active trivalent form (Sb(III)). However, sensitivity to trivalent antimony varies among different Leishmania species. In general, Leishmania species causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are more sensitive to Sb(III) than the species responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Leishmania aquaglyceroporin (AQP1) facilitates the adventitious passage of antimonite down a concentration gradient. In this study, we show that Leishmania species causing CL accumulate more antimonite, and therefore exhibit higher sensitivity to antimonials, than the species responsible for VL. This species-specific differential sensitivity to antimonite is directly proportional to the expression levels of AQP1 mRNA. We show that the stability of AQP1 mRNA in different Leishmania species is regulated by their respective 3’-untranslated regions. The differential regulation of AQP1 mRNA explains the distinct antimonial sensitivity of each species. PMID:25714343

  12. Transcription factor avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogen homolog-1 is a novel mediator of renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenguang; Chumley, Phillip; Prieto, Minolfa C; Miyada, Kayoko; Seth, Dale M; Fatima, Huma; Hua, Ping; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Sanders, Paul W; Jaimes, Edgar A

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factor E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (ETS-1) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of a variety of genes, including growth factors, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. We recently demonstrated that angiotensin II increases the glomerular expression of ETS-1 and that blockade of ETS-1 ameliorates the profibrotic and proinflammatory effects of angiotensin II. The Dahl salt-sensitive rat is a paradigm of salt-sensitive hypertension associated with local activation of the renin-angiotensin system. In these studies, we determined whether: (1) salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with renal expression of ETS-1 and (2) ETS-1 participates in the development of end-organ injury in salt-sensitive hypertension. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed a normal-salt diet (0.5% NaCl diet) or a high-salt diet (4% NaCl) for 4 weeks. Separate groups on high-salt diet received an ETS-1 dominant-negative peptide (10 mg/kg/d), an inactive ETS-1 mutant peptide (10 mg/kg/d), the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan (10 mg/kg/d), or the combination high-salt diet/dominant-negative peptide/angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker for 4 weeks. High-salt diet rats had a significant increase in the glomerular expression of the phosphorylated ETS-1 that was prevented by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker. ETS-1 blockade reduced proteinuria, glomerular injury score, fibronectin expression, urinary transforming growth factor-β excretion, and macrophage infiltration. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker reduced proteinuria, glomerular injury score, and macrophage infiltration, whereas concomitant ETS-1 blockade and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker had additive effects and reduced interstitial fibrosis. Our studies demonstrated that salt-sensitive hypertension results in increased glomerular expression of phosphorylated ETS-1 and suggested that ETS-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of end-organ injury in salt-sensitive

  13. Global transcriptional response of solvent-sensitive and solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strains exposed to toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Gómez Lozano, María

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are generally recognized as solvent tolerant, exhibiting varied sensitivity to organic solvents. Pan-genome analysis has revealed that 30% of genes belong to the core-genome of Pseudomonas. Accessory and unique genes confer high degree of adaptability and capabilities...

  14. Sensitization of prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine induced by a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of cytosine deaminase adenoviral/5-fluorocytosine system on prostate cancer cell lines. METHODS: Cell culture, infectivity test and sensitivity test, observing the bystander effect and animal model experiment were carried out. RESULTS: All the established prostate cancer cell lines were eventually infectable, but ratio of vector/cell and time of exposed at which infection occurs was dependent on the cell lines. The expression of transfered cytosine deaminase gene peaked at different days, but persisted beyond 11 days. The prostate cell lines were sensitized to the 5-fluorocytosine by infection with the cytosine deaminase gene adenoviral vector, and only 5% of the LNCap and 10% of the RM-1 cells infected were required for 100% cell death. In the animal model, there was significant eradiation of tumor growth at the ratio of 400 vector particles/cell and with the systematic treatment of 5-fluorocytosine. CONCLUSION: The adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit can sensitize the prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine, and the system can significantly inhibit the growth of prostatic tumor in mice.

  15. Passive sensitization increases histamine-stimulated calcium signaling and NF-кB transcription activity in bronchial epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si JIN; Dan TIAN; Jian-guo CHEN; Li-ping ZHU; Sheng-yuan LIU; Di-xun WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To find out if the two aspects of asthma (chronic airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness) are related to hypersensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells. Methods: Porcine bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were divided into sensitized (S) and nonsesitized (N) groups. In group S, the cells were preincubated with serum from ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs. In group N, the cells were preincubated with serum from nonsensitized guinea pigs. Single cell calcium imaging and ELISA-based NF-κB activity were used to evaluate the histamine-stimulated intracellular free calcium level and NF-κB activity, respectively. Results: First, 0.1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations in PBEC of group S, but not in group N. Second, 1 umol/L histamine could induce [Ca2+]i oscillations of PBEC in both group S and group N. The [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency of PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N, though the [Ca2+]i oscillation amplitude showed no difference between the two groups. Finally, when 10 umol/L histamine was used to stimulate PBEC, a transient initial increase followed by a sustained elevation (FSE) of [Ca2+]i was observed in PBEC in both groups. The amplitude of the FSE of [Ca2+]i in PBEC was significantly higher in group S than in group N. The subsequent NF-KB activity was in accordance to the calcium oscillation frequency evoked by histamine, but not to the amplitude. Conclusion: It was suggested that the increased sensitivity of calcium signaling in bronchial epithelial cells might contribute to the exorbitant inflammation or increased susceptibility in asthmatic airway epithelial cells.

  16. Characterization of three Arabidopsis AP2/EREBP family transcription factors involved in ABA sensitivity,freeze and salt tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI WenQian; LEI Juan; Xu Yu; WEI Gang; ZHU YuXian

    2007-01-01

    AP2/EREBP transcription factors (TFs) play very important roles in plant development,hormonal regulation and stress response. Upon genome-wide cDNA cloning,phylogenetic and expression pattern analyses of this plant specific TF family,we found that three of the members including At1g71450,At1g50680 and At5g13910,were likely involved in responses to ABA,cold and salt. Complementary DNAs containing putative full-length ORFs of these three TFs were obtained and fused individually to the GAL4 DNA-binding domains. All the 3 genes functioned effectively as trans-activators using yeast one-hybrid assays. RT-PCR experiments showed that the At1g71450 gene was induced by ABA and low temperature; the At1g50680 gene was responsive to quite a few stress conditions,but especially to freezing temperature; and the At5g13910 gene was induced by high salt treatment,drought and ethylene. By searching the ABRC T-DNA insertion mutant stocks,we obtained knockout lines for these TFs. Homozygous ko1 (At1g71450) plants showed a hypersensitive response to ABA during seed germination and also in stomata movement. Homozygous ko2 (At1g50680) plants showed a significant reduction in plant freezing tolerance compared to the wild type after chilling treatment. Homozygous ko3 (At5g13910) were less tolerant to high salinity than wild type plants. Our data suggest that At1g71450 is a negative regulator in ABA signaling,while At1g50680 and At5g13910 are positive regulators in cold and salt stress responses,respectively.

  17. Schisandrin B exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulation of the redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checker, Rahul; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Sharma, Deepak; Menon, Jisha; Thoh, Maikho; Bhilwade, Hari N; Konishi, Tetsuya; Sandur, Santosh K

    2012-10-01

    Schisandrin B (SB), a dibenzocyclooctadiene derivative isolated from Schisandra chinensis and used commonly in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of hepatitis and myocardial disorders, has been recently shown to modulate cellular redox balance. Since we have shown that cellular redox plays an important role in the modulation of immune responses, the present studies were undertaken to study the effects of SB on activation and effector functions of lymphocytes. SB altered the redox status of lymphocytes by enhancing the basal reactive oxygen species levels and altering the GSH/GSSG ratio in lymphocytes. It also induced nuclear translocation of redox sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 and increased the transcription of its dependent genes. SB inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion by lymphocytes. SB also significantly inhibited mitogen-induced upregulation of T cell costimulatory molecules and activation markers. It was observed that SB inhibited mitogen-induced phosphorylation of c-Raf, MEK, ERK, JNK, and p38. It suppressed IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in activated lymphocytes. Anti-inflammatory effects of SB were significantly abrogated by the inhibitors of Nrf2 and HO-1, suggesting the involvement of this pathway. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of SB on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion were also observed in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the anti-inflammatory effects of SB are mediated via modulation of Nrf2 and NF-κB in lymphocytes.

  18. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction for Simultaneous Screening of 29 Chromosomal Translocation in Hematologic Malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) has been proved to possess great clinical potential for simultaneous screening of 29 chromosomal translocations in acute leukemia. To evaluate the clinical value of M-RT-PCR in hematologic malignancies, bone marrow samples from 90 patients with various hematologic malignancies, including 25 acute myeloge nous leukemia (AML), 22 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 27 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), 4 myeloproliferative diseases (MPD), 3 chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (CLL), 3 and 1 malignant histocytosis (MH) were subjected to both M-RT-PCR and chromosome karyotypic analysis. Some of cases were subjected to follow-up examination of M-RT-PCR during the period of ukemia. In our hand, 12 of 29chromosomal translocation transcripts including TEL/PDGFR, DEK/CAN, MLL/AF6, AML1/ETO,F9, BCR/ABL, MLL/MLL, PML/RARα, TLS/ERG, E2A/HLF, EVIl and HOXI1 were detected in 57 cases (63.3 %) of the 90 samples, which were in consistence with the results of karyore, M-RT-PCR had also shown good clinical relevance when used as an approach to detect minimal residual leukemia. We concluded that M-RT-PCR could be used as an effiy in the initial diagnosis of hematologic malignancies but also in subsequent monitor of minimal residual leukemia.

  19. BCR-ABL isoforms associated with intrinsic or acquired resistance to imatinib : more heterogeneous than just ABL kinase domain point mutations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Franz X.; Lundan, Tuija; Goll, Rasmus; Silye, Aleksandra; Mikkola, Ingvild; Rekvig, Ole Petter; Knuutila, Sakari; Remes, Kari; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Porkka, Kimmo; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib, a small molecule inhibitor of ABL, PDGFR and C-KIT, has revolutionized treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). However, resistance to treatment is of increasing importance and often is due to point mutations in the Abl kinase domain (Abl KD). Here, we analysed clinical outcome and mu

  20. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E;

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic...

  1. Allopurinol ameliorates thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure by regulating cellular redox-sensitive transcription factors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Ulvi; Yalniz, Mehmet; Aygün, Cem; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Bahçecioğlu, Ibrahim Halil

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress plays important role in the development of acute liver failure. In this study, we investigated effects of allopurinol (AP) upon thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury and the potential mechanisms leading to amelioration in inflammation with AP treatment. Acute liver failure was induced by intraperitoneal administration of TAA (300 mg/kg/day for 2 days). Thirty-five rats were divided into five groups as control (group 1), TAA (group 2), TAA + 25AP (group 3), TAA + 50 AP (group 4), and TAA + 100AP (group 5). The number of animals in each group was seven. At the end of the study, histopathological, biochemical, and western blot analysis were done. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of aminotransferases, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-қB ), activator protein-1 (AP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, and the necro-inflammation scores. Nevertheless, nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expressions in the liver were decreased by TAA. AP treatment significantly lowered the serum levels of aminotransferases (P < 0.01) and liver MDA, NF-κB, AP-1, TNF-α, COX-2, and IL-6 expressions (P < 0.05). Moreover, AP restored the liver Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions and improved the necro-inflammation scores significantly. AP improves oxidative stress-induced liver damage by regulating cellular redox-sensitive transcriptor factors and expression of pro-inflammatory and antioxidant defense mechanisms. AP probably exerts these beneficiary features by its free radical scavenging ability in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Microinjection of CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide into the nucleus accumbens inhibits the cocaine-induced upregulation of dopamine receptors and locomotor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qinghua; Sun, Xi; Liu, Ziyong; Yang, Jianghua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2014-09-01

    Repeated exposure to addictive drugs enhances dopamine receptor (DR) signaling and the ultimate phosphorylation of the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These effects are known to contribute to the expression of behavioral sensitization. CART peptides are neuropeptides that modulate drug reward and reinforcement. The present experiments investigated the effects of CART 55-102 microinjection into the NAcc on (1) the phosphorylation of CREB, (2) cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and (3) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylated kinase signaling. Here, we show that repeated microinjections into the NAcc of CART 55-102 peptides (1.0 or 2.5μg, 0.5μl/side) attenuates cocaine-induced enhancements of D1R, D2R and D3R phosphorylation in this sites. Furthermore, the microinjection of CART 55-102 followed by repeated injections of cocaine (15mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked the enhancement of cAMP levels, PKA activity and pERK and pCREB levels on the fifth day of cocaine administration. The cocaine-induced locomotor activity and behavioral sensitization in rats were also inhibited by the 5-day-microinjection of CART peptides. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB by cocaine in the NAcc was blocked by the CART 55-102 peptide via the inhibition of D1R and D2R stimulation, D3R phosphorylation, cAMP/PKA signaling and ERK phosphorylated kinase signaling. These effects may have played a compensatory inhibitory role in the behavioral sensitization of rats that received microinjections of CART 55-102.

  3. Interference with Activator Protein-2 transcription factors leads to induction of apoptosis and an increase in chemo- and radiation- sensitivity in breast cancer cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thewes, Verena

    2010-05-11

    Abstract Background Activator Protein-2 (AP-2) transcription factors are critically involved in a variety of fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Expression of the family members AP-2α and AP-2γ is particularly well documented in malignancies of the female breast. Despite increasing evaluation of single AP-2 isoforms in mammary tumors the functional role of concerted expression of multiple AP-2 isoforms in breast cancer remains to be elucidated. AP-2 proteins can form homo- or heterodimers, and there is growing evidence that the net effect whether a cell will proliferate, undergo apoptosis or differentiate is partly dependent on the balance between different AP-2 isoforms. Methods We simultaneously interfered with all AP-2 isoforms expressed in ErbB-2-positive murine N202.1A breast cancer cells by conditionally over-expressing a dominant-negative AP-2 mutant. Results We show that interference with AP-2 protein function lead to reduced cell number, induced apoptosis and increased chemo- and radiation-sensitivity. Analysis of global gene expression changes upon interference with AP-2 proteins identified 139 modulated genes (90 up-regulated, 49 down-regulated) compared with control cells. Gene Ontology (GO) investigations for these genes revealed Cell Death and Cell Adhesion and Migration as the main functional categories including 25 and 12 genes, respectively. By using information obtained from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Systems we were able to present proven or potential connections between AP-2 regulated genes involved in cell death and response to chemo- and radiation therapy, (i.e. Ctgf, Nrp1, Tnfaip3, Gsta3) and AP-2 and other main apoptosis players and to create a unique network. Conclusions Expression of AP-2 transcription factors in breast cancer cells supports proliferation and contributes to chemo- and radiation-resistance of tumor cells by impairing the

  4. A Rapid Field-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Sensitive and Specific Detection of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambagala, A; Pahari, S; Fisher, M; Lee, P-Y A; Pasick, J; Ostlund, E N; Johnson, D J; Lung, O

    2017-04-01

    Bluetongue is a non-contagious, haemorrhagic, Culicoides-borne disease of ruminants. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), is a member of the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family. So far, 26 BTV serotypes have been identified worldwide. The global distribution of bluetongue has been expanding, and rapid detection of BTV, preferably in the field, is critical for timely implementation of animal movement restrictions and vector control measures. To date, many laboratory-based, molecular assays for detection of BTV have been developed. These methods require the samples to be shipped to a central laboratory with sophisticated instruments and highly skilled technicians to perform the assays, conduct analyses and interpret the results. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a rapid, portable, user-friendly, pan-BTV reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay that can potentially be used in low-resource field conditions. The total length of the assay was <60 min, and at the end of the assay, the results were automatically displayed as '+' or '-' without the need for data interpretation. The RT-iiPCR assay detected 36 BTV isolates and two in vitro transcribed RNA samples representing all 26 BTV serotypes. The assay did not cross-react with other animal viruses tested, including two closely related orbiviruses. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was as low as nine copies of in vitro transcribed double-stranded BTV RNA. Analysis of BTV-infected whole blood samples showed that the BTV RT-iiPCR assay was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR. The assay can potentially be used for rapid screening of animals for BTV in routine diagnostics and for monitoring bluetongue outbreaks both in ruminants and in Culicoides vectors in the field and in the laboratory.

  5. Detection of the Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus by a Highly Sensitive Quantitative Real-time Reverse-transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yang; Guoliang Mao; Yujun Liu; Yuan-Chuan Chen; Chengjing Liu; Jun Luo; Xihan Li

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been widely used successfully for detection and monitoring of the pandemic H1N 1/2009 influenza A virus.In this study,we report the design and characterization of a novel set of primers to be used in a qRT-PCR assay for detecting the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus.The newly designed primers target three regions that are highly conserved among the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and are different from those targeted by the WHO-recommended primers.The qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers are highly specific,and as specific as the WHO-recommended primers for detecting pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and other influenza viruses including influenza B viruses and influenza A viruses of human,swine,and raccoon dog origin.Furthermore,the qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers appeared to be at least 10-fold more sensitive than those with the WHO-recommended primers as the detection limits of the assays with our primers and the WHO-recommended primers were 2.5 and 25 copies of target RNA per reaction,respectively.When tested with 83 clinical samples,32 were detected to be positive using the qRT-PCR assays with our designed primers,while only 25 were positive by the assays with the WHO-recommended primers.These results suggest that the qRT-PCR system with the newly designed primers represent a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis of the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus infection.

  6. Sodium butyrate sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by induction of transcription from the DR5 gene promoter through Sp1 sites in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ho; Park, Jong-Wook; Lee, Jai-Youl; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2004-10-01

    Sodium butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid naturally present in the human colon, is able to induce cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis in various cancer cells. Sodium butyrate is most probably related to the inhibition of deacetylases leading to hyperacetylation of chromatin components such as histones and non-histone proteins and to alterations in gene expression. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that sodium butyrate selectively up-regulated DR5 but had no effect on the expression of the other TNF-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, DR4. Sodium butyrate-induced expression of DR5 involves the putative Sp1 site within the DR5 promoter region. Using a combination of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and the luciferase reporter assay, we found that a specific Sp1 site (located at -195 bp relative to the transcription start site) is required for sodium butyrate-mediated activation of the DR5 promoter. When HCT116 cells were incubated with sodium butyrate and TRAIL, enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis was observed. The enhanced apoptosis was measured by fluorescent activated cell sorting analysis, DNA fragmentation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, down-regulation of XIAP and caspase activity. Taken together, the present studies suggest that sodium butyrate may be an effective sensitizer of TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

  7. The dynamin chemical inhibitor dynasore impairs cholesterol trafficking and sterol-sensitive genes transcription in human HeLa cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Girard

    Full Text Available Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In both cell types, dynasore treatment led to the abnormal accumulation of LDL and free cholesterol (FC within the endolysosomal network. The measure of cholesterol esters (CE further showed that the delivery of regulatory cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER was deficient. This resulted in the inhibition of the transcriptional control of the three major sterol-sensitive genes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCoAR, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. The sequestration of cholesterol in the endolysosomal compartment impaired both the active and passive cholesterol efflux in HMDM. Our data further illustrate the importance of membrane trafficking in cholesterol homeostasis and validate dynasore as a new pharmacological tool to study the intracellular transport of cholesterol.

  8. MicroRNA-149 Increases the Sensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells to 5-Fluorouracil by Targeting Forkhead Box Transcription Factor FOXM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previously, we have shown that microRNA (miR-149 suppresses the migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC cells by targeting forkhead box transcription factor (FOXM1. However, the roles of miR-149 in the chemoresistance of CRC cells to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether miR-149 targets FOXM1 to regulate the 5-FU resistance of CRC. Methods: The qRT-PCR assay was performed to detect the expression of miR-149 in 5-FU-resistant CRC cells (HCT-8/5-FU and LoVo/5-FU and their parental CRC cells (HCT-8 and LoVo. Also, the effects of miR-149 expression on the sensitivity of CRC cells to 5-FU were determined by gain- and loss-of-function assays. Finally, whether miR-149 regulates the 5-FU resistance of CRC cells by targeting the mammalian Forkhead Box M1 (FOXM1 was investigated. Results: The expression of miR-149 was significantly downregulated in 5-FU-resistant CRC cells in comparison with their parental CRC cells. Re-expression of miR-149 could enhance the 5-FU sensitivity of 5-FU-resistant CRC cells by increasing 5-FU-inducing apoptosis, while downregulation of miR-149 could decrease the 5-FU sensitivity of parental CRC cells by decreasing 5-FU-inducing apoptosis. In addition, the luciferase assay indicated that miR-149 could bind to the 3'-UTR sequence of FOXM1 mRNA. The silencing of FOXM1 could mimic the effect of miR-149 upregulation on the 5-FU resistance of 5-FU-resistant CRC cells. Furthermore, the expression of miR-149 in the 5-FU-responding CRC tissues was significantly higher than that in the non-responding tissues and inversely correlated with FOXM1 mRNA level. Conclusions: MiR-149 reverses the resistance of CRC cells to 5-FU by directly targeting FOXM1. Thus, targeting miR-149/FOXM1 signaling will be a potential strategy in the treatment of 5-FU-chemoresistant CRC.

  9. Transcriptional responses of the nerve agent-sensitive brain regions amygdala, hippocampus, piriform cortex, septum, and thalamus following exposure to the organophosphonate anticholinesterase sarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhoff James L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the acute toxicity of organophosphorus nerve agents is known to result from acetylcholinesterase inhibition, the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of neuropathology following nerve agent-induced seizure are not well understood. To help determine these pathways, we previously used microarray analysis to identify gene expression changes in the rat piriform cortex, a region of the rat brain sensitive to nerve agent exposure, over a 24-h time period following sarin-induced seizure. We found significant differences in gene expression profiles and identified secondary responses that potentially lead to brain injury and cell death. To advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in sarin-induced toxicity, we analyzed gene expression changes in four other areas of the rat brain known to be affected by nerve agent-induced seizure (amygdala, hippocampus, septum, and thalamus. Methods We compared the transcriptional response of these four brain regions to sarin-induced seizure with the response previously characterized in the piriform cortex. In this study, rats were challenged with 1.0 × LD50 sarin and subsequently treated with atropine sulfate, 2-pyridine aldoxime methylchloride, and diazepam. The four brain regions were collected at 0.25, 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after seizure onset, and total RNA was processed for microarray analysis. Results Principal component analysis identified brain region and time following seizure onset as major sources of variability within the dataset. Analysis of variance identified genes significantly changed following sarin-induced seizure, and gene ontology analysis identified biological pathways, functions, and networks of genes significantly affected by sarin-induced seizure over the 24-h time course. Many of the molecular functions and pathways identified as being most significant across all of the brain regions were indicative of an inflammatory response. There

  10. Co-expression of the CBFβ-MYH11 and BCR-ABL fusion genes in chronic myeloid leukaemia / Coexistenţa genelor de fuziune CBFβ-MYH11 şi BCR-ABL în leucemia mieloidă cronică

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Roxana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coexistenţa t(9;22 şi a inv(16 a fost descrisă într-un număr limitat de cazuri de LMC, LAM de novo sau LAM post chimioterapie. Raportăm un pacient cu LMC care a prezentat atât inversie de 16 cât şi cromozom Philadelphia şi care a evoluat spre criză blastică sub tratament cu Imatinib. Diagnosicul de laborator şi monitorizarea s-a realizat prin citometrie în flux, citogenetică convenţională şi tehnici de genetică moleculară. Inv(16, detectată prin cariotipare în clona Philadelphia pozitivă la momentul transformării blastice, a fost evaluată retrospective prin metoda real-time PCR, şi s-a dovedit a fi fost prezentă încă de la diagnostic. Biopsia de măduvă osoasă, efectuată în faza blastică a LMC, a confirmat prezenţa blaştilor aparţinând liniei mieloide, cu indicii de diferenţiere monocitoidă, frecvent asociată cu inv (16. De asemenea, cazul a asociat şi mutaţia F359V în domeniul kinazic al ABL, care determină rezistenţă intermediară la Imatinib şi Nilotinib, ceea ce a impus schimbarea terapiei cu Dasatinib. În cazul prezentat evoluţia a fost progresivă, urmată de deces ca urmare a lipsei de răspuns la inhibitorii de tirozin kinază, la 18 luni de la diagnosticare. Coexistenţa t(9; 22 şi inv(16 în LMC pare a fi asociată cu o evoluţie clinică agresivă şi rezistenţă la terapia cu inhibitori de tirozin kinază. Având în vedere numărul foarte mic de cazuri descrise în literatura de specialitate, deciziile terapeutice în cazul pacienţilor care prezintă aceste anomalii sunt încă dificile

  11. Ablation of the transcriptional regulator Id1 enhances energy expenditure, increases insulin sensitivity, and protects against age and diet induced insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Ande; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Gavrilova, Oksana; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health concern that contributes to the development of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, and cancer. Id proteins are helix-loop-helix transcription factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells from multiple tissues, including adipocytes. We screened mouse tissues for the expression of Id1 and found that Id1 protein is highly expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT), suggesting a role for Id1 in adipogenesis and cell metabolism. Id1(-/-) mice are viable but show a significant reduction in fat mass (P<0.005) over the life of the animal that was not due to decreased number of adipocytes. Analysis of Id1(-/-) mice revealed higher energy expenditure, increased lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation, resulting in reduced triglyceride accumulation in WAT compared to Id1(+/+) mice. Serum levels of triglycerides (193.9±32.2 vs. 86.5±33.8, P<0.0005), cholesterol (189.4±33.8 vs. 110.6±8.23, P<0.0005) and leptin (1263±835 vs. 222±260, P<0.005) were significantly lower in aged Id1(-/-) mice compared to Id1(+/+) mice. Id1-deficient mice have higher resting (P<0.005) and total (P<0.05) O(2) consumption and lower respiratory exchange ratio (P<0.005), confirming that Id1(-/-) mice use a higher proportion of lipid as an energy source for the increased energy expenditure. The expression of PGC1α and UCP1 were 2- to 3-fold up-regulated in Id1(-/-) BAT, suggesting that loss of Id1 increases thermogenesis. As a consequence of higher energy expenditure and reduced fat mass, Id1(-/-) mice displayed enhanced insulin sensitivity. Id1 deficiency protected mice against age- and high-fat-diet-induced adiposity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis. Our findings suggest that Id1 plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and could be a potential target in the treatment of insulin resistance and fatty liver disease.

  12. Loss of Interdependent Binding by the FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 Forkhead Transcription Factors Culminates in Perturbation of Active Chromatin Marks and Binding of Transcriptional Regulators at Insulin-sensitive Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalley, Akua; Schill, Daniel; Hatta, Mitsutoki; Johnson, Nicole; Cirillo, Lisa Ann

    2016-04-15

    FoxO1 binds to insulin response elements located in the promoters of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), activating their expression. Insulin-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO1 promotes cytoplasmic translocation, inhibiting FoxO1-mediated transactivation. We have previously demonstrated that FoxO1 opens and remodels chromatin assembled from the IGFBP1 promoter via a highly conserved winged helix motif. This finding, which established FoxO1 as a "pioneer" factor, suggested a model whereby FoxO1 chromatin remodeling at regulatory targets facilitates binding and recruitment of additional regulatory factors. However, the impact of FoxO1 phosphorylation on its ability to bind chromatin and the effect of FoxO1 loss on recruitment of neighboring transcription factors at its regulatory targets in liver chromatin is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that an amino acid substitution that mimics insulin-mediated phosphorylation of a serine in the winged helix DNA binding motif curtails FoxO1 nucleosome binding. We also demonstrate that shRNA-mediated loss of FoxO1 binding to the IGFBP1 and G6Pase promoters in HepG2 cells significantly reduces binding of RNA polymerase II and the pioneer factors FoxA1/A2. Knockdown of FoxA1 similarly reduced binding of RNA polymerase II and FoxO1. Reduction in acetylation of histone H3 Lys-27 accompanies loss of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 binding. Interdependent binding of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 possibly entails cooperative binding because FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 facilitate one another's binding to IGFPB1 promoter DNA. These results illustrate how transcription factors can nucleate transcriptional events in chromatin in response to signaling events and suggest a model for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through interdependent FoxO/FoxA binding.

  13. Cooperation between RUNX1-ETO9a and novel transcriptional partner KLF6 in upregulation of Alox5 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell C DeKelver

    Full Text Available Fusion protein RUNX1-ETO (AML1-ETO, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 is expressed as the result of the 8q22;21q22 translocation [t(8;21], which is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities found in acute myeloid leukemia. RUNX1-ETO is thought to promote leukemia development through the aberrant regulation of RUNX1 (AML1 target genes. Repression of these genes occurs via the recruitment of the corepressors N-COR and SMRT due to their interaction with ETO. Mechanisms of RUNX1-ETO target gene upregulation remain less well understood. Here we show that RUNX1-ETO9a, the leukemogenic alternatively spliced transcript expressed from t(8;21, upregulates target gene Alox5, which is a gene critically required for the promotion of chronic myeloid leukemia development by BCR-ABL. Loss of Alox5 expression reduces activity of RUNX1-ETO9a, MLL-AF9 and PML-RARα in vitro. However, Alox5 is not essential for the induction of leukemia by RUNX1-ETO9a in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that the upregulation of Alox5 by RUNX1-ETO9a occurs via the C₂H₂ zinc finger transcription factor KLF6, a protein required for early hematopoiesis and yolk sac development. Furthermore, KLF6 is specifically upregulated by RUNX1-ETO in human leukemia cells. This identifies KLF6 as a novel mediator of t(8;21 target gene regulation, providing a new mechanism for RUNX1-ETO transcriptional control.

  14. Haemophilus influenzae strains possess variations in the global transcriptional profile in response to oxygen levels and this influences sensitivity to environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Donald; Tikhomirova, Alexandra; Kidd, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    An alcohol dehydrogenase, AdhC, is required for Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20 growth with high oxygen. AdhC protects against both exogenous and metabolically generated, endogenous reactive aldehydes. However, adhC in the strain 86-028NP is a pseudogene. Unlike the Rd KW20 adhC mutant, 86-028NP does grow with high oxygen. This suggests the differences between Rd KW20 and 86-028NP include broader pathways, such as for the maintenance of redox and metabolism that avoids the toxicity related to oxygen. We hypothesized that these differences affect their resistance to relevant toxic chemicals, including reactive aldehydes. Across a range of oxygen concentrations, despite the growth profiles of Rd KW20 and 86-028NP being similar, there was a significant variation in their sensitivity to reactive aldehydes. 86-028NP is more sensitive to methylglyoxal, formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde under high oxygen than low oxygen as well as compared to Rd KW20. Also, as oxygen levels changed the whole genome gene expression profiles of Rd KW20 and 86-028NP revealed distinctions in their transcriptomes (the iron, FNR and ArcAB regulons). These were indicative of a difference in their intracellular redox properties and we show it is this that underpins their survival against reactive aldehydes.

  15. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Version 1.2014: Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Susan; Radich, Jerald P.; Abboud, Camille N.; Akhtari, Mojtaba; Altman, Jessica K.; Berman, Ellin; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Deininger, Michael; Devine, Steven; Fathi, Amir T.; Gotlib, Jason; Jagasia, Madan; Kropf, Patricia; Moore, Joseph O.; Pallera, Arnel

    2013-01-01

    The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1...

  16. Rapid and sensitive detection of novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral-flow device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyue Ge

    Full Text Available A severe disease in humans caused by a novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged in China recently, which has caused at least 128 cases and 26 deaths. Rapid detection of the novel H7N9 virus is urgently needed to differentiate the disease from other infections, and to facilitate infection control as well as epidemiologic investigations. In this study, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow device (RT-LAMP-LFD assay to rapidly detect H7N9 virus was developed and evaluated. The RT-LAMP primers were designed to target the haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of H7N9 virus. Results of 10-fold dilution series assays showed that analysis of RT-LAMP products by the LFD method was as sensitive as real-time turbidity detection, and that the analytic sensitivities of the HA and NA RT-LAMP assays were both 10 copies of synthetic RNA. Furthermore, both the assays showed 100% clinical specificity for identification of H7N9 virus. The performance characteristics of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were evaluated with 80 clinical specimens collected from suspected H7N9 patients. The NA RT-LAMP-LFD assay was more sensitive than real time RT-PCR assay. Compared with a combination of virus culture and real-time RT-PCR, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were all 100%. Overall, The RT-LAMP-LFD assay established in this study can be used as a reliable method for early diagnosis of the avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus infection.

  17. Wild-type and specific mutant androgen receptor mediates transcription via 17β-estradiol in sex hormone-sensitive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Takao; Ikaga, Reina; Kajitani, Takashi; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Okinaga, Hiroko; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Okazaki, Tomoki

    2015-07-01

    We previously encountered regulatory processes wherein dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exerted its inhibitory effect on parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene repression through the estrogen receptor (ER)α, but not the androgen receptor (AR), in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we investigated whether such aberrant ligand-nuclear receptor (NR) interaction is present in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. First, we confirmed that LNCaP cells expressed large amounts of AR at negligible levels of ERα/β or progesterone receptor. Both suppression of PTHrP and activation of prostate-specific antigen genes were observed after independent administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), DHT, or R5020. Consistent with the notion that the LNCaP AR lost its ligand specificity due to a mutation (Thr-Ala877), experiments with siRNA targeting the respective NR revealed that the AR monopolized the role of the mediator of shared hormone-dependent regulation, which was invariably associated with nuclear translocation of this mutant AR. Microarray analysis of gene regulation by DHT, E2, or R5020 disclosed that more than half of the genes downstream of the AR (Thr-Ala877) overlapped in the LNCaP cells. Of particular interest, we realized that the AR (wild-type [wt]) and AR (Thr-Ala877) were equally responsible for the E2-AR interactions. Fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated that both EGFP-AR (wt) and EGFP-AR (Thr-Ala877) were exclusively localized within the nucleus after E2 or DHT treatment. Furthermore, reporter assays revealed that some other cancer cells exhibited aberrant E2-AR (wt) signaling similar to that in the LNCaP cells. We herein postulate the presence of entangled interactions between wt AR and E2 in certain hormone-sensitive cancer cells.

  18. A label-free and enzyme-free ultra-sensitive transcription factors biosensor using DNA-templated copper nanoparticles as fluorescent indicator and hairpin DNA cascade reaction as signal amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Liang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2016-08-15

    Detection and quantification of specific protein with ultralow concentration play a crucial role in biotechnological applications and biomedical diagnostics. In this paper, a label-free and enzyme-free amplified fluorescent biosensor has been developed for transcription factors detection based on AT-rich double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles (ds DNA/Cu NPs) and hairpin DNA cascade reaction. This strategy was demonstrated by using nuclear factor-kappa B p50 (NF-κB p50) and specific recognition sequences as a model case. In this assay, a triplex consists of double-stranded DNA containing NF-κB p50 specifically binding sequences and a special design single-stranded DNA (Trigger) which is able to activate the hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In the presence of NF-κB p50, the triplex became unstable since the target bound to the recognition sequences with strong affinity. The selective binding event confirmed that the Trigger was successfully released from the triplex and initiated HDCA to yield the product which could effectively template the formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. The experimental results revealed that the advanced strategy was ultra-sensitive for detecting NF-κB p50 in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 pM with a detection limit of 0.096 pM. In addition, the relative standard deviation was 4.08% in 3 repetitive assays of 500 pM NF-κB p50, which indicated that the reproducibility of this strategy was acceptable. Besides desirable sensitivity, the developed biosensor also showed high selectivity, cost-effective, and simplified operations. In addition, the proposed biosensing platform is versatile. By conjugating with various specific recognition units, it could hold considerable potential to sensitive and selective detect various DNA-binding proteins and might find wide applications in biomedical fields.

  19. Newly emerging mutations in the matrix genes of the human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses reduce the detection sensitivity of real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Huang, Hsiang-Yi; Wu, Fu-Ting; Huang, Yi-Lung; Cheng, Chieh-Yu; Su, Yu-Ting; Chang, Feng-Yee; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    New variants of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses were detected in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. Some of these variants were not detected in clinical specimens using a common real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay that targeted the conserved regions of the viral matrix (M) genes. An analysis of the M gene sequences of the new variants revealed that several newly emerging mutations were located in the regions where the primers or probes of the real-time RT-PCR assay bind; these included three mutations (G225A, T228C, and G238A) in the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, as well as one mutation (C163T) in the A(H3N2) virus. These accumulated mismatch mutations, together with the previously identified C154T mutation of the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus and the C153T and G189T mutations of the A(H3N2) virus, result in a reduced detection sensitivity for the real-time RT-PCR assay. To overcome the loss of assay sensitivity due to mismatch mutations, we established a real-time RT-PCR assay using degenerate nucleotide bases in both the primers and probe and successfully increased the sensitivity of the assay to detect circulating variants of the human influenza A viruses. Our observations highlight the importance of the simultaneous use of different gene-targeting real-time RT-PCR assays for the clinical diagnosis of influenza.

  20. Allele-specific suppression of the temperature sensitivity of fitA/fitB mutants of Escherichia coli by a new mutation (fitC4): isolation, characterization and its implications in transcription control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Vidya; B Praveen Kamalakar; M Hussain Munavar; L Sathish Kumar; R Jayaraman

    2006-03-01

    The temperature sensitive transcription defective mutant of Escherichia coli originally called fitA76 has been shown to harbour two missense mutations namely pheS5 and fit95. In order to obtain a suppressor of fitA76, possibly mapping in rpoD locus, a Ts+ derivative (JV4) was isolated from a fitA76 mutant. It was found that JV4 neither harbours the lesions present in the original fitA76 nor a suppressor that maps in or near rpoD. We show that JV4 harbours a modified form of fitA76 (designated fitA76*) together with its suppressor. The results presented here indicate that the fit95 lesion is intact in the fitA76* mutant and the modification should be at the position of pheS5. Based on the cotransduction of the suppressor mutation and/or its wild type allele with pps, aroD and zdj-3124::Tn10 kan we have mapped its location to 39⋅01 min on the E. coli chromosome. We tentatively designate the locus defined by this new extragenic suppressor as fitC and the suppressor allele as fitC4. While fitC4 could suppress the Ts phenotype of fitA76* present in JV4, it fails to suppress the Ts phenotype of the original fitA76 mutant (harbouring pheS5 and fit95). Also fitC4 could suppress the Ts phenotype of a strain harbouring only pheS5. Interestingly, the fitC4 Ts phenotype could also be suppressed by fit95. The pattern of decay of pulse labelled RNA in the strains harbouring fitC4 and the fitA76* resembles that of the original fitA76 mutant implying a transcription defect similar to that of fitA76 in both these mutants. The implications of these findings with special reference to transcription control by Fit factors in vivo are discussed.

  1. Detection of BCR/ABL Fusion Gene in Interphase Cens with Bi-labelling Hybridization in Situ%双标记原位杂交法检测间期细胞BCR/ABL融合基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁长吉; 王建伟; 李舜华; 易永林

    2003-01-01

    目的:应用双标记原位杂交方法检测BCR/ABL融合基因.方法:BCR基因探针用地高辛标记,碱性磷酸酶显色;ABL基因用3H-dATP标记,核子乳胶放射自显影.结果:检测9例初治的慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)病人均为阳性,阳性细胞比例为93%;检测CML来源的K562细胞株阳性细胞占98.8%;正常人假阳性率为0.75%.结论:该方法简便、快速,适用于CML微小残留病的检测.

  2. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity reduces imatinib uptake and efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jueqiong; Lu, Liu; Kok, Chung H; Saunders, Verity A; Goyne, Jarrad M; Dang, Phuong; Leclercq, Tamara M; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2017-02-02

    Imatinib is actively transported by OCT-1 influx transporter, and low OCT-1 activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia blood mononuclear cells is significantly associated with poor molecular response to imatinib. Here we report that, in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells and BCR-ABL1+ cell lines, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (GW1929, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) significantly decrease OCT-1 activity; conversely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists (GW9662, T0070907) increase OCT-1 activity. Importantly, these effects can lead to corresponding changes in sensitivity to Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. Results were confirmed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-transduced K562 cells. Furthermore, we identified a strong negative correlation between OCT-1 activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma transcriptional activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia patients (n=84; preceptor gamma activation has a negative impact on the intracellular uptake of imatinib and consequent Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. The inter-patient variability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation likely accounts for the heterogeneity observed in patient OCT-1 activity at diagnosis. Recently, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone was reported to act synergistically with imatinib targeting the residual chronic myeloid leukemia stem cell pool. Our findings suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands have differential effects on circulating mononuclear cells compared to stem cells. Since the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation on imatinib uptake in mononuclear cells may counteract the clinical benefit of this activation in stem cells, caution should be applied when combining these therapies, especially in patients with high peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

  3. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML.

  4. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, histopathology, and immunohistochemical labeling for the detection of Rift Valley fever virus in naturally infected cattle and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendaal, Lieza; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Romito, Marco; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Clift, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), histopathology, and immunohistochemical labeling (IHC) were performed on liver specimens from 380 naturally infected cattle and sheep necropsied during the 2010 Rift Valley fever (RVF) epidemic in South Africa. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of real-time RT-PCR, histopathology, and IHC were estimated in a latent-class model using a Bayesian framework. The Se and Sp of real-time RT-PCR were estimated as 97.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.2-98.8%) and 71.7% (95% CI = 65-77.9%) respectively. The Se and Sp of histopathology were estimated as 94.6% (95% CI = 91-97.2%) and 92.3% (95% CI = 87.6-95.8%), respectively. The Se and Sp of IHC were estimated as 97.6% (95% CI = 93.9-99.8%) and 99.4% (95% CI = 96.9-100%), respectively. Decreased Sp of real-time RT-PCR was ascribed to cross-contamination of samples. Stratified analysis of the data suggested variations in test accuracy with fetuses and severely autolyzed specimens. The Sp of histopathology in fetuses (83%) was 9.3% lower than the sample population (92.3%). The Se of IHC decreased from 97.6% to 81.5% in the presence of severe autolysis. The diagnostic Se and Sp of histopathology was higher than expected, confirming the value of routine postmortem examinations and histopathology of liver specimens. Aborted fetuses, however, should be screened using a variety of tests in areas endemic for RVF, and results from severely autolyzed specimens should be interpreted with caution. The most feasible testing option for countries lacking suitably equipped laboratories seems to be routine histology in combination with IHC.

  5. The role of Ikaros transcriptional factor in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis: biological and clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Vshivkoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the pathogenesis and factors effecting recurrence, progression and drug resistance in acute leukemia (AL remains a major challenge for hematology and other related areas. The role of more than 50 genes and proteins in the AL pathogenesis has been shown, including the well-studied tumor suppressor (CDKN2A/CDKN2B, RB1, PTEN, p53, and classical fusion genes (BCR/ABL1, TEL/AML1, E2A/PBX, MLL translocations. In addition, high frequency of aberrations in genes responsible for lymphoid differentiation have been identified such as transcription factors (PAX5, IKZF1 and EBF1, transcriptional regulation of the genes (ETV6, ERG, and signaling pathways of antigen receptors (BTLA, CD200, TOX, BLNK, VPREB1, as well as genes involved in chemoresistance of leukemia cells (NR3C1. In recent studies, Ikaros abnormalities have been reported to be frequently associated with AL. Ikaros is a member of a Kruppel-like family of zinc finger transcription factors that also includes IKZF2 (Helios, IKZF3 (Aiolos, Eos and Pegasus, and encoded by the IKZF1 gene. In hematopoietic cells Ikaros functions as a transcription factor, a key protein controlling T-, B-, NK-, and dendritic cells early differentiation. At the early hematopoiesis stages, it represses the myeloid and erythroid lineages, and stimulates the lymphoid differentiation. Ikaros also normally modulates immune response and plays role of a tumor suppressor in lymphoid malignances. Data from numerous clinical studies confirmed an association between the presence of IKZF1 aberrations and B-cell and, to a lesser extent, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL development. Besides, loss of Ikaros function was associated with progression of myeloproliferative diseases to acute myeloid leukemia (AML in children. From clinical point of view, particular intragenic IKZF1 deletions and a short (non-functional protein Ikaros isoforms, which may occur as a result of intragenic deletions or aberrant splicing

  6. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  7. Electrochemical branched-DNA assay for polymerase chain reaction-free detection and quantification of oncogenes in messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Cheng; Dai, Ziyu; Chen, Baowei; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-12-15

    We describe a novel electrochemical branched-DNA (bDNA) assay for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-free detection and quantification of p185 BCR-ABL leukemia fusion transcripts in the population of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) extracted from cell lines. The bDNA amplifier carrying high loading of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) tracers was used to amplify the target signal. The targets were captured on microplate well surfaces through cooperative sandwich hybridization prior to the labeling of bDNA. The activity of captured ALP was monitored by square-wave voltammetric (SWV) analysis of the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 1-naphthyl phosphate. The voltammetric characteristics of substrate and enzymatic product as well as the parameters of SWV analysis were systematically optimized. A detection limit of 1 fM (1 x 10(-19) mol of target transcripts in 100 microL) and a 3-order-wide dynamic range of target concentration were achieved by the electrochemical bDNA assay. Such limit corresponded to approximately 17 fg of the p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcripts. The specificity and sensitivity of assay enabled direct detection of target transcripts in as little as 4.6 ng of mRNA population without PCR amplification. In combination with the use of a well-quantified standard, the electrochemical bDNA assay was capable of direct use for a PCR-free quantitative analysis of target transcripts in mRNA population. A mean transcript copy number of 62,900/ng of mRNA was determined, which was at least 50-fold higher than that of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The finding was consistent with the underestimation of targets by qPCR reported earlier. In addition, the unique design based on bDNA technology increases the assay specificity as only the p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcripts will respond to the detection. The approach thus provides a simple, sensitive, accurate, and quantitative tool alternative to the qPCR for early disease diagnosis.

  8. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  9. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  10. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  11. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  12. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  13. Using both strands: The fundamental nature of antisense transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Mellor, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding transcription across the antisense strands of genes is an abundant, pervasive process in eukaryotes from yeast to humans, however its biological function remains elusive. Here, we provide commentary on a recent study of ours, which demonstrates a genome-wide role for antisense transcription: establishing a unique, dynamic chromatin architecture over genes. Antisense transcription increases the level of nucleosome occupancy and histone acetylation at the promoter and body of genes, without necessarily modulating the level of protein-coding sense transcription. It is also associated with high levels of histone turnover. By allowing genes to sample a wider range of chromatin configurations, antisense transcription could serve to make genes more sensitive to changing signals, priming them for responses to developmental programs or stressful cellular environments. Given the abundance of antisense transcription and the breadth of these chromatin changes, we propose that antisense transcription represents a fundamental, canonical feature of eukaryotic genes.

  14. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  15. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  16. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  17. Biological properties of leukemia cell-derived exosome and anti-leukemia effects of its sensitized DCs%白血病细胞来源胞外体的生物学特性及其致敏DC的抗白血病效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚烨; 王椿; 沈畅; 陈琳军; 邓晓辉; 郝思国

    2013-01-01

    目的:探索白血病细胞来源的胞外体(leukemia cell-derived exosome,LEX)的生物学特性及其致敏DC的抗白血病免疫效应.方法:超速离心分离纯化BCR-ABL阳性的白血病K562细胞来源的胞外体(LEXK562),采用免疫电镜及Western blotting检测LEXK562中热激蛋白70(heat shock protein 70,HSP70)及BCR-ABL的表达,采用激光扫描共聚焦显微镜及流式细胞术检测LEXK562靶向结合DC的动力学,采用LDH释放法以及小鼠模型体内实验检测LEX及其致敏DC的抗白血病免疫效应.结果:与其他细胞来源的胞外体相似,K562细胞来源的胞外体LEXK562为直径50 ~ 100 nm的囊状结构,且表达K562细胞特异性的BCR-ABL和HSP70分子.LEXK562在体外可靶向结合DC,3~4h到达高峰,并能在DC中稳定存在72 h以上.LEXK562致敏DC(DC/LEXK562)诱导的细胞毒性T淋巴细胞(cytotoxic T lymphocyte,CTL)可有效杀伤K562靶细胞,效靶比为50:1时,其杀伤活性显著高于LEXK562诱导的CTL[(68.6±5.7)%vs(22.5±2.9)%,P<0.01];体内实验进一步证实,白血病L1210细胞来源的胞外体(LEXL1210)免疫后小鼠接种L1210细胞的成瘤率明显高于LEXL1210致敏DC(DC/LEXL1210)免疫小鼠的成瘤率[(54.17±8.33)%vs(16.67±4.18)%,P<0.05].结论:LEX表达白血病细胞相关抗原,LEX体外可靶向结合DC,其致敏的DC能诱导更强的抗白血病免疫效应.%Objective: To explore the biological properties of leukemia cell-derived exosomes (LEXs) and the anti-leukemia immunological effect of LEX-sensitized dendritic cells ( DCs). Methods: LEX from BCR-ABL positive leukemia K562 cells was separated and purified by ultracentrifugation. The expressions of heat shock protein 70 ( HSP70) and BCR-ABL were investigated by immuno-electron microscopy and Western blotting. The kinetics of LEXk562 targeted binding to DCs was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The anti-leukemia immunological effect of LEX and its sensitized DCs was

  18. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  19. Two novel imatinib-responsive PDGFRA fusion genes in chronic eosinophilic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Claire E; Grand, Francis H; Musto, Pellegrino; Clark, Andrew; Murphy, John; Perla, Gianni; Minervini, Maria M; Stewart, Janet; Reiter, Andreas; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2007-07-01

    We identified two patients with a t(2;4)(p24;q12) and a t(4;12)(q2?3;p1?2), respectively, in association with BCR-ABL and FIP1L1-PDGFRA negative chronic eosinophilic leukaemia. Molecular analysis revealed a novel STRN-PDGFRA fusion for the t(2;4) and ETV6-PDGFRA for the t(4;12). The fusions were confirmed by specific amplification of the genomic breakpoints, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Both patients were treated with imatinib and, following a rapid haematological response, achieved cytogenetic remission and a major molecular response. In conclusion, PDGFRA fuses to diverse partner genes in myeloid disorders. Identification of these fusions is important as they are particularly sensitive to imatinib.

  20. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  1. RNA quantification using gold nanoprobes - application to cancer diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptista Pedro V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular nanodiagnostics applied to cancer may provide rapid and sensitive detection of cancer related molecular alterations, which would enable early detection even when those alterations occur only in a small percentage of cells. The use of gold nanoparticles derivatized with thiol modified oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes for the detection of specific nucleic acid targets has been gaining momentum as an alternative to more traditional methodologies. Here, we present an Au-nanoparticles based approach for the molecular recognition and quantification of the BCR-ABL fusion transcript (mRNA, which is responsible for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and to the best of our knowledge it is the first time quantification of a specific mRNA directly in cancer cells is reported. This inexpensive and very easy to perform Au-nanoprobe based method allows quantification of unamplified total human RNA and specific detection of the oncogene transcript. The sensitivity settled by the Au-nanoprobes allows differential gene expression from 10 ng/μl of total RNA and takes less than 30 min to complete after total RNA extraction, minimizing RNA degradation. Also, at later stages, accumulation of malignant mutations may lead to resistance to chemotherapy and consequently poor outcome. Such a method, allowing for fast and direct detection and quantification of the chimeric BCR-ABL mRNA, could speed up diagnostics and, if appropriate, revision of therapy. This assay may constitute a promising tool in early diagnosis of CML and could easily be extended to further target genes with proven involvement in cancer development.

  2. Rhythm quantization for transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.; Desain, P.W.M.; Kappen, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Automatic Music Transcription is the extraction of an acceptable notation from performed music. One important task in this problem is rhythm quantization which refers to categorization of note durations. Although quantization of a pure mechanical performance is rather straightforward, the task becom

  3. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  4. Transcription Dynamics in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Rodriguez, Joseph; Chen, Huimin; Larson, Daniel R

    2016-07-01

    The transcription cycle can be roughly divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Understanding the molecular events that regulate all these stages requires a dynamic view of the underlying processes. The development of techniques to visualize and quantify transcription in single living cells has been essential in revealing the transcription kinetics. They have revealed that (a) transcription is heterogeneous between cells and (b) transcription can be discontinuous within a cell. In this review, we discuss the progress in our quantitative understanding of transcription dynamics in living cells, focusing on all parts of the transcription cycle. We present the techniques allowing for single-cell transcription measurements, review evidence from different organisms, and discuss how these experiments have broadened our mechanistic understanding of transcription regulation.

  5. Timing of transcriptional quiescence during gametogenesis is controlled by global histone H3K4 demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengshu; Soloveychik, Maria; Ranger, Mathieu; Schertzberg, Michael; Shah, Zarna; Raisner, Ryan; Venkatasubrahmanyan, Shivkumar; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Hughes, Tim; van Bakel, Harm; Nislow, Corey; Madhani, Hiten D; Meneghini, Marc D

    2012-11-13

    Gametes are among the most highly specialized cells produced during development. Although gametogenesis culminates in transcriptional quiescence in plants and animals, regulatory mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here, we confirm that gamete differentiation in the single-celled yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is accompanied by global transcriptional shutoff following the completion of meiosis. We show that Jhd2, a highly conserved JARID1-family histone H3K4 demethylase, activates protein-coding gene transcription in opposition to this programmed transcriptional shutoff, sustaining the period of productive transcription during spore differentiation. Moreover, using genome-wide nucleosome, H3K4me, and transcript mapping experiments, we demonstrate that JHD2 globally represses intergenic noncoding transcription during this period. The widespread transcriptional defects of JHD2 mutants are associated with precocious differentiation and the production of stress-sensitive spores, demonstrating that Jhd2 regulation of the global postmeiotic transcriptional program is critical for the production of healthy meiotic progeny.

  6. Effect of nuclear transcription factor RelB on the proteasome inhibitor-sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells%核转录因子RelB对慢性B淋巴细胞白血病细胞蛋白酶体抑制剂敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晶晶; 周鹏; 孙爱宁; 国风

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of nuclear transcription factor RelB on the proteasome inhibitor-sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.Methods The mRNA expression of RelB in CD5 + CD19 + CLL cells from BM was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR).The RelB activity was examined by electromobility shift assay (EMSA) and an ELISA-based NF-κd3 family transcription factor activity assay.CLL cells were classified into RelB+ and RelB-groups according to RelB activity.The frequencies of cell death of CLL cells cultured with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) after treatment with PS-341,MG-132 or fludarabine were determined by PI staining.Results RelB mRNA expression and RelB activity could be detected in CLL cells at variable levels.Fludarabine (10 μmol/L),MG-132 (1 μmol/L) and PS-341 (1 μmol/L) could induce cell death of RelB+ and RelB-CLL cells co-cultured with hBMSCs in a time dependent manner.There was no significant difference in the fludarabine sensitivity between RelB + and RelB-CLL cells,and the frequencies of cell death of RelB+ and RelB-CLL cells were (61.11 ±6.91)% and (67.57±9.45)%,respectively,when treated with fludarabine for 72 h.RelB+ CLL cells were more sensitive to MG-132 than RelB-CLL cells for 72 h,and the frequencies of cell death were (66.22±3.39) % and (51.07±5.93) %,respectively.RelB+ CLL cells were more sensitive to PS-341 than RelB CLL cells for 24 and 48 h treatment,and the frequencies of cell death of RelB+ and RelB-CLL cells were (75.50±4.66)% and (66.32±10.20)% for 24 h,(92.11±3.14)% and (85.84 ± 5.81)% for 48 h treatment,respectively.Conclusion The alternative NF-κB activity was detected in bone marrow derived CLL cells.Enhancement of RelB activity may increase CLL cells' sensitivity to proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and MG-132.However,the sensitivity of CLL cells to fludarabine had no relationship to RelB activity.%目的 探讨核转录因子RelB对慢性B淋巴细胞白血

  7. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.

  8. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  9. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  10. SNFing HIV transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukrinsky Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is an essential regulator of transcription of cellular genes. HIV-1 infection induces exit of a core component of SWI/SNF, Ini1, into the cytoplasm and its association with the viral pre-integration complex. Several recent papers published in EMBO Journal, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Retrovirology provide new information regarding possible functions of Ini1 and SWI/SNF in HIV life cycle. It appears that Ini1 has an inhibitory effect on pre-integration steps of HIV replication, but also contributes to stimulation of Tat-mediated transcription. This stimulation involves displacement of the nucleosome positioned at the HIV promoter.

  11. Climate Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindzen, Richard [M.I.T.

    2011-11-09

    Warming observed thus far is entirely consistent with low climate sensitivity. However, the result is ambiguous because the sources of climate change are numerous and poorly specified. Model predictions of substantial warming aredependent on positive feedbacks associated with upper level water vapor and clouds, but models are notably inadequate in dealing with clouds and the impacts of clouds and water vapor are intimately intertwined. Various approaches to measuring sensitivity based on the physics of the feedbacks will be described. The results thus far point to negative feedbacks. Problems with these approaches as well as problems with the concept of climate sensitivity will be described.

  12. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in other products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different from celiac disease, an immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage ...

  13. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  14. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    in different cell types. This thesis presents several methods for analysis and description of promoters. We focus particularly the binding sites of TFs and computational methods for locating these. We contribute to the ¿eld by compiling a database of binding preferences for TFs which can be used for site...... published providing an unbiased overview of the transcription start site (TSS) usage in a tissue. We have paired this method with high-throughput sequencing technology to produce a library of unprecedented depth (DeepCAGE) for the mouse hippocampus. We investigated this in detail and focused particularly...

  15. Path Sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵著行; 闵应骅; 等

    1997-01-01

    For different delay models,the concept of sensitization can be very different.Traditonal concepts of sensitization cannot precisely describe circuit behavior when the input vectors change very fast.Using Boolean process aporoach,this paper presents a new definition of sensitization for arbitrary input waveforms.By this new concept it is found that if the inputs of a combinational circuit can change at any time,and each gate's delay varies within an interval (bounded gate delay model),then every path,which is not necessarily a single topological path,is sensitizable.From the experimental results it can be seen that,all nonsensitizable paths for traditional concepts actually can propagate transitions along them for some input waveforms.However,specified time between input transitions(STBIT) and minimum permissible pulse width(ε)are two major factors to make some paths non-sensitizable.

  16. A Preliminary Study of the Suitability of Archival Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Smears for Diagnosis of CML Using FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charwudzi, Alice; Olayemi, Edeghonghon E; Ekem, Ivy; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Coyle, Mariann; Benneh, Amma Anima; Allotey, Emmanuel Alote

    2014-01-01

    Background. FISH is a molecular cytogenetic technique enabling rapid detection of genetic abnormalities. Facilities that can run fresh/wet samples for molecular diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic disorders are not readily available in Ghana and other neighbouring countries. This study aims to demonstrate that interphase FISH can successfully be applied to archival methanol-fixed bone marrow and peripheral blood smear slides transported to a more equipped facility for molecular diagnosis of CML. Methods. Interphase FISH was performed on 22 archival methanol-fixed marrow (BM) and 3 peripheral blood (PB) smear slides obtained at diagnosis. The BM smears included 20 CML and 2 CMML cases diagnosed by morphology; the 3 PB smears were from 3 of the CML patients at the time of diagnosis. Six cases had known BCR-ABL fusion results at diagnosis by RQ-PCR. Full blood count reports at diagnosis were also retrieved. Result. 19 (95%) of the CML marrow smears demonstrated the BCR-ABL translocation. There was a significant correlation between the BCR-ABL transcript detected at diagnosis by RQ-PCR and that retrospectively detected by FISH from the aged BM smears at diagnosis (r = 0.870; P = 0.035). Conclusion. Archival methanol-fixed marrow and peripheral blood smears can be used to detect the BCR-ABL transcript for CML diagnosis.

  17. A Preliminary Study of the Suitability of Archival Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Smears for Diagnosis of CML Using FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Charwudzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. FISH is a molecular cytogenetic technique enabling rapid detection of genetic abnormalities. Facilities that can run fresh/wet samples for molecular diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic disorders are not readily available in Ghana and other neighbouring countries. This study aims to demonstrate that interphase FISH can successfully be applied to archival methanol-fixed bone marrow and peripheral blood smear slides transported to a more equipped facility for molecular diagnosis of CML. Methods. Interphase FISH was performed on 22 archival methanol-fixed marrow (BM and 3 peripheral blood (PB smear slides obtained at diagnosis. The BM smears included 20 CML and 2 CMML cases diagnosed by morphology; the 3 PB smears were from 3 of the CML patients at the time of diagnosis. Six cases had known BCR-ABL fusion results at diagnosis by RQ-PCR. Full blood count reports at diagnosis were also retrieved. Result. 19 (95% of the CML marrow smears demonstrated the BCR-ABL translocation. There was a significant correlation between the BCR-ABL transcript detected at diagnosis by RQ-PCR and that retrospectively detected by FISH from the aged BM smears at diagnosis (r=0.870; P=0.035. Conclusion. Archival methanol-fixed marrow and peripheral blood smears can be used to detect the BCR-ABL transcript for CML diagnosis.

  18. Monitoring of bcr/abl Fusion Gene by Interphase-Dual-Color and Dual-Fusion Fluorescence in situ Hybridization in CML after Allo-HSCT%间期双色双融合荧光原位杂交监测慢性髓系白血病异基因造血干细胞移植后bcr/abl融合基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱思轩; 李建勇; 张闰; 洪鸣; 仇海荣; 李丽; 徐卫; 盛瑞兰; 吴汉新

    2006-01-01

    本研究探讨bcr/abl双色双融合荧光原位杂交(DD-FISH)的敏感性及临床应用价值.对19例慢性髓细胞白血病(CML)异基因造血干细胞移植(allo-HSCT)后微小残留病灶(MRD)用DD-FISH进行监测,同时与常规细胞遗传学(CC)、逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)结果相比较.样本取自骨髓,少数来源于骨髓片或外周血.结果表明:14例CML患者在Allo-HSCT后CC显示持续正常供者核型,RT-PCR转为阴性,移植2月后均为完全供者嵌合(DC),DD-FISH检测结果持续为阴性,平均随访11.25月,MRD无增加.1例CC及RT-PCR阴性,而性染色体FISH为混合嵌合,DD-FISH阳性,监测无MRD增加,临床未治疗,疾病稳定.3例骨髓复发患者的DD-FISH及性染色体FISH均提示MRD明显增加,RT-PCR转为阳性,却只有1例CC异常,供者淋巴细胞输注(DLI)及甲磺酸伊马替尼治疗后均为DC,DD-FISH阴性,RT-PCR阴性.1例骨活检证实髓外复发患者骨髓或外周血样本的DD-FISH、CC及PCR均阴性,供受者完全嵌合.结论:间期双色双融合FISH可应用于CML异基因造血干细胞移植后MRD的监测,其操作简易快速,灵敏度高,且骨髓或外周血均可采用.动态监测能及时发现扩大的白血病细胞克隆.

  19. Role of the three-dimensional distribution of abl and bcr genes in the formation of bcr/abl fusion gene in interphase neucleus%间期细胞核中abl和bcr基因的三维空间分布在bcr/abl融合基因形成中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青; 周淑芸; 刘晓力; 牛超; 徐岚; 陈赛娟

    2002-01-01

    目的从生物体视学角度分析bcr/abl融合基因的形成机制.方法应用荧光原位杂交和激光共聚焦扫描显微镜技术,观察γ-射线对IM9细胞中的bcr和abl基因在间期核内三维空间分布的影响.结果abl和bcr基因在间期核内有其特定的分布区域,且该分布区域在细胞周期中呈规律性的动态变化.放射性照射会使abl和bcr基因之间的距离缩短.结论abl和bcr基因在间期细胞核内的易接近性是bcr/abl融合基因形成的因素之一.

  20. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  1. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  2. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  3. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...... in the area of mental health (Dupret Søndergaard 2009, 2010). The concept of sensitive innovation is developed to capture and conceptualise exactly those heterogenic and intangible processes. Sensitive innovation is therefore primarily a way to understand innovative sources that can be......, but are not necessarily, recognized and acknowledged as such in the outer organisational culture or by management. The added value that qualifies these processes to be defined as “innovative” are thus argued for along different lines than in more traditional innovation studies (e.g. studies that build on the classic...

  4. 7SK-BAF axis controls pervasive transcription at enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan A; Do, Brian T; Rubin, Adam J; Calo, Eliezer; Lee, Byron; Kuchelmeister, Hannes; Rale, Michael; Chu, Ci; Kool, Eric T; Wysocka, Joanna; Khavari, Paul A; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-03-01

    RNA functions at enhancers remain mysterious. Here we show that the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating nucleosome position. 7SK occupies enhancers and super enhancers genome wide in mouse and human cells, and it is required to limit enhancer-RNA initiation and synthesis in a manner distinct from promoter pausing. Clustered elements at super enhancers uniquely require 7SK to prevent convergent transcription and DNA-damage signaling. 7SK physically interacts with the BAF chromatin-remodeling complex, recruits BAF to enhancers and inhibits enhancer transcription by modulating chromatin structure. In turn, 7SK occupancy at enhancers coincides with that of Brd4 and is exquisitely sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Thus, 7SK uses distinct mechanisms to counteract the diverse consequences of pervasive transcription that distinguish super enhancers, enhancers and promoters.

  5. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A post-transcriptional operon is a set of monocistronic mRNAs encoding functionally related proteins that are co-regulated by a group of RNA-binding proteins and/or small non-coding RNAs so that protein expression is coordinated at the post-transcriptional level. The post-transcriptional operon...... model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...

  6. Mastering Transcription: Multiplexed Analysis of Transcription Start Site Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochschild, Ann

    2015-12-17

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Vvedenskaya et al. (2015) describe a high-throughput sequencing-based methodology for the massively parallel analysis of transcription from a high-complexity barcoded template library both in vitro and in vivo, providing a powerful new tool for the study of transcription.

  7. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional profile of human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Deutsch, Samuel; Genolet, Raphael; Borel, Christelle; Parand, Leila; Ucla, Catherine; Schütz, Frederic; Duriaux Sail, Genevieve; Dupré, Yann; Jaquier-Gubler, Pascale; Araud, Tanguy; Conne, Beatrice; Descombes, Patrick; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Curran, Joseph; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated extensive transcriptional activity across the human genome, a substantial fraction of which is not associated with any functional annotation. However, very little is known regarding the post-transcriptional processes that operate within the different classes of RNA molecules. To characterize the post-transcriptional properties of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21 (HSA21), we separated RNA molecules from three cell lines (GM06990, HeLa S3, and SK-N-AS) according to their ribosome content by sucrose gradient fractionation. Polyribosomal-associated RNA and total RNA were subsequently hybridized to genomic tiling arrays. We found that approximately 50% of the transcriptional signals were located outside of annotated exons and were considered as TARs (transcriptionally active regions). Although TARs were observed among polysome-associated RNAs, RT-PCR and RACE experiments revealed that approximately 40% were likely to represent nonspecific cross-hybridization artifacts. Bioinformatics discrimination of TARs according to conservation and sequence complexity allowed us to identify a set of high-confidence TARs. This set of TARs was significantly depleted in the polysomes, suggesting that it was not likely to be involved in translation. Analysis of polysome representation of RefSeq exons showed that at least 15% of RefSeq transcripts undergo significant post-transcriptional regulation in at least two of the three cell lines tested. Among the regulated transcripts, enrichment analysis revealed an over-representation of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including APP and the BACE1 protease that cleaves APP to produce the pathogenic beta 42 peptide. We demonstrate that the combination of RNA fractionation and tiling arrays is a powerful method to assess the transcriptional and post-transcriptional properties of genomic regions.

  8. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  9. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-d

  10. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is regulated by a complex cascade of signals that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of the fibroblastic precursors. Genome-wide analyses of chromatin accessibility and binding of adipogenic transcription factors make it possible to generate "snapshots" of the trans...

  11. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...... to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy....

  12. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  13. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  14. DNA supercoiling and aerobic regulation of transcription from the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifLA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R A; Henderson, N C; Austin, S

    1988-11-11

    Expression from the K. pneumoniae nifLA promoter is oxygen sensitive and is also inhibited by the DNA gyrase inhibitor coumermycin A1 under anaerobic growth conditions. The activity of this promoter was found to be highly sensitive to changes in DNA topology in vitro. Transcription was completely dependent on negative supercoiling at physiological salt concentrations although transcription from linear or fully relaxed closed circular templates was detectable at KCl concentrations lower than 50 mM. These observations suggest that aerobic regulation of nif transcription may be mediated through the level of DNA supercoiling.

  15. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics in nuclei of vasopressin-sensitive renal collecting duct cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bolger, Steven J.; Hurtado, Patricia A. Gonzales; Hoffert, Jason D.; Saeed, Fahad; Pisitkun, Trairak; Knepper, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates transport across the collecting duct epithelium in part via effects on gene transcription. Transcriptional regulation occurs partially via changes in phosphorylation of transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, and protein kinases in the nucleus. To test whether vasopressin alters the nuclear phosphoproteome of vasopressin-sensitive cultured mouse mpkCCD cells, we used stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry to quantify thousands of phosphorylation sites...

  17. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  18. Transcription without XPB Establishes a Unified Helicase-Independent Mechanism of Promoter Opening in Eukaryotic Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Sergey; Nagy, Zita; Sandoz, Jérémy; Weiss, Amélie; Egly, Jean-Marc; Le May, Nicolas; Coin, Frederic

    2017-02-02

    Transcription starts with the assembly of pre-initiation complexes on promoters followed by their opening. Current models suggest that class II gene transcription requires ATP and the TFIIH XPB subunit to open a promoter. Here, we observe that XPB depletion surprisingly leaves transcription virtually intact. In contrast, inhibition of XPB ATPase activity affects transcription, revealing that mRNA expression paradoxically accommodates the absence of XPB while being sensitive to the inhibition of its ATPase activity. The XPB-depleted TFIIH complex is recruited to active promoters and contributes to transcription. We finally demonstrate that the XPB ATPase activity is only used to relieve a transcription initiation block imposed by XPB itself. In the absence of this block, transcription initiation can take place without XPB ATPase activity. These results suggest that a helicase is dispensable for mRNA transcription, thereby unifying the mechanism of promoter DNA opening for the three eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

  19. Selective inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription as a potential approach to treat African trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Louise E.; Pegg, Elaine E.; Cameron, Donald P.; Budzak, James; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on an essential Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival in the mammalian bloodstream. High VSG expression within an expression site body (ESB) is mediated by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which in other eukaryotes exclusively transcribes ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). As T. brucei is reliant on Pol I for VSG transcription, we investigated Pol I transcription inhibitors for selective anti-trypanosomal activity. The Pol I inhibitors quarfloxin (CX-3543), CX-5461, and BMH-21 are currently under investigation for treating cancer, as rapidly dividing cancer cells are particularly dependent on high levels of Pol I transcription compared with nontransformed cells. In T. brucei all three Pol I inhibitors have IC50 concentrations for cell proliferation in the nanomolar range: quarfloxin (155 nM), CX-5461 (279 nM) or BMH-21 (134 nM) compared with IC50 concentrations in the MCF10A human breast epithelial cell line (4.44 μM, 6.89 μM or 460 nM, respectively). T. brucei was therefore 29-fold more sensitive to quarfloxin, 25-fold more sensitive to CX-5461 and 3.4-fold more sensitive to BMH-21. Cell death in T. brucei was due to rapid inhibition of Pol I transcription, as within 15 minutes treatment with the inhibitors rRNA precursor transcript was reduced 97-98% and VSG precursor transcript 91-94%. Incubation with Pol I transcription inhibitors also resulted in disintegration of the ESB as well as the nucleolus subnuclear structures, within one hour. Rapid ESB loss following the block in Pol I transcription argues that the ESB is a Pol I transcription nucleated structure, similar to the nucleolus. In addition to providing insight into Pol I transcription and ES control, Pol I transcription inhibitors potentially also provide new approaches to treat trypanosomiasis. PMID:28263991

  20. Selection acts on DNA secondary structures to decrease transcriptional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hoede

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA is more subject to mutation than double stranded. During transcription, DNA is transiently single stranded and therefore subject to higher mutagenesis. However, if local intra-strand secondary structures are formed, some bases will be paired and therefore less sensitive to mutation than unpaired bases. Using complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli, we show that local intra-strand secondary structures can, as a consequence, be used to define an index of transcription-driven mutability. At gene level, we show that natural selection has favoured a reduced transcription-driven mutagenesis via the higher than expected frequency of occurrence of intra-strand secondary structures. Such selection is stronger in highly expressed genes and suggests a sequence-dependent way to control mutation rates and a novel form of selection affecting the evolution of synonymous mutations.

  1. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  2. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Jason [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mishra, Bud [Departments of Computer Science and Mathematics, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Pittenger, Bede [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Magonov, Sergei [Veeco Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Troke, Joshua [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Teitell, Michael A [Department of Pathology and Center for Cell Control, an NIH Nanomedicine Development Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations.

  3. Assessing coral stress responses using molecular biomarkers of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M B; Vogelien, D L; Snell, T W

    2001-03-01

    We present a method for detecting rapid changes in coral gene expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level. The staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis was exposed to 1 and 10 microg/L permethrin and 25 and 50 microg/L copper for 4 h. Using differential display polymerase chain reaction (PCR), mRNA associated with each toxicant exposure were reverse transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA) fragments that were subsequently amplified and isolated. Six differentially expressed cDNA fragments were further developed into molecular probes that were used in Northern dot blots to determine the change in transcription levels of target transcripts. Changes in mRNA abundance were quantified by densitometry of chemiluminescence of digoxigenin-labeled probes hybridizing to target mRNA transcripts. The six gene probes showed varying degrees of sensitivity to the toxicants as well as specificity between toxicants. These probes were hybridized in Southern blots to genomic DNA from A. formosa sperm, which lacks zooxanthellae, to demonstrate that the genes coding for the mRNA transcripts produced are found within the coral genome. The gene probes developed in this study provide coral biologists with a new tool for coral assessment. Gene probes are sensitive, toxicant-specific biomarkers of coral stress responses with which gene sequence information can be obtained, providing a mechanism for identifying the stressor altering the gene expression.

  4. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappala, Giovanna, E-mail: zappalag@mail.nih.gov [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rechler, Matthew M. [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Clinical Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  5. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  6. How to build transcriptional network models of mammalian pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissa Kioussi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic regulatory networks of sequence specific transcription factors underlie pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Deciphering and representing the mammalian networks is a central problem in development, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine. Transcriptional networks specify intermingled embryonic cell populations during pattern formation in the vertebrate neural tube. Each embryonic population gives rise to a distinct type of adult neuron. The homeodomain transcription factor Lbx1 is expressed in five such populations and loss of Lbx1 leads to distinct respecifications in each of the five populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have purified normal and respecified pools of these five populations from embryos bearing one or two copies of the null Lbx1(GFP allele, respectively. Microarrays were used to show that expression levels of 8% of all transcription factor genes were altered in the respecified pool. These transcription factor genes constitute 20-30% of the active nodes of the transcriptional network that governs neural tube patterning. Half of the 141 regulated nodes were located in the top 150 clusters of ultraconserved non-coding regions. Generally, Lbx1 repressed genes that have expression patterns outside of the Lbx1-expressing domain and activated genes that have expression patterns inside the Lbx1-expressing domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Constraining epistasis analysis of Lbx1 to only those cells that normally express Lbx1 allowed unprecedented sensitivity in identifying Lbx1 network interactions and allowed the interactions to be assigned to a specific set of cell populations. We call this method ANCEA, or active node constrained epistasis analysis, and think that it will be generally useful in discovering and assigning network interactions to specific populations. We discuss how ANCEA, coupled with population partitioning analysis, can greatly facilitate the systematic dissection of

  7. Subventricular zone microglia transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starossom, Sarah C; Imitola, Jaime; Wang, Yue; Cao, Li; Khoury, Samia J

    2011-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. There is evidence of microglial diversity with distinct phenotypes exhibiting either neuroprotection and repair or neurotoxicity. However the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are still unknown. Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we performed transcriptional profiling of isolated subventricular zone microglia from the acute and chronic disease phases of EAE. We found that microglia exhibit disease phase specific gene expression signatures, that correspond to unique gene ontology functions and genomic networks. Our data demonstrate for the first time, distinct transcriptional networks of microglia activation in vivo, that suggests a role as mediators of injury or repair.

  8. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  9. Transcriptional effects of polyamines on ribosomal proteins and on polyamine-synthesizing enzymes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S C; Panagiotidis, C A; Canellakis, E S

    1990-05-01

    We find that the transcription of various ribosomal proteins can be differentially affected by polyamines and by changes in growth rates. Using strain MG1655 of Escherichia coli K-12 (F-, lambda-), we have determined the effects of polyamines and changes in growth rate on the transcription of several ribosomal genes and the polyamine-synthesizing enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase; EC 4.1.1.17) and arginine decarboxylase (L-arginine carboxylyase; EC 4.1.1.19). Ribosomal proteins S20 and L34 can be differentiated from the other ribosomal proteins studied; the transcription of S20 and L34 is especially sensitive to polyamines and less sensitive to changes in growth rates. In contrast, the transcription of S10, S15, S19, L2, L4, L20, L22, and L23 is insensitive to polyamines although it is particularly sensitive to changes in growth rates. Like S20 and L34, the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase is especially sensitive to polyamines. Polyamines specifically enhance the transcription of ribosomal proteins S20 and L34, and decrease that of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase. It is evident that polyamines can exert both positive and negative regulation of gene expression in E. coli that can be differentiated from the effects caused by changes in growth rates.

  10. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  11. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  12. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  13. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  14. Stepwise mechanism for transcription fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorov Savva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription is the first step of gene expression and is characterized by a high fidelity of RNA synthesis. During transcription, the RNA polymerase active centre discriminates against not just non-complementary ribo NTP substrates but also against complementary 2'- and 3'-deoxy NTPs. A flexible domain of the RNA polymerase active centre, the Trigger Loop, was shown to play an important role in this process, but the mechanisms of this participation remained elusive. Results Here we show that transcription fidelity is achieved through a multi-step process. The initial binding in the active centre is the major discrimination step for some non-complementary substrates, although for the rest of misincorporation events discrimination at this step is very poor. During the second step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are discriminated against based on differences in reaction transition state stabilization and partly in general base catalysis, for correct versus non-correct substrates. This step is determined by two residues of the Trigger Loop that participate in catalysis. In the following step, non-complementary and 2'-deoxy NTPs are actively removed from the active centre through a rearrangement of the Trigger Loop. The only step of discrimination against 3'-deoxy substrates, distinct from the ones above, is based on failure to orient the Trigger Loop catalytic residues in the absence of 3'OH. Conclusions We demonstrate that fidelity of transcription by multi-subunit RNA polymerases is achieved through a stepwise process. We show that individual steps contribute differently to discrimination against various erroneous substrates. We define the mechanisms and contributions of each of these steps to the overall fidelity of transcription.

  15. Sequential changes in chromatin structure during transcriptional activation in the beta globin LCR and its target gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihoon; Kim, AeRi

    2010-09-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during transcriptional activation. The changes include the association of transcriptional activators, formation of hypersensitive sites and covalent modifications of histones. To understand the order of the various changes accompanying transcriptional activation, we analyzed the mouse beta globin gene, which is transcriptionally inducible in erythroid MEL cells over a time course of HMBA treatment. Transcription of the globin genes requires the locus control region (LCR) consisting of several hypersensitive sites (HSs). Erythroid specific transcriptional activators such as NF-E2, GATA-1, TAL1 and EKLF were associated with the LCR in the uninduced state before transcriptional activation. The HSs of the LCR were formed in this state as revealed by high sensitivity to DNase I and MNase attack. However the binding of transcriptional activators and the depletion of histones were observed in the promoter of the beta globin gene only after transcriptional activation. In addition, various covalent histone modifications were sequentially detected in lysine residues of histone H3 during the activation. Acetylation of K9, K36 and K27 was notable in both LCR HSs and gene after induction but before transcriptional initiation. Inactive histone marks such as K9me2, K36me2 and K27me2 were removed coincident with transcriptional initiation in the gene region. Taken together, these results indicate that LCR has a substantially active structure in the uninduced state while transcriptional activation serially adds active marks, including histone modifications, and removes inactive marks in the target gene of the LCR.

  16. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Carretero, Julian; Al-shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R.; Poulsen, Hans S.; Aref, Amir R.; Barbie, David A.; Bradner, James E.; George, Rani; Gray, Nathanael S.; Young, Richard A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription factor genes including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors are highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  17. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  18. Eliminating Late Recurrence to Eradicate Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    6926–37 116. Yu WH, Cuervo AM, Kumar A, Peterhoff CM, Schmidt SD, et al. 2005. Macroautophagy—a novel β-amyloid peptide –generating pathway activated...Persistence of transcriptionally silent BCR-ABL rearrangements in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in sustained complete cytogenetic remission . Leuk Lymphoma...during interferon-induced remission in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of individual colonies. J Clin Invest. 1994; 94

  19. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  20. Transcription fluctuation effects on biochemical oscillations.

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    Ryota Nishino

    Full Text Available Some biochemical systems show oscillation. They often consist of feedback loops with repressive transcription regulation. Such biochemical systems have distinctive characteristics in comparison with ordinary chemical systems: i numbers of molecules involved are small, ii there are typically only a couple of genes in a cell with a finite regulation time. Due to the fluctuations caused by these features, the system behavior can be quite different from the one by deterministic rate equations, because the rate equations ignore molecular fluctuations and thus are exact only in the infinite molecular number limit. The molecular fluctuations on a free-running circadian system have been studied by Gonze et al. (2002 by introducing a scale parameter [Formula: see text] for the system size. They consider, however, only the first effect, assuming that the gene process is fast enough for the second effect to be ignored, but this has not been examined systematically yet. Here we study fluctuation effects due to the finite gene regulation time by introducing a new scale parameter [Formula: see text], which we take as the unbinding time of a nuclear protein from the gene. We focus on the case where the fluctuations due to small molecular numbers are negligible. In simulations on the same system studied by Gonze et al., we find the system is unexpectedly sensitive to the fluctuation in the transcription regulation; the period of oscillation fluctuates about 30 min even when the regulation time scale [Formula: see text] is around 30 s, that is even smaller than 1/1000 of its circadian period. We also demonstrate that the distribution width for the oscillation period and amplitude scales with [Formula: see text], and the correlation time scales with [Formula: see text] in the small [Formula: see text] regime. The relative fluctuations for the period are about half of that for the amplitude, namely, the periodicity is more stable than the amplitude.

  1. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  2. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  3. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  4. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  5. A unified model for yeast transcript definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Carl G; van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Li, Joyce; Morris, Quaid D; Nislow, Corey; Greenblatt, Jack F; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes in the genomic context is central to a cell's ability to interpret the genome. Yet, in general, the signals used to define eukaryotic genes are poorly described. Here, we derived simple classifiers that identify where transcription will initiate and terminate using nucleic acid sequence features detectable by the yeast cell, which we integrate into a Unified Model (UM) that models transcription as a whole. The cis-elements that denote where transcription initiates function primarily through nucleosome depletion, and, using a synthetic promoter system, we show that most of these elements are sufficient to initiate transcription in vivo. Hrp1 binding sites are the major characteristic of terminators; these binding sites are often clustered in terminator regions and can terminate transcription bidirectionally. The UM predicts global transcript structure by modeling transcription of the genome using a hidden Markov model whose emissions are the outputs of the initiation and termination classifiers. We validated the novel predictions of the UM with available RNA-seq data and tested it further by directly comparing the transcript structure predicted by the model to the transcription generated by the cell for synthetic DNA segments of random design. We show that the UM identifies transcription start sites more accurately than the initiation classifier alone, indicating that the relative arrangement of promoter and terminator elements influences their function. Our model presents a concrete description of how the cell defines transcript units, explains the existence of nongenic transcripts, and provides insight into genome evolution.

  6. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  7. TAF7: traffic controller in transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegonne, Anne; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-01-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex, controls the first steps of transcription. It interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of transcription factors that regulate RNA polymerase II progression. Its diverse functions in transcription initiation are consistent with its essential role in cell proliferation.

  8. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  9. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  10. RNA interference against transcription elongation factor SII does not support its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon-Roy, Christine; Stubbert, Lawton J; McKay, Bruce C

    2011-01-10

    RNA polymerase II is unable to bypass bulky DNA lesions induced by agents like ultraviolet light (UV light) and cisplatin that are located in the template strand of active genes. Arrested polymerases form a stable ternary complex at the site of DNA damage that is thought to pose an impediment to the repair of these lesions. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) preferentially repairs these DNA lesions through an incompletely defined mechanism. Based on elegant in vitro experiments, it was hypothesized that the transcription elongation factor IIS (TFIIS) may be required to couple transcription to repair by catalyzing the reverse translocation of the arrested polymerase, allowing access of repair proteins to the site of DNA damage. However the role of TFIIS in this repair process has not been tested in vivo. Here, silencing TFIIS using an RNA interference strategy did not affect the ability of cells to recover nascent RNA synthesis following UV exposure or the ability of cells to repair a UV-damaged reporter gene while a similar strategy to decrease the expression Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) resulted in the expected repair defect. Furthermore, RNA interference against TFIIS did not increase the sensitivity of cells to UV light or cisplatin while decreased expression of CSB did. Taken together, these results indicate that TFIIS is not limiting for the repair of transcription-blocking DNA lesions and thus the present work does not support a role for TFIIS in TC-NER.

  11. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  12. Methy-sens Comet assay and DNMTs transcriptional analysis as a combined approach in epigenotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Alessio; Rossi, Valeria; Mutti, Antonio; Buschini, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    Epigenotoxicology needs simple and fast tools to assess xenobiotic epigenetic load. This work proposes a comet assay modification designed to detect global methylation changes (Methy-sens Comet) through enzymatic digestion with two restriction enzymes (HpaII, MspI). In the methylation-sensitive protocol tested for repeatability on A549 cells, nickel chloride induced hypermethylation and decitabine-induced hypomethylation. A concomitant assessment of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) genes transcriptional levels has been performed, to implement a multifunctional approach to epigenotoxicology. Methy-sens Comet showed a general good repeatability and sensitivity to methylation changes while DNMTs transcriptional levels granted additional proof of xenobiotic-induced impairment of methylome maintenance.

  13. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  14. Transcription factories: genetic programming in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Lucas Brandon; Fraser, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Among the most intensively studied systems in molecular biology is the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus, which expresses genes in a regulated manner across hundreds of different cell types. Several studies over the past few years have added weight to the concept that transcription takes place within discrete 'transcription factories' assembled inside the cell nucleus. These studies apply innovative technical approaches to gain insights into the molecular constituents, dynamical behaviour and organizational regulators of transcription factories, providing exciting insights into the spatial dimension of transcriptional control.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  16. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  17. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  18. Exploring cellular memory molecules marking competent and active transcriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu De-Pei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development in higher eukaryotes involves programmed gene expression. Cell type-specific gene expression is established during this process and is inherited in succeeding cell cycles. Higher eukaryotes have evolved elegant mechanisms by which committed gene-expression states are transmitted through numerous cell divisions. Previous studies have shown that both DNase I-sensitive sites and the basal transcription factor TFIID remain on silenced mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that certain trans-factors might act as bookmarks, maintaining the information and transmitting it to the next generation. Results We used the mouse globin gene clusters as a model system to examine the retention of active information on M-phase chromosomes and its contribution to the persistence of transcriptional competence of these gene clusters in murine erythroleukemia cells. In cells arrested in mitosis, the erythroid-specific activator NF-E2p45 remained associated with its binding sites on the globin gene loci, while the other major erythroid factor, GATA-1, was removed from chromosome. Moreover, despite mitotic chromatin condensation, the distant regulatory regions and promoters of transcriptionally competent globin gene loci are marked by a preserved histone code consisting in active histone modifications such as H3 acetylation, H3-K4 dimethylation and K79 dimethylation. Further analysis showed that other active genes are also locally marked by the preserved active histone code throughout mitotic inactivation of transcription. Conclusion Our results imply that certain kinds of specific protein factors and active histone modifications function as cellular memory markers for both competent and active genes during mitosis, and serve as a reactivated core for the resumption of transcription when the cells exit mitosis.

  19. The transcriptional regulation of pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Chi Yeo; Huck-Hui Ng

    2013-01-01

    The defining features of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are their self-renewing and pluripotent capacities.Indeed,the ability to give rise into all cell types within the organism not only allows ESCs to function as an ideal in vitro tool to study embryonic development,but also offers great therapeutic potential within the field of regenerative medicine.However,it is also this same remarkable developmental plasticity that makes the efficient control of ESC differentiation into the desired cell type very difficult.Therefore,in order to harness ESCs for clinical applications,a detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling ESC pluripotency and lineage commitment is necessary.In this respect,through a variety of transcriptomic approaches,ESC pluripotency has been found to be regulated by a system of ESC-associated transcription factors; and the external signalling environment also acts as a key factor in modulating the ESC transcriptome.Here in this review,we summarize our current understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network in ESCs,discuss how the control of various signalling pathways could influence pluripotency,and provide a future outlook of ESC research.

  20. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  1. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  2. Yap5 is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that regulates vacuolar iron storage in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-02-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3' untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Delta strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation.

  3. Yap5 Is an Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Activator That Regulates Vacuolar Iron Storage in Yeast▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3′ untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Δ strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation. PMID:18070921

  4. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  5. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  6. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  7. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, K J; Liang, S

    2000-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg2+ binding.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  9. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears ...

  10. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  11. CDT6-expression can alter tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouis, D; Hospers, GAP; Meijer, C; Dam, W; Mulder, NH

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cornea-derived transcript 6 (CDT6 = AngX) has been shown to have an anti-tumor effect. Materials and Methods: We transfected the murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 with the CDT6 gene and compared the sensitivity to cytostatic drugs of the resulting cell line, B16-CDT6, to that of the empt

  12. Optimized rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for mapping bacterial mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, D; Burns, B P; Neilan, B A

    2000-03-01

    A simple, efficient and sensitive RACE-based procedure was developed for the determination of unknown 5' regions from bacterial cDNA. A number of critical modifications were made to the standard RACE method, including the optimization of the RNA extraction, reverse transcription and PCR conditions. This procedure was used to accurately determine the site of transcript initiation and structure of the promoter region of the Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase gene (pyrB). The technique avoids many of the difficulties associated with established bacterial transcript mapping protocols and can be performed in two days starting with less than 1 microgram of total RNA. The modifications described here have significant potential for the identification of transcript start sites of bacterial genes and non-polyadenylated eukaryotic RNA.

  13. A genetic assay for transcription errors reveals multilayer control of RNA polymerase II fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D Irvin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a highly sensitive assay to detect transcription errors in vivo. The assay is based on suppression of a missense mutation in the active site tyrosine in the Cre recombinase. Because Cre acts as tetramer, background from translation errors are negligible. Functional Cre resulting from rare transcription errors that restore the tyrosine codon can be detected by Cre-dependent rearrangement of reporter genes. Hence, transient transcription errors are captured as stable genetic changes. We used this Cre-based reporter to screen for mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 (RPO21 that increase the level of misincorporation during transcription. The mutations are in three domains of Rpb1, the trigger loop, the bridge helix, and in sites involved in binding to TFIIS. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that these variants have elevated misincorporation, and/or ability to extend mispaired bases, or defects in TFIIS mediated editing.

  14. A genetic assay for transcription errors reveals multilayer control of RNA polymerase II fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Jordan D; Kireeva, Maria L; Gotte, Deanna R; Shafer, Brenda K; Huang, Ingold; Kashlev, Mikhail; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2014-09-01

    We developed a highly sensitive assay to detect transcription errors in vivo. The assay is based on suppression of a missense mutation in the active site tyrosine in the Cre recombinase. Because Cre acts as tetramer, background from translation errors are negligible. Functional Cre resulting from rare transcription errors that restore the tyrosine codon can be detected by Cre-dependent rearrangement of reporter genes. Hence, transient transcription errors are captured as stable genetic changes. We used this Cre-based reporter to screen for mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPB1 (RPO21) that increase the level of misincorporation during transcription. The mutations are in three domains of Rpb1, the trigger loop, the bridge helix, and in sites involved in binding to TFIIS. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that these variants have elevated misincorporation, and/or ability to extend mispaired bases, or defects in TFIIS mediated editing.

  15. Tooth sensitivity and whitening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Edward J

    2005-09-01

    This article presents a review of the basic concepts of tooth sensitivity and how those concepts apply to cervical dentin hypersensitivity and the sensitivity frequently associated with tooth whitening. The etiology and treatment of cervical dentin hypersensitivity are described. The clinical presentation, incidence, and predisposing factors for sensitivity associated with tooth whitening also are discussed.

  16. How sensitizing is chlorocresol?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hamann, K

    1984-01-01

    Chlorocresol is a biocide with widespread use in industry and pharmaceutical products. It is an occasional human contact sensitizer. The sensitizing potential of chlorocresol was judged strong using the guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) and doubtful in the less sensitive open epicutaneous test ...

  17. Detecting Pyronin Y labeled RNA transcripts in live cell microenvironments by phasor-FLIM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Laura M.; Jones, Mark R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Pyronin Y is an environment-sensitive probe which labels all double-stranded RNA in live cells. Methods to determine which RNA species Pyronin Y may be labeling are limited due to the lack of studies aimed at determining whether this probe has different spectroscopic properties when bound to specific transcripts. A major issue is that transcripts are difficult to isolate and study individually. We detected transcripts directly in their biological environment allowing us to identify RNA species on the basis of their location in the cell. We show that the phasor approach to lifetime analysis has the sensitivity to determine at least six different RNA species in live fibroblast cells. The detected lifetime differences were consistent among cells. To our knowledge this is the first application of a spectroscopic technique aimed at identifying Pyronin Y labeled RNA subtypes in living cells.

  18. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500...... base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short...

  19. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  20. Swinger RNAs with sharp switches between regular transcription and transcription systematically exchanging ribonucleotides: Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    During RNA transcription, DNA nucleotides A,C,G, T are usually matched by ribonucleotides A, C, G and U. However occasionally, this rule does not apply: transcript-DNA homologies are detectable only assuming systematic exchanges between ribonucleotides. Nine symmetric (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric (X ↔ Y ↔ Z, e.g. A ↔ C ↔ G) exchanges exist, called swinger transcriptions. Putatively, polymerases occasionally stabilize in unspecified swinger conformations, possibly similar to transient conformations causing punctual misinsertions. This predicts chimeric transcripts, part regular, part swinger-transformed, reflecting polymerases switching to swinger polymerization conformation(s). Four chimeric Genbank transcripts (three from human mitochondrion and one murine cytosolic) are described here: (a) the 5' and 3' extremities reflect regular polymerization, the intervening sequence exchanges systematically between ribonucleotides (swinger rule G ↔ U, transcript (1), with sharp switches between regular and swinger sequences; (b) the 5' half is 'normal', the 3' half systematically exchanges ribonucleotides (swinger rule C ↔ G, transcript (2), with an intercalated sequence lacking homology; (c) the 3' extremity fits A ↔ G exchanges (10% of transcript length), the 5' half follows regular transcription; the intervening region seems a mix of regular and A ↔ G transcriptions (transcript 3); (d) murine cytosolic transcript 4 switches to A ↔ U + C ↔ G, and is fused with A ↔ U + C ↔ G swinger transformed precursor rRNA. In (c), each concomitant transcript 5' and 3' extremities match opposite genome strands. Transcripts 3 and 4 combine transcript fusions with partial swinger transcriptions. Occasional (usually sharp) switches between regular and swinger transcriptions reveal greater coding potential than detected until now, suggest stable polymerase swinger conformations.

  1. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  2. E2F1-mediated transcriptional inhibition of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koziczak, M; Müller, H; Helin, K;

    2001-01-01

    -sensitive retinoblastoma protein (pRB), a shift to a permissive temperature induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In U2OS cells stably expressing an E2F1-estrogen receptor chimeric protein that could be activated by tamoxifen, PAI-1 gene transcription was markedly reduced by tamoxifen even in the presence of cycloheximide...

  3. Defective transcription-coupled repair in Cockayne syndrome B mice is associated with skin cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); A.J. van Gool (Alain); J. de Wit (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert); H. Morreau (Hans); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA mouse model for the nucleotide excision repair disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) was generated by mimicking a truncation in the CSB(ERCC6) gene of a CS-B patient. CSB-deficient mice exhibit all of the CS repair characteristics: ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, inactivation of transcription-

  4. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  5. Using Virtual Reference Transcripts for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David

    2003-01-01

    Describes a method of library staff training based on chat transcript analysis in which graduate student workers at a university reference desk examined transcripts of actual virtual reference desk transactions to analyze reference interviews. Discusses reference interview standards, reference desk behavior, and reference interview skills in…

  6. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes.......Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  7. Transcription and the aspect ratio of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    analysis of transcription. It is shown that under certain reasonable assumptions transcription is only possible if the aspect ratio is in the regime corresponding to further twisting. We find this constraint to be in agreement with long-established crystallographic studies of DNA....

  8. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  9. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  10. Early transcriptional response of soybean contrasting accessions to root dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ribamar Costa Ferreira Neto

    Full Text Available Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression "protein binding" as the most represented for "Molecular Function", whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to "hormone response" (LOX, ERF1b, XET, "water response" (PUB, BMY, "salt stress response" (WRKY, MYB and "oxidative stress response" (PER figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with important

  11. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...... is regulated to allocate resources to growth and/or defense at different time points. Among plant chemical defenses are the amino acid-derived glucosinolates (GLS). Their absolute and relative accumulation is tightly regulated at basal level, but also in response to e.g. pathogen attack and hormone stimuli...

  12. Combinatorial Regulation in Yeast Transcription Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao

    2006-03-01

    Yeast has evolved a complex network to regulate its transcriptional program in response to changes in environment. It is quite common that in response to an external stimulus, several transcription factors will be activated and they work in combinations to control different subsets of genes in the genome. We are interested in how the promoters of genes are designed to integrate signals from multiple transcription factors and what are the functional and evolutionary constraints. To answer how, we have developed a number of computational algorithms to systematically map the binding sites and target genes of transcription factors using sequence and gene expression data. To analyze the functional constraints, we have employed mechanistic models to study the dynamic behavior of genes regulated by multiple factors. We have also developed methods to trace the evolution of transcriptional networks via comparative analysis of multiple species.

  13. Transcription Factor Networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y. Rhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular fates and functions depend on differential gene expression, which occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and is controlled by complex regulatory networks of transcription factors (TFs. TFs act through combinatorial interactions with other TFs, cofactors, and chromatin-remodeling proteins. Here, we define protein-protein interactions using a coaffinity purification/mass spectrometry method and study 459 Drosophila melanogaster transcription-related factors, representing approximately half of the established catalog of TFs. We probe this network in vivo, demonstrating functional interactions for many interacting proteins, and test the predictive value of our data set. Building on these analyses, we combine regulatory network inference models with physical interactions to define an integrated network that connects combinatorial TF protein interactions to the transcriptional regulatory network of the cell. We use this integrated network as a tool to connect the functional network of genetic modifiers related to mastermind, a transcriptional cofactor of the Notch pathway.

  14. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  15. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Tsuchiya; Ryoichi Misaka; Kosaku Nitta; Ken Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterizedby a typical bZip structure; these transcription factorsact as important regulators of the development anddifferentiation of many organs and tissues, includingthe kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroupsthat are characterized according to their structure largeMaf transcription factors and small Maf transcriptionfactors. The large Maf subgroup consists of fourproteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neuralretina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is adistinct molecule that has been attracting the attentionof researchers because it acts as a strong transactivatorof insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors arelikely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. Inthis review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in variousorgans.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoja, Nada; Gazel, Alix; Banno, Tomohiro; Yano, Shoichiro; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2006-10-03

    In epidermal differentiation basal keratinocytes detach from the basement membrane, stop proliferating, and express a new set of structural proteins and enzymes, which results in an impermeable protein/lipid barrier that protects us. To define the transcriptional changes essential for this process, we purified large quantities of basal and suprabasal cells from human epidermis, using the expression of beta4 integrin as the discriminating factor. The expected expression differences in cytoskeletal, cell cycle, and adhesion genes confirmed the effective separation of the cell populations. Using DNA microarray chips, we comprehensively identify the differences in genes expressed in basal and differentiating layers of the epidermis, including the ECM components produced by the basal cells, the proteases in both the basal and suprabasal cells, and the lipid and steroid metabolism enzymes in suprabasal cells responsible for the permeability barrier. We identified the signaling pathways specific for the two populations and found two previously unknown paracrine and one juxtacrine signaling pathway operating between the basal and suprabasal cells. Furthermore, using specific expression signatures, we identified a new set of late differentiation markers and mapped their chromosomal loci, as well as a new set of melanocyte-specific markers. The data represent a quantum jump in understanding the mechanisms of epidermal differentiation.

  18. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  19. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale.

  20. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  1. Monitoração molecular da Leucemia Mielóide Crônica na era do imatinibe Molecular monitoring of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the imatinib era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Bendit

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos dez anos, o tratamento da leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC passou por uma grande mudança com a introdução da terapia alvo, onde o mesilato de imatinibe (MI atua inibindo a atividade tirosina quinase do transcrito BCR-ABL produto este do cromossomo Filadélfia (Ph. Esta revolução terapêutica obrigou que técnicas moleculares, até então de uso restrito na oncohematologia, como a reação em cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (RQ-PCR, fossem necessárias para monitorar o sucesso terapêutico ou a detecção precoce da perda de resposta ao MI. Nesta revisão estão delineados, de forma resumida, os principais procedimentos quanto à monitoração dos pacientes com LMC em tratamento com o MI segundo o Consenso Brasileiro de LMC.Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has changed since the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM 10 years ago. IM acts as a target therapy against the BCR-ABL gene by inhibiting its tyrosine kinase activity. This revolution in treating CML compels the introduction of molecular techniques, such as real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR to monitor the response to IM by providing an accurate measurement of the degree to which the BCR-ABL transcript is reduced or an early detection of loss of response identified by a rising level of BCR-ABL. In this review, we summarize the Brazilian CML consensus regarding the main procedures used to monitor CML patients treated with IM.

  2. Triomics Analysis of Imatinib-Treated Myeloma Cells Connects Kinase Inhibition to RNA Processing and Decreased Lipid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Helenius, Katja P; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Asara, John M

    2015-11-03

    The combination of metabolomics, lipidomics, and phosphoproteomics that incorporates triple stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protein labeling, as well as (13)C in vivo metabolite labeling, was demonstrated on BCR-ABL-positive H929 multiple myeloma cells. From 11 880 phosphorylation sites, we confirm that H929 cells are primarily signaling through the BCR-ABL-ERK pathway, and we show that imatinib treatment not only downregulates phosphosites in this pathway but also upregulates phosphosites on proteins involved in RNA expression. Metabolomics analyses reveal that BCR-ABL-ERK signaling in H929 cells drives the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and RNA biosynthesis, where pathway inhibition via imatinib results in marked PPP impairment and an accumulation of RNA nucleotides and negative regulation of mRNA. Lipidomics data also show an overall reduction in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid incorporation with a significant decrease in lysophospholipids. RNA immunoprecipitation studies confirm that RNA degradation is inhibited with short imatinib treatment and transcription is inhibited upon long imatinib treatment, validating the triomics results. These data show the utility of combining mass spectrometry-based "-omics" technologies and reveals that kinase inhibitors may not only downregulate phosphorylation of their targets but also induce metabolic events via increased phosphorylation of other cellular components.

  3. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7% patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4% patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1% patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8% patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4% patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  4. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cacuci, Dan G; Navon, Ionel Michael

    2005-01-01

    As computer-assisted modeling and analysis of physical processes have continued to grow and diversify, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have become indispensable scientific tools. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis. Volume I: Theory focused on the mathematical underpinnings of two important methods for such analyses: the Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure and the Global Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis Procedure. This volume concentrates on the practical aspects of performing these analyses for large-scale systems. The applications addressed include two-phase flow problems, a radiative c

  6. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  7. Intermittent Transcription Dynamics for the Rapid Production of Long Transcripts of High Fidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Depken

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal cellular function relies on the efficient and accurate readout of the genetic code. Single-molecule experiments show that transcription and replication are highly intermittent processes that are frequently interrupted by polymerases pausing and reversing directions. Although intermittent dynamics in replication are known to result from proofreading, their origin and significance during transcription remain controversial. Here, we theoretically investigate transcriptional fidelity and show that the kinetic scheme provided by the RNA-polymerase backtracking and transcript-cleavage pathway can account for measured error rates. Importantly, we find that intermittent dynamics provide an enormous increase in the rate of producing long transcripts of high fidelity. Our results imply that intermittent dynamics during transcription may have evolved as a way to mitigate the competing demands of speed and fidelity in the transcription of extended sequences.

  8. Evolution and diversification of the basal transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttke, Sascha H C

    2015-03-01

    Transcription initiation was once thought to be regulated primarily by sequence-specific transcription factors with the basal transcription machinery being largely invariant. Gradually it became apparent that the basal transcription machinery greatly diversified during evolution and new studies now demonstrate that diversification of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) family yielded specialized and largely independent transcription systems.

  9. Prunus transcription factors: Breeding perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor João Bianchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs. In peach, 1,533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome.

  10. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin's roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation.

  11. Notation systems for transcription: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Catherine; O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    A 21-syllable question posed by Bernard Shaw in a CNN television interview with Margaret Thatcher was presented to 90 participants, either as an audio recording or as a typed transcript or as both. Participants were asked to speak it, as closely as possible, as Shaw had (or, in conditions without the audio recording, as he might have). The typed version was either an ordinary transcript or a transcript in one of three transcription systems used currently in research on spoken discourse, all of which incorporate notations for prosody. Hence, there were nine conditions in all, with five women and five men in each. Contrary to the experimental hypothesis, approximations to Shaw's original temporal measures of performance were not degraded but were instead improved significantly by the addition of a prosodically notated transcript to the audio recording and significantly more in the absence of the audio recording. Presentation of the ordinary transcript alone produced the worst approximation to Shaw's temporal measures. The usefulness, accuracy, and readability of transcripts prepared according to detailed notation systems are discussed.

  12. Hormone-Sensitive Lipase Knockouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Wen-Jun

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract All treatments for obesity, including dietary restriction of carbohydrates, have a goal of reducing the storage of fat in adipocytes. The chief enzyme responsible for the mobilization of FFA from adipose tissue, i.e., lipolysis, is thought to be hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL. Studies of HSL knockouts have provided important insights into the functional significance of HSL and into adipose metabolism in general. Studies have provided evidence that HSL, though possessing triacylglycerol lipase activity, appears to be the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesteryl ester and diacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue and is essential for complete hormone stimulated lipolysis, but other triacylglycerol lipases are important in mediating triacylglycerol hydrolysis in lipolysis. HSL knockouts are resistant to both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, displaying reduced quantities of white with increased amounts of brown adipose tissue, increased numbers of adipose macrophages, and have multiple alterations in the expression of genes involved in adipose differentiation, including transcription factors, markers of adipocyte differentiation, and enzymes of fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. With disruption of lipolysis by removal of HSL, there is a drastic reduction in lipogenesis and alteration in adipose metabolism.

  13. Structure sensitivity in adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Nielsen, Ole Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1997-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of CO adsorption on different flat, stepped, kinked and reconstructed Pt surfaces is studied using large-scale density-functional calculations. We find an extremely strong structure sensitivity in the adsorption energy with variations up to 1 eV (or 100%) from one...

  14. Mixed sensitivity design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakernaak, Huibert; Camacho, E.F.; Basanez, L.; Puente, de la J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Mixed sensitivity design of a linear multivariable control system amounts toshaping its sensitivity functions to achieve the design targets of closed-loop system performance and robustness. Both H∞ and H2 optimization may be used to this end. Various tools are available, in particular low and high f

  15. Multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Kupers, Ron;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent, non-specific symptoms in response to chemically unrelated exposures in non-toxic concentrations. Although the pathophysiology of MCS remains unknown, central sensitization may be an important factor...

  16. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (sensitivity levels.

  17. Folding Kinetics of Riboswitch Transcriptional Terminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwine, Benjamin; Widom, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Riboswitches control the expression of genes in bacteria by halting gene transcription or allowing it to proceed based on the presence of ligands in solution. A key feature of every riboswitch is a transcriptional terminator in which the messenger RNA folds into a secondary structure with the stem-loop structure of a hairpin. Through kinetic Monte Carlo simulation we show that terminators have been naturally selected to fold with high reliability on the time-scale of gene transcription. This efficient folding behavior is preserved among two classes of riboswitch and among two species of bacteria.

  18. Our evolving knowledge of the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The development of a genome-scale approach to identification of the 5' ends of capped mRNAs (CAGE) has given new insights into many aspects of mammalian RNApolII transcription control. They include the identification of the minimal initiator motif, the different types of proximal promoter architecture, the promoters of noncoding RNAs, the transcription of retrotransposons, and the extensive impact of alternative promoters on the proteome. CAGE also offers applications as a form of expression profiling that measures promoter use, allowing more precise development of transcriptional network models.

  19. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  20. Optogenetic control of transcription in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Light inducible protein-protein interactions are powerful tools to manipulate biological processes. Genetically encoded light-gated proteins for controlling precise cellular behavior are a new and promising technology, called optogenetics. Here we exploited the blue light-induced transcription system in yeast and zebrafish, based on the blue light dependent interaction between two plant proteins, blue light photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 and the bHLH transcription factor CIB1 (CRY-interacting bHLH 1. We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing rapid transcription suppression and activation in zebrafish.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of LUX by CBF1 mediates cold input to the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brenda Y; Sanchez, Sabrina E; Breton, Ghislain; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Krogan, Naden T; Kay, Steve A

    2014-07-07

    Circadian clocks allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment to enhance overall fitness. Transcription factors (TFs) play a prominent role in the molecular mechanism but are incompletely described possibly due to functional redundancy, gene family proliferation, and/or lack of context-specific assays. To overcome these, we performed a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid screen using the LUX ARRYHTHMO (LUX) gene promoter as bait against an Arabidopsis TF library. LUX is a unique gene because its mutation causes severe clock defects and transcript maintains high-amplitude cycling in the cold. We report the well-characterized cold-inducible C-repeat (CRT)/drought-responsive element (DRE) binding factor CBF1/DREB1b is a transcriptional regulator of LUX. We show that CBF1 binds the CRT in the LUX promoter, and both genes overlap in temporal and spatial expression. CBF1 overexpression causes upregulation of LUX and also alters other clock gene transcripts. LUX promoter regions including the CRT and Evening Element (EE) are sufficient for high-amplitude transcriptional cycling in the cold, and cold-acclimated lux seedlings are sensitive to freezing stress. Our data show cold signaling is integrated into the clock by CBF-mediated regulation of LUX expression, thereby defining a new transcriptional mechanism for temperature input to the circadian clock.

  2. Reconstruction of transcriptional network from microarray data using combined mutual information and network-assisted regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-D; Qi, Y-X; Jiang, Z-L

    2011-03-01

    Many methods had been developed on inferring transcriptional network from gene expression. However, it is still necessary to design new method that discloses more detailed and exact network information. Using network-assisted regression, the authors combined the averaged three-way mutual information (AMI3) and non-linear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to infer the transcriptional network, and to obtain both the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics. Synthetic and experimental data were used to evaluate the performance of the above approach. In comparison with the previous methods based on mutual information, AMI3 obtained higher precision with the same sensitivity. To describe the regulatory dynamics between transcription factors and target genes, network-assisted regression and regression without network, respectively, were applied in the steady-state and time series microarray data. The results revealed that comparing with regression without network, network-assisted regression increased the precision, but decreased the fitting goodness. Then, the authors reconstructed the transcriptional network of Escherichia coli and simulated the regulatory dynamics of genes. Furthermore, the authors' approach identified potential transcription factors regulating yeast cell cycle. In conclusion, network-assisted regression, combined AMI3 and ODE model, was a more precisely to infer the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics of transcriptional network from microarray data. [Includes supplementary material].

  3. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  4. Contributions of nuclear architecture to transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, G S; van Wijnen, A J; Stein, J; Lian, J B; Montecino, M

    1995-01-01

    Three parameters of nuclear structure contribute to transcriptional control. The linear representation of promoter elements provides competency for physiological responsiveness within the contexts of development as well as cycle- and phenotype-dependent regulation. Chromatin structure and nucleosome organization reduce distances between independent regulatory elements providing a basis for integrating components of transcriptional control. The nuclear matrix supports gene expression by imposing physical constraints on chromatin related to three-dimensional genomic organization. In addition, the nuclear matrix facilitates gene localization as well as the concentration and targeting of transcription factors. Several lines of evidence are presented that are consistent with involvement of multiple levels of nuclear architecture in cell growth and tissue-specific gene expression during differentiation. Growth factor and steroid hormone responsive modifications in chromatin structure, nucleosome organization, and the nuclear matrix that influence transcription of the cell cycle-regulated histone gene and the bone tissue-specific osteocalcin gene during progressive expression of the osteoblast phenotype are considered.

  5. Topologies for perfect adaptation in gene transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation is commonly used in sensory systems and signaling networks to allow the detection of further stimuli. Despite enzymatic network topologies for adaptation have been investigated systematically, the topology of transcriptional network that could perform adaptation still remains unclear, due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we systematically investigated all three-node transcriptional networks, and found the topologies of transcriptional networks for adaptation are different from that of enzymatic ones. While both negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed forward loop (IFFL) are capable of performing adaptation analytically, a positive self-regulation on buffer node is necessary for NFBL topology and more flexible structures emerge for IFFL than that of enzymatic networks. Most of the simulation results agree with analytical predictions. This study may explain the mechanism of adapted gene regulation behavior and supply a design table for gene regulatory adaptation.

  6. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications...

  7. Dynamics of transcription-translation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D.; Edwards, R.

    2016-09-01

    A theory for qualitative models of gene regulatory networks has been developed over several decades, generally considering transcription factors to regulate directly the expression of other transcription factors, without any intermediate variables. Here we explore a class of models that explicitly includes both transcription and translation, keeping track of both mRNA and protein concentrations. We mainly deal with transcription regulation functions that are steep sigmoids or step functions, as is often done in protein-only models, though translation is governed by a linear term. We extend many aspects of the protein-only theory to this new context, including properties of fixed points, description of trajectories by mappings between switching points, qualitative analysis via a state-transition diagram, and a result on periodic orbits for negative feedback loops. We find that while singular behaviour in switching domains is largely avoided, non-uniqueness of solutions can still occur in the step-function limit.

  8. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  9. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  10. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  11. A Discriminative Model for Polyphonic Piano Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliner Graham E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a discriminative model for polyphonic piano transcription. Support vector machines trained on spectral features are used to classify frame-level note instances. The classifier outputs are temporally constrained via hidden Markov models, and the proposed system is used to transcribe both synthesized and real piano recordings. A frame-level transcription accuracy of 68% was achieved on a newly generated test set, and direct comparisons to previous approaches are provided.

  12. Co-transcriptional splicing in two yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Herzel, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Cellular function and physiology are largely established through regulated gene expression. The first step in gene expression, transcription of the genomic DNA into RNA, is a process that is highly aligned at the levels of initiation, elongation and termination. In eukaryotes, protein-coding genes are exclusively transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Upon transcription of the first 15-20 nucleotides (nt), the emerging nascent RNA 5’ end is modified with a 7-methylguanosyl cap. This is on...

  13. Allergic sensitization: screening methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladics, Gregory S.; Fry, Jeremy; Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    conformational epitopes, and protein families that become allergens. Some common challenges for predicting protein sensitization are addressed: (a) exposure routes; (b) frequency and dose of exposure; (c) dose-response relationships; (d) role of digestion, food processing, and the food matrix; (e) role...... of infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing...

  14. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel;

    2014-01-01

    was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...

  15. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  16. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin;

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  17. The regulation of transcription in memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberini, Cristina M; Kandel, Eric R

    2014-12-04

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation.

  18. DMD transcript imbalance determines dystrophin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitali, Pietro; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Wokke, Beatrijs; Janson, Anneke A M; van den Eijnde, Rani; den Dunnen, Johan T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2013-12-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by out-of-frame and in-frame mutations, respectively, in the dystrophin encoding DMD gene. Molecular therapies targeting the precursor-mRNA are in clinical trials and show promising results. These approaches will depend on the stability and expression levels of dystrophin mRNA in skeletal muscles and heart. We report that the DMD gene is more highly expressed in heart than in skeletal muscles, in mice and humans. The transcript mutated in the mdx mouse model shows a 5' to 3' imbalance compared with that of its wild-type counterpart and reading frame restoration via antisense-mediated exon skipping does not correct this event. We also report significant transcript instability in 22 patients with Becker dystrophy, clarifying the fact that transcript imbalance is not caused by premature nonsense mutations. Finally, we demonstrate that transcript stability, rather than transcriptional rate, is an important determinant of dystrophin protein levels in patients with Becker dystrophy. We suggest that the availability of the complete transcript is a key factor to determine protein abundance and thus will influence the outcome of mRNA-targeting therapies.

  19. Control of transcription by cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yung Wu

    Full Text Available Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. Here we show that ploidy-associated changes in gene expression reflect transcriptional adjustment to a larger cell size, implicating cellular geometry as a key parameter in gene regulation. Using RNA-seq, we identified genes whose expression was altered in a tetraploid as compared with the isogenic haploid. A significant fraction of these genes encode cell surface proteins, suggesting an effect of the enlarged cell size on the differential regulation of these genes. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of these genes in haploid mutants that also produce enlarged size. Surprisingly, many genes differentially regulated in the tetraploid are identically regulated in the enlarged haploids, and the magnitude of change in gene expression correlates with the degree of size enlargement. These results indicate a causal relationship between cell size and transcription, with a size-sensing mechanism that alters transcription in response to size. The genes responding to cell size are enriched for those regulated by two mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and components in those pathways were found to mediate size-dependent gene regulation. Transcriptional adjustment to enlarged cell size could underlie other cellular changes associated with polyploidy. The causal relationship between cell size and transcription suggests that cell size homeostasis serves a regulatory role in transcriptome maintenance.

  20. Mitochondrial transcription: is a pattern emerging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaehning, J A

    1993-04-01

    Despite the striking similarities of RNA polymerases and transcription signals shared by eubacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryotes, there has been little indication that transcription in mitochondria is related to any previously characterized model. Only in yeast has the subunit structure of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase been determined. The yeast enzyme is composed of a core related to polymerases from bacteriophage T7 and T3, and a promoter recognition factor similar to bacterial sigma factors. Soluble systems for studying mitochondrial transcript initiation in vitro have been described from several organisms, and used to determine consensus sequences at or near transcription start sites. Comparison of these sequences from fungi, plants, and amphibians with the T7/T3 promoter suggests some intriguing similarities. Mammalian mitochondrial promoters do not fit this pattern but instead appear to utilize upstream sites, the target of a transcriptional stimulatory factor, to position the RNA polymerase. The recent identification of a possible homologue of the mammalian upstream factor in yeast mitochondria may indicate that a pattern will eventually be revealed relating the transcriptional machineries of all eukaryotic mitochondria.

  1. Transcriptional elongation factor ENL phosphorylated by ATM recruits polycomb and switches off transcription for DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Nagaura, Yuko; Yasui, Akira

    2015-05-07

    Transcription is repressed if a DNA double-strand break (DSB) is introduced in close proximity to a transcriptional activation site at least in part by H2A-ubiquitination. While ATM signaling is involved, how it controls H2A-ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we identify that, in response to DSBs, a transcriptional elongation factor, ENL (MLLT1), is phosphorylated by ATM at conserved SQ sites. This phosphorylation increases the interaction between ENL and the E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) via BMI1. This interaction promotes enrichment of PRC1 at transcription elongation sites near DSBs to ubiquitinate H2A leading to transcriptional repression. ENL SQ sites and BMI1 are necessary for KU70 accumulation at DSBs near active transcription sites and cellular resistance to DSBs. Our data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ENL functions as switch from elongation to Polycomb-mediated repression to preserve genome integrity.

  2. Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Petra; Bauer, Axel; Müller, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) indicates poor prognosis after acute myocardial infarction. Noninvasive BRS assessment is complicated by nonstationarities and noise in electrocardiogram and pressure signals. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a novel signal processing technology overcoming...

  3. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination of long noncoding RNA transcripts hosting microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J; Jopling, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major part in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with cotranscriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. Although most miRNAs are located within introns of protein-coding transcripts, a substantial minority of miRNAs originate from long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, for which transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lncRNA transcripts containing miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) do not use the canonical cleavage-and-polyadenylation pathway but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a new RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells.

  4. Charge-sensitive amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Startsev V. I.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider design and circuit design techniques of reduction of the influence of the pyroelectric effect on operation of the charge sensitive amplifiers. The presented experimental results confirm the validity of the measures taken to reduce the impact of pyroelectric currents. Pyroelectric currents are caused by the influence of the temperature gradient on the piezoelectric sensor and on the output voltage of charge sensitive amplifiers.

  5. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...... data together with clinical data from metal workers heavily exposed to cobalt suggest that patch-test reactions are sometimes false positive and that patch testers should carefully evaluate their clinical relevance....

  6. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  7. Variable behavior of iPSCs derived from CML patients for response to TKI and hematopoietic differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Bedel

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia disease (CML found effective therapy by treating patients with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, which suppress the BCR-ABL1 oncogene activity. However, the majority of patients achieving remission with TKI still have molecular evidences of disease persistence. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the disease persistence and recurrence. One of the hypotheses is that the primitive leukemic stem cells (LSCs can survive in the presence of TKI. Understanding the mechanisms leading to TKI resistance of the LSCs in CML is a critical issue but is limited by availability of cells from patients. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from CD34⁺ blood cells isolated from CML patients (CML-iPSCs as a model for studying LSCs survival in the presence of TKI and the mechanisms supporting TKI resistance. Interestingly, CML-iPSCs resisted to TKI treatment and their survival did not depend on BCR-ABL1, as for primitive LSCs. Induction of hematopoietic differentiation of CML-iPSC clones was reduced compared to normal clones. Hematopoietic progenitors obtained from iPSCs partially recovered TKI sensitivity. Notably, different CML-iPSCs obtained from the same CML patients were heterogeneous, in terms of BCR-ABL1 level and proliferation. Thus, several clones of CML-iPSCs are a powerful model to decipher all the mechanisms leading to LSC survival following TKI therapy and are a promising tool for testing new therapeutic agents.

  8. Transcription of pattern recognition receptors and abortive agents induced chemokines in the bovine pregnant uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Martins, Telma da Mata; Borges, Alan Maia; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2012-01-15

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are important components of the innate immune system whose ligands are specific pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Considering the scarcity of studies on transcription of PRRs in the pregnant uterus of cows, and its response to PAMPs and microorganisms that cause abortion in cattle, this study aimed to characterize the transcription of TLR1-10, NOD1, NOD2 and MD2 in bovine uterus throughout gestation and to investigate the sensitivity of different uterine tissues at third trimester of pregnancy to purified TLR ligands or heat-killed Brucella abortus, Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin (S. Dublin), Listeria monocytogenes, and Aspergillus fumigatus, by assessing chemokine transcription. RNA extracted from endometrium, placentome and intercotiledonary region of cows at the first (n=6), second (n=6), and third (n=6) trimesters of pregnancy were subjected to real time RT-PCR. After stimulation of endometrium and intercotiledonary regions with purified TLR ligands or heat-killed microorganisms, gene transcription was assessed by real time RT-PCR. In the placentome, there was no significant variation in TLRs transcription throughout the three trimesters of pregnancy. In the endometrium, there was significant variation in TLR4 and TLR5 transcription during the three stages of gestation; i.e. TLR4 transcription was higher during the third trimester, whereas TLR5 transcription was higher during the last two trimesters. In the intercotiledonary region, there was significant variation in transcription of TLR1/6, TLR7, and TLR8, which were more strongly expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy. At the third trimester of gestation, significant transcription of CXCL6 and CXCL8 was detected mostly in endometrial tissues in response to purified TLR4 and TLR2 ligands. Transcription of these chemokines was induced in the endometrium and intercotiledonary region at the third trimester of pregnancy when stimulated with heat

  9. Transcriptional Truncation of the Long Coding Imprinted Gene Usp29.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi He

    Full Text Available Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29 is a paternally expressed gene located upstream of another imprinted gene Peg3. In the current study, the transcription of this long coding gene spanning a 250-kb genomic distance was truncated using a knockin allele. According to the results, paternal transmission of the mutant allele resulted in reduced body and litter sizes whereas the maternal transmission caused no obvious effects. In the paternal mutant, the expression levels of Usp29 were reduced to 14-18% level of the wild-type littermates due to the Poly-A signal included in the knockin cassette. Expression analyses further revealed an unusual female-specific up-regulation of the adjacent imprinted gene Zfp264 in the mutant. Consistent with this, the promoter of Zfp264 was hypomethylated only in the female mutant. Interestingly, this female-specific hypomethylation by the knockin allele was not detected in the offspring of an interspecific crossing, indicating its sensitivity to genetic background. Overall, the results suggest that the transcription of Usp29 may be involved in DNA methylation setting of Zfp264 promoter in a sex-specific manner.

  10. The transcriptional response to tumorigenic polarity loss in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Brandon D; Nellimoottil, Tittu T; Boileau, Ryan M; Classen, Anne K; Bilder, David

    2015-02-26

    Loss of polarity correlates with progression of epithelial cancers, but how plasma membrane misorganization drives oncogenic transcriptional events remains unclear. The polarity regulators of the Drosophila Scribble (Scrib) module are potent tumor suppressors and provide a model for mechanistic investigation. RNA profiling of Scrib mutant tumors reveals multiple signatures of neoplasia, including altered metabolism and dedifferentiation. Prominent among these is upregulation of cytokine-like Unpaired (Upd) ligands, which drive tumor overgrowth. We identified a polarity-responsive enhancer in upd3, which is activated in a coincident manner by both JNK-dependent Fos and aPKC-mediated Yki transcription. This enhancer, and Scrib mutant overgrowth in general, are also sensitive to activity of the Polycomb Group (PcG), suggesting that PcG attenuation upon polarity loss potentiates select targets for activation by JNK and Yki. Our results link epithelial organization to signaling and epigenetic regulators that control tissue repair programs, and provide insight into why epithelial polarity is tumor-suppressive.

  11. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  12. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward;

    2014-01-01

    diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele......Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central...... to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...

  13. Identification of epididymis-specific transcripts in the mouse and rat by transcriptional profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel S. Johnston; Terry T. Turner; Joshua N. Finger; Tracy L. Owtscharuk; S. Kopf; Scott A. Jelinsky

    2007-01-01

    As part of our efforts to identify novel contraceptive targets in the epididymis we performed transcriptional profiling on each of the 10 and 19 segments of the mouse and rat epididymidis, respectively, using Affymetrix whole genome microarrays. A total of 17 096 and 16 360 probe sets representing transcripts were identified as being expressed in the segmented mouse and rat epididymal transcriptomes, respectively. Comparison of the expressed murine transcripts against a mouse transcriptional profiling database derived from 22 other mouse tissues identified 77transcripts that were expressed uniquely in the epididymis. The expression of these genes was further evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of RNA from 21 mouse tissues. RT-PCR analysis confirmed epididymis-specific expression of Defensin Beta 13 and identified two additional genes with expression restricted only to the epididymis and testis. Comparison of the 16 360 expressed transcripts in the rat epididymis with data of 21 other tissues from a rat transcriptional profiling database identified 110 transcripts specific for the epididymis.Sixty-two of these transcripts were further investigated by qPCR analysis. Only Defensin 22 (E3 epididymal protein)was shown to be completely specific for the epididymis. In addition, 14 transcripts showed more than 100-fold selective expression in the epididymis. The products of these genes might play important roles in epididymal and/or sperm function and further investigation and validation as contraceptive targets are warranted. The results of the studies described in this report are available at the Mammalian Reproductive Genetics (MRG) Database (http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu/).

  14. PhyloScan: identification of transcription factor binding sites using cross-species evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When transcription factor binding sites are known for a particular transcription factor, it is possible to construct a motif model that can be used to scan sequences for additional sites. However, few statistically significant sites are revealed when a transcription factor binding site motif model is used to scan a genome-scale database. Methods We have developed a scanning algorithm, PhyloScan, which combines evidence from matching sites found in orthologous data from several related species with evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic region, to better detect regulons. The orthologous sequence data may be multiply aligned, unaligned, or a combination of aligned and unaligned. In aligned data, PhyloScan statistically accounts for the phylogenetic dependence of the species contributing data to the alignment and, in unaligned data, the evidence for sites is combined assuming phylogenetic independence of the species. The statistical significance of the gene predictions is calculated directly, without employing training sets. Results In a test of our methodology on synthetic data modeled on seven Enterobacteriales, four Vibrionales, and three Pasteurellales species, PhyloScan produces better sensitivity and specificity than MONKEY, an advanced scanning approach that also searches a genome for transcription factor binding sites using phylogenetic information. The application of the algorithm to real sequence data from seven Enterobacteriales species identifies novel Crp and PurR transcription factor binding sites, thus providing several new potential sites for these transcription factors. These sites enable targeted experimental validation and thus further delineation of the Crp and PurR regulons in E. coli. Conclusion Better sensitivity and specificity can be achieved through a combination of (1 using mixed alignable and non-alignable sequence data and (2 combining evidence from multiple sites within an intergenic

  15. Development of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of an emerging potyvirus: tomato necrotic stunt virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato necrotic stunt virus (ToNStV) is an emerging potyvirus that causes severe stunting to the infected tomato plants. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for a sensitive detection of ToNStV. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was comparable to th...

  16. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaykalova, Daria A; Kulaeva, Olga I; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Sokolova, Olga S; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2015-10-27

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA-histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone-histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed.

  17. Control and signal processing by transcriptional interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Ungricht, Rosemarie; Kelemen, János Z; Shetty, Chetak; Ratna, Prasuna; Becskei, Attila

    2009-01-01

    A transcriptional activator can suppress gene expression by interfering with transcription initiated by another activator. Transcriptional interference has been increasingly recognized as a regulatory mechanism of gene expression. The signals received by the two antagonistically acting activators are combined by the polymerase trafficking along the DNA. We have designed a dual-control genetic system in yeast to explore this antagonism systematically. Antagonism by an upstream activator bears the hallmarks of competitive inhibition, whereas a downstream activator inhibits gene expression non-competitively. When gene expression is induced weakly, the antagonistic activator can have a positive effect and can even trigger paradoxical activation. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium models of transcription shed light on the mechanism by which interference converts signals, and reveals that self-antagonism of activators imitates the behavior of feed-forward loops. Indeed, a synthetic circuit generates a bell-shaped response, so that the induction of expression is limited to a narrow range of the input signal. The identification of conserved regulatory principles of interference will help to predict the transcriptional response of genes in their genomic context. PMID:19690569

  18. Energy expenditure and bone formation share a common sensitivity to AP-1 transcription in the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, Glenn C; Vialou, Vincent; Sato, Kazusa;

    2012-01-01

    ) whether these effects were due to antagonism to AP1. Our results show that stereotactic injection of an adeno-associated virus vector to restrict overexpression of ¿FosB to the ventral hypothalamus of wildtype mice induced a profound increase in both energy expenditure and bone formation and bone mass....... This effect was phenocopied, at an even stronger level, by overexpressiong of a dominant-negative DNJunD, a pure AP1 antagonist. Taken together these results suggest that downregulation of AP1 activity in the hypothalamus profoundly increases energy expenditure and bone formation, leading to both a decrease...... in adipose mass and an increase in bone mass. These findings may have physiological implications since ¿FosB is expressed and regulated in the hypothalamus. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research....

  19. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott;

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  20. Sensitivity of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, Marco Tulio; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity (i.e. dynamic response) of complex networked systems has not been well understood, making difficult to predict whether new macroscopic dynamic behavior will emerge even if we know exactly how individual nodes behave and how they are coupled. Here we build a framework to quantify the sensitivity of complex networked system of coupled dynamic units. We characterize necessary and sufficient conditions for the emergence of new macroscopic dynamic behavior in the thermodynamic limit. We prove that these conditions are satisfied only for architectures with power-law degree distributions. Surprisingly, we find that highly connected nodes (i.e. hubs) only dominate the sensitivity of the network up to certain critical frequency.

  1. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  2. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  4. Transcription map of the early region of the Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, C J; Smith, M C

    1992-12-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), lysogenised by the temperature-sensitive cts1 mutant of phi C31, can be synchronously induced into the lytic cycle by heat treatment. A transcription map of 10 kb of the phi C31 early gene cluster was deduced using low-resolution S1 nuclease mapping of RNA prepared 10 min after induction. At least nine early transcripts, early (e)RNAs 1-9, were localised reading exclusively rightwards with respect to the standard physical map of phi C31. The mRNAs were extensively overlapping, frequently initiating at the same place but terminating at different sites, and vice versa. Gene expression during the lytic cycle was tightly regulated; no transcription was observed before induction. Transcription was maximal at 10 min post-induction, and at 20 min, eRNAs 5 and 6 persisted whilst eRNAs 7-9 were severely reduced or absent. The pattern of transcription of the early region is consistent with the simultaneous activation of a large number of promoters and differential termination efficiency.

  5. Nitrogen fixation and molecular oxygen: comparative genomic reconstruction of transcription regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Tsoy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. Being a complex and sensitive process, nitrogen fixation requires a complicated regulatory system, also, on the level of transcription. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics analysis for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  6. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  7. Transcriptional effects of CRP* expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli exhibits diauxic growth in sugar mixtures due to CRP-mediated catabolite repression and inducer exclusion related to phosphotransferase system enzyme activity. Replacement of the native crp gene with a catabolite repression mutant (referred to as crp* enables co-utilization of glucose and other sugars in E. coli. While previous studies have examined the effects of expressing CRP* mutants on the expression of specific catabolic genes, little is known about the global transcriptional effects of CRP* expression. In this study, we compare the transcriptome of E. coli W3110 (expressing wild-type CRP to that of mutant strain PC05 (expressing CRP* in the presence and absence of glucose. Results The glucose effect is significantly suppressed in strain PC05 relative to strain W3110. The expression levels of glucose-sensitive genes are generally not altered by glucose to the same extent in strain PCO5 as compared to W3110. Only 23 of the 80 genes showing significant differential expression in the presence of glucose for strain PC05 are present among the 418 genes believed to be directly regulated by CRP. Genes involved in central carbon metabolism (including several TCA cycle genes and amino acid biosynthesis, as well as genes encoding nutrient transport systems are among those whose transcript levels are most significantly affected by CRP* expression. We present a detailed transcription analysis and relate these results to phenotypic differences between strains expressing wild-type CRP and CRP*. Notably, CRP* expression in the presence of glucose results in an elevated intracellular NADPH concentration and reduced NADH concentration relative to wild-type CRP. Meanwhile, a more drastic decrease in the NADPH/NADP+ ratio is observed for the case of CRP* expression in strains engineered to reduce xylose to xylitol via a heterologously expressed, NADPH-dependent xylose reductase. Altered expression levels of

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Arabidopsis in Response to Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhulong Chan

    2012-01-01

    Salt stress is a major factor limiting agricultural productivity worldwide.Adaptations to salt stress include avoidance by reduced sodium uptake,sequestration of toxic sodium ions away from the cytoplasm,or production of compatible solutes or osmoprotectants to reduce molecular disruption.Approaches to engineer salt stress resistance have included regulation of ion transport through introduction of Na+/H+ antiporter; synthesis of compatible solutes; or the introduction of transcription factors regulating expression of stress-responsive genes.On the other hand,naturally occurring variation among wild-type populations of plants also can be used to understand plant adaptive responses to their environments.In this study,we compared phenotypic and transcriptomic effects of constitutive expression of genes intended to confer salt stress tolerance by three different mechanisms:a transcription factor,CBF3/DREB1a; a metabolic gene,M6PR,for mannitol biosynthesis; and the Na+/H+ antiporter,SOS1.In the absence of salt,M6PR and SOS1 lines performed comparably with wild type; CBF3 lines exhibited dwarfing as reported previously.All three transgenes conferred fitness advantage when subjected to 100 mmol/L NaCI in the growth chamber.CBF3 and M6PR affected transcription of numerous abiotic stress-related genes as measured by Affymetrix microarray analysis.M6PR additionally modified expression of biotic stress and oxidative stress genes.Transcriptional effects of SOS1 were smaller and primarily limited to redox-related genes.In addition,we compared natural variations in salt tolerance between Ler and Sha ecotypes based on their responses to salt treatments and the results indicated that Ler was salt-sensitive,but Sha,which obtained a truncated RAS1 protein,was salt-tolerant.Transcriptome analysis revealed that many genes involved in secondary metabolism,photosynthesis,and protein synthesis were mainly down-regulated by salinity effects,while transposable element genes,microRNA and

  9. Identification of Pharmacodynamic Transcript Biomarkers in Response to FGFR Inhibition by AZD4547.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpuech, Oona; Rooney, Claire; Mooney, Lorraine; Baker, Dawn; Shaw, Robert; Dymond, Michael; Wang, Dennis; Zhang, Pei; Cross, Sarah; Veldman-Jones, Margaret; Wilson, Joanne; Davies, Barry R; Dry, Jonathan R; Kilgour, Elaine; Smith, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    The challenge of developing effective pharmacodynamic biomarkers for preclinical and clinical testing of FGFR signaling inhibition is significant. Assays that rely on the measurement of phospho-protein epitopes can be limited by the availability of effective antibody detection reagents. Transcript profiling enables accurate quantification of many biomarkers and provides a broader representation of pathway modulation. To identify dynamic transcript biomarkers of FGFR signaling inhibition by AZD4547, a potent inhibitor of FGF receptors 1, 2, and 3, a gene expression profiling study was performed in FGFR2-amplified, drug-sensitive tumor cell lines. Consistent with known signaling pathways activated by FGFR, we identified transcript biomarkers downstream of the RAS-MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. Using different tumor cell lines in vitro and xenografts in vivo, we confirmed that some of these transcript biomarkers (DUSP6, ETV5, YPEL2) were modulated downstream of oncogenic FGFR1, 2, 3, whereas others showed selective modulation only by FGFR2 signaling (EGR1). These transcripts showed consistent time-dependent modulation, corresponding to the plasma exposure of AZD4547 and inhibition of phosphorylation of the downstream signaling molecules FRS2 or ERK. Combination of FGFR and AKT inhibition in an FGFR2-mutated endometrial cancer xenograft model enhanced modulation of transcript biomarkers from the PI3K/AKT pathway and tumor growth inhibition. These biomarkers were detected on the clinically validated nanoString platform. Taken together, these data identified novel dynamic transcript biomarkers of FGFR inhibition that were validated in a number of in vivo models, and which are more robustly modulated by FGFR inhibition than some conventional downstream signaling protein biomarkers. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2802-13. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcription and the Pitch Angle of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Kasper W

    2013-01-01

    The question of the value of the pitch angle of DNA is visited from the perspective of a geometrical analysis of transcription. It is suggested that for transcription to be possible, the pitch angle of B-DNA must be smaller than the angle of zero-twist. At the zero-twist angle the double helix is maximally rotated and its strain-twist coupling vanishes. A numerical estimate of the pitch angle for B-DNA based on differential geometry is compared with numbers obtained from existing empirical data. The crystallographic studies shows that the pitch angle is approximately 38 deg., less than the corresponding zero-twist angle of 41.8 deg., which is consistent with the suggested principle for transcription.

  12. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  13. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  14. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  15. Battles and hijacks: noncoding transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jégu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription.

  16. Automatic Phonetic Transcription for Danish Speech Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkedal, Andreas Søeborg

    Automatic speech recognition (ASR) uses dictionaries that map orthographic words to their phonetic representation. To minimize the occurrence of out-of-vocabulary words, ASR requires large phonetic dictionaries to model pronunciation. Hand-crafted high-quality phonetic dictionaries are difficult...... of automatic phonetic transcriptions vary greatly with respect to language and transcription strategy. For some languages where the difference between the graphemic and phonetic representations are small, graphemic transcriptions can be used to create ASR systems with acceptable performance. In other languages......, like Danish, the graphemic and phonetic representations are very dissimilar and more complex rewriting rules must be applied to create the correct phonetic representation. Automatic phonetic transcribers use different strategies, from deep analysis to shallow rewriting rules, to produce phonetic...

  17. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Deciphering the Innate Lymphoid Cell Transcriptional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Seillet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are enriched at mucosal surfaces, where they provide immune surveillance. All ILC subsets develop from a common progenitor that gives rise to pre-committed progenitors for each of the ILC lineages. Currently, the temporal control of gene expression that guides the emergence of these progenitors is poorly understood. We used global transcriptional mapping to analyze gene expression in different ILC progenitors. We identified PD-1 to be specifically expressed in PLZF+ ILCp and revealed that the timing and order of expression of the transcription factors NFIL3, ID2, and TCF-1 was critical. Importantly, induction of ILC lineage commitment required only transient expression of NFIL3 prior to ID2 and TCF-1 expression. These findings highlight the importance of the temporal program that permits commitment of progenitors to the ILC lineage, and they expand our understanding of the core transcriptional program by identifying potential regulators of ILC development.

  19. Transcriptional network underlying Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takao; Wang, Minqin; Ririe, Ted O; Fernandes, Jolene S; Sternberg, Paul W

    2005-04-05

    The vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans provides an opportunity to investigate genetic networks that control gene expression during organogenesis. During the fourth larval stage (L4), seven vulval cell types are produced, each of which executes a distinct gene expression program. We analyze how the expression of cell-type-specific genes is regulated. Ras and Wnt signaling pathways play major roles in generating the spatial pattern of cell types and regulate gene expression through a network of transcription factors. One transcription factor (lin-29) primarily controls the temporal expression pattern. Other transcription factors (lin-11, cog-1, and egl-38) act in combination to control cell-type-specific gene expression. The complexity of the network arises in part because of the dynamic nature of gene expression, in part because of the presence of seven cell types, and also because there are multiple regulatory paths for gene expression within each cell type.

  20. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of SPURR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witholder, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute has conducted a limited sensitivity analysis on a System for Projecting the Utilization of Renewable Resources (SPURR). The study utilized the Domestic Policy Review scenario for SPURR agricultural and industrial process heat and utility market sectors. This sensitivity analysis determines whether variations in solar system capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and fuel cost (biomass only) correlate with intuitive expectations. The results of this effort contribute to a much larger issue: validation of SPURR. Such a study has practical applications for engineering improvements in solar technologies and is useful as a planning tool in the R and D allocation process.

  2. Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers primarily treats the circuit design of optical receivers with external photodiodes. Continuous-mode and burst-mode receivers are compared. The monograph first summarizes the basics of III/V photodetectors, transistor and noise models, bit-error rate, sensitivity and analog circuit design, thus enabling readers to understand the circuits described in the main part of the book. In order to cover the topic comprehensively, detailed descriptions of receivers for optical data communication in general and, in particular, optical burst-mode receivers in deep-sub-µm CMOS are presented. Numerous detailed and elaborate illustrations facilitate better understanding.

  3. Direct competition assay for transcription fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Lucyna; Kireeva, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Accurate transcription is essential for faithful information flow from DNA to RNA and to the protein. Mechanisms of cognate substrate selection by RNA polymerases are currently elucidated by structural, genetic, and biochemical approaches. Here, we describe a fast and reliable approach to quantitative analyses of transcription fidelity, applicable to analyses of RNA polymerase selectivity against misincorporation, incorporation of dNMPs, and chemically modified rNMP analogues. The method is based on different electrophoretic mobility of RNA oligomers of the same length but differing in sequence.

  4. Transcriptional networks leading to symbiotic nodule organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyano, Takashi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    The symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria leading to root nodules is a relatively recent evolutionary innovation and limited to a distinct order of land plants. It has long been a mystery how plants have invented this complex trait. However, recent advances in molecular genetics of model legumes has elucidated genes involved in the development of root nodules, providing insights into this process. Here we discuss how the de novo assembly of transcriptional networks may account for the predisposition to nodulate. Transcriptional networks and modes of gene regulation from the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, nitrate responses and aspects of lateral root development have likely all contributed to the emergence and development of root nodules.

  5. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhal, Bruce D.; Dang, My-Trang T.; Li, Xiaopeng; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2012-01-01

    An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG) system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed. PMID:22500179

  6. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce D. Uhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed.

  7. The retinoblastoma protein as a transcriptional repressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Ed, H

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is one of the best-studied tumour suppressor gene products. Its loss during the genesis of many human tumours, its inactivation by several DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, and its ability to inhibit cell growth when introduced into dividing cells all suggest that pRB...... negatively regulates some aspect of normal cell growth. The discovery that pRB associates with transcription factors such as E2F has provided the first model for pRB function. In this review, we discuss how pRB may regulate cell growth by repressing transcription of genes essential for cell proliferation....

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases.

  9. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation.

  10. Fundamental Physics Microgravity Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Ulf

    1998-01-01

    An introduction followed by a brief discussion about the sensitivity to microgravity environment disturbances for some recent and planned experiments in microgravity fundamental physics will be presented. In particular, correlation between gravity disturbances and the quality of science data sets measured by the Confined Helium Experiment (CHEX) during ground testing and during the November 1997 USMP-4 flight will be described.

  11. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Anne Gram

    Et voksende antal mennesker i Danmark oplever at være overfølsomme over for dufte og kemikalier. Imidlertid er den tilskrevne diagnose Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) ikke medicinsk anerkendt i Danmark pga. mangel på organiske og patofysiologisk basis for symptomerne. Dette speciale bygger på...

  12. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  13. High-Sensitivity Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Selected high-sensitivity spectrophotometric methods are examined, and comparisons are made of their relative strengths and weaknesses and the circumstances for which each can best be applied. Methods include long path cells, noise reduction, laser intracavity absorption, thermocouple calorimetry, photoacoustic methods, and thermo-optical methods.…

  14. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of retrovirus HTLV-1 transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Alberto; Di Camillo, Barbara; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is a human retrovirus endemic in many areas of the world. Although many studies indicated a key role of the viral protein Tax in the control of viral transcription, the mechanisms controlling HTLV-1 expression and its persistence in vivo are still poorly understood. To assess Tax effects on viral kinetics, we developed a HTLV-1 model. Two parameters that capture both its deterministic and stochastic behavior were quantified: Tax signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which measures the effect of stochastic phenomena on Tax expression as the ratio between the protein steady-state level and the variance of the noise causing fluctuations around this value; t(1/2), a parameter representative of the duration of Tax transient expression pulses, that is, of Tax bursts due to stochastic phenomena. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the major determinant of Tax SNR is the transactivation constant, the system parameter weighting the enhancement of retrovirus transcription due to transactivation. In contrast, t(1/2) is strongly influenced by the degradation rate of the mRNA. In addition to shedding light into the mechanism of Tax transactivation, the obtained results are of potential interest for novel drug development strategies since the two parameters most affecting Tax transactivation can be experimentally tuned, e.g. by perturbing protein phosphorylation and by RNA interference.

  17. Rice-arsenate interactions in hydroponics: whole genome transcriptional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J; Lou-Hing, Daniel E; Meharg, Andrew A; Price, Adam H

    2008-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) varieties that are arsenate-tolerant (Bala) and -sensitive (Azucena) were used to conduct a transcriptome analysis of the response of rice seedlings to sodium arsenate (AsV) in hydroponic solution. RNA extracted from the roots of three replicate experiments of plants grown for 1 week in phosphate-free nutrient with or without 13.3 muM AsV was used to challenge the Affymetrix (52K) GeneChip Rice Genome array. A total of 576 probe sets were significantly up-regulated at least 2-fold in both varieties, whereas 622 were down-regulated. Ontological classification is presented. As expected, a large number of transcription factors, stress proteins, and transporters demonstrated differential expression. Striking is the lack of response of classic oxidative stress-responsive genes or phytochelatin synthases/synthatases. However, the large number of responses from genes involved in glutathione synthesis, metabolism, and transport suggests that glutathione conjugation and arsenate methylation may be important biochemical responses to arsenate challenge. In this report, no attempt is made to dissect differences in the response of the tolerant and sensitive variety, but analysis in a companion article will link gene expression to the known tolerance loci available in the BalaxAzucena mapping population.

  18. Salt sensitivity correlates positively with insulin sensitivity in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Voordouw, JJ; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB

    1999-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between insulin sensitivity and salt sensitivity in healthy subjects who display a wide range of insulin sensitivity. As a secondary objective, we assessed the relationship between salt sensitivity and the other characteristics of the in

  19. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm van Bakel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  20. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  1. On-Chip Peptide Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Protein Kinase Inhibitor Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Lai; Kim, Young-Pil; Son, Jin Gyeong; Son, Miyoung; Lee, Tae Geol

    2017-01-03

    Protein kinases are enzymes that are important targets for drug discovery because of their involvement in regulating the essential cellular processes. For this reason, the changes in protein kinase activity induced by each drug candidate (the inhibitor in this case) need to be accurately determined. Here, an on-chip secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging technique of the peptides was developed for determining protein kinase activity and inhibitor screening without a matrix. In our method, cysteine-tethered peptides adsorbed onto a gold surface produced changes in the relative peak intensities of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated substrate peptides, which were quantitatively dependent on protein kinase activity. Using mass spectrometry imaging of multiple compartments on the gold surface in the presence of a peptide substrate, we screened 13,727 inhibitors, of which seven were initially found to have inhibitor efficiencies that surpassed 50%. Of these, we were able to identify a new breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL)(T315I) kinase inhibitor, henceforth referred to as KR135861. KR135861 showed no cytotoxicity and was subsequently confirmed to be superior to imatinib, a commercial drug marketed as Gleevec. Moreover, KR135861 exhibited a greater inhibitory effect on the BCR-ABL(T315I) tyrosine kinase, with an IC50 value as low as 1.3 μM. In in vitro experiments, KR135861 reduced the viability of both Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL(T315I), in contrast to imatinib's inhibitory effects only on Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL. Due to the surface sensitivity and selectivity of SIMS imaging, it is anticipated that our approach will make it easier to validate the small modifications of a substrate in relation to enzyme activity as well as for drug discovery. This mass spectrometry imaging analysis enables efficient screening for protein kinase inhibitors, thus permitting high-throughput drug screening with high accuracy

  2. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger p

  3. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casperson, Gerald F. (Ballwin, MO); Schmidhauser, Christian T. (Berkeley, CA); Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  4. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casperson, G.F.; Schmidhauser, C.T.; Bissell, M.J.

    1999-12-21

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  5. 20 CFR 901.47 - Transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcript. 901.47 Section 901.47 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension or Termination of...

  6. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  7. Transcriptional networks in epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Venkov

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT changes polarized epithelial cells into migratory phenotypes associated with loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal rearrangements. This form of plasticity is seen in mesodermal development, fibroblast formation, and cancer metastasis.Here we identify prominent transcriptional networks active during three time points of this transitional process, as epithelial cells become fibroblasts. DNA microarray in cultured epithelia undergoing EMT, validated in vivo, were used to detect various patterns of gene expression. In particular, the promoter sequences of differentially expressed genes and their transcription factors were analyzed to identify potential binding sites and partners. The four most frequent cis-regulatory elements (CREs in up-regulated genes were SRY, FTS-1, Evi-1, and GC-Box, and RNA inhibition of the four transcription factors, Atf2, Klf10, Sox11, and SP1, most frequently binding these CREs, establish their importance in the initiation and propagation of EMT. Oligonucleotides that block the most frequent CREs restrain EMT at early and intermediate stages through apoptosis of the cells.Our results identify new transcriptional interactions with high frequency CREs that modulate the stability of cellular plasticity, and may serve as targets for modulating these transitional states in fibroblasts.

  8. Transcriptional control of hepatocanalicular transporter gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M

    2000-01-01

    Transport processes for larger organic solutes at the canalicular membrane are mainly driven by members of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The funct ions of these transporters range from bile component secretion to xenobiotica and phase II-conjugate export. The transcript

  9. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  10. Mitochondrial transcription: How does it end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Byrnes; M Garcia-Diaz

    2011-12-31

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  11. TRANSFAC: transcriptional regulation, from patterns to profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, V; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Gössling, E; Haubrock, M; Hehl, R; Hornischer, K; Karas, D; Kel, A E; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Kloos, D-U; Land, S; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Michael, H; Münch, R; Reuter, I; Rotert, S; Saxel, H; Scheer, M; Thiele, S; Wingender, E

    2003-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on eukaryotic transcriptional regulation, comprising data on transcription factors, their target genes and regulatory binding sites, has been extended and further developed, both in number of entries and in the scope and structure of the collected data. Structured fields for expression patterns have been introduced for transcription factors from human and mouse, using the CYTOMER database on anatomical structures and developmental stages. The functionality of Match, a tool for matrix-based search of transcription factor binding sites, has been enhanced. For instance, the program now comes along with a number of tissue-(or state-)specific profiles and new profiles can be created and modified with Match Profiler. The GENE table was extended and gained in importance, containing amongst others links to LocusLink, RefSeq and OMIM now. Further, (direct) links between factor and target gene on one hand and between gene and encoded factor on the other hand were introduced. The TRANSFAC public release is available at http://www.gene-regulation.com. For yeast an additional release including the latest data was made available separately as TRANSFAC Saccharomyces Module (TSM) at http://transfac.gbf.de. For CYTOMER free download versions are available at http://www.biobase.de:8080/index.html.

  12. Virtual Reference Transcript Analysis: A Few Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Describes the introduction of virtual, or digital, reference service at the University of New Brunswick libraries. Highlights include analyzing transcripts from LIVE (Library Information in a Virtual Environment); reference question types; ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries) information literacy competency standards; and the Big 6…

  13. 40 CFR 164.82 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transcripts. 164.82 Section 164.82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING HEARINGS, UNDER THE FEDERAL INSECTICIDE, FUNGICIDE, AND RODENTICIDE ACT, ARISING FROM REFUSALS...

  14. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hughes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  15. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  16. Insights into centromeric transcription in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The major role of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is to generate mRNAs. I recently uncovered a novel function of RNAP II in chromosome segregation in mitosis, installing the cohesin protector, Shugoshin, at centromeres. Here I will discuss the current understanding of RNAP II-dependent centromeric transcription in mitosis.

  17. Transcriptional inhibition by the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A; Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M. The underphosphory......The retinoblastoma protein, pRB, appears to play a key role in coordinating the regulation of cell cycle position and transcriptional events. pRB undergoes specific cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation, being underphosphorylated in G1 and heavily phosphorylated in S, G2, and M....... The underphosphorylated form is able to interact with the E2F transcription factor. Recently, we have cloned a cDNA for E2F-1. By using this clone and a series of non-pRB binding mutants, we have been able to show that the binding of pRB to E2F-1 causes inhibition of E2F-mediated transactivation. pRB's inhibition of E2F......-mediated transcription would be lost by mutation in the retinoblastoma gene in human tumours, by pRB's interaction with DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, or by phosphorylation during the cell cycle....

  18. Interaction of Restin with transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yousheng; LU; Fan; QI; Yinxin; WANG; Ruihua; ZHANG; Jia

    2005-01-01

    Restin, a member of melanoma-associated antigen superfamily gene, was first cloned from differentiated leukemia cell induced by all trans-retinoic acid, and was able to inhibit cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism was not clear. Since Restin was localized in cell nucleus, and its homolog member, Necdin (neuronal growth suppressor factor), could interact with transcription factors p53 and E2F1, we proposed that Restin might also function as Necdin through interacting with some transcription factors. In this study, transcription factors p53, AP1,ATFs and E2Fs were cloned and used in the mammalian two-hybrid system to identify their interaction with Restin. The results showed that only ATF3 had a strong interaction with Restin. It is interesting to know that ATF3 was an important transcription factor for G1 cell cycle initiation in physiological stress response. It was possible that the inhibition of cell proliferation by Restin might be related with the inhibition of ATF3 activity.

  19. Transcriptional Responses to the Auxin Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, Dolf; Wagner, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is arguably the most important signaling molecule in plants, and the last few decades have seen remarkable breakthroughs in understanding its production, transport, and perception. Recent investigations have focused on transcriptional responses to auxin, providing novel insight into the fun

  20. Regulation of the Ets transcription factor Tel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roukens, Mark Guido

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we report novel studies on the molecular regulation of the transcriptional repressor Tel (Translocation Ets Leukemia). The work in this thesis is presented as follows: Chapter 1 is an introduction which summarizes the literature about Tel and its Drosophila orthologue Yan as it was k

  1. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protei...

  2. TCP transcription factors: architectures of plant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, Nora G Uberti; Viola, Ivana L; Welchen, Elina; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    After its initial definition in 1999, the TCP family of transcription factors has become the focus of a multiplicity of studies related with plant development at the cellular, organ, and tissue levels. Evidence has accumulated indicating that TCP transcription factors are the main regulators of plant form and architecture and constitute a tool through which evolution shapes plant diversity. The TCP transcription factors act in a multiplicity of pathways related with cell proliferation and hormone responses. In recent years, the molecular pathways of TCP protein action and biochemical studies on their mode of interaction with DNA have begun to shed light on their mechanism of action. However, the available information is fragmented and a unifying view of TCP protein action is lacking, as well as detailed structural studies of the TCP-DNA complex. Also important, the possible role of TCP proteins as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment has deserved little attention. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the structure and functions of TCP transcription factors and analyze future perspectives for the study of the role of these proteins and their use to modify plant development.

  3. Mitochondrial transcription: how does it end?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF1) provides novel insight into the mechanism of binding, recognition of the termination sequence and the conformational changes involved in mediating termination. Besides its functional implications, this structure provides a framework to understand the consequences of numerous diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  5. Systematic clustering of transcription start site landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J;

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters...

  6. In Vitro Transcription Assays and Their Application in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Ma, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In vitro transcription assays have been developed and widely used for many years to study the molecular mechanisms involved in transcription. This process requires multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and a series of transcription factors that act to modulate the activity of RNAP during gene expression. Sequencing gel electrophoresis of radiolabeled transcripts is used to provide detailed mechanistic information on how transcription proceeds and what parameters can affect it. In this paper we describe the protocol to study how the essential elongation factor NusA regulates transcriptional pausing, as well as a method to identify an antibacterial agent targeting transcription initiation through inhibition of RNAP holoenzyme formation. These methods can be used a as platform for the development of additional approaches to explore the mechanism of action of the transcription factors which still remain unclear, as well as new antibacterial agents targeting transcription which is an underutilized drug target in antibiotic research and development.

  7. COLOR- SENSITIZED SOLAR ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gish R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic devices are a promising solution to the energy crisis, because they generate electricity directly from sunlight, without producing CO2. While color-sensitized batteries are the most studied element, mainly due to its low cost and high efficiency solar energy conversion into electricity. Until recently, the color-sensitized solar cells performance was less than 1%, however, the use of titanium dioxide as the anode material have greatly raised their efficiency. The advantages of titanium dioxide is primarily in the low cost, but its use provides high light capture efficiency, with external quantum efficiency (efficiency incident photon - charge, usually in the range of 60-90% using nanocrystal forms in comparison with

  8. Culturally sensitive assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C P; Kumru, A

    1999-04-01

    Issues of cultural interaction and culturally sensitive assessment and treatment of young children have become prominent in recent years for mental health professionals, for reasons having to do with changing demographics, public values, and professional vision. "Culture" refers to the sociocultural adaptation of design for living shared by people as members of a community. Mental health professionals who work with culturally diverse populations need to become culturally self-aware and find abstract and experiential ways to build a useful body of professional knowledge concerning childrearing and discipline practices, health and illness beliefs, communication styles, and expectations about family or professional relations or other group interactions. They also need to learn how to work effectively in intercultural teams, use families as partners and resources, train and work with interpreters, and select and use formal and nonformal assessment procedures in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways.

  9. Developing cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi; Turner, deSalle

    2007-01-01

    comfortable with the experience of making a transition from one culture to another, making adjustments to cultural differences, and growing personally. Central to this process was the students’ experience of studying in an unfamiliar environment, experiencing stress and varying degrees of culture shock......Title. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students’ experiences of a study abroad programme Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students....... The findings suggest that study abroad is a useful strategy for bridging the theory–practice divide. However, further research is needed with larger and more diverse students to test the generalizability of the findings. Longitudinal research is also needed to assess the impact of study abroad programmes...

  10. Density Sensitive Hashing

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yue; Li, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Nearest neighbors search is a fundamental problem in various research fields like machine learning, data mining and pattern recognition. Recently, hashing-based approaches, e.g., Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH), are proved to be effective for scalable high dimensional nearest neighbors search. Many hashing algorithms found their theoretic root in random projection. Since these algorithms generate the hash tables (projections) randomly, a large number of hash tables (i.e., long codewords) are required in order to achieve both high precision and recall. To address this limitation, we propose a novel hashing algorithm called {\\em Density Sensitive Hashing} (DSH) in this paper. DSH can be regarded as an extension of LSH. By exploring the geometric structure of the data, DSH avoids the purely random projections selection and uses those projective functions which best agree with the distribution of the data. Extensive experimental results on real-world data sets have shown that the proposed method achieves better ...

  11. Solving tooth sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Solving tooth sensitivity requires both you and the patients to be resilient and to understand that if one approach doesn't work, you can try another one that is non-invasive or, at worst, minimally invasive. Much like the clinician who posted the original question, I strongly believe that it is our responsibility to convince patients that jumping to a radical solution could be totally unnecessary--and expensive-- and still might not solve the problem.

  12. Integrated Sensitivity Analysis Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman-Hill, Ernest J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Edward L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibson, Marcus J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clay, Robert L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a crucial element of rigorous engineering analysis, but performing such an analysis on a complex model is difficult and time consuming. The mission of the DART Workbench team at Sandia National Laboratories is to lower the barriers to adoption of advanced analysis tools through software integration. The integrated environment guides the engineer in the use of these integrated tools and greatly reduces the cycle time for engineering analysis.

  13. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopec, Stephenie D; Watson, John D; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear.

  14. Control of the C. albicans cell wall damage response by transcriptional regulator Cas5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both response and regulation may be conserved in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. We have tested this hypothesis by using a new C. albicans genetic resource: we have screened mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes for sensitivity to the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor caspofungin. We find that the zinc finger protein CaCas5, which lacks a unique ortholog in S. cerevisiae, governs expression of many CWI genes. CaRlm1 has a modest role in this response. The transcriptional coactivator CaAda2 is also required for expression of many CaCas5-dependent genes, as expected if CaCas5 recruits CaAda2 to activate target gene transcription. Many caspofungin-induced C. albicans genes specify endoplasmic reticulum and secretion functions. Such genes are not induced in S. cerevisiae, but promote its growth in caspofungin. We have used a new resource to identify a key C. albicans transcriptional regulator of CWI genes and antifungal sensitivity. Our gene expression findings indicate that both divergent and conserved response genes may have significant functional roles. Our strategy may be broadly useful for identification of pathogen-specific regulatory pathways and critical response genes.

  15. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  16. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Muñoz; Daniella Santos Muñoz; Aleksey Zimin; Yorke, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm) for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-r...

  17. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients With Hematological Cancer Who Are Undergoing Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; RAEB-2; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive

  18. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  19. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  20. High-density transcriptional initiation signals underline genomic islands in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianli Huang

    Full Text Available Genomic islands (GIs, frequently associated with the pathogenicity of bacteria and having a substantial influence on bacterial evolution, are groups of "alien" elements which probably undergo special temporal-spatial regulation in the host genome. Are there particular hallmark transcriptional signals for these "exotic" regions? We here explore the potential transcriptional signals that underline the GIs beyond the conventional views on basic sequence composition, such as codon usage and GC property bias. It showed that there is a significant enrichment of the transcription start positions (TSPs in the GI regions compared to the whole genome of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. There was up to a four-fold increase for the 70% GIs, implying high-density TSPs profile can potentially differentiate the GI regions. Based on this feature, we developed a new sliding window method GIST, Genomic-island Identification by Signals of Transcription, to identify these regions. Subsequently, we compared the known GI-associated features of the GIs detected by GIST and by the existing method Islandviewer to those of the whole genome. Our method demonstrates high sensitivity in detecting GIs harboring genes with biased GI-like function, preferred subcellular localization, skewed GC property, shorter gene length and biased "non-optimal" codon usage. The special transcriptional signals discovered here may contribute to the coordinate expression regulation of foreign genes. Finally, by using GIST, we detected many interesting GIs in the 2011 German E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain TY-2482, including the microcin H47 system and gene cluster ycgXEFZ-ymgABC that activates the production of biofilm matrix. The aforesaid findings highlight the power of GIST to predict GIs with distinct intrinsic features to the genome. The heterogeneity of cumulative TSPs profiles may not only be a better identity for "alien" regions, but also provide hints to the special

  1. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  2. Transcriptional and phenotypic responses of Listeria monocytogenes to chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleitner, Aaron M; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Linton, Richard L; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-05-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σ(B) and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer.

  3. Computational Investigations of Post-Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær

    and miRNA regulation was studied by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and RBP double knockdown experiments. A comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets of 49 RBPs demonstrated that RBPs modulate miRNA regulation. Results suggest it is mediated by RBP-binding hotspots that likely...... investigated using high-throughput data. Analysis of IMP RIP-seq, iCLIP and RNA-seq datasets identified transcripts associated with cytoplasmic IMP ribonucleoproteins. Many of these transcripts were functionally involved in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Further analyses of this data permitted estimation...... of a bipartite motif, composed of an AU-rich and a CA-rich domain. In addition, a regulatory motif discovery method was developed and applied to identify motifs using differential expression data and CLIP-data in the above investigations. This thesis increased the understanding of the role of RBPs in mi...

  4. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  5. Improving accuracy of transcripts in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lynne M; Meyer, Mechthild; Estable, Alma

    2004-01-01

    Everyone who has worked with qualitative interview data has run into problems with transcription error, even if they do the transcribing themselves. A thoughtful, accurate, reliable, multilingual transcriptionist with a quick turnaround time is worth her or his weight in gold. In this article, the authors examine some transcription circumstances that seem to bring about their own consistent set of problems. Based on their experiences, the authors examine the following issues: use of voice recognition systems; notation choices; processing and active listening versus touch typing; transcriptionist effect; emotionally loaded audiotaped material; class and/or cultural differences among interviewee, interviewer, and transcriptionist; and some errors that arise when working in a second language. The authors offer suggestions for working with transcriptionists as part of the qualitative research team.

  6. The "fourth dimension" of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Bert W

    2009-05-01

    The three dimensions of space provide our relationship to position on the earth, but the fourth dimension of time has an equally profound influence on our lives. Everything from light and sound to weather and biology operate on the principle of measurable temporal periodicity. Consequently, a wide variety of time clocks affect all aspects of our existence. The annual (and biannual) cycles of activity, metabolism, and mating, the monthly physiological clocks of women and men, and the 24-h diurnal rhythms of humans are prime examples. Should it be surprising to us that the fourth dimension also impinges upon gene expression and that the genome itself is regulated by the fastest running of all biological clocks? Recent evidence substantiates the existence of such a ubiquitin-dependent transcriptional clock that is based upon the activation and destruction of transcriptional coactivators.

  7. Dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Di

    2010-03-16

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO(2), ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed.

  8. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed.

  9. Context Sensitive Health Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Context is a key consideration when designing and evaluating health information technology (HIT) and cannot be overstated. Unintended consequences are common post HIT implementation and even well designed technology may not achieve desired outcomes because of contextual issues. While context should...... be considered in the design and evaluation of health information systems (HISs) there is a shortcoming of empirical research on contextual aspects of HIT. This conference integrates the sociotechnical and Human-Centered-Design (HCD) approaches and showcases current research on context sensitive health...... informatics. The papers and presentations outlines theories and models for studying contextual issues and insights on how we can better design HIT to accommodate different healthcare contexts....

  10. Sensitivity Data File Formats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rearden, Bradley T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The format of the TSUNAMI-A sensitivity data file produced by SAMS for cases with deterministic transport solutions is given in Table 6.3.A.1. The occurrence of each entry in the data file is followed by an identification of the data contained on each line of the file and the FORTRAN edit descriptor denoting the format of each line. A brief description of each line is also presented. A sample of the TSUNAMI-A data file for the Flattop-25 sample problem is provided in Figure 6.3.A.1. Here, only two profiles out of the 130 computed are shown.

  11. Evolution of transcriptional regulation in "Escherichia coli"

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Luise

    2014-01-01

    During gene expression, transcription initiation marks the first step towards synthesis of functional proteins. Expression levels of specific types of RNA molecules in the cell depend on the underlying genotype of the promoter sequence. Prediction of expression levels from the promoter sequence alone can have important implications for the design of artificial promoters. In this work, we explored promoter determinants that cause differences in expression levels and tracked how ...

  12. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG RuiHua; LU Fan; FU HaiYan; WU YouSheng; YANG GuoDong; ZHAO WenMing; Zhao ZhongLiang

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP△p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  13. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP?p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  14. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn K White

    Full Text Available The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR. NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  15. Theoretical analysis of transcription process with polymerase stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidences show that in gene transcription, RNA polymerase has the possibility to be stalled at certain position of the transcription template. This may be due to the template damage, or protein barriers. Once stalled, polymerase may backtrack along the template to the previous nucleotide to wait for the repair of the damaged site, or simply bypass the barrier or damaged site and consequently synthesize an incorrect messenger RNA, or degrade and detach from the template. Thus, the {\\it effective} transcription rate (the rate to synthesize correct product mRNA) and the transcription {\\it effectiveness} (the ratio of the {\\it effective} transcription rate to the {\\it effective} transcription initiation rate) are both influenced by polymerase stalling events. This study shows that, Without backtracking, detachment of stalled polymerase can also help to increase the {\\it effective} transcription rate and transcription {\\it effectiveness}. Generally, the increase of bypass rate of the stalled polymeras...

  16. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  17. Functional characterization of Arabidopsis NaCl-inducible WRKY25 and WRKY33 transcription factors in abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanqing; Deyholos, Michael K

    2009-01-01

    Previous microarray analyses of Arabidopsis roots identified two closely related WRKY transcription factors (WRKY25 and WRKY33) among the transcripts that increased in abundance following treatment with NaCl. Here, we report further characterization of these genes, which we found to be inducible by a variety of abiotic stresses in an SOS-pathway independent manner, although WRKY33 induction was dependent on ABA signaling. Transcripts of both genes were detected in roots and leaves, while specific patterns of enrichment were observed in stems and floral buds for WRKY25 and WRKY33, respectively. We also identified upstream intergenic regions from each gene that were sufficient to confer stress-inducible expression on a reporter gene. However, the stress sensitivity of wrky25 null mutants did not differ from wild-type under any assay condition, while wrky33 null mutants and wrky25wrky33 double mutants showed only a moderate increase in NaCl-sensitivity, suggesting functional redundancy with other transcription factors. Nevertheless, overexpression of WRKY25 or WRKY33 was sufficient to increase Arabidopsis NaCl tolerance, while increasing sensitivity to ABA. Through microarray analyses of relevant genotypes, we identified 31 and 208 potential downstream targets of WRKY25 and WRKY33, respectively, most of which contained a W-box in their upstream regions.

  18. Transcript analysis in two alfalfa salt tolerance selected breeding populations relative to a non-tolerant population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M Y; Xia, J; Yu, M; Steppuhn, H; Wall, K; Messer, D; Sharpe, A G; Acharya, S N; Wishart, D S; Johnson, D; Miller, D R; Taheri, A

    2017-02-01

    With the growing limitations on arable land, alfalfa (a widely cultivated, low-input forage) is now being selected to extend cultivation into saline lands for low-cost biofeedstock purposes. Here, minerals and transcriptome profiles were compared between two new salinity-tolerant North American alfalfa breeding populations and a more salinity-sensitive western Canadian alfalfa population grown under hydroponic saline conditions. All three populations accumulated two-fold higher sodium in roots than shoots as a function of increased electrical conductivity. At least 50% of differentially expressed genes (p population growing under high salinity, while expression remained unchanged in the saline-tolerant populations. In particular, most reduction in transcript levels in the salt-sensitive population was observed in genes specifying cell wall structural components, lipids, secondary metabolism, auxin and ethylene hormones, development, transport, signalling, heat shock, proteolysis, pathogenesis-response, abiotic stress, RNA processing, and protein metabolism. Transcript diversity for transcription factors, protein modification, and protein degradation genes was also more strongly affected in salt-tolerant CW064027 than in salt-tolerant Bridgeview and salt-sensitive Rangelander, while both saline-tolerant populations showed more substantial up-regulation in redox-related genes and B-ZIP transcripts. The report highlights the first use of bulked genotypes as replicated samples to compare the transcriptomes of obligate out-cross breeding populations in alfalfa.

  19. Alternative Spliced Transcripts as Cancer Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otavia L. Caballero

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic mRNAs are transcribed as precursors containing their intronic sequences. These are subsequently excised and the exons are spliced together to form mature mRNAs. This process can lead to transcript diversification through the phenomenon of alternative splicing. Alternative splicing can take the form of one or more skipped exons, variable position of intron splicing or intron retention. The effect of alternative splicing in expanding protein repertoire might partially underlie the apparent discrepancy between gene number and the complexity of higher eukaryotes. It is likely that more than 50% form. Many cancer-associated genes, such as CD44 and WT1 are alternatively spliced. Variation of the splicing process occurs during tumor progression and may play a major role in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, alternatively spliced transcripts may be extremely useful as cancer markers, since it appears likely that there may be striking contrasts in usage of alternatively spliced transcript variants between normal and tumor tissue than in alterations in the general levels of gene expression.

  20. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.